Home Store Products Research Design Strategy Support New
 Research US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. III, Vol. 1.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

{p.1}

SERIES III.-VOL. I.
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS
OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES
FROM NOVEMBER 1, 1860, TO MARCH 31, 1862.*

* For all documents relating to the organization of troops on the Pacific Coast, &c., see Series I, Vol. L.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, November 12, 1859.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In compliance with your orders of the 10th instant, I transmit the inclosed tabular statement of the muskets and rifles on hand at each of the armories and arsenals. It does not include the 23,894 flint-lock muskets and 652 flint-lock rifles still remaining unaltered.

I am, sir, with much respect, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

[Inclosure.]

Statement of the number of serviceable muskets and rifles on hand at each armory and arsenal.

Name of armory or arsenalMuskets.Rifles.
Altered to percussion, cal. 69.Altered to Maynard lock, cal. 69.Made as percussion, cal. 69.Percussion, since rifled, cal. 69.Rifled musket, cal. 58.Total muskets.Altered to percussion, cal. 54.Made as percussion, cal. 54.New model rifle, cal. 58.Total rifles.
Kennebec Arsenal, Me.24,31324,313
Watertown Arsenal, Mass.18,05015518,10612,85512,855
Springfield Arsenal, Mass.99,4461133,9734,2535,303242,976
Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y.44,88811,8252545,7219,68629,688
New York Arsenal, N. Y.88464457642,0998,3078,307
Detroit Arsenal, Mich.346100446
Frankford Arsenal, Pa.5,1698,3482062,68116,4041919
Allegheny Arsenal, Pa.824110,3653511,2251,6031,603
Pikesville Arsenal, Md.5015122
Washington Arsenal, D.C.23,32550,00417615273,6572,300192,319
Harper’s Ferry Armory, Va.14924,5697378,59914,0566963,5704,266
Fort Monroe Arsenal, Va.30120321312051
Fayetteville Arsenal, N. C.4,8172,8617,6781,6851,685
Charleston Arsenal, S. C.2,4132,413814814
Mount Vernon Arsenal, Ala.2,3642,3643232
Baton Rouge Arsenal, La.8,2664001,59680061011,6721,3851031,488
San Antonio Arsenal, Tex.773962855431,301260260
Little Rock Arsenal, Ark.3493495454
Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.25,9901,5023254,48871033,015236483719
Benicia Arsenal, Cal.14,6491072,63010,8122,25230,4704,5744,574
Vancouver Arsenal, Wash. Ter.2,533537662313,7631188126
In transitu from armories and Frankford to California.4,0009,0005,00018,000
Totals275,74414,765213,15533,63124,105561,4001,38543,3754,10248,862

R. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, November 192. 1859.

{p.2}

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., November 1, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I am instructed by the Governor of Virginia to inform you that there exists in this State an extended and daily increasing apprehension of insecurity and danger, resulting, among other causes, from manifestations of domestic insubordination; that he feels it necessary for protection and security to arm the volunteer corps in particular localities with better arms than we have now at command, and for that purpose requests that you will authorize an advance to the State immediately of a number of the original army percussioned muskets, with accouterments, equivalent to the quota of arms which may be due to the State under the act of Congress of 1808 for the year 1861, estimated by the Colonel of Ordnance at about 682 muskets. This would not be asked except under the pressure of extraordinary circumstances. I am further instructed to say that the money value of the arms shall be promptly paid to the United States if Congress shall so require, or the arms returned in kind and of equal value so soon as they can be fabricated at the armory of the State now going into operation.

If this request be complied with, an immediate delivery of the arms will be desirable. It is proper to state that there are some discrepancies in the account between the State of Virginia and the United States, growing out of irregularities during the excitement from the capture of the Government works at Harper’s Ferry last fall, which have not yet been adjusted; that there is an order in the hands of the proper officer at Harper’s Ferry Arsenal in favor of the State for the delivery of 187 rifled muskets and appendages, with accouterments, which by reason of the discrepancies in account have not been drawn, and which will not be drawn in the event of a compliance with the above request for an advance of the smooth-bore muskets; that on the 26th October, 1859, the State is charged with a requisition in favor of Col. J. T. Gibson, of Jefferson County, with 120 rifled muskets and accouterments, equal to 167 4/13 muskets, which in fact were not drawn by that officer, who in lieu of them received a like number of Hall rifles on loan, as he states, from the superintendent. These Hall arms Colonel Gibson has been ordered to return to the superintendent; but I conceive that the 120 rifled muskets which the requisition called for ought not to be charged to the State, not having been received by her, nor the Hall rifles, which were issued in lieu of them without her knowledge or authority. Triplicate receipts for alleged issues at Harper’s Ferry Arsenal upon the verbal order of Governor Wise have been presented for signature to this office, but have not yet been signed, for the reason that it does not yet appear to whom or where the arms were delivered or sent, and there is no trace of any order for them in the proper department here. These receipts are for 120 long-range rifles with sword attachment, 200 rifled muskets, and some fixed ammunition. None of these items, I conceive, can properly be charged against the State now, and if not I suppose the quota for the next year stands without a drawback.

I need scarcely say that all items of the account which may now be suspended for any cause will be fairly adjusted by the State authorities, and that any irregularity of issues which were certainly made to the officers of the State will not be used as an advantage or objection when those issues shall have been traced, which, owing to unavoidable circumstances, has not yet been done. No impediment to the request {p.3} for the advance upon the next year’s quota, I hope, therefore, will arise, and especially as you are personally aware of the urgency of our necessities.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. RICHARDSON, Adjutant-General.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, November 3, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the letter of General Richardson of the 1st instant, referred to this office for a report, I have the honor to state that the State of Virginia, as fully communicated to General Richardson in my letter to him of the 15th of September last, is charged with its full quota for 1861 and arms equivalent to 203 muskets on account of the quota for 1862. The 120 rifled muskets and accouterments referred to by General Richardson were at first charged to the State, but it having been subsequently ascertained that they had not been issued, and that 120 Hall rifles had been supplied in their stead, the State received credit for the 120 rifled muskets and accouterments. This matter was fully explained to General Richardson in my letters to him of the 26th of July and 10th of August last. There is no evidence in this office that the 120 Hall rifles have been returned to the armory. When information shall have been received of their return in good, serviceable condition, they will be credited to the State. The issue to Colonel Davis of 120 long-range rifles with sword bayonets was made by the orders of this office-60 of them on the requisition of General Richardson of the 5th of November last, and 60 by order of Governor Wise. The 200 rifled muskets were issued to Colonel Davis on the requisition of Governor Wise. All these issues having been regularly reported as made to the State, I entertain no doubt as to their correctness. As it appears from General Richardson’s letter that the 187 rifled muskets and accouterments ordered in June last remain still undrawn, I deem it but proper, with a view to keep the issues to the State within the limit of the quota of 1861, to reduce their issue to 42 rifled muskets and accouterments. If the 120 Hall rifles herein referred to are returned to the United States, the State will then be entitled, in addition to the 42 rifled muskets and accouterments, to 156 5/13 muskets, being equivalent to 112 rifled muskets and accouterments.

The letter of General Richardson is herewith returned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

RICHMOND, November 3, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I am instructed by the armory board of commissioners of Virginia to make the following requests of the War Department:

First. That we shall be allowed to purchase from the Government 5,000 muskets altered from flint-lock to percussion, and said to be for sale at $2.50 apiece. Our necessity for these is immediate, in consequence of the small number of arms in the State and the rumors of {p.4} insurrection which, whether well or ill founded, disturb the public mind and render it necessary for our repose that our military should be armed. Capt. Charles Dimmock will visit Washington immediately to receive these muskets, and we respectfully request that every facility may be afforded to him in forwarding the arms to this place without delay. We shall be prepared to pay for them at such time as the Department may indicate.

Second. We are informed that the Government has 130,000 seasoned musket-stocks at Harper’s Ferry, and that the consumption does not exceed 12,000 per annum. We suppose, therefore, that 20,000 of these seasoned stocks might be replaced by green ones without injury to the public service, and we ask leave to make such substitution. The green stocks can be purchased by the superintendent at Harper’s Ferry, and we will pay for them. The seasoned stocks are intended for use a year or two hence, or possibly a little earlier, as the operations of our armory may require, and unless we can get them from the Government we shall have barrels without stocks until the green stocks shall season. We are informed that a stock does not season properly in less than three years.

Third. We are engaged in making a model arm at Springfield, under an order which the War Department was so obliging as to give, and we should be greatly aided by permission to use the Government patterns and to take drawings of them. We request that our master armorer, Mr. Solomon Adams, may be allowed to do this at our expense, and so far as it may be done without detriment to the public service.

I have the honor to remain, your most obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH.

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, November 6, 1860.

The proposition for the purchase of 5,000 altered muskets, at $2.50 each, made within, is accepted. The Colonel of Ordnance will take the necessary measures to have them delivered as requested. The arms to be selected by Captain Dimmock.

J. B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Jackson, Miss., November 6, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD:

DEAR SIR: The State of Mississippi has 160 flint-lock muskets in perfect order, never having been used. I wish to exchange them for rifles. If you have the power to make this exchange, please write me on what terms. Please write me also how and when I can purchase of the Federal Government a few thousand muskets with percussion locks, or rifles.

Very respectfully,

JOHN J. PETTUS.

–––

HDQRS. OHIO MILITIA AND VOLUNTEER MILITIA, QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Columbus, November 6, 1860.

Hon. S. S. Cox, Columbus:

DEAR SIR: When we made this year’s requisition on the General Government for our quota of arms as usual, we applied for friction {p.5} primers and Maynard primers-articles that were furnished us last year. The Ordnance Department advised me that we could not be furnished with them, but suggested they might be had of the Government by purchase. My object in addressing you is to desire you to recommend to the Secretary of War to issue an order to the Ordnance Department to supply our State with these articles and such small lots of fixed ammunition as we may be in want of-if possible on our quota of arms, or by purchase. And you will much oblige this department.

Respectfully, yours,

D. L. WOOD, Quartermaster-General of Ohio.

[Indorsement.]

COLUMBUS, OHIO, November 16, 1860.

Hon. J. B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Can the order within asked for by the Ohio quartermaster-general, Wood, be complied with? If so, it will oblige,

Yours, &c.,

S. S. COX.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbia, S. C., November 12, 1860.

Col. H. K. CRAIG:

DEAR SIR: I learn that some of the States have received their quota of arms for next year, and I should be pleased to have the quota for South Carolina. I wish the whole quota in “rifled muskets and appendages, new patterns, caliber .58.” Send them immediately to Charleston, S. C., to Maj. P. F. Stevens, superintendent of the Citadel Academy.

Very respectfully,

WM. H. GIST.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 14, 1860.

His Excellency JOHN J. PETTUS, Governor of Mississippi, Jackson:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt this day from the Hon. Jacob Thompson of your letter of the 6th instant, and in reply to inform you that there is no authority in this Department to exchange rifles for flint-lock muskets, as proposed by you. We have percussion muskets altered from flint-lock at the Baton Rouge and Saint Louis arsenals, which are for sale at $2.50 each. Should you desire to purchase any of them, and will advise me of the number, I will issue the necessary orders to comply with your request. Two thousand can be delivered at Baton Rouge, and any larger number at Saint Louis.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, November 15, 1860.

His Excellency WILLIAM H. GIST, Governor of South Carolina, Columbia, S. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 12th instant, and in answer to state that according to a regulation {p.6} established by President Jackson on the 29th of June, 1835, and reconfirmed by President Pierce April 30, 1855, issues in advance to the States and Territories under the law of 23d of April, 1808, are not authorized to be made. This rule has, however, in several instances been recently departed from by issuing arms to some of the States for 1861. If you desire it, and will so indicate to me, I will refer your letter to the Secretary of War for his action in the case.

Respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Nashville, Tenn., November 20, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, War Department:

SIR: Will you do me the favor to have a statement of the number and character of arms advanced to Tennessee made out and forwarded to me; also the amount now due the State, and when the next installment of arms will be due?

Very respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, November 20, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: The letter from the quartermaster-general of the State of Ohio, referred to you by the Hon. S. S. Cox, asking that directions be issued to this Department to issue to that State such friction and Maynard primers and fixed ammunition as it might require on account of its quota of arms, or to allow it to purchase such, has been received, with your directions thereon for a report.

On the 10th of April last I reported that, in consequence of the changes that had taken place in arms and ammunition, and of the difficulty to the State authorities in obtaining the requisite ammunition for the new arms issued to them under the law of 1808, I recommended that such cartridges for small-arms, pressed bullets, primers, and ammunition for field artillery as the States should from time to time require should be sold to them at cost from our arsenal supplies, and upon your call for a report whether such sales could be made in view of the act of 3d of March, 1825, I had the honor further to report in favor of the measure. You came to no decision on the subject that I know of; and in my annual report of 30th ultimo I recommended that an act of Congress should be asked for expressly authorizing such sales to the States.*

In the special case in hand I recommend the sale.

Mr. Cox’s letter is herewith returned.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* See Ex. Doc. No. 1, Senate, 36th Congress, 2d Session, p. 253.

–––

NEW YORK, November 21, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I understand that you have a large quantity of muskets changed from flint to percussion now at Watervliet for sale.

{p.7}

Will you do me the favor to state the lowest price and terms of payment for 10,000 stand, with the privilege of taking 40,000 more on the same terms; and whether they can be delivered here immediately, or whether they must be received at Watervliet? The former would be preferred, if it causes no delay.

A prompt reply will be acceptable, by telegraph or otherwise.

Very respectfully,

G. B. LAMAR.

P. S.-I presume they are all packed, ready for transportation.

PRIVATE.]

TREDEGAR IRON WORKS, J. R. ANDERSON & Co., Richmond, November 21, 1860.

Governor FLOYD:

DEAR SIR: For a year or more I have had on hand a large quantity of gun-iron which I had reason to expect we would convert into guns for the Government, having contracted to make to the extent of $20,000. In the present state of things this burden has almost worn me down, and in view of the present aspect of things I do not think it is likely that the Government will ever receive a gun from me after the 4th of March next. Under these circumstances, seeing that I could not prepare and make these guns after the necessary experiments by that time, I take the liberty of making a last request of you during your official term, viz, to let us make our order by casting solid.

Yours, truly,

J. R. ANDERSON.

Won’t you do me the favor to answer this request, as it is of the highest importance in the threatening aspect of commercial matters that we should be able to make this large fund to some extent available?

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 24, 1860.

G. B. LAMAR, Esq., New York:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 21st instant, and in reply have to say that I have directed 10,000 altered percussion muskets to be delivered at Watervliet Arsenal to you, on your order, on payment of $2.50 each for the same. This sale covers all the arms that I am at liberty to sell.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Milledgeville, Ga., November 24, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Being desirous of having manufactured in Georgia a supply for the State of certain military equipments, I am compelled again to trespass upon your kindness to ask of you the favor to help me in some {p.8} way-by sale or cause to be advanced to our State as a part of Georgia’s quota of arms, &c., for the coming year two sample sets of each of the following equipments, viz:

First. Equipments for riflemen, consisting of knapsack, cartridge box, and belt, complete.

Second. Equipments for infantry, complete.

Third. Saber equipments, complete, including pouch for Colt revolvers. All of the latest and most approved styles and patterns adopted by the U. S. Army.

I dislike to trouble you with this small matter, but really I know of no other method of obtaining, with certainty as to kind, &c., samples or patterns of the equipments desired. I would prefer to purchase the articles to obtaining them otherwise, if I knew where they could be obtained. Be pleased to cause the sample sets, two of each, furnished me, in some way least troublesome to yourself, of the said equipments, and you will lay me under renewed obligations for your kindness.

I am, very sincerely, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

[First indorsement.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, December 1, 1860.

I respectfully report to the Secretary of War that such of the military equipments asked for as belong to this department can be furnished without inconvenience, viz: Two knapsacks, $5.56; two haversacks, 78 cents; and two canteens and straps, 92 cents.

J. E. JOHNSTON, Quartermaster-General.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, December 1, 1860.

Respectfully returned, with the report that the State of Georgia, having drawn her full quotas, including that for 1861, cannot obtain the accouterments by issue, on that account, from the Government supply, nor can such articles as are wanted be sold by the Government.

There will be no difficulty, however, in Governor Brown’s obtaining them, if he will write to Maj. W. A. Thornton, U. S. Arsenal, New York, and request him to purchase for the State two sets of infantry accouterments, complete; two saber-belts and plates, complete; two saber-knots, two holster pouches for Colt belt pistols; all of the latest U. S. Army patterns.

I doubt not that Major Thornton will make the purchase for the Governor with pleasure.

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, MASS., November 24, 1860.

Hon. J. B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

My DEAR SIR: Please allow me to address a line to you on a matter that deeply interests your State.

Having been engaged in the Springfield Armory for fifteen years last past, and knowing that assistance has been rendered and privileges granted to foreign Governments and to some of our own States, as well as to private individuals, I desire the same favors granted to the State of Virginia.

{p.9}

I have no hopes of any favors from Colonel Craig, for in a conversation with him a few months since I found him deadly opposed to the Virginia Armory.

We wish to use some of the armory patterns for the Richmond machinery, and the privilege of taking drawings of fixtures, tools, &c.

I desire that the honorable Secretary issue an order to the superintendents of the Springfield and Harper’s Ferry armories to give the master armorer of the Virginia State Armory and Joseph R. Anderson or his agents every facility they may need in said armories, at the same time not interfering with the legitimate business of the armory.

I desire to get all the assistance we can from the national armories before our much-honored and esteemed Secretary of War vacates his office, for I have no hopes of any assistance after a Black Republican takes possession of the War Department. Should the honorable Secretary see fit to grant the request of the petitioner, I wish a copy of the order be sent to me at Springfield, Mass., as I shall be engaged here for a couple of months getting up a model gun for the State of Virginia.

Your humble servant,

S. ADAMS, Master Armorer State Armory Virginia.

[Indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, November 26, 1860.

Respectfully returned to the Secretary of War, with the report that this application is similar to that made by G. W. Randolph, esq., in which case I recommended, on the 24th instant, that the application be granted. It should be granted on the former application.

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 26, 1860.

His Excellency ISHAM G. HARRIS, Governor of Tennessee, Nashville:

SIR: In reply to the inquiry contained in your letter of the 20th instant, I have the honor to inform you that there are now due to Tennessee, on account of her quota for the present and previous years, arms to the value of 892 12/13 muskets, and that the quota for 1861 will become available on the 1st of January next.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 27, 1860.

G. B. LAMAR, Esq., 48 University Place, New York City:

SIR: In reply to yours of the 26th instant,* I have to say that by reference to my letter of the 24th instant you will find this sentence: “This sale covers all the arms that I am at liberty to sell.” I presumed you would infer from that remark that the Department had no other {p.10} arms that could be sold, which is the fact. I regret to add that I am not at liberty to authorize the delivery of the arms until payment is made, it being contrary to law.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD.

* Not found.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 28, 1860.

JOSEPH R. ANDERSON, Esq., Tredegar iron Works, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have received your letter of the 21st instant in regard to your contract for making guns for the Government. If I were to change the orders as now existing and enter into new arrangements for procuring guns I should have to advertise for proposals and take the lowest bid. The results of actual trials, especially those most recently made, show a decided superiority of the hollow-cast guns. You will thus perceive that in either case the interest of the Government would not be subserved so far as regards proper precautions for obtaining cannon of the best quality. Under these circumstances, although with every disposition to accommodate you in your work for this Department, I cannot change the present orders for cannon. It is very desirable that you, as well as the other founders having similar outstanding orders, should take immediate measures for completing them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

RICHMOND, December 1, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I take the liberty of introducing to you Mr. J. H. Burton, late master armorer at Enfield, England, and now engaged with Joseph R. Anderson & Co., of this place, in executing a contract for the machinery of the Virginia Armory. It will facilitate their operations to be allowed free access to the drawings, machines, tools, &c., and the use of the patterns for castings at the Springfield and Harper’s Ferry armories, and as this privilege was accorded to the British Government, I respectfully ask that it may be granted to the agents of the State of Virginia.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH.

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 4, 1860.

The Secretary directs that the privilege within asked for be granted By order:

W. R. DRINKARD.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’s OFFICE, Richmond, Va., December 6, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I am instructed by the Governor to request that the implements and machinery for manufacturing the Bormann fuse may be made for {p.11} the State at one of the Government arsenals, say Washington, to be paid for by the State commissioners having charge of this subject.

Pursuant to orders from the War Department the State has received 450 smooth-bore percussion muskets, with accouterments, leaving, according to statement of the Ordnance Office, the following suspended items to be adjusted hereafter: 120 long-range rifles; 200 rifled muskets, alleged to have been issued from Harper’s Ferry Arsenal upon the verbal order of Governor Wise, but not receipted for by any State officer; 120 Hall rifles, delivered without orders to Col. J. T. Gibson by the superintendent of Harper’s Ferry Arsenal, instead of 120 rifled muskets and accouterments for which there was a requisition. These Hall rifles ought not to be charged to the State, because never called for, and because we had a number of them in depot at Richmond. This charge can never be admitted. But the 120 rifled muskets and accouterments mentioned are charged to the State on the 26th of October, 1859. Never having been issued, they are now due to the State. I beg your attention to this, and that the Ordnance Department may be directed to have them delivered to my address at this place.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. RICHARDSON, Adjutant-General.

[First indorsement.]

Ordnance Office, for report.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, December 10, 1860.

Respectfully returned. The implements, &c., for making the Bormann fuse may be made, on the terms within stated, at Washington Arsenal.

In relation to the account between the State of Virginia and the United States for arms under the law of 1808, it has been fully explained to General Richardson in a letter from this office, a copy of which is herewith inclosed.

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

[Third indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 10, 1860.

The implements, &c., for making the fuses may be made on the terms within stated, at the Washington Arsenal.

J. B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, December 10, 1860.

General WILLIAM H. RICHARDSON, Adjutant-General of Virginia, Richmond:

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, and in answer you are respectfully referred to the statement of an account transmitted to you in a letter from this office of the 10th of August last, wherein it will be perceived, inasmuch as it had been ascertained that the 120 rifled muskets and accouterments referred to in your letter had not been issued to the State, they were not debited in said statement, and hence left a balance on account of the quota of 1861 {p.12} of 167 9/13 muskets-the equivalent of the 120 rifled muskets and accouterments. Crediting the State with this balance and with the 187 rifled muskets and accouterments ordered to be issued upon your requisition of the 21st of June last but not furnished, also with the disputed issue of 60 long-range rifles with accouterments and 60 long-range rifles without accouterments, the State is now indebted to the United States, as per annexed statement, to arms equivalent to 597 11/13, which will be covered within 1 7/13 muskets by the quota for 1861 when due.

In the statement transmitted to you in the letter of the 10th August the six 12-pounder Navy howitzers were charged at their equivalent at 232 6/13 muskets, while it is now ascertained to be 235 6/13 muskets-difference, 2 12/13 muskets.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

Balance (without charging the State with the 120 rifled muskets and accouterments said to have been issued to Colonel Gibson) due to the State of Virginia, as per account rendered August 10, 1860, 167 9/13 muskets.

By value of 187 rifled muskets and accouterments ordered to be issued June 27, 1860, but not drawn by the State, 261 6/13 muskets.

Sixty long-range rifles and accouterments, 101 4/13 muskets.

Sixty long-range rifles, 65 11/13 muskets.

Balance due to the State on quota of 1861, 596 4/13 muskets.

State, debtor.-To 450 percussion muskets and accouterments ordered to be issued November 23, 1860, being equivalent to 594 12/13 muskets.

Additional cost of Navy howitzers, 2 12/13 muskets.

Due the United States, 597 11/13 muskets.

Deduct balance on quota of 1861, 596 4/13 muskets.

Chargeable to quota for 1862, 1 7/13 muskets.

–––

NEW YORK, December 12, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: General Semmes, agent to purchase arms for the State of Georgia, and with whom I am advising to the best of my information, desires to know what kind of projectile you would recommend for rifle cannon; also, the weight of the field gun and the size of the bore. We know that many experiments have been made under your orders and direction, and if any satisfactory results have been arrived at we should be pleased to get them. A letter addressed to me at the Fifth Avenue Hotel will reach, if sent within the next three or four days.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. J. HARDEE, Lieutenant-Colonel, First Cavalry.

–––

UNITED STATES SENATE, COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS AND MILITIA, Washington, December 13, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: By a resolution of the Senate, adopted on the 11th instant, this committee is instructed to inquire whether the expenses in the military {p.13} department of the Government cannot be reduced without detriment to the public service, and to report to what extent and what particular branch or branches of that service can be dispensed with or reduced. The committee desire to discharge this duty promptly and satisfactorily, and therefore request that you aid them with the views and opinions of your Department on the subjects thus referred to them.

With great respect, &c.,

JEFFERSON DAVIS, Chairman.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 14, 1860.

Lieut. Col. W. J. HARDEE, Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 12th instant, I have to state that the results of trials of rifled cannon and projectiles, under direction of this Department, indicate a superiority of James’ expanding projectiles for such cannon. The regulation field 6-pounder, with a rifled bore (weight 884 pounds), carries a James projectile of about 13 pounds; but you can have a field gun made to carry a 6-pound James projectile and not to weigh over 700 pounds. By applying to General Charles T. James you can readily obtain full descriptions of these projectiles and any other information you may desire respecting his plan of rifled cannon.

His address is Providence, R. I., but you can probably see him in person at the Astor House, New York.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 15, 1860.

Hon. JOHN SLIDELL, Senate:

SIR: As requested by Governor Moore in his telegraphic dispatch to you, I have directed that 5,000 altered percussion muskets, at Baton Rouge Arsenal, be delivered to the order of the Governor on the payment of $2.50 each for the same. Instructions to that effect have been sent by telegraph to the commanding officer of the arsenal. I return Governor Moore’s dispatch.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 15, 1860.

Hon. SAMUEL S. COX, House of Representatives:

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter transmitting the application of the quartermaster-general of Ohio for an order from this Department to supply the State with fixed ammunition and primers, on account of the quota, under the law for arming and equipping the militia, or by purchase.

The law for arming the militia, act of April 23, 1808, authorizes the issue of “arms and military equipments” only, and the Department has {p.14} no authority to order the issue of ammunition under that provision. The only authority for selling military stores is that contained in the act of 2d of March, 1825, which restricts such sales to articles which, upon proper inspection or survey, are found to be damaged or otherwise unsuitable for the public service. It will thus be seen that this Department cannot, under existing laws, give the order desired by the quartermaster-general of Ohio. In the report of the Ordnance Bureau communicated to Congress with the last annual report of this Department there was a recommendation for an act to authorize sales to the States of ammunition for the arms supplied under the law for arming the militia.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 17, 1860.

His Excellency SAM. HOUSTON, Governor of Texas, Austin:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communications by mail of the 28th ultimo and by telegraph of the 6th instant, desiring that a corps of Texas Rangers may be called into the service of the United States in view of late depredations and murders committed by Indians on the frontiers of Texas.

In reply I have respectfully to inform you that, Congress having given no sanction for such a measure, this Department is without the necessary power to adopt it.

In connection with this subject, I beg leave to say that, in consequence of previous representations from Your Excellency and the unprotected state of the frontier settlements in Texas, the number of regular troops in that military department has been recently augmented, so that it now exceeds what it has been at any time before. It now consists of five companies of artillery, two of which are armed with light batteries, ten companies of cavalry, and twenty-five companies of infantry; in all, equal to four regiments.

I cannot permit myself to doubt that these troops will be found efficient and ready for any active service the Indian relations in the State may demand, and that so soon as the proper commanders on the spot become aware of the need of their assistance in any quarter it will be promptly and successfully applied.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 18, 1860.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 24th ultimo, I have the honor to state that the following samples of accouterments can be furnished to you by the United States on payment of their cost price, as annexed, viz: Two knapsacks, $5.06; two haversacks, 78 cents; two canteens, with straps, 92 cents. Total, $7.26.

You can obtain the remaining equipments desired by addressing Maj. W. A. Thornton, U. S. Arsenal, New York, and requesting their purchase, describing them as follows: Two sets of infantry accouterments, {p.15} complete; two saber-belts and plates, complete; two saber-knots; two holsters (pouches) for Colt belt pistols; all of the latest U. S. Army pattern. I have no doubt Major Thornton will take pleasure in attending to the matter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

–––

SENATE CHAMBER, Washington, December 21, 1860.

Col. H. K. CRAIG, Ordnance Department:

SIR: I will be obliged if you will inform me at your earliest convenience what number of arms of every kind has been distributed within a year past to the different States and Territories, under the existing laws or otherwise, designating rifle, infantry, ordnance, and cavalry equipments and ammunition; also what arms and munitions have been disposed of, to whom sold, and the reason for such sale, and amount now in the public armories subject to the order of your department.

With great respect, &c.,

HENRY WILSON.

[Indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, December 22, 1860.

Under a standing rule prohibiting heads of bureaus from entering into direct correspondence with members of Congress, this letter is respectfully transmitted to the Secretary of War.

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

–––

CHRISTMAS EVENING, 1860.

Governor FLOYD:

MY DEAR SIR: I send you a telegram which I have this moment received from Pittsburg.

Your friend, very respectfully,

JAMES BUCHANAN.

[Inclosure.]

PITTSBURG, December 25, 1860.

His Excellency JAMES BUCHANAN, President of the United States, Washington:

An order has issued from the War Department to transfer all the effective munitions of war from the arsenal in this city to Southern forts. Great excitement has been created in the public mind by this order. We would advise that the order be immediately countermanded. We speak at the instance of the people, and if not done we cannot be answerable for the consequences.

WILLIAM WILKINS. WM. F. JOHNSTON. W. ROBINSON. THOS. WILLIAMS. CHARLES SHALER.

{p.16}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 27, 1860.

Hon. JEFFERSON DAVIS, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, Senate:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 13th instant, I beg leave to refer you to the inclosed reports of the chiefs of the several bureaus, as communicating in detail the information desired by your committee touching the reduction of the expenses of the military establishment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

[Inclosures.]

A.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF SUBSISTENCE, Washington, December 17, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In compliance with your instructions to report upon the communication of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia, of the 13th instant, I have the honor to state that whilst the strength of the Army continues as at present, and is employed in the same manner, I know of no reduction which can be made in the expenditure for its subsistence.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

J. P. TAYLOR, Acting Commissary-General Subsistence.

B.

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, December 17, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to a communication referred by you to this office from the chairman of the Military Committee of the Senate, inquiring “whether the expenses in the military department of the Government cannot be reduced without detriment to the public service,” I have the honor to report that the expenditures of the medical and hospital department of the Army have always been regulated with a view to the utmost economy.

It is not believed that these expenditures can be reduced in a single item without a sacrifice of the welfare of the soldier and the true interests of the public service.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

By order:

R. C. WOOD, Surgeon, U. S. Army.

C.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, December 18, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the resolution of the Military Committee of the Senate, adopted on the 11th instant, inquiring “whether the expenses in {p.17} the military department of the Government cannot be reduced without detriment to the public service,” I have the honor to report that the number of engineer officers in service is barely sufficient to perform the various duties connected with that branch of the service. That in most instances it falls, of necessity, to the lot of the officers in charge of fortifications to have three or four of them at a time under their supervision; and, finally, that the demand of engineer officers for the Military Academy is with difficulty supplied.

Under these circumstances I can see no way by which the expenses of the Corps of Engineers could be reduced without actual and serious detriment to the service.

In regard to the appropriations usually disbursed by the corps, viz, those for fortifications, it will be seen by comparison of the estimates presented by this office for several years past with the appropriations made by Congress that while the former exhibit the wants of this branch of service reduced to the lowest point that economy and a regard to reasonable progress will justify, the latter have been far below this limit, and therefore that any further reduction could hardly be expected if due regard is had to the defense of the naval and commercial positions of our seaboard frontiers.

With the highest respect, your most obedient servant,

R. E. DE RUSSY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Engineers, Commanding.

D.

PAYMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, December 17, 1860.

Hon. J. B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to the letter of the chairman of the Military Committee of the Senate, I have the honor to report that in my opinion no reduction can be made in the Pay Department without serious injury to the service.

The disbursements of this department average $5,000,000 per annum, and in the present widely dispersed condition of the troops it requires the most untiring efforts of all its officers to make the payments according to law.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. LARNED, Paymaster-General.

E.

BUREAU OF TOPOGRAPHICAL ENGINEERS, Washington, December 20, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the reference to this Bureau of the resolution of the Senate, as communicated by the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs of the Senate of the 13th instant, inquiring “whether the expenses in the military department of the Government cannot be reduced without detriment to the public service,” &c., and in obedience to your direction to report thereupon, I have to state that the estimates for objects under the control of this Bureau {p.18} have been reduced to the least amounts consistent with the interests of the public service.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

J. J. ABERT, Colonel, Topographical Engineers.

F.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, December 18, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive from your office a copy of the letter of the chairman of the Military Committee of the Senate to you, inquiring “whether the expenses in the military department of the Government cannot be reduced without detriment to the public service.”

As our troops are now stationed and employed, the estimate for the next fiscal year made in this office includes, I think, nothing which can be dispensed with or reduced.

The only way in which the expenditures of the Quartermaster’s Department can be judiciously reduced, that occurs to me, is to diminish the number of military posts; and, wherever it is practicable to establish them near the frontiers or on navigable waters, and to make from those points expeditions into the Indian countries as often as it may be expedient to do so.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. E. JOHNSTON, Quartermaster. General.

G.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, December 19, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the letter referred to this office from the Senate Committee on Military Affairs and the Militia, asking for views and opinions on a reduction of the expenses in the military department without detriment to the public service, I have the honor to report:

So far as the particular branch of the military service intrusted to the Ordnance Department is concerned, I have no doubt that a change in the present organization of its personnel, and in the character and use of its arsenals, can be made which will attain the object of the committee’s inquiry. There is a bill before the Senate, reported from its Military Committee, for the better organization of the general staff and the Engineer and Ordnance departments, which, if enacted, will, in my opinion, reduce expenses in the personnel of those branches, not only without detriment, but with advantage to the public service. That bill embodies provisions for the better organization of what is commonly called the staff and staff corps of the Army, which have heretofore been recommended by the War Department for legislative action, and have met the approval of the Military Committee after full consideration and investigation.

The operations of the Ordnance Department are, in my opinion, now too much scattered; that is to say, we have too many arsenals used as places of construction. This has resulted, in a measure at least, from {p.19} legislation seeking to distribute public expenditures instead of concentrating them at a few points, where they can be most effectively and economically applied. It would, in my opinion, be a measure of economy in the construction and preparation of ordnance supplies, as well as one calculated to improve their quality, to confine constructions to four arsenals at most-one at the North, one at the West, one at the South, and one on the Pacific Coast. There are a few of the other arsenals which, from their locations, are no longer useful for military purposes, and these should be sold and the proceeds applied to enlarging the means of fabrication at the four principal arsenals. The other arsenals, which may be conveniently situated for the distribution of supplies from them, should be retained simply as store-houses or depositories, in charge of military store-keepers, or perhaps better, of veteran and worthy sergeants, with a hired or enlisted force only sufficient to keep in order the articles deposited at each. The residue of that force necessary to carry on the operations of the department and all the officers not required for detached service with troops should be concentrated at the arsenals of construction. These are measures the execution of which, in their details, must be left to executive discretion. Legislation can properly confer only the general power to sell and apply the proceeds as above indicated, and to classify and use the other arsenals-four for construction and the remainder for depositories. They are measures which cannot be expected to be carried into effect immediately, but, to be properly executed, must be done gradually. Their beneficial effects, both economically and in other respects, I regard as certain in the end if systematically and uninterruptedly pursued, although they may be gradual in attainment. Concentration, before recommended for the operations of the Ordnance Department, applies also as a measure of economy, but in a far higher degree to the stations of troops. A great source of our military expense lies in the vast number of posts or stations among which our troops are scattered. These posts should be as few as possible for permanent occupation, and the service of protecting our exposed Territories should be performed by detachments sent out from and returning to the fixed stations. Such a plan will diminish the now necessarily very large expenses of transportation, as well as many others incident to a multiplicity of small posts, while it is believed confidently that it will rather promote than damage the efficiency of the public service. This idea is not claimed as original It has been before advanced, and with more elaboration and detail than I have given it. But, as it has not yet been carried into effect, nor I believe fairly and fully tried, I deem it not useless to put it forth again. The measure it suggests does not, in my opinion, require legislation to carry it into effect, and in so far the suggestion may be considered out of place in answer to a call from a committee of a branch of the Legislature; but it is, I conceive, a proper and legitimate answer to a call for views and opinions on a reduction of expenses in the military department of the Government, even if it tends only to show that legislation is not necessary for all reformations in this respect, and that much may be effected by, if left to, executive management.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

{p.20}

H.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, December 26, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have, pursuant to your directions, the honor to make the following report in answer to the Senate’s resolution of the 11th instant, inquiring into the practicability of reducing the present expenditures of the Army, &c.:

The amount of money disbursed annually under the direction and control of this office scarcely exceeds, on an average, $60,000, and is almost exclusively for the recruiting service. Any very great retrenchment, therefore, on so small an amount, is manifestly impracticable. Yet there is one item of expenditure involved in it that might be suppressed without the slightest “detriment to the public service.” Reference is had to the bounty provided by section 29 of the act approved July 5, 1838-an act which, as amended by section 8, act of July 7,1838, authorizes the payment of three months’ extra pay to every soldier who re-enlists under certain conditions there named. Not only is this bounty useless, it is injurious. Useless, because an infinitely better bounty for re-enlistment is provided in section 2 of the act of August 4, 1854; the inducements held out by which for re-enlisting are, moreover, abundantly sufficient. Injurious, because many a man now re-enlists with the single motive of pocketing this bounty, and then immediately deserts.

As directly connected with this-though the disbursement is one made by the Pay Department-I would also call the attention of the Department to section 3 of an act “to encourage enlistments,” &c., approved June 17, 1850, and would recommend its repeal, being satisfied that whatever effect the bounty there provided may have had in encouraging enlistments at the time of its passage-that is to say, when the excitement occasioned by the California gold discoveries was at its greatest height-it has no longer the same effect now; for I think it may be safely affirmed that of the very few who enlist for their first term of service on our remote frontiers there is not one who would not have enlisted without this inducement, and that, as an inducement to re-enlist, it is an unnecessary addendum to the act of August 4, 1854.

Finally, as our recruits are nearly all made in the Atlantic cities, and must thence be transported at a heavy cost to where their services are needed-in the Indian countries west of the Mississippi River-it follows that for every deserter whom it has to replace the Government is subjected to a certain amount of clear loss, a hence that everything that may tend to suppress desertion will also tend to reduce the expenditures of the Army.

With a view to this I would, in the first place, recommend that the amount retained from the soldier’s monthly pay be, instead of $1, as fixed by section 5 of the act of July 7, 1838, $2, as originally resolved in section 16 of the act of July 5, 1838, or $3, should this seem best to Congress.

And as not tending in the least to prevent desertion but, on the contrary, to prevent many a deserter from returning to his colors, I would at the same time urge that the punishment of flogging for desertion be done away with, and that in lieu of it, if possible, every deserter from the Army be forever disfranchised, wherever Congress has the power of doing so-that is to say, in all the Territories belonging to the United {p.21} States. The sympathy so universally felt for deserters among those of their own class, and which now not only facilitates their escape, but encourages to it, would be more effectually destroyed by such a measure than, perhaps, by any other which could possibly be devised.

As conducing to the same end, I would also recommend the establishment of an Army savings institution, as well as some law for the punishment of the imposition practiced upon recruiting officers by minors, who, representing themselves as of full age, succeed in getting themselves enlisted on this pretense; and after having been fed and clothed and transported at a heavy expense by the Government to their regiments, are discharged, just as their services are beginning to be of some use, under the operation of the act approved September 28, 1850, section 5.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Troy, December 29, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: Seeing it stated in the newspapers of the day that I had written a letter to the effect that on the 9th of this month Secretary Floyd ordered 10,000 muskets at the Watervliet Arsenal, in Troy, to be sold to G. B. Lamar, I deem it proper, in regard to myself, to say that I have written no such letter, and the only letter that I have written on the subject was written in reply to certain queries of an editor, as follows, viz:

TROY, December 27, 1860.

DEAR SIRS: The Evening Post, in relation to the rumor that 500 cases of muskets had been removed from the arsenal of Watervliet to New York and put on board of the steamer Florida for Savannah, asks, “Where is General Wool?” I answer that he is at his headquarters, and attending to the duties assigned to his position. He, however, has no control over the arsenal of Watervliet, which is reserved under the direction of the Secretary of War.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL.

–––

WASHINGTON, December 31, 1860.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT:

By virtue of the act of Congress approved February 13, 1795, entitled “An act to amend the act entitled ‘An act making alterations in the Treasury and War Departments,’” I hereby authorize Joseph Holt, Postmaster-General, to perform the duties of the office of the Secretary of War, now vacant by the resignation of John B. Floyd, until a successor shall be appointed and the vacancy filled.

JAMES BUCHANAN.

–––

WASHINGTON, December 31, 1860.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: The House of Representatives has just passed a resolution instructing the Committee on Military Affairs to inquire into the sale {p.22} and distribution of arms for the last year, and also the condition of the forts, arsenals, &c., with power to send for persons and papers.

Believing that the exigencies of the service require that the information asked for should be furnished to the House with the least possible delay, with the view to the early initiation of such measures as the information asked for may require, you will oblige me by furnishing me at your earliest leisure the names of such witnesses in your Department as will furnish the desired information. You will also please advise me what has been done, or what orders have been given, with the view to the protection of the public property in Charleston and in Charleston Harbor.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Jackson, December 31, 1860.

Hon. JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War:

SIR: I write to request you to send the quota of arms for the State of Mississippi for 1862, and if you have the Map [sic] patent breech-loading rifles at your disposal, I would prefer them. If not, please send me the rifle known here as the Mississippi rifle.

Very respectfully,

JOHN J. PETTUS, Governor of Mississippi.

–––

Abstract from returns of the U. S. Army, December 31, 1860.

Arm of service.Present.Absent.Present and absent
Officers.Men.Aggregate.Officers.Men.Aggregate.Officers.Men.Aggregate.
General officers4444
Adjutant General’s Department14141212
Judge-Advocate’s Department11
Inspector-General’s Department2222
Signal Department1111
Quartermaster’s Department44444040
Subsistence Department12121111
Medical Department1157118611571186
Pay Department28282828
Engineer Department486311135354898146
Topographical Engineers45454545
Ordnance Department59411470101059421480
Ordnance sergeants77777777
Detachment at Military Academy17817811179179
Cavalry*823,1233,2051004825821823,6053,787
Artillery*1262,8552,981841041882102,9593,169
Infantry**1647,1407,3041877098963517,8498,200
Total Army of the United States.**74513,91814,6633711,3411,7121,10815,25918,367

* Including the general recruiting depots.

** To avoid counting them twice, two of the assistant adjutants-general, four of the assistant quartermasters, one of the commissaries of subsistence, and the Judge-Advocate of the Army are omitted from the columns “officers present and absent” and “total present and absent” of their respective departments, as they hold commissions in regiments and other departments In which they are properly accounted for.

{p.23}

–––

Statement showing the distribution of the U. S. Army on the 1st day of January, 1861, with the changes between that date and the 15th of April, 1861.

[Compiled from the records of the Adjutant-General’s Office.]

Stations January 1, 1861.Troops.Changes between January 1 and April 15, 1861.
DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST.
(Comprising the country east of the Mississippi River.)
Fort Mackinac, Mich.G, 2d Artillery.No change.
Plattsburg Barracks, N. Y.K, 2d Artillery.To Fort Hamilton, N. Y., Jan. 21-22; to Fort McHenry, Md., Jan. 29-30; to Washington, D. C., Feb. 1; to Fort Lafayette, N. Y., April 4-5; to Fort Pickens, Fla., April 8-20.
Fort Independence, Mass.C, 2d Artillery.To Fort Jefferson, Fla., Jan. 10-18.
Fort Monroe, Va.A, 1st Artillery.To Pensacola Harbor, Fla., Jan. 24-Feb. 6; to Fort Pickens Fla., April 13.
C, 1st Artillery.No change.
B and L, 2d Artillery.Do.
F and K, 3d Artillery.Do.
D and L, 4th Artillery.Do.
Fayetteville Arsenal, N. C.D, 2d Artillery.Do.
Fort Sumter, S. C.E and H, 1st Artillery.To Fort Hamilton, NY., April 14-18.
Augusta Arsenal, Ga.E, 2d Artillery.To Washington, D. C., Feb. 1-7.
Baton Rouge Barracks, La.D, 1st Artillery.To Fort Hamilton, N. Y., Jan. 13-23; to Fort McHenry Md., Jan. 29-30; to Washington, D. C., Feb. 2-3.
Barrancas Barracks, Fla.G, 1st Artillery.To Fort Pickens, Fla., Jan. 10.
Key West Barracks, Fla.B, 1st Artillery.To Fort Taylor. Fla., Jan. 14.
NOTE-Engineer Company A left the west Point Military Academy January 18, and the West Point Battery (afterward known as D, Fifth Artillery) left same post January 31, both for Washington, D. C. The former was ordered from Washington to Fort Hamilton, N.Y., April 2.
DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST.
(Embracing the country west of the Mississippi River and east of the Rocky Mountains except the State of Texas and the Territory of Utah, and all of New Mexico east of the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude.)
Fort Leavenworth, Kans.I, 1st Artillery.To Fort McHenry Md., Jan. 7-12; to Washington, D. C., Jan. 29.
A, 2d Artillery.To Washington, D. C., Jan. 7-13; to Fort Hamilton, N.Y., April 4-5; to Fort Pickens, Fla., April 6-19.
H, 2d Artillery.To Fort McHenry, Md., Jan. 7-12; to Washington, D. C., Feb. 1; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., April 4-5; to Fort Pickens, Fin., April 8-21.
Fort Riley, Kans.G, 2d Infantry.No change.
H, 2d Infantry.To Fort Lamed, Kans., April 11-19.
Fort Scott, Kans.C and K, 2d Dragoons.To Fort Riley, Kans., Jan. 7-12; to Fort Leavenworth, Kans., Jan. 29-Feb. 3.
Miami Valley, Kans.B, 2d Infantry.To Fort Scott, Kans., Jan. 5-7; to Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo., Feb. 1-7.
Fort Wise, Kans.F, G, H and K, 1st Cavalry.No change.
C and H, 10th Infantry.Do.
Fort Kearny, Nebr.A, 2d Dragoons.Do.
E and F, 2d Infantry.Do.
Fort Laramie Nebr.D and F, 2d Dragoons.Do.
D and K, 10th Infantry.Do.
Fort Randall, Nebr.E, G, H, I, and M, 4th Artillery.Do.
Fort Ridgely. Minn.I, 2d Artillery.To Fort McHenry, Md., April 13-15.
E, 3d Artillery.To Elkton, Md., April 14-24.
F, 4th Artillery.To Washington, D. C., April 13-18.
K, 4th Artillery.No change.
Fort Ripley, Minn.C and K, 2d Infantry.Do.
Fort Abercrombie, Minn.A. D. and I, 2d Infantry.Do.
Fort Smith, Ark.D and E, 1st Cavalry.Do.
Little Rock Arsenal, Ark.F, 2d Artillery.To Jefferson Barracks, Mo., Feb. 8-22.
Fort Washita, Ind. Ter.C and I, 1st Cavalry.No change.
Fort Cobb, Ind. Ter.B, C, D, and F, 1st Infantry.Do.
Fort Arbuckle, Ind. Ter.A and B, 1st Cavalry.Do.
E, 1st Infantry.To Fort Washita, Ind. Ter., March 28-30. {p.24}
DEPARTMENT OF OREGON.
(Comprising the State of Oregon and Territory of Washington.)
Fort Vancouver, Wash.A and B, 3d Artillery.To Fort Point, Cal., Feb. 23-March 5.
C, D, G, and M, 3d Artillery.No change.
Fort Cascades, Wash.H, 4th Infantry.Do.
Fort Walla Walla, Wash.C, E, and I, 1st Dragoons.Do.
B and E, 9th Infantry.Do.
Fort Colville, Wash.A, C, I, and K, 9th Infantry.Do.
Fort Steilacoom Wash.F and H, 9th Infantry.Do.
Fort Townsend, Wash.C, 4th Infantry.Do.
Fort Umpqua, Wash.L, 3d Artillery.Do.
Camp Pickett Wash.D, 9th Infantry.Do.
Camp Chehalis, Wash.A, 4th Infantry.Do.
Fort Dalles, Oreg.H, 1st Dragoons.Do.
G, 9th Infantry.Do.
Fort Yamhill, Oreg.K, 4th Infantry.Do.
Fort Hoskins, Oreg.F and G, 4th Infantry.Do.
DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA.
(Comprising the country west of the Rocky Mountains south of Oregon and Washington Territory, excepting so much of Utah as lies east of the one hundred and seventeenth degree of west longitude and of New Mexico east of the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude.)
Fort Ter-Waw, Cal.D, 4th Infantry.No change.
Fort Crook, Cal.F, 1st Dragoons.Do.
E, 6th Infantry.Do.
Fort Humboldt, Cal.B, 6th InfantryDo.
Fort Gaston, Cal.B, 4th Infantry.Do.
Fort Bragg, Cal.D, 6th Infantry.Do.
Fort Tejon, Cal.B and K, 1st Dragoons.Do.
Fort Yuma, Cal.C, 6th Infantry.Do.
E, 4th Infantry.Do.
Benicia Barracks, Cal.G and K, 6th Infantry.Do.
Presidio San Francisco. Cal.I, 3d Artillery.To Fort Point, Cal., Feb. 15; to Presidio, Cal., March 5.
Alcatraz Island, Cal.H, 3d Artillery.No change.
New San Diego, Cal.F, 6th Infantry.Do.
Fort Mojave, N. Mex.I, 4th Infantry.Do.
I, 6th Infantry.Do.
Fort Churchill, UtahA, 1st Dragoons.Do.
A and H, 6th Infantry.Do.
DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS.
(Embracing the State of Texas.)
Fort ClarkB, 3d Infantry.To near San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 23-29; to Fort Clark, Tex., Jan. 39-Feb. 5; to Fort Duncan, Tex., Feb. 29-21; to Indianola, Tex., March 20-April 7; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., April 12-26.
D, 3d Infantry.To near San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 23-29; to Fort Clark, Tex., Jan. 10-Feb. 5; to Indianola, Tex., March 19-April 7; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., April 12-26.
G, H, and K, 3d Infantry.To Indianola, Tex., March 19-April 7; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., April 12-26.
Fort LancasterK, 1st Infantry.To Green Lake, Tex., March 19-April 12; to Indianola, Tex., April 17; to mouth of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola, April 18, to near Saluria, Tex., April 22-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled, April 26); to New York Harbor, April 30-May 31.
Fort DavisH, 8th Infantry.To San Lucas Sprint, Tex., April 13-May 9. Captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
Fort ChadbourneG, 1st InfantryTo Green Lake, Tex., March 23-April 15; to Indianola, Tex., April 17; to mouth of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola April 18; to near Saluria, Tex., April 22-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled, April 26); to New York Harbor, April 30-May 31. {p.25}
Fort IngeC, 2d Cavalry.To Indianola, Tex., March 19-April 12; to Carlisle Barracks, Pa., April 13-28.
Fort StocktonH, 1st Infantry.To Camp Cooper, Tex., Jan. 3-21; to Fort Chadburne. Tex., Feb. 21-27; to Indianola, Tex., March 1-29; to Key West, Fla., March 30-April4.
C, 8th Infantry.No change.
Camp ColoradoB, 2d Cavalry.To Fort Mason, Tex., Feb. 26-March 1; to Carlisle Barracks, Pa., March 28-April 27.
Camp HudsonE, 2d Cavalry.To Indianola, Tex., March 17-22; to New York Harbor, March 31-April 11; to Carlisle Barracks, April 11-13.
A, 8th Infantry.To San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 10-18; to Indianola, Tex., April 17; to month of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola, April 18; to near Saluria, Tex., April 28-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled, April 28); to New York Harbor. April 30-May 31.
En route from Ringgold Barracks
to Camp Hudson.D, 8th Infantry.To Camp Hudson, Tex., Jan. 8; to Green Lake, Tex., March 17-April 4; to Indianola, Tex., April 17; to mouth of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola, April 18; to near Saluria, Tex., April 23-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled, April 28); to New York Harbor, April 30-May 31.
Fort QuitmanF, 8th Infantry.To San Lucas Spring, Tex., April 3-May 9; captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
Camp CooperD and H, 2d Cavalry.To Indianola, Tex., Feb. 21-March 30; to Washington, D. C., March 31-April 14.
Camp VerdeA, 1st Infantry.To San Antonio, Tex., Jan. 23-26; to Camp Verde, Tex., Feb. 3-7; en route to coast and return to Camp Verde, Feb. 23-26; to Green Lake, Tex., March 7-19; to Key West, Fla., March 30-April 4.
San Antonio BarracksI, 1st Infantry.To San Pedro Springs, Tex., Feb. 16; to Green Lake, Tex., March 2-10; to Indianola, Tex., March 28; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., March 30-April 12; to Washington, D. C., April 13-14.
Fort MasonA and F, 2d Cavalry.To Carlisle Barracks, Pa., March 28-April 27.
Camp IvesI, 2d Cavalry.To Camp verde, Tex., Jan. 28; to Carlisle Barracks, Pa., Feb. 21-April 13.
Fort BrownM, 1st Artillery.To mouth of the Rio Grande, Tex., March 9; to Fort Jefferson, Fla., March 19-24.
M, 2d Artillery.To Fort Hamilton, N.Y., March 13-30; to Fort Pickens, Fla., April 6-17.
Camp WoodK, 2d Cavalry.To Carlisle Barracks, Pa., March 13-April 27.
Ringgold BarracksA, 3d Infantry.To Fort Brown, Tex., March 7-11; to the mouth of the Rio Grande, March 20; to Indianola Tex., April 11-13; to mouth of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola, April 18; to near Saluria, Tex. April 23-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled. April 26); to New York Harbor, May 3-June 1.
C and E, 3d Infantry.To Fort Brown, Tex., Feb. 23-28; to mouth of Rio Grande, March 11-12; to Fort Hamilton, N. Y., March 1940; to Fort Pickens, Fla., April 6-16.
Fort McIntoshF and I, 3d Infantry.To mouth of the Rio Grande March 12-26; to Indianola, Tex., April 12-13; to mouth of Matagorda Bay and return to Indianola, April 18; to near Saluria, Tex., April 28-24 (surrendered to the Confederates and paroled, April 26); to New York Harbor, May 3-June 1.
Fort DuncanF, K, and L, 1st Artillery.To mouth of the Rio Grande, Feb. 20-March 11; to Fort Taylor, Fla., March 20-25, Company L being left at Fort Jefferson, Fla., March 24.
Fort BlissI, 8th Infantry.To San Lucas Spring, Tex., March 31-May 9; captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
Camp on the Rio GrandeG, 2d Cavalry.To New York Harbor, March 20-April 11; to Carlisle Barracks, Pa., April 12-13. {p.26}
DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO.
(Comprising so much of the Territory of New Mexico as lies east of the one hundred and tenth degree of west longitude.)
Stations January 1, 1861.Troops.Changes between January land April 15, 1861.
TaosG and I, 2d Dragoons.No change.
Fort GarlandF, 10th Infantry.Do.
Fort UnionE, H, and K, Mounted Rifles.Do.
D, Mounted Rifles.To Fort Stanton, March 11-April 8.
AlbuquerqueG, Mounted Rifles.To Fort Craig, Feb. 27-March 10.
I, Mounted Rifles.No change.
A, E, and I, 7th Infantry.Do.
A, Mounted Riles.To Fort Fillmore, Feb. 6-9.
F, Mounted Rifles.No change.
D, F, and K, 7th Infantry.Do.
Fort StantonB, Mounted Rifles.Do.
I, 5th Infantry.Do.
Fort FillmoreE, 8th Infantry.To Fort Bliss, Tex., Feb. 17-18; to Fort Davis, Tex., Feb. 26-March -; to San Lucas Spring, Tex., April 13-May 9. Captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
Fort DefianceA and B, 5th Infantry.No change.
E, 5th Infantry.To Fort Union, March 22-April 14.
H, 5th Infantry.To Fort Marcy, March 16-31.
Fort FauntleroyC, D, F, and G, 5th Infantry.No change.
K, 5th Infantry.To Albuquerque, March 14-29.
A, 10th Infantry.To Fort Garland, March 5.29.
Fort Floyd*B and G, 7th Infantry.No change.
Fort BreckinridgeD and G, 1st Dragoons.Do.
B, 8th Infantry.To Fort Bliss, Tex., Feb. 3-21; to San Lucas Spring, Tex., March 31-May 9. Captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
Fort BuchananC and H, 7th Infantry.No change.
Hatch’s RanchC, Mounted Rifles.To Fort Stanton, March 11-15.
K, 8th Infantry.To Fort Bliss, Tex., Jan. 25-Feb. 20; to San Lucas Spring, Tex., March 31-May 9. Captured by the Confederates and held as prisoners of war.
DEPARTMENT OF UTAH.
(Embracing so much of the Territory of Utah as lies east of the one hundred and seventeenth degree of west longitude.)
Camp Floyd**B, E, and H, 2d Dragoons.No change.
A, B, and C, 4th Artillery.Do.
E and I, 10th Infantry.Do.
Fort BridgerB and G, lOth lnfantry.Do.

* Name changed to Fort McLane, January 18, 1861.

** Name changed to Fort Crittenden February 6, 1861.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 3, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: General Cameron and myself called this morning to see you with regard to the removal of cannon from the Allegheny Arsenal. {p.27} The people of my district are greatly excited on this subject, but disposed to maintain law and order, as they should. We hope to be able to see you to-day, and ask respectfully that you do not decide the case adverse to the wishes of our constituents before receiving us.

Respectfully, yours,

J. K. MOORHEAD. SIMON CAMERON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 3, 1861.

Hon. BENJAMIN STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In answer to your letter, asking for information on certain points specified in a resolution adopted by the Committee on Military Affairs of the House of Representatives on the 18th ultimo, I have the honor to state as follows:*

...

The other information asked for in regard to the number and description of arms “distributed since the 1st day of January, 1860, and to whom and at what price,” will be found in the accompanying statements (Nos. 2 and 3) from the Ordnance Bureau. It is deemed proper to state, in further explanation of statement No. 2, that where no distribution appears to have been made to the State or Territory, or where the amount of the distribution is small, it is because such State or Territory has not called for all the arms due on its quotas and remains a creditor for dues not distributed, which can be obtained at any time on requisition therefor.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

* For portion here omitted, see Series I, Vol. I, p. 129.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Number and description of arms distributed since the lat of January, 1860, to the States and Territories, and at what price.

States and Territories.6-pounder bronze guns.12-pounder bronze howitzers.12-pounder Navy howitzers.Mountain howitzers.
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
Maryland6$207.00
Mississippi6$400.002$860.00
Illinois1$165.00
Oregon4
Kansas Territory21$165.00
District of Columbia1$165.00
Total12263
{p.28}
States and Territories.Rifle muskets, caliber .58-inch.Percussion muskets, caliber .69-inch.Cadet muskets, caliber .58-inch.Musketoons, caliber .69-inch.
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
Maine300$13.93
Massachusetts800
Vermont150
Connecticut240
New York192
Maryland400
Virginia450$13.25
South Carolina646
Georgia390122$15.20
Florida100
Alabama170150
Louisiana185
Tennessee701381
Ohio600
Michigan160
Indiana573
Illinois8012013.25801$11.00
Wisconsin80
Missouri252
Iowa100
California115
Minnesota283
Kansas Territory5230
District of Columbia458411.00
Pennsylvania1,011
Total7,8535709485
States and Territories.Long range rifles, caliber .58-inch.Percussion rifles, caliber .54-inch. Colt rifles.Hall carbines
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
Massachusetts100$17.43
New York4291$42.50
New Jersey100
Virginia50
North Carolina311
Louisiana104
Mississippi212
Tennessee1
Kentucky80
Indiana170
Illinois11$17.00
Wisconsin40$12.88
Iowa12
California115
Washington Territory242.50
Kansas Territory10
New Mexico Territory22012.881042.50
Pennsylvania4217.434012.88
Total1,728300131
States and Territories.Sharps carbines.Colt artillery carbines.Colt cavalry carbines.Percussion pistols.Colt belt pistols.
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
New York1$30.001$35.001$32.50
Georgia40$18.00
Louisiana60$7.008
Tennessee130.0011
Illinois130.00135.00132.50407.0020
Wisconsin3
Missouri8
Washington Territory.4
Nebraska Territory.40
Kansas Territory.1030.00207.0020
New Mexico Territory.2020
Pennsylvania1587.00
Total3322279164
{p.29}
States and Territories.Colt holster pistols.Adams belt pistols.Colt holster pistols, with attachment.Cavalry sabers, heavy.
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
New Hampshire132$7.50
New York1$50.00
Virginia1007.50
Georgia407.50
Louisiana307.50
Washington Territory3350.00
Nebraska Territory30$22.505107.50
Pennsylvania27$18.00747.50
Total302739426
States and Territories.Cavalry sabers, light.Horse artillery sabers.Non-commissioned officers’ swords.Musicians’ swords.Artillery swords.
No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.No.Price.
New Hampshire50$4.00
New Jersey50$5.50504.00
Florida132$8.50
Louisiana1010$4.40
Tennessee18.501$5.501114.00
Ohio5050
Michigan50
Illinois100
Wisconsin12204.00
Missouri8
Kansas Territory104.00
Dist. of Columbia.508.50252064.40
Pennsylvania655.50364.40
Total183176266103131

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, December 21. 1860.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

Statement of arms distributed by sale since the 1st of January, 1860, to whom sold, at what price, and place whence sold.

To whom sold.Kind of arms.Number.Price each.Date of sale.Where sold.
J. W. Zacharie & Co.Flint-lock muskets altered to percussion.4,000$2.50Feb. 3, 1860Saint Louis Arsenal.
James T. Amesdo1,0002.50Mar. 14, 1860New York Arsenal.
Capt. G. Barrydo802.00June 11, 1860Saint Louis Arsenal.
W. C. N. Swiftdo4002.50Aug. 31, 1860Springfield Armory.
Dodo802.50Nov. 13,1860Do.
State of Alabamado1,0002.50Sept. 27, 1860Baton Rouge Arsenal.
Dodo2,5002.50Nov. 14,1860Do.
State of Virginiado5,0002.50Nov. 6, 1860Washington Arsenal.
Phillips County (Arkansas Volunteersdo502.00Nov. 16, 1860Saint Louis Arsenal.
G. B. Lamardo10,0002.50Nov. 24, 1860Watervliet Arsenal.

WM. MAYNADIER, Captain of Ordnance.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, December 21, 1860.

{p.30}

–––

MAYOR’S OFFICE, Pittsburg, January 4, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Select and Common Councils of the City of Pittsburg:

Intelligence of an authentic character reached me yesterday to the effect that the order for the removal of the ordnance from the U. S. Arsenal near this city had been countermanded.

In view of the excitement which has prevailed in the community on this subject I deem it proper to make this official communication. I may also be permitted to suggest the propriety of your taking some formal action expressive of the grateful feeling which now animates all classes for an act of the Government at once so well timed and judicious. It is matter of just pride and congratulation that notwithstanding the popular indignation at the outset, our citizens of all parties refrained from any act of violence and appealed successfully to the authorities at Washington for the rescinding of the obnoxious order.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,

GEO. WILSON, Mayor.

Extract from the minutes.

COUNCIL CHAMBERS, Pittsburg, January 4, 1861.

Be it resolved by the Select and Common Councils of the City of Pittsburg, That we have heard with much pleasure of the action of the proper Department in countermanding the order of the late Secretary of War for the removal of the ordnance from the U. S. Arsenal near this city.

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution, signed by the mayor of Pittsburg and the presiding officers of councils, be transmitted to the President, Attorney-General, and the Acting Secretary of War.

GEO. WILSON, Mayor. JAMES McAULEY, President Select Council. A. G. McCANDLESS, President Common Council.

Attest:

H. McMASTER, Clerk of Common Council.

Attest:

R. MORROW, Clerk of Select Council.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 8, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Inclosed you have a copy of a resolution passed by the House of Representatives on the 31st ultimo.

You will see that the inquiry directed by the House covers matters not included in the resolution of the Committee on Military Affairs of the 18th ultimo and therefore not covered by your reply of the 3d. instant.

{p.31}

The committee do not suppose there will be any necessity for resorting to the power to send for persons and papers conferred by the resolution, as it is not the intention of the committee to ask for information which, in the judgment of the Department, ought not to be made public. You will oblige me, therefore, by furnishing at your earliest convenience the information which the committee is required to procure and report to the House, so far as you can do so without detriment to the public service.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs.

[Inclosure.]

THIRTY-SIXTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 31, 1860.

On motion of Mr. Stanton-

Resolved, That the standing Committee on Military Affairs be instructed to inquire and report to the House how, to whom, and at what price the public arms distributed since the 1st day of January, A. D. 1860, have been disposed of, and also into the condition of the forts, arsenals, dock-yards, &c., of the country; whether they are supplied with adequate garrisons, and whether any further legislation is required to enable the President to afford adequate protection to the public property; and that the committee have power to send for persons and papers and leave to report at any time.

Attest:

J. W. FORNEY, Clerk.

[Indorsements.]

Memorandum for the Secretary.

Mr. Stanton says the committee desires no information which the Secretary may deem improper to be made public.

Shall the statements of the defensive condition of Forts Sumter, Pickens, &c., and the strength of their garrisons, be communicated?

R. B. I[RWIN].

No. Be very particular in suppressing all that relates to “Sumter, Pickens, &c.”

Forts Sumter, Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson withheld, after consulting General Totten and Colonel Cooper.

January 23, 1861.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, January 8, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to that portion of the information called for by the resolution of the House of Representatives instructing the Committee on Military Affairs to “inquire into the sale and distribution of arms for the last year,” &c., and in compliance with the request made to you by the Hon. B. Stanton, chairman of said committee, under date of 31st {p.32} ultimo, I respectfully name the following persons as being able to communicate the information required, viz: Col. H. K. Craig, Chief of Ordnance; Capt. William Maynadier, principal assistant to Chief of Ordnance; Morris Adler, clerk in Ordnance Office; J. P. Keller, clerk in Ordnance Office. The letter of Hon. B. Stanton is herewith returned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 8, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor to state, in answer to your inquiries as to the state of preparation for their armaments of the fortifications at Galveston, Tex., and Ship Island, Miss.-

First The fort at Galveston, for which an appropriation of $80,000 has been made, has no further been begun than by the erection of temporary buildings and quarters for mechanics and laborers, of houses, wharf, &c., and the making of other indispensable preparations. So far as we know here the ground has as yet hardly been broken for the foundations of the fort itself. We may, at any rate, say confidently that even the foundations of the walls have not been begun. The estimate for the work is $413,000, and according to the rate of appropriations of late years for similar works, we cannot expect full readiness for its armament in less than five years.

Second. At the fort on Ship Island the working force is now engaged in the construction of the embrasures of the lower tier, of which the officer in charge hoped to have four covered in by the 1st instant, the others being in various stages of forwardness. Not a platform has been laid, and some months will be required to mount the first tier of guns even on temporary platforms, and another appropriation of at least $85,000 must be made and applied before the work can be got ready for its entire armament. At present not a gun could be mounted.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. G. TOTTEN, Brevet Brigadier-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 8, 1861.

General THOMAS HILLHOUSE, Adjutant-General, New York State, Albany, N. Y.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of December 21, offering in the name of His Excellency the Governor the men to garrison the forts within the State of New York. The emergency has happily passed which would require prompt action on the subject, but the United States Government will at a convenient time look to the defenses of our frontiers and seaports. Meantime the Government holds in high appreciation the new proof of the patriotism of the State of New York.

I am, sir, &c.,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

{p.33}

–––

WASHINGTON, January 8, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: It has long been a custom of the War Department to permit the States to draw their respective quotas of arms one year in advance. Virginia has drawn hers for this year. Two companies in every district want arms from our State and we cannot furnish them. Governor Letcher informs me he will draw on you for them if you will honor his order. Please inform me what you will do in the premises. Before Governor Floyd resigned I had assurances from his chief clerk, Colonel Drinkard, that he would grant the arms. An early answer is desired.

Your friend and obedient servant,

JOHN T. HARRIS.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, January 8, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In my last annual report, dated 30th of October, 1860, I had the honor, among other matters, to state as follows:

The number of arms manufactured at the national armories during the last year was not as great as the available finds would have justified. This diminution is in a measure attributable to the diversion of armory operations from the manufacture of arms of the established model to the alteration of arms according to plans of patentees and to getting up models of arms for inventors. Our store of muskets of all kinds at this time does not exceed 530,000, dispersed among the arsenals of the country-nowhere more than 130,000 arms being together. As this supply of arms is applicable to the equipment of the Army, the Navy, the Marine Corps, and the militia of the country, it is certainly too small, and every effort should be made to increase the number of our new-model guns, whilst no further reduction by sale of the old-model serviceable arms should be allowed until our arsenals are better supplied. Our store of muskets has in former years reached nearly 700,000, and was not then considered too great for the country, as was evidenced by the liberal appropriations made for the further increase and for the construction of more perfect and productive machinery for the fabrication of small-arms. ...

Since that date 127,655 serviceable muskets altered to percussion have been ordered to be sold, many of which have already been disposed of and passed out of the possession of Government. I have now respectfully to recommend that no more arms on the orders already given be disposed of, and that no further sales be made except in the manner authorized by the act of March 3, 1825.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

[Indorsement.]

Approved:

J. HOLT, Acting Secretary of War ad interim.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 10, 1861.

Hon. JOHN T. HARRIS, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to your note of the 8th instant, I have the honor to state that, in the present unhappily excited state of the public mind, {p.34} the distribution of the arms of the Government in advance, as you suggest, or their transportation through the country, cannot but increase the feverish apprehensions already prevailing, and thus tend to results in every way to be deplored.

Should the Governor of Virginia make the requisition which you say he contemplates, it will receive such a response as my sense of duty under all the circumstances shall prompt.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

–––

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 10, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: I have been informed by the quartermaster-general of Alabama that the quota of arms due the State for the present year which were shipped last August has never been received. Will you please inform me what has become of them, and how and where they can be procured, or has the order of distribution been countermanded?

Very truly, yours,

DAVID CLOPTON.

–––

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, January 10, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim:

SIR: The authorities of some of the Southern States having caused certain forts to be seized and occupied by their troops, namely, as we know, Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, in Charleston Harbor; Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, Ga.; Fort Morgan, at the mouth of Mobile Bay, Ala.; and as a like action may not unreasonably be looked for as to other forts on these coasts, it is important that this department should have your determination as to our proceedings at forts now under construction or repair on the Southern coasts. Excluding Forts Taylor and Jefferson, at Key West and the Tortugas, as belonging to another category, the forts alluded to above are Fort Clinch, at the north end of Amelia Island, Fla. (entrance to Cumberland Sound); Fort Gaines, west side of the entrance to Mobile Bay, Ala.; fort on Ship Island, coast of Mississippi; Forts Jackson and Saint Philip, on the Mississippi River below New Orleans, and new fort at Galveston, Tex. There are several other forts on these coasts, but I mention only those on which we are making disbursements. The questions I beg to present are:

First. Whether we shall proceed as heretofore by adjusting the rate of expenditure in the most advantageous manner as regards season, &c., to the amount of the appropriation in each case; or,

Second. Whether we shall at once reduce all these expenditures to an absolute minimum; that is to say, merely keeping possession by an overseer and two, three, or four laborers.

I do not offer the alternative of entire abandonment-if for no other reason, because the second assumption is nearly equivalent, while it takes care, as far as we can do so, of the public property. Besides the course that the policy of the General Government may dictate in reference {p.35} to fortifications on that part of our seaboard under present political circumstances, I must add that the present state of the Treasury will probably be regarded as bearing strongly on the questions. We judge of this condition, however, only from the fate of requisitions for funds made by this office on the demand of officers in charge of works for the means of prosecuting their labors. It will be seen by the statement herewith that several such demands have been unsatisfied for a month and more. This last remark refers, as you will see by the table, not alone to engineer operations at the South, but to those at the North and to those on the Pacific Coast as well. I am therefore obliged to inquire further whether it is necessary or proper, in your opinion, at once and for the present to restrict expenditures and engagements at all our fortifications.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. G. TOTTEN, Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel Engineers.

[Inclosure.]

List of applications from the Engineer Department to the Secretary of War for remittances on account of fortifications and for the Military Academy which have not been complied with.

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, January 10, 1861.

November 17, 1860.– Col. R. Delafield, Military Academy, $4,500; Lieut. J. B. McPherson, fort at Alcatraz Island, Cal., $5,000; Maj. H. Brewerton, Fort Carroll, Md., $5,000.

November 26.-Capt. J. F. Gilmer, fort at Fort Point, Cal., $6,000.

December 1.-Lieut. Col. R. E. De Russy, Fort Calhoun, Va., $10,000; Lieut. F. E. Prime, fort at Ship Island, Miss., $3,000; Fort Gaines, Ala., $2,000; Fort McRee, Fla., $1,000.

December 6.-Capt. J. G. Foster, Fort Sumter, S. C., $10,000; Capt. J. Newton, Fort Delaware, Del., $3,000.

December 10.-Lieut. W. H. Stevens, fort at entrance to Galveston, Tex., $10,000; contingencies of fortifications, $950; Capt. W. H. C. Whiting, Fort Clinch, Fla., $15,000.

December 12.-Maj. P. G. T. Beauregard, Fort Jackson, La., $10,000; Fort Saint Philip, La., $3,000; contingencies of fortifications, $170; Col. R. Delafield, Military Academy, $5,250; Capt. J. G. Foster, Fort Sumter, S. C., $5,000.

December 17.-Lieut. F. E. Prime, Fort Gaines, Ala., $8,000; Capt. H. W. Benham, fort at Sandy Hook, N. J., $10,000; Lieut. J. B. McPherson, fort at Alcatraz Island, Cal., $5,000.

December 21.-Maj. J. G. Barnard, Fort Richmond, N. Y., $1,000.

December 26.-Maj. J. G. Barnard, Fort Tompkins, N. Y., $1,000; Capt. J. F. Gilmer, fort at Fort Point, Cal., $6,000.

January 9, 1861.– Lieut. F. E. Prime, fort at Ship Island, Miss., $8,000; Maj. H. Brewerton, Fort Carroll, Md., $5,000.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Senate: Hon. J. K. MOORHEAD, House of Representatives:

GENTLEMEN: In reply to the inquiry contained in your note of the 3d instant, I have the honor to state that the order directing the shipment of cannon from the Allegheny Arsenal to certain forts in the {p.36} South was countermanded on the same day. On investigation it was satisfactorily ascertained that the fortifications in question were not at all in a condition to receive their armament, nor will they probably be for several years to come. This will more fully appear from the letter of General Totten, in charge of the Engineer Department, which accompanies this communication.* The heavy guns referred to, amounting to 124 in number, were not manufactured for the forts to which they had been ordered to be forwarded, nor had they been purchased by any special appropriation for the erecting or arming of these forts. As they would have been entirely useless at the points for which, under the order of shipment, they were destined, and as their transportation through the country could not have failed to increase the feverish agitation and apprehension already so unhappily prevalent, I did not hesitate, when the matter was brought to my notice, to direct their return to the arsenal.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

* See Totten to Holt, next, ante.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 11, 1861.

Hon. J. HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Will you have the goodness to furnish me, for the information of the Committee on Military Affairs, with a statement of the distribution of arms from the armories of the United States to the U. S. arsenals, and other places of deposit for safe-keeping, from the 1st day of January, A. D. 1860, to the 1st day of January, A. D. 1861, showing the number sent from each armory to each arsenal, or other place of deposit, and the time when each parcel was sent; also whether any portion of the arms so distributed have been taken from the custody and control of the officers or persons charged with their custody or safe-keeping, and, if so, when and by whom they have been so taken. An early reply will very much oblige,

Yours, respectfully,

B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs.

–––

BOSTON, January 12, 1861.

Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

SIR: I have the honor to address you for the purpose of communicating in my official capacity with yourself, as the commander of the Army of the United States, with a view to obtaining whatever advice or information may be deemed proper to be imparted to me bearing upon the preparation of Massachusetts to meet any demand for patriotic citizen soldiers to assist you in maintaining the laws and the integrity of the country.

It is thought not unlikely that such contribution of men may be wanted, and should that be the case, Massachusetts, if duly admonished of it in advance, will respond with an alacrity and force which will meet your entire satisfaction. May I ask then, sir, to receive from you, or your department, your views of what it is desirable to be done by us at this moment, and the probability there may be of our being wanted.

Our Legislature is now in session, and the committees formed to-day. I had an interview with the joint committee on the militia, and can {p.37} assure you that they will take any needful steps to prepare for a march of our full share of men. Two brigadier-generals of the active volunteer militia have already tendered their services.

The general state of our militia is given in my address to the Legislature, of which I have had the honor to send you a copy.

I shall send you this note under cover to Senator Wilson, who, from his former services, is familiar with the militia of this Commonwealth, and may be able to answer inquiries on your part which I cannot distinctly anticipate.

With the fervent hope that your health and life may be continued for the sake of the country you have so long and so ably served, and that the country may find a happy and honorable escape from present dangers, I am, with great respect, your most obedient servant,*

JOHN A. ANDREW.

* Answer, if any, not found.

–––

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 12, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: The special committee to whom was referred the President’s message of the 9th instant* have directed me to inclose to you a copy of their instructions, and to respectfully request that you will communicate any information upon any of the subjects mentioned in your possession not in your opinion inconsistent with the public service. The committee earnestly desire to aid and not embarrass the Executive Departments in upholding the Constitution and the laws. We desire you to communicate such facts only as will enable the House to act intelligently and efficiently in sustaining the Constitution and the laws.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. A. HOWARD, Chairman.

* See “The Congressional Globe,” Part I, p. 294.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

THIRTY-SIXTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 9, 1861.

On motion of Mr. Leake-

Resolved, That the committee of five to which the special message of the President of the United States was this day referred, with certain instructions, be instructed also to inquire whether any of the arms of the United States at any of the arsenals or armories have recently been removed or ordered to be removed, and, if so, by whose order and for what reasons.

Attest:

J. W. FORNEY, Clerk.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

THIRTY-SIXTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 9, 1861.

On motion of Mr. William A. Howard-

Resolved, That the message this day received from the President of the United States be referred to a special committee of five members of {p.38} this House, and that they be instructed to report on the same as early as possible; and that said committee make immediate inquiry and report-

First. Whether any executive officer of the United States has been or is now treating or holding communication with any person or persons concerning the surrender of any forts or fortresses or public property of the United States, and whether any demand for such surrender has been made, and when and by whom and what answer has been given.

Second. Whether any officer of this Government has at any time entered into any pledge, agreement, or understanding with any person or persons not to send re-enforcements to the forts of the United States in the harbor at Charleston, and the particulars of such agreement, pledge, or understanding; when, where, and with whom it was made, and on what consideration.

Third. What demand for re-enforcements of the said forts has been made, and for what reason such re-enforcements have not been furnished.

Fourth. Where the ships of the United States are now stationed, with what commands, and with what orders.

Fifth. Whether the custom-house, post-office, arsenal, and other public buildings of the United States at Charleston have been seized and are held in possession by any person or persons, and the particulars of such seizure and possession.

Sixth. Whether any revenue cutter of the United States has been seized and is now held in possession by any person or persons, and the particulars thereof; and whether any efforts have been made by the head of the Treasury Department to recapture or recover possession of said vessel; and that the committee have power to send for persons and papers and to take testimony.

Attest:

J. W. FORNEY, Clerk.

–––

BLAIN, January 12, 1861.

Hon. JAMES BUCHANAN:

DEAR SIR: Not knowing how soon your honor will need the services of the uniformed volunteers to suppress the Southern fire-eating disunionists, we hereby tender the services of our company, subject to your orders. The following are the names of our members; we number about forty-four members.

JOHN A. WILSON, Captain Washington Artillery. [AND SEVENTEEN OTHERS.]

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 15, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 11th instant, I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Chief of Ordnance, communicating the information desired by your committee touching the distribution of arms from the armories to the arsenals in the Southern States during the year 1860.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

{p.39}

[Inclosure.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 15, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the reference of a letter from the Hon. B. Stanton, chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs of the House of Representatives, asking for the statement of the distribution of arms from the armories to the arsenals and other places of deposit, for safe-keeping, from January 1, 1860, to January 1, 1861, &c., and, in compliance with your directions, have to report that on December 30, 1859, an order was received from the War Department directing the transfer of 115,000 arms from the Springfield Armory and the Watertown and Watervliet Arsenals to different arsenals at the South.

Orders were given, in obedience to these instructions, on January 30, 1860, and the arms were removed during the past spring from and to the places as follows, viz:

From Springfield Armory, 65,000 percussion muskets, caliber of .69, and 40,000 muskets, altered from flint to percussion, caliber of .69. From Watertown Arsenal, 6,000 percussion rifles, caliber of .54. From Watervliet Arsenal, 4,000 percussion rifles, caliber of .54. Of which there were sent to Charleston Arsenal, 9,280 percussion muskets, 5,720 altered muskets, and 2,000 rifles; North Carolina Arsenal, 15,480 percussion muskets, 9,520 altered muskets, and 2,000 rifles; Augusta Arsenal, 12,380 percussion muskets, 7,620 altered muskets, and 2,000 rifles; Mount Vernon Arsenal, 9,280 percussion muskets, 5,720 altered muskets, and 2,000 rifles; Baton Rouge Arsenal, 18,580 percussion muskets, 11,420 altered muskets, and 2,000 rifles.

The arms thus transferred, which were at the Charleston Arsenal, the Mount Vernon Arsenal, and the Baton Rouge Arsenal, have been seized by the authorities of the several States of South Carolina, Alabama, and Louisiana, and are no longer in possession of the Ordnance Department. Those stored at Augusta Arsenal and at North Carolina are still in charge of officers of this department.

In addition to the foregoing there have been transfers of arms from the armories to different arsenals, but only in such quantities as the exigencies of the service demand for immediate issues to the Army and to the States, under the act of April 23, 1808, and which I infer are not intended to be embraced in the call of the Hon. Mr. Stanton, whose letter is herewith returned.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, January 15, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the reference to this office of a letter from the Hon. D. Clopton, asking for information in relation to certain arms issued to the State of Alabama last August, but which have not yet reached their destination, and on this subject have respectfully to report that, as stated by Mr. Clopton, the stores were issued from the Allegheny Arsenal in August last, addressed to the Governor of Alabama, at Montgomery, and it was supposed they had been duly {p.40} received until the quartermaster-general of that State, on the 26th of November last, advised the Secretary of War that they had not been received, and asking what he should do in the premises. In answer to this he was informed that diligent inquiry should be made, the result of which would be communicated, and if it should so happen that the arms were lost, that the issue would be duplicated. On the 29th of December the Governor of Alabama was informed of the result of the inquiries made, which was to the effect that the arms, &c., had reached New Orleans, and were stored preparatory to reshipment to their destination, and it is quite probable that by this time they have been duly delivered.

The stores, though issued in August, 1860, were on account of the State’s quota for 1861, and in this connection it may be proper to say that such issues, under the law of 1808, in advance, are without the authority of law, and instead of its being “usual,” as was said in a recent application to you for a similar issue, they have been restricted to the last four years, and perhaps some especial instances of former dates, as will appear from the following prohibitory order of President Jackson on a similar application by the State of Louisiana in 1835, viz:

The President directs that the gun applied for be furnished, but that in future no advances be made, more especially to States to which no arms are due.

29th June, 1835.

If the stores referred to by the Governor of Alabama, and supposed to have been detained at New Orleans, as above stated, should not be forthcoming, I will not under existing circumstances feel called on to renew the issue without your especial instructions, and in that event I would respectfully suggest that the Governor be authorized to draw the stores, or their equivalent in muskets, from the Mount Vernon Arsenal, now in possession of the State of Alabama.

The letter of Hon. D. Clopton is herewith returned.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* See January 10, p. 34.

–––

ALBANY, January 16, 1861.

Lieut. Gen. WINFIELD SCOTT, General-in-Chief, &c.:

GENERAL: Being under the impression that the state of the country might render it necessary to withdraw for service elsewhere the whole or a large part of the troops now occupying posts in the harbor of New York, I take great pleasure in saying, with the approval of Governor Morgan, with whom I have conferred on this subject, that I can furnish from the First Division New York State Militia, at any time, a sufficient force to take charge of the fortifications in our harbor as long as may be necessary. And should it be necessary (as I trust it will not) to sustain the Government and keep the peace at Washington by a larger force than you can concentrate from the U. S. Army, I can send you, at short notice, five or six good regiments, upon which you could rely with confidence.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. W. SANDFORD, New York.

{p.41}

–––

WASHINGTON, January 17, 1861.

His Excellency E. D. MORGAN, Governor of New York:

SIR: I am very sure that the President, as yet, has not seriously thought of calling for volunteers or militia from any quarter beyond this District; and to maintain the peace here the local militia, the constabulary, and some 700 regulars, including three companies of horse or flying artillery, are at present deemed sufficient.

Perhaps no regiment or company can be brought here from a distance without producing hurtful jealousies in this vicinity.

If there be an exception, it is the Seventh Infantry, of the city of New York, which has become somewhat national, and it is held deservedly in the highest respect from its escorting the remains of President Monroe from New York to Richmond, and its presence at the inauguration of the statue of the Father of his Country in Washington.

In reply to the latter part of Your Excellency’s letter, I beg to say that a better reference of the subject cannot be made than to Major-General Sandford, a general of excellent intelligence and judgment in all such matters.

With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Your Excellency’s most obedient servant,

WINFIELD SCOTT.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 17, 1861.

Hon. DAVID CLOPTON, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 10th instant I have the honor to state that on the 29th of November last the Governor of Alabama was informed that the arms, &c., issued upon his requisition in August last had reached New Orleans and were stored, preparatory to reshipment to their destination. It is quite probable that by this time they have been duly delivered. If they have not, I will, upon the request of the Governor, give him authority to draw the stores, or their equivalent in muskets, from the Mount Vernon Arsenal, in that State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, January 17, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

DEAR SIR: I write for the purpose of obtaining information as to the quantity and kind of arms to which the State of Indiana is entitled from the General Government, and whether there are not arrearages due her for past years; upon what principle or ratio arms are distributed; whether upon Congressional representation or on enrollment of the militia, or both, under different acts of Congress; and, finally, the form of application therefor, and how soon the arms that may be due can be forwarded.

A speedy answer is very much desired.

Very respectfully,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

{p.42}

–––

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Will you please inform me what number of improved arms, now recognized as suitable for the service, are now in possession of the Department, and how large a force the Department can now arm with the latest improved arms.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Please send me, for use of the Committee on Military Affairs, a copy of the order of the Secretary of War of December 30 [29], 1659, in relation to the distribution of arms, referred to in the letter of Colonel Craig to you of the 15th instant, and also the orders of January 30, 1860, referred to in the same letter, under which 115,000 stand of arms were distributed to sundry arsenals in the Southern States.

You will also please advise me whether any arms have been distributed to any of the States for the year 1861, and, if so, the number and description distributed to each, and the date of the distribution.

It has seemed to me that there has been unnecessary delay in answering my former inquiries in relation to the distribution of arms.

You will oblige me, therefore, by furnishing me the information now asked for at your earliest convenience.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

B. STANTON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 21, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 18th instant I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Chief of Ordnance, showing the number of arms in our arsenals and armories suitable for the service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

[Inclosures.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 21, 1861.

Hon. J. HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the letter of the Hon. B. Stanton of the 18th instant I have to state that it appears by the last returns that there were remaining in the U. S. arsenals and armories as follows: Percussion muskets and muskets altered to percussion (caliber .69), 499,554, and percussion rifles (caliber .54), 42,011; total, 541,565. It from this number are deducted the numbers of the same description that were in the arsenals in South Carolina, Alabama, and Louisiana, {p.43} which arsenals have been officially reported to have been taken possession of by the authorities of those States, 60,878, it leaves this number, 480,687; the whole of which are “recognized as suitable for the service.” In addition to these there are, rifle muskets, model of 1855 (caliber .58), 22,827; rifles, model of 1855 (caliber .58), 12,508; total, 35,335; which are “the latest improved arms.”

The letter of Mr. Stanton is herewith returned.

I am, sir, very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

NOTE.-Of the above 480,687 muskets and rifles, 22,000 of them are in the arsenal at Augusta, Ga., and 36,362 in the arsenal at Fayetteville, N. C.

Serviceable arms at the U. S. forts and arsenals within the several States and Territories, per the last inventories and returns, excluding flint-lock arms, as well as Colt revolvers and all other patent arms.

States and Territories.Muskets.Rifles, &c.Total small-arms.Siege and garrison.Sea-coast.Field.Total artillery.
All descriptions now used and usable.Rifles and all other U. S. arms now used and usable.8 and 10 inch columbiads and howitzers, and 42 and 32 pounder guns, and 24 pounder flank howitzers.8 inch howitzers, and 24, 18, and 12 pounder guns.Brass field guns and howitzers.
Maine24,31324,313213419
New Hampshire20222
Massachusetts155,56612,177167,74313810720265
Rhode Island100492151
Connecticut4922273
New York42,00528,40670,41150620929744
Pennsylvania27,4435,49332,9362136121295
Maryland50505624181
District of Columbia73,7782,28576,0633101791490
Virginia10,6466,86817,5146801777864
North Carolina32,6783,63636,36437441
South Carolina17,4132,81720,230109204133
Georgia20,0012,00022,00120222
Florida3391214464
Alabama17,3592,00019,359641579
Louisiana12,3646,14118,50563124187
Texas3,2532,2045,4571010
Arkansas1,310541,3641010
Missouri32,4685,67338,1412911
Kansas1,3852,1933,57844
New Mexico2,3332,2484,58155
California47,5017,21854,7191462922197
Washington Territory4,0824704,552
Total525,94891,933617,8812,7951,2091634,167

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 22, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 18th instant, I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Chief of Ordnance, communicating the {p.44} information desired by your committee respecting the recent distribution of arms to arsenals in the Southern States.

Referring to your remark touching the delay in answering your former inquiries, I beg to observe that there has been no such delay beyond that necessarily involved in the preparation of the information called for by the respective bureaus, a work upon which, generally speaking, only a very limited force could be advantageously employed. You will notice, for example, that the last report called for in response to your letter of the 8th instant-that of the Chief of Ordnance-did not reach me until yesterday afternoon.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

[Inclosures.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 21, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In compliance with the request in the letter from the Hon. B. Stanton of 18th instant, referred by you to this office, I have the honor to transmit herewith the following papers:

First. Copy of directions from the Secretary of War, dated December 30 [29], 1859, for the transfer of arms to Southern arsenals.

Second. Copies of three orders for supplies from this office, dated January 30, 1860, these orders being the necessary action for carrying into effect the previous directions of the Secretary of War, December 30 [29], 1859.

Third. A statement of arms issued on account of the quotas due the States for 1861 in advance, the date of the orders directing the issue, and States to which issued.*

Mr. Stanton’s letter is herewith returned.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* Copy of this statement not found.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, December 29, 1859.

The Colonel of Ordnance will give the requisite orders for supplying the arsenals at Fayetteville, N. C.; Charleston, S. C.; Augusta, Ga.; Mount Vernon, Ala., and Baton Rouge, La., with the following arms, in addition to those on hand at those arsenals, viz: 65,000 percussion muskets (caliber .69) and 40,000 altered to percussion (caliber .69) from Springfield Armory; also 6,000 percussion rifles (caliber .54) from Watertown Arsenal and 4,000 percussion rifles (caliber .54) from Watervliet Arsenal. These orders will be given from time to time as may be most suitable for economy and convenience of transportation. The distribution to the five first-named arsenals will be in proportion to their respective means of proper storage.

JOHN B. FLOYD, Secretary of War.

{p.45}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Order for supplies, No. 55.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., January 30, 1860.

J. S. WHITNEY, Esq., Superintendent U. S. Armory, Springfield:

SIR: You are hereby required to issue to the officers stated below the following ordnance stores, viz:

To whom to be issued.Percussion muskets, caliber .69, with appendages.Muskets, caliber .69, altered to percussion, with appendages.
Capt. J. Gorgas, Charleston Arsenal8,2805,720
Capt. J. A. J. Bradford, North Carolina Arsenal15,4509,520
John M. Galt, military store-keeper, Augusta Arsenal, Ga.12,3807,620
Capt. J. L. Reno, Mount Vernon Arsenal9,2306,729
Theo. Lewis, esq. military store-keeper, Baton Rouge Arsenal18,55011,420
65,00040,000

The within rifles will be held in readiness for issue at such time as you may be called upon by the Quartermaster’s Department. Copy of a letter to that department from this office is inclosed herewith for your information and government.

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

Order for supplies, No. 56.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., January 30, 1860.

Maj. A. MORDECAI, Watervliet Arsenal:

SIR: You are hereby required to issue to Capt. J. Gorgas, Charleston Arsenal, the following ordnance stores, viz: 2,000 percussion rifles, caliber .54, with appendages. To Capt. J. A. J. Bradford, North Carolina Arsenal, 2,000 percussion rifles, caliber .54, with appendages.

The within rifles will be held in readiness for issue at such time as you may be called upon by the Quartermaster’s Department. Copy of a letter to that department from this office is inclosed herewith for your information and government.*

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* See sub-inclosure, p. 46.

Order for supplies, No. 57.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., January 30, 1860.

Capt. T. J. RODMAN, Watertown Arsenal:

SIR: You are hereby required to issue to John M. Galt, esq., military store-keeper, &c., Augusta Arsenal, Ga., the following ordnance stores, viz: 2,000 percussion rifles, caliber .54, with appendages; to Bvt. Capt. J. L. Reno, Mount Vernon Arsenal, 2,000 percussion rifles, caliber .54, {p.46} with appendages; to Theo. Lewis, esq., military store-keeper, Baton Rouge Arsenal, 2,000 percussion rifles, caliber .54, and appendages.

The within rifles will be held in readiness for issue at such time as you may be called upon by the Quartermaster’s Department. Copy of a letter to that department from this office is inclosed herewith for your information and government.*

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* See next, post.

[Sub-inclosure.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 2d, 1860.

Major-General JESUP, Quartermaster-General U. 8. Army:

SIR: I have to request that transportation may be provided for the following number of boxes of muskets and rifles to be supplied to the arsenals at Fayetteville, N. C., Charleston, S. C., Augusta, Ga., Mount Vernon, Ala., and Baton Rouge, La., by direction of the Secretary of War:

Boxes.
From Springfield Armory to Charleston Arsenal750
From Watervliet Arsenal to Charleston Arsenal100
From Springfield Armory to North Carolina Arsenal1,250
From Watervliet Arsenal to North Carolina Arsenal100
From Springfield Armory to Augusta Arsenal1,000
From Watertown Arsenal to Augusta Arsenal100
From Springfield Armory to Mount Vernon Arsenal750
From Watertown Arsenal to Mount Vernon Arsenal100
From Springfield Armory to Baton Rouge Arsenal1,500
From Watertown Arsenal to Baton Rouge Arsenal100
Total5,750

Each box contains 20 arms, weight about 300 pounds, and occupies about 10 cubic feet. The transfers of these arms may be made from time to time as may be most suitable for economy and convenience of transportation, and they will be held in readiness for delivery from Springfield Armory and Watervliet and Watertown Arsenals at such times and in such parcels as may best suit the arrangements which your department may make for their transfer.

Respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 22, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Information which comes to me in a shape which is entitled to great confidence and respect satisfies me that a military force beyond the amount in reach and available for immediate exigencies is necessary at some points for local defense and the protection of the public property.

This is said to be especially the case for the protection of this District and the public property here, and also for the protection of the arsenal and custom-house and sub-treasury at Saint Louis, and perhaps at other points where the necessity may not be so great.

If you concur with me in this opinion, you will oblige me by having a bill prepared authorizing the President, if he shall deem it necessary, {p.47} to call for such number of volunteers and for such time and such description of force as he may think the exigencies of the service may demand.

An early reply will much oblige your humble servant,

B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 22, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: In reply to the resolution of the House of Representatives communicated with your letter of the 8th instant, I have the honor to inclose to you reports from the Adjutant-General, Chief Engineer, and Chief of Ordnance, containing the information called for touching the garrisons and defensive condition of our fortifications and the recent sales of the public arms.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War ad interim.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Herewith I have the honor to lay before you a statement of so much of the information called for by resolution of the House of Representatives under date of the 31st ultimo as can be furnished by this office, and am,

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

Tabular list of the forts belonging to the United States, with statement annexed of their actual garrison and also of their appropriate garrisons, the latter as originally set forth in a report of the Colonel of Engineers dated November 1, 1851, and which was prepared in answer to a call of the House of Representatives made on the 3d of March of the same year.

Designation of the work and State in which located.Number of garrison in war.Number of actual garrison.
Fort Preble, Portland Harbor, Me.2001
Fort Scammel, Portland Harbor, Me.3000
Fort McClary, Portland Harbor, Me.800
Fort Constitution, Portsmouth Harbor, N. H.2501
Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, Mass.5001
Fort Winthrop, Boston Harbor, Mass.4000
West Head Battery, Governors Island, Boston Harbor, Mass.
Southeast Battery, Governor’s Island, Boston Harbor, Mass.
Fort at New Bedford Harbor, Mass.600
Fort Trumbull, New London Harbor, Conn.3501
Fort Columbus, Governor’s Island, N. Y.800*613
Castle William, Governor’s Island, N. Y.
South Battery, Governor’s Island, N. Y.
Fort Gibson, Ellis Island, N. Y.800
Fort Wood, Bedloe’s Island, N. Y.3501
Fort Richmond, Staten Island, N. Y.1,0000
For Tomkins, Staten Island, N. Y.
Battery Hudson, Staten Island, N. Y.
Battery Morton, Staten Island, N. Y.1 {p.48}
Fort Lafayette, Narrows, New York Harbor, N. Y.3701
Fort Mifflin, Delaware River, Pa.2001
Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbor, Md.350146
Fort Madison, Annapolis Harbor, Md.1501
Fort Washington, Potomac River, Md.4001
Castle Pinckney, Charleston Harbor, S. C.1000
Fort Moultrie, Charleston Harbor, S. C.3000
Fort Jackson, Savannah River, Ga.700
Fort Marion and seawall at Saint Augustine, Fla.1000
Fort Barrancas and barracks, Pensacola, Fla.2500
Fort Saint Philip, Mississippi River, La.6000
Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Mass.1,5000
Fort Adams, Newport Harbor, R. I.2,4401
Fort Schuyler, Throg’s Neck, East River, N. Y.1,2501
Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, N. Y.8008
Fort Monroe, Old Point Comfort, Va.2,450464
Fort Macon (and preservation of its site), Beaufort Harbor, N. C.3001
Fort Caswell, Oak Island, N. C.4001
Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga.8001
Fort Pickens Pensacola Harbor, Fla.1,26059
Fort McRee, Poster’s Bank, Pensacola Harbor, Fla.6501
Fort Morgan, Mobile Point, Ala.7001
Fort Pike, Rigolets, La.3001
Fort Macomb (formerly Fort Wood), Chef Menteur, La.3000
Battery Bienvenue, Bayou Bienvenue, La.1000
Tower Dupré, Bayou Dupré, La.500
Fort Jackson, Mississippi River, La.6000
Fort Livingston, Barrataria Bay, La.3000
Fort Knox, opposite Bucksport Me.5000
Fort Delaware, Delaware River, Del.7500
Fort Carroll, Sollers Point Flats, Baltimore Harbor, Md.8000
Fort Calhoun, Hampton Reads, Va.1,1200
Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C.65089
Fort Clinch, Cumberland Sound, Fla.5500
Fort Taylor, Key West, Fla.1,00052
Fort Jefferson, Garden Key, Tortugas, Fla.1,5000
Redoubt of Fort Barrancas, Fla.1000
Fort Gaines, Dauphin Island, Ala.4000
Fort on Sandy Hook Point, N. J.1,0000
Fort at Proctor’s Landing, La.1000
Fort at Ship Island, Miss.4000
Alcatraz Island, Harbor of San Francisco, Cal.50085
ARMORIES, ARSENALS, AND DEPOTS.
Springfield Armory, Mass.1
Harpers Ferry Armory, Va.63
Allegheny Arsenal, Pa.43
Apalachicola Arsenal, Fla.4
Augusta Arsenal, Ga.93
Texas Arsenal, Tex.1
Benicia Arsenal, Cal.44
Champlain Arsenal, N. Y.0
Detroit Arsenal, Mich.6
Fort Monroe Arsenal, Va.17
Frankford Arsenal, Pa.32
Kennebec Arsenal, Me.8
Little Rock Arsenal, Ark.90
Missouri Depot, Mo.0
Mount Vernon Arsenal. Ala.19
New York Arsenal, N. Y.1
North Carolina Arsenal, N. C.58
Pikesville Arsenal, Md.8
Washington Arsenal, D. C.57
Fort Union Depot, N. Mex.16
Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.33
Watertown Arsenal, Mass.22
Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y.46
Vancouver Depot, Wash. Ter.13
Leavenworth Arsenal, Kans. Ter.25
Rome Arsenal, N. Y.1
Charleston Arsenal, S. C.0
Baton Rouge Arsenal, La.0

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

* Recruits.

{p.49}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have received a copy of a resolution passed by the House of Representatives on the 31st ultimo, referred by you to this office on the 15th instant, and I have the honor to furnish so much of the information required as relates to the condition of the forts.

Fort Wayne, Detroit, Mich.-In a condition to mount its entire armament, but deficient in quarters.

Fort Porter, Black Rock, near Buffalo, N. Y.-Prepared for its armament and garrison.

Fort Niagara, mouth of Niagara River, N. Y.-Ready for its armament, but deficient in accommodation for garrison and supplies.

Fort Ontario, Oswego, N. Y.-Defensible.

Fort Montgomery, Rouse’s Point, N. Y.-About half built; capable of some defense.

Fort Preble, Portland Harbor, Me.-In a defensible condition.

Fort Scammel, Portland Harbor, Me.-In a defensible condition.

Fort on flog Island Ledge, Portland Harbor, Me.-Under construction; not defensible.

Fort Knox, Narrows of the Penobscot River, Me.-Is in condition to receive a considerable portion of its armament bearing on the river passage, but is not defensible on the land side.

Fort McClary, Portsmouth Harbor, Me.-Defensible.

Fort Constitution, Portsmouth Harbor, Me.-Defensible.

Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Mass.-This strong work is essentially ready for its garrison and for nearly the whole of its armament.

Fort Winthrop, Boston Harbor, Mass.-The barbette guns of the tower may be mounted; capable of a good defense.

West Head Battery, Governor’s Island, Boston Harbor, Mass.-Defensible.

Southeast Battery, Governor’s Island, Boston Harbor, Mass.-Defensible.

Fort Independence, Boston Harbor, Mass.-In good condition for service.

Old fort at New Bedford Harbor, Mass.-Defensible.

New fort at New Bedford Harbor, Mass.-Not defensible.

Fort Wolcott, Newport Harbor, R. I.-Defensible.

Fort Adams, Newport Harbor, R. I.-This very strong work is now essentially ready for its garrison and for its entire armament.

Fort Trumbull, New London Harbor, Conn.-This work is essentially finished. It is ready for its garrison and is already supplied with nearly the whole of its armament.

Fort Schuyler, eastern entrance to New York Harbor.-Ready for its garrison and for its entire armament.

Fort Griswold, New London Harbor, Conn.-The exterior battery in good condition.

Fort at Willets Point, eastern entrance to New York Harbor.-Not commenced.

Fort Columbus and Castle William, New York Harbor.-Both in good condition for defense.

Fort Wood Bedloe’s Island, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

Fort Gibson, Ellis Island, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

{p.50}

Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

Fort Richmond, New York Harbor.-Ready for its armament and for occupation by troops.

Fort on site of Fort Tompkins, New York Harbor.-Not yet far enough advanced to be of much service.

Battery Hudson, Staten Island, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

Battery Morton, Staten Island, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

Fort Lafayette, Narrows, New York Harbor.-Defensible.

Fort at Sandy Hook, N. J.-A few guns might be mounted; no shelter for men and supplies.

Fort Muffin, Delaware River, Pa.-Ready for garrison and armament Fort Delaware, Delaware River, Del.-May receive garrison and armament.

Fort McHenry, Baltimore Harbor, Md.-Defensible.

Fort Carroll, Baltimore Harbor, Md.-Not far enough advanced to afford full protection; not armed; a part of one tier might be mounted in a few weeks.

Fort Madison, Annapolis Harbor, Md.-Battery nearly ready for guns.

Fort Washington, Potomac River, Md.-Defensible.

Fort Monroe, Old Point Comfort, Va.-In excellent defensible condition; needs minor repairs only.

Fort Calhoun, Hampton Roads, Va.-Under construction; not ready for armament or garrison.

Fort Macon, Beaufort Harbor, N. C.-In pretty good condition for defense.

Fort Caswell, mouth of Cape Fear River, N. C.-In pretty good condition for defense.

Fort Moultrie, Charleston Harbor, S. C.-Had been placed in the best condition possible under the circumstances prior to its evacuation.

Fort Sumter, Charleston Harbor, S. C.-In good condition for defense, having been greatly strengthened within the last few months; a very strong work.

Castle Pinckney, Charleston Harbor, S. C.-In good condition; defensible.

Fort Pulaski, Savannah River, Ga.-Ready for its garrison and nearly the whole of its armament; a very strong work.

Fort Jackson, Savannah Rive,-, Ga.-Can receive its armament and garrison.

Fort Clinch, Amelia Island, Fla.-Is nearly prepared for a partial but efficient armament of its channel fronts; is weak on the land side.

Fort Marion, Saint Augustine, Fla.-The battery nearly ready for guns and is defensible.

Fort Taylor, Key West, Fla.-Is prepared for its casemate batteries, two tiers; guns enough already in place for efficient action in all directions; in the absence of the projected cover-face, not prepared to resist siege by land.

Fort Jefferson, Tortugas, Fla.-Is prepared for its lower casemate guns; capable of making a good defense.

Fort Pickens, Pensacola Harbor, Fla.-Is prepared for its entire casemate armament, its new barbette armament of heavy caliber on one curtain and two bastions, and the old and lighter armament on the remaining fronts, and should make a good defense.

Fort Barrancas, Pensacola Harbor, Fla.-Is capable of good defense; its armament is mounted, its magazines in good order. In the redoubt the flanking howitzers of scarp and counterscarp can be mounted in a short time.

{p.51}

Fort McRee, Pensacola Harbor, Fla.-A strong and efficient battery; prepared for its new armament on both casemate tiers and its old and light armament on the barbette tier; ready for occupation by troops.

Fort Morgan, Mobile Harbor, Ala.-A strong work, essentially complete.

Fort Gaines, Dauphin Island, entrance to Mobile Harbor, Ala.-Is not yet prepared for much defense.

Fort on Ship Island, coast of Mississippi.-Not prepared for much defense.

Military defenses at Proctor’s Landing, La.-Not complete, but may receive a garrison and armament and make a good defense.

Fort Saint Philip, Mississippi River, La.-Not complete, but may receive a garrison and armament and make a good defense.

Fort Jackson, Mississippi River, La.-Defensible; but requiring repairs and enlargement of the citadel.

Fort Pike, Rigolets, La.-Defensible.

Fort Macomb, Chef Menteur, La.-Defensible.

Battery Bienvenue, Bayou Bienvenue, La.-Defensible.

Tower Dupré, Bayou Dupré, La.-Defensible.

Fort Livingston, Barrataria Bay, La.-Defensible.

Fortifications at Galveston Harbor, Tex.-Hardly commenced.

Fort at Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Harbor, Cal.-In a very efficient condition, already partly armed.

Fort at Fort Point, entrance of San Francisco Harbor, Cal.-A strong and defensible work. The body of the place is so far advanced as to be ready to receive all its guns.

For more particular information relative to works now under construction or repairs, I respectfully invite your attention to the annual report from this Department, dated November 14, 1860.*

Very,

JOS. G. TOTTEN, Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

* See Ex. Doc. No. 1, Senate, 36th Congress, 2d Session, p. 253.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., January 21, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to that portion of the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 31st ultimo communicated in the letter of Hon. B. Stanton, of the 8th instant, which relates to the distribution of arms from January 1, 1860, to January 1, 1861, I transmit herewith a statement giving the information desired, so far as it is understood to call for. I have not embraced the arms which were sold under the act of March 3, 1825, after regular condemnation, by public auction, under the supposition that this was not required. It may be proper, also, to state that on November 2, last, a proposition was made to the Secretary of War by A. A. Belknap for the purchase of from “100,000 to 250,000 of the U. S. flint-lock and altered percussion muskets, and to have the same delivered to me or my agent in the city of New York. I respectfully ask the privilege of taking the whole or any part thereof within the next sixty-five days upon the payment of $2.15 per gun on delivery as aforesaid,” which proposition was accepted by the Secretary of War on November 22, in these words:

The within proposition is accepted to the extent of 100,000 muskets, and as many more, up to the maximum number, as the service will spare.

{p.52}

This accepted proposition was subsequently modified by the Secretary of War on December 26, as follows:

The acceptance of the within proposition of A. A. Belknap was made under the belief that the price offered was $2.50 per gun. That was the price which I distinctly understood was to be paid, as it is the least I will consent to sell the muskets for. This decision on the proposition will supersede the indorsement of November 22, 1860, which was signed under an erroneous impression as to the proposition then before me.

All further action in relation to this sale has, however, been arrested by your approval of my proposition of the 8th instant, to the effect that no more arms be disposed of under the orders given and that “no more muskets be sold.”

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

[Sub-inclosure.]

Statement of arms distributed by sale, by order of the Secretary of War, from January 1, 1860, to January 1, 1861, showing to whom, how, the number, kind, price, and date when sold, and place of delivery.

To whom sold.How sold.Number.Kind of arms.Price each.Date.Place of delivery.
1860
J. W. Zacharie & Co.Private Sale.4,000Muskets altered to percussion.$2.50Feb. 3Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.
J. T. Amesdo1,000do2.50Mar. 14New York Arsenal, N. Y.
Capt. G. Barrydo50do2.00June 11Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.
W. C. N. Swiftdo400do2.50Aug. 31Springfield Armory, Mass.
Dodo50do2.50Nov. 13Do.
State of Alabamado1,000do2.50Sept. 27Baton Rouge Arsenal, La.
Dodo2,500do2.50Nov. 14Do.
State of Virginiado5,000do2.50Nov. 6Washington Arsenal, D. C.
Phillips County (Ark.) Volunteers.do50do2.00Nov. 16Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.
G. B. Lamardo10,000do2.50Nov. 24Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y.
State of Mississippido5,000do2.50Dec. 4Baton Rouge Arsenal, La.
State of Louisianado5,000do2.50Dec. 15Do.

* Of these the State of Louisiana took and paid for 2,500 only.

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, January 21, 1861.

–––

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE, New York, January 23, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: On yesterday afternoon I was informed of the shipment of a number of boxes, which had the usual appearance of those in which muskets, &c., were packed. I directed a portion of my force to take possession of any such packages as had the appearance of containing arms when on board of, or about to be placed on board of, any vessel destined for a port in any of the seceded States. In conformity with this order, thirty-eight cases of muskets were taken in charge at Pier No. 12, North River, a part of which were found on board of, and the remainder were on the wharf in the process of being placed on board of, the steamer Monticello, bound to Savannah, Ga. The cases were directed to Montgomery, Ala., by railroad from Savannah. After taking these arms in charge I had them placed for safety in the New York State Arsenal, at the corner of Seventh avenue and Thirty-fifth street, in this city, where they remain at the disposal of the U. S. authorities.

{p.53}

This morning I called personally on Mr. Roosevelt, the district attorney, and informed him of my procedure, and requested him to take such action as under the charge of Judge Smalley seemed proper. He, however, declined to direct me in the premises, but kindly suggested to me to confer with you. Having received information of a much larger number of arms being in a similar situation with those I now hold, I deemed it proper for me to write to Mr. Roosevelt, repeating to him the substance of the information I had given him orally and the further information I had received. A copy of that letter is herewith inclosed. After writing the above, I learned that several large cases of cartridges were being placed on board of the Charleston steamer at Pier No. 4, North River, a notice of which I immediately transmitted to the district attorney. You will very much oblige by making such suggestions as it would be proper for a local officer to comply with who is anxious to lend the aid of his force in support of the Government and the preservation of the Union.

I do not desire to interfere in the least with the duties of the U. S. officers in this city; but when arms and other munitions of war are being passed through it, in the face of day, to be used for the subjugation of the constituted authorities of the country, and it was in my power to stay their progress, I felt it my duty to do so. It is for you, sir, to determine whether I shall continue this course, or to deliver up the arms I already hold into the hands of traitors.

Your early reply will very much oblige your obedient servant,

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Superintendent.

[Inclosure.]

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE, New York, January 23, 1861.

Hon. JAMES I. ROOSEVELT, U. S. District Attorney:

DEAR SIR: I beg leave to inform you that I have caused to be seized thirty-eight cases, containing about 900 stand of arms, which were about to be shipped on board of the steamer Monticello, for Savannah, Ga., thence to be forwarded to Montgomery, Ala., to be treasonably used by parties who are making war upon, and armed resistance to the laws and authority of, the United States. I am prepared to furnish you with evidence that these arms are furnished and were being transported with the design and for the purpose stated. I have information of other large quantities of arms and munitions of war which are about to be forwarded with the same design.

I desire your advice in relation to the proceedings to be taken in such cases, and especially whether parties who furnish and forward arms and munitions of war, with a knowledge that they are for the purpose of breaking up the Federal Government, are not liable to the penalties of treason. I may be able to furnish you from time to time information of the movement of other lots of similar property for the same treasonable purpose. I shall be happy to give you this information, and any aid in my power to enable you to perform your duty as law officer of the United States in preventing the accomplishment of treasonable acts and in punishing traitors against the Government.

Very respectfully, I am, yours, &c.,

JOHN A. KENNEDY.

{p.54}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 23, 1861.

General J. MEREDITH READ, Jr., Adjutant-General of New York, Albany:

SIR: In answer to the inquiry contained in your letter of the 21st instant, relative to [whether in] the event of the passage of an appropriation therefor by her Legislature the State of New York can be permitted to purchase about 5,000 Minie muskets from the United States, I have the honor to inform you that the practice of disposing of the Government arms has been abandoned, and none are now for sale.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

–––

WAIL DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 24, 1861.

His Excellency O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana, Indianapolis:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the l7th instant I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Chief of Ordnance, communicating the information desired by you touching the quantity and kind of arms due to Indiana and the mode of obtaining the same.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, January 23, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to the letter of His Excellency O. P. Morton, Governor of Indiana, of the 17th instant, and referred to this office, I have the honor to report that, as stated in my letter to Governor Hammond, of the 9th instant, copy of which is herewith inclosed, the State of Indiana is entitled to 592 muskets for its quota for 1861; from which being deducted, for arms since issued upon Governor Hammond’s requisition of the 14th instant, 104 4/13 muskets, there remains now a balance due to the State of 487 9/13 muskets. There are no arrearages due to the State for past years.

The arms are distributed to the States, according to the number of their Representatives and Senators in Congress, respectively, being in conformity with the seventh section of “An act making appropriations for the support of the Army for the year ending the 30th of June, 1856, and for other purposes,” approved 3d of March, 1855. There is no particular form of application required. All that is necessary for the Governor to do is to designate in his letter to this office the particular kind of arms desired of those that are issuable, as per printed statement inclosed, when they will be promptly furnished.

The letter of Governor Morton is herewith returned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

{p.55}

[Sub-inclosure.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, January 9, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF INDIANA, Indianapolis:

SIR: Your requisition of 17th ultimo for seventy-five rifle muskets, on account of the quota of arms due to the State of Indiana for 1861, was referred to this office by the Secretary of War on the 21st of the same month, and as no issue can be made in advance without special directions, it was, on the same day, submitted to the Secretary with the remark that the issue could be made if so ordered. No action was taken on this suggestion, and on the application of Hon. A. G. Porter this day for information as to what had been done in the matter, the paper could not be found at the War Department. Your requisition can, however, now be complied with, as you will perceive by the inclosed letter, if you will state what you wish issued and to whom the same shall be sent.

I remain, very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 24, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives:

SIR: I have received your letter of the 22d instant respecting the necessity for calling into the service of the United States a volunteer force for local defense and the protection of the public property at certain points, and requesting me, if I concur with you, to prepare a bill giving the necessary authority to the President to meet the emergency.

In reply I have the honor to say that in my opinion the force now at the command of this Department is sufficient for any contemplated contingency, and that I do not apprehend a necessity for making a requisition for the services of volunteers. I may add that the President, concurring I believe in these views, would not desire to have such a bill as you propose submitted to Congress.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 24, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War, Washington City, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a letter tendering to the President the services of the Governor’s Greys, a military company at Dubuque in this State. The services of other military companies have been tendered directly to me.

Whilst I deeply regret that the perils to which the union of the States is exposed arise from domestic and not from foreign foes, I feel a great and I think an honest pride in the knowledge that the people of Iowa are possessed of an unyielding devotion to the Union and of a fixed determination that so far as depends on them it shall be preserved.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

{p.56}

[Inclosure.]

DUBUQUE, IOWA, January 15, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: At a meeting of the Governor’s Greys, a regularly organized and fully equipped volunteer company of this city, a resolution was unanimously passed “that the services of the corps be tendered to the President of the United States for any service he may deem proper during the present insurrection at the South.” As the captain of the corps, I have the honor herewith to make known to you the sentiments of my command. This will be forwarded you by the Governor of the State of Iowa.

I am, respectfully, yours,

F. J. HERRON, Captain Governor’s Greys.

–––

SAINT MARY’S, January 24, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM BIGLER:

SIR: As our company is organized in your immediate vicinity, and as you know our sincere attachment to the Constitution and the Union, we would beg leave to request of you the favor to hand the inclosed to His Excellency the President. We hope that it will be favorably received and that we will be able to show our attachment to the Union by defending its institutions.

With the highest regard, we remain, your obedient servants,

CHAS. H. YOLK, Captain of the Elk Artillery Company No. 1, Benzinger Post-Office, Elk County, Pa.

[Inclosure.]

ST. MARY’S, ELK COUNTY, PA., January 24, 1861.

His Excellency JAMES BUCHANAN, President of the United States of America:

SIR: As we discover by the public prints and otherwise that a part of the South is about to secede, and that war with them is actually commenced, we would therefore beg leave to offer our services to Your Excellency-that is, as well my own humble services as the services of the company over which I have the honor to preside as captain. We were organized and mustered into the service on the 15th of August last, and now number fifty men rank and file. We have as yet not received our arms or cannon, but are otherwise fully uniformed, and would be ready at a day’s notice to march to the defense of the Constitution and to assist in upholding the Union. The majority of my company consist of German-born citizens, who have all sworn to uphold and support the Constitution, which oath they are now willing to seal with their services, and in its defense are willing, if necessary, to sacrifice their blood or lives. If my offer of my services should be acceptable to Your Excellency, we will look for your orders to march soon. As I have already had the honor to fight under the glorious Stars and Stripes in the campaign in Mexico, I feel confident that our company would render good service to our beloved country.

I remain, with the highest regard, your obedient servant,

CHARLES H. VOLK, Captain of Elk Artillery No. 1, Benzinger Post-Office, Elk County, Pa.

{p.57}

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 25, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: I wrote on yesterday to Col. H. K. Craig, asking to anticipate now the quota of arms that will be due this State for 1862. Since mailing that letter I have thought the application should have been made to you, and now make it. I have been informed that during last year the same privilege was granted to other States, and hope it may be granted to Iowa. Will the quota of arms for 1862 be still under the apportionment and census for 1850?

I learn that the present unfortunate condition of public affairs has rendered necessary the transfer of the U. S. troops from Fort Kearny and other points in the West to the seaboard. It is now rumored here that large bands of Indians are gathering near Fort Kearny with hostile intentions. The northwestern border of this State has for several years last past been subject to Indian depredations, the evidence of which is on file in your Department. Should an outbreak occur among the Indians near Fort Kearny it will probably stimulate the Indians in Dakota and Minnesota again to make inroads in the northwestern part of this State. Owing to the small number of arms distributed to this State under the census of 1850 we are almost without arms, and all sent to this State prior to 1860 were the old regulation muskets, altered from the flint to the percussion lock.

Can an extra number of arms be in any way sent to this State, to provide against the contingencies of an Indian outbreak? They might be stored at Fort Des Moines or Fort Dodge, in the care of a person to be selected by you, and used only in case of necessity.

If a single U. S. officer were at either of these places, and had a supply of arms, he could at any moment have as many men as would be necessary for the protection of our frontier. I shall be pleased to hear from you touching these matters at your earliest convenience.

And have the honor to be,

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

PHILADELPHIA, January 28, 1861.

His Excellency JAMES BUCHANAN, President of the United States:

SIR: Two regiments of volunteer infantry-the First and Second Regiments of the Washington Guards-have been organized in this city for immediate duty in defense of the Union, and have authorized and requested me to tender their services to you. Sensible of the great dangers which now threaten the permanency of our beloved Union, and fully realizing their obligations as citizens and soldiers, the officers and men of this brigade are ready at once to answer any call which Your Excellency may make upon them. They make this offer in no unfriendly or hostile spirit toward any State or section of the Confederacy, and with no desire of making an exhibition of their patriotism and devotion to the institutions of the country. On the contrary, they sincerely trust that wise counsels may yet avert the perils by which the Federal Government is surrounded. But if pacific measures fail to restore harmony among the States and a resort to force shall become necessary to maintain the Union in all its constitutional integrity and power, they are {p.58} prepared to assume and discharge the duties which will then devolve upon them without hesitation, and with zeal and fidelity.

If Your Excellency desires to withdraw the regular troops now stationed in this vicinity and to employ them elsewhere this brigade will cheerfully assume the duty of garrisoning the arsenals, naval stations, and forts on and near the river Delaware. This, perhaps, would be the best course in any sudden emergency, as it would place at Your Excellency’s disposal experienced regular troops, while it would afford us an opportunity of perfecting our organization and discipline. The new troops would thus be rendered efficient and ready for the field in a few weeks, or even days, while Your Excellency would have at your command the present regular force for immediate service. One of the regiments of this brigade is composed of citizens of German birth or ancestry; in the other, many of the officers and men who served in the late war with Mexico take a prominent and active part. Both are entirely reliable and could in a very short time be made equal to the best regular troops.

In the hope that this tender of service may be accepted in the spirit in which it is made, should occasion require it, I have the honor to be very respectfully, Your Excellency’s obedient servant,

WM. F. SMALL, Brigadier-General, Washington Guards.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 28, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Esq., Superintendent of Police, 413 Broome Street, New York:

SIR: After carefully considering the suggestions of your letter of the 23d instant, I have reached the conclusion that this Department has no authority to interpose in the matter to which you refer, and that, in consequence, it would be improper for me to offer any counsel for your guidance. If you are correct in your opinion as to the purpose of the movement you have arrested, it is certainly greatly to be deplored. To Congress, however, under the Constitution, belongs the power to regulate commerce between the several States, and in the exercise of that power no laws have been passed interdicting a free traffic in and transportation of arms from one State to another. The absence of such legislation disables the executive branch of the Government from interfering. If these arms are ascertained to be intended for use in the prosecution of any treasonable enterprise, all concerned in their transportation, with knowledge of such purpose, would be liable to arrest; but as the laws now stand I do not see how the arms themselves which are lawful articles of commerce between the States, could be detained except through the arrest of all concerned in forwarding them.

Judge Smalley’s opinion, which I have not seen, may possibly suggest means of overcoming the difficulties with which you must perceive the subject is now surrounded. Additional legislation on the part of Congress may occur, and relieve the authorities of the embarrassments which they have encountered in the discharge of what they deem an urgent duty of patriotism.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

{p.59}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 29, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM A. HOWARD, Chairman of the Select Committee, House of Representatives:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 12th instant inclosing two resolutions of the House of Representatives directing your committee to inquire, among other things, into certain facts connected with the seizure of the forts, arsenals, and other property of the United States, and the removal of arms from the arsenals and armories.

The information called for in the resolution offered by Mr. Leake respecting the recent removal of arms from the arsenals and armories is communicated in the accompanying report of the Chief of Ordnance, marked A.

In reply to the resolution offered by Mr. Howard I have the honor to state as follows, numbering my answers to correspond with the numbers of the paragraphs in the resolution:

1. The inclosed report of the Chief of Ordnance, marked B, with its accompaniments, and the copies of dispatches from Major Haskin, recently commanding at Baton Rouge Barracks, and from Captain Elzey, recently in command of the Augusta Arsenal, also inclosed, contain the only information in possession of this Department relating to any demand for the surrender of any of the forts or arsenals or any communication having reference to such surrender.

2. There is no information on the records of this Department to show whether any officer of this Government “has at any time entered into any pledge, agreement, or understanding with any person or persons not to send re-enforcements to the forts of the United States in the harbor of Charleston.”

3. The information desired by your committee as to “what demand for re-enforcements of the said forts has been made, and for what reason such re-enforcements have not been furnished,” cannot, consistently with the public interests, be communicated at this time.

4. The fourth paragraph relates exclusively to matters under the direction of the Navy Department.

5. All the particulars touching the seizure of the arsenal in the city of Charleston are contained in the report of the Chief of Ordnance above referred to, marked B.

6. The sixth paragraph relates exclusively to matters under the control of the Treasury Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

A.

ORDNANCE OFFICE, WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In answer to a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 9th instant, as to “whether any of the arms of the United States at any of the arsenals or armories have recently been removed or ordered to be removed, and, if so, by whose orders, and for what reasons,” I have to state that there have been no removals of arms since the 115,000 muskets and rifles which were ordered in January, 1860, from the armory {p.60} at Springfield, Mass., and the arsenals at Watertown, Mass., and Watervliet, N. Y., to be deposited in the arsenals in North and South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana (other than to meet the regular requisitions of the Army, the requisitions of the States for their yearly quotas, and such as have been sold), except the pieces of heavy ordnance ordered on the 22d ultimo from the Allegheny Arsenal, near Pittsburg, Pa., viz, twenty-one 10-inch and twenty-one 8-inch columbiads and four 32-pounder guns, ordered to Ship Island, Miss., for a fort in course of construction there, and twenty-three 10-inch and forty-eight 8-inch columbiads and seven 32-pounder guns, to Galveston Harbor, Tex., for a fort to be erected at that place, but the removal of which columbiads and guns was stopped by your order.

The removal of the muskets and rifles and the intended removal of the columbiads and guns, as well as the sale of the arms, was in obedience to orders from the Hon. John B. Floyd, late Secretary of War.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

B.

ORDNANCE OFFICE Washington, D. C., January 18, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In compliance with the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 9th instant, communicated in the letter of the Hon. W. A. Howard, I have the honor to transmit herewith copies of the correspondence with this office,* so far as it relates to the demand for and the surrender of arsenals and the military stores therein deposited, viz:

1. Charleston Arsenal.

I. Letter from Military Store-keeper Humphreys, dated December 31, 1860, indorsing order of Governor Pickens to Colonel Cunningham; letter of Colonel Cunningham to Humphreys and reply of Humphreys to Colonel Cunningham.

II. F. C. Humphreys to Ordnance Office, January 2, 1861.

III. Ordnance Office to F. C. Humphreys, January 2, 1861.

IV. F. C. Humphreys to Ordnance Office, January 3, 1861.

V. Ordnance Office to F. C. Humphreys, January 8, 1861.

2. Mount Vernon Arsenal.

I. Capt. J. L. Reno, January 4, 1861, reporting seizure of Mount Vernon Arsenal by troops acting under orders from the Governor of Alabama.

3. Apalachicola Arsenal.

I. Ordnance-Sergeant E. Powell, Quincy, Fla., January 5, 1861, reporting seizure of Apalachicola Arsenal by troops acting under orders of Governor of Florida.

II. Ordnance-Sergeant E. Powell, Chattahoochee, Fla., January 6, 1861, transmitting copy of order from the Governor of Florida directing Colonel Dunn to seize Apalachicola Arsenal.

{p.61}

4. Baton Rouge Arsenal.

I. Lieut. J. W. Todd, Baton Rouge, La., January 10, 1861, telegram reporting surrender of Baton Rouge Arsenal to Governor of Louisiana.

5. Fort Marion and Ordnance Depot, Saint Augustine, Fla.

I. Ordnance-Sergeant Henry Douglas, Saint Augustine, Fla., January 7, 1861, reporting seizure of Fort Marion (magazine and ordnance stores deposited therein) by troops acting under orders of the Governor of Florida.

Which correspondence is all to be found on the files and records of this office having any relation to the subjects embraced in said resolution, which is herewith returned.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

* This correspondence will be found in Series I, Vol. I, in connection with the events to which it specially relates.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, January 30, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa, Iowa City:

SIR: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 24th instant, communicating the tender of their services by the Governor’s Greys of Dubuque. In reply I beg leave to request that you will convey to the company the thanks of this Department for their patriotic offer, which the Government has, however, no present occasion to accept.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

–––

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, Washington City, February 4, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your letter of the 22d ultimo, with the accompanying papers, in relation to the forts and garrisons of the country, does not show that any of them have been taken possession of by the State authorities or any other hostile force.

As I desire to prepare the report of the committee under the resolution of the House of the 31st December, you will oblige me by furnishing at your earliest convenience a statement of the forts that have been taken possession of by the State authorities of any of the States.

Very respectfully, yours,

B. STANTON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, February 7, 1861.

Hon. B. STANTON, Chairman Committee on Military Affairs:

SIR: In answer to the inquiries contained in your letter of the 4th instant I have the honor to state that it appears from dispatches received by the Department that the following works have been taken {p.62} possession of by parties acting in the name and under the authority of the States in which they are respectively situated, viz:

First. Fort Moultrie, S. C., December 27, 1860.

Second. Fort Morgan, Ala., January 5, 1861.

Third. Baton Rouge Barracks, La., January 10, 1861.

Fourth. Forts Jackson, and

Fifth. Saint Philip, La., January 11, 1861.

Sixth. Fort Pike, La., January 14, 1861.

Seventh. Oglethorpe Barracks, Ga., January 27 [26], 1861.

The surrender of the Charleston, Augusta, Mount Vernon, and Baton Rouge arsenals was communicated in my letter of the 22d ultimo.

Besides these posts, it is understood that the arsenal at Chattahoochee Forts McRee and Barrancas, and Barrancas Barracks have been seized by the authorities of Florida, but no official information to that effect has so far reached the Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, February 6, 1861.

Maj. Robert Anderson, First Artillery, reports, December 27, 1860, that the authorities of South Carolina took possession of Fort Moultrie, S. C., on that day. Military Store-keeper F. C. Humphreys surrendered Charleston Arsenal to the authorities of South Carolina December 31, 1860.

Bvt. Maj. Joseph A. Haskin, captain, First Artillery, reports by telegraph, January 10, 1861, that he has surrendered the barracks and arsenal at Baton Rouge to the authorities of the State of Louisiana.

Bvt. Lieut. Col. A. C. Myers, captain, Quartermaster’s Department, reports, January 28, 1861, that the State of Louisiana has taken possession of the public property in the custody of the army officers stationed in New Orleans.

Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second Artillery, reports, January 24, 1861, that he has surrendered the Augusta Arsenal to the authorities of the State of Georgia.

Ordnance-Sergeant Bosworth reports, January 14, 1861, that Fort Pike has been taken possession of by the State of Louisiana.

Ordnance-Sergeant Burt reports, January 27, 1861, that the stores at Oglethorpe Barracks were taken possession of by the troops of the State of Georgia.

Ordnance-Sergeant Smith reports, January 11, 1861, that Forts Jackson and Saint Philip have been seized by the troops of the State of Louisiana.

Ordnance-Sergeant Patterson reports, January 5, 1861, the seizure of Fort Morgan by the troops of the State of Alabama.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

Besides the above, it is understood that Mount Vernon Arsenal is in the hands of the Alabama authorities, and that Chattahoochee Arsenal, Forts McRee and Barrancas, and the Barracks are in the hands of the authorities of Florida, though no official reports have been received to that effect at this office.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

{p.63}

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, February 12, 1861.

Hon. J. HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR. In compliance with your verbal request of this morning I have the honor to state that I have examined and ascertained that there are at the Kennebec Arsenal 24,300 muskets that have been altered from flint-lock to percussion, all of the model of 1822; and we also have at other arsenals and armories more than 100,000 percussion muskets of the model of 1842, which are much superior to the altered arms. Preparations were made for rifling the latter, but the process was stopped by your immediate predecessor. It will be resumed, and until the superior class are completed it is not deemed good policy to commence rifling those of inferior quality, like those in store at the Kennebec Arsenal, of which, it is believed, not more than one-half will be found fit for rifling. I also think it will be most economical to send the muskets to be rifled to an arsenal where we have machinery and steam power, or to the Springfield Armory.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

LEAVENWORTH CITY, KANS., Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, February 20, 1861.

Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to tender to you, and the Government, the services of the volunteer militia company, consisting of sixty rank and file, infantry, which I at present command. We are willing to serve in any capacity and any way, and against any powers which the public need may require or the constituted authorities order.

Hoping that you will at least give us an equal chance, I remain, with sentiments of highest respect, your obedient servant.

DANIEL MCCOOK, Captain Leavenworth State Guard.

–––

[MARCH 2, 1861.-For act of Congress making appropriations for the support of the Army for the year ending June 30, 1862, see Statutes at Large, Vol. 12, p. 200.]

–––

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Raleigh, April 2, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor, agreeably to instructions from His Excellency Governor Ellis, to address you with regard to the quota of arms due this State from the General Government.

Governor E., having been notified as usual that the quota of arms due North Carolina was subject to his draft, drew the entire quota in long-range rifles (pattern of 1859) with sword-bayonets. No notice having been taken of the latter, he made a second application, and was {p.64} informed on the 4th of February last, by the Chief of the Ordnance Department, that orders had been issued to the U. S. Armory at Harper’s Ferry to forward to his address “334 long-range rifles with sword-bayonets and appendages,” being the equivalent of 453 muskets, the quota due North Carolina. Up to this date nothing further has been heard from them, and application is now made directly to you, sir, in the hope that you will cause the matter to receive proper attention without further delay.

With much respect, yours, &c.,

GRAHAM DAVES, Private Secretary.

–––

WASHINGTON, April 4, 1861.

To the ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT:

The quota of arms for Indiana for the year 1862 may be furnished in one 6-pounder cannon, with carriage and equipage, and the remainder in long-range rifles, with sword-bayonets and necessary accouterments. I shall be very glad if the shipment can be made immediately to Indianapolis. I will have a safe place of deposit for the 5,000 stand of arms to be sent to Indiana in addition by the time they can get there.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

[Indorsements.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, April 5, 1861.

The issue of arms, &c., in advance to the States being contrary to regulations, the authority of the Secretary of War is required before making it.

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

APRIL 10, 1861.

An order to be issued in this case for anticipation of one year’s quota and that they be supplied from a depot to be established at Indianapolis.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Hon. S. CAMERON, Washington, April 5, 1861.

Secretary of War:

SIR: Referring to the conversation I had the honor to hold with you yesterday on the subject of providing other depots for the more prompt distribution of arms to the militia when called on to aid in the execution of the laws or repel invasion, I have to report that in my opinion a depot of arms at some central point in the State of Indiana, say at its capital, might be of great national importance at this time-the depot building to be furnished by the State authority or hired by the United States, and, with the stores, to be placed in charge of a military storekeeper or other officer of the Ordnance Department. No issues to be made except under instructions from the War Department, on applications from the Governor of the State. A small store of ammunition only will be required at this depot, as supplies can be promptly sent {p.65} from the Allegheny Arsenal, near Pittsburg. At present a store of 5,000 muskets and accouterments will be a sufficient one for the depot.

With much respect, your obedient,

H. K. CRAIG, Colonel of Ordnance.

Approved:

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

CRAWFORDSVILLE, IND., April 6, 1861.

Hon. H. S. LANE:

DEAR SIR: If Indiana is expected to aid the Government in the prospective troubles, it is but right that she should have some preparation.

Preparation is impossible without arms, and as the Legislature made no provision for any at its late session, the procurement of arms is impossible without assistance from the Secretary of War. Might not Mr. Cameron be prevailed upon to advance ill the way of a loan, or in some other way, subject to his order, 1,000 or 1,200 rifles, of which I suppose there are plenty in the arsenals. The distribution could be had securely under the regulation of Governor Morton.

I suggested the matter to Governor Morton a few days ago, and he expressed himself willing to co-operate with you in an effort of the kind. I also proposed to him a plan of operations.

If I could obtain 1,000 rifles from the Secretary of War, I would organize a regiment of picked men, in counties accessible by railroad, willing to serve for a term of five years, or during the war.

As soon as the company officers were elected I would call them to Indianapolis and go into school with them for two or three months, instructing them in tactics, outpost duty, field fortifications, &c.; their expenses to be paid while there by themselves or by their respective companies. At the end of that time they would be somewhat fitted to go home and instruct their commands, who could then in a short time be put in condition to render efficient service when called out.

If you think it proper, be kind enough to bring the matter before Mr. Cameron. Without some such preparation as I propose our people, though ever so willing, cannot aid the Government as they ought. You have experience enough to know that some instruction is absolutely essential; at the same time it is out of question without generous assistance from the Secretary.

Very respectfully,

LEWIS WALLACE.

[Indorsement.]

Captain Wallace, the writer of the above letter, is one of our best military men, and entirely reliable in his devotion to the Union. Please answer the inquiries in his letter, and if possible let us have the arms, and I will guarantee their proper use.

I am, yours, most truly,

H. S. LANE.

–––

[APRIL 9, 1861.-For Cameron to Weightman, calling for ten companies of militia from the District of Columbia, see Series I, Vol. LI, Part I, p. 321.]

{p.66}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 12, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN W. ELLIS, Governor of North Carolina, Raleigh:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter addressed to this Department on the 2d instant by Graham Daves, esq., your private secretary, inquiring the cause of the delay in the issue of the arms called for by you on account of North Carolina’s quota for the current year.

The rifles were ordered to be sent to you on the 4th of February last from the Harper’s Ferry Armory, but their issue has probably been retarded by numerous prior engagements, the rule, unless in special cases, being to execute the orders for issues according to priority of receipt at the armory. The superintendent of the armory has been requested to make the issue to your State at the earliest moment possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Norwich, Conn., April 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: The General Assembly of this State will convene in a few days, and I shall call its attention to the importance of reorganizing our militia system so as to render it of more practical value. Any suggestions which you will make relative to the manner in which we can co-operate with the General Government in enforcing the laws and in supporting its dignity and authority I shall be happy to receive.

I am, dear sir, yours, with high regard,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

[APRIL 13, 1861.-For Cameron to Weightman, calling for five companies of militia from the District of Columbia, see Series I, Vol. LI, Part I, p. 324.]

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Boston, Mass., April 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I am directed by His Excellency the Governor to request of you, if consistent with law and the policy of your Department, to allow me to draw 5,000 rifled muskets from the U. S. Arsenal at Springfield in advance of our annual quota becoming due. We have 5,000 infantry now armed and equipped and properly officered. Only about 3,000 of them, however, are armed with the rifled musket; the others have the old smooth-bores, all of which have been changed from flintlocks to the percussion. If you will permit us to draw 2,000 more of the new rifled musket, we will have 5,000 as well armed, drilled, and officered infantry as ever handled a musket.

{p.67}

I would also suggest that a couple of regiments of our volunteers be ordered by the President to garrison Forts Warren and Independence in Boston Harbor. They are now without men, and might be taken by lawless men and turned against the Government. I believe that our troops would like to do garrison duty until called upon by the President for active service. The regiments might alternate every four or six weeks, and thus they would learn much that would be of service to them, and hold the forts against attack or surprise.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

WM. SCHOULER, Adjutant-General, Massachusetts.

–––

WASHINGTON CITY, April 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: As the Executive of the State of Minnesota, I here by tender to the Government of the United States, on the part of that State, 1,000 men, to be ready for service so soon as the necessary information can be communicated to the people there.

As the Legislature is not in session, and will not be, unless specially convened, before January of next year, may I ask whether you would feel justified in saying that the reasonable expenses that may be incurred will be furnished by the General Government, in view of the facts above stated?

I am pleased to say that in all this I have the advice and support of the Senators from Minnesota, and know that this action will be heartily and promptly responded to.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. RAMSEY.

–––

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the laws of the United States have been for some time past and now are opposed and the execution thereof obstructed in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals by law:

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call forth, and hereby do call forth, the militia of the several States of the Union, to the aggregate number of 75,000, in order to suppress said combinations and to cause the laws to be duly executed.

The details of this object will be immediately communicated to the State authorities through the War Department.

I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and the existence of our National Union, and the perpetuity of popular government, and to redress wrongs already long enough endured.

{p.68}

I deem it proper to say that the first service assigned to the forces hereby called forth will probably be to repossess the forts, places, and property which have been seized from the Union, and in every event the utmost care will be observed, consistently with the objects aforesaid, to avoid any devastation, any destruction of or interference with property, or any disturbance of peaceful citizens in any part of the country.

And I hereby command the persons composing the combinations aforesaid to disperse and retire peaceably to their respective abodes within twenty days from date.

Deeming that the present condition of public affairs presents an extraordinary occasion, I do hereby, in virtue of the power in me vested by the Constitution, convene both houses of Congress.

Senators and Representatives are therefore summoned to assemble at their respective chambers at twelve o’clock noon on Thursday, the fourth day of July next, then and there to consider and determine such measures as in their wisdom the public safety and interest may seem to demand.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this fifteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 15, 1861.

SIR: Under the act of Congress “for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, repel invasions,” &c., approved February 28, 1795, I have the honor to request Your Excellency to cause to be immediately detached from the militia of your State the quota designated in the table below, to serve as infantry or riflemen, for the period of three months, unless sooner discharged.

Your Excellency will please communicate to me the time at or about which your quota will be expected at its rendezvous, as it will be met as soon as practicable by an officer or officers to muster it into the service and pay of the United States. At the same time the oath of fidelity to the United States will be administered to every officer and man. The mustering officer will be instructed to receive no man under the rank of commissioned officer who is in years apparently over forty-five or under eighteen, or who is not in physical strength and vigor.*

* Sent to the Governors of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota; and they were notified by telegraph, same date, of the requisition being made.

{p.69}

–––

Table of quotas.*

[Composition of the regiments and proportion of general staff officers omitted.]

Major-generals.Brigadier-generals.Engineers.Total of officers.Total of men.Aggregate.
Maine137743780
New Hampshire137743780
Vermont137743780
Massachusetts2741,4861,560
Rhode Island137743780
Connecticut137743780
New York241764912,63113,280
Pennsylvania**241661211,88812,500
New Jersey141512,9723,123
Delaware137743780
Maryland141512,9723,123
Virginia31112,2292,340
North Carolina2741,4861,560
Tennessee2741,4861,560
Arkansas137743780
Kentucky141512,9723,123
Missouri141512,9723,123
Illinois162254,4584,683
Indiana162254,4584,683
Ohio13134949,65910,153
Michigan137743780
Wisconsin137743780
Iowa137743780
Minnesota137743780
Total517943,54969,84273,391

The rendezvous for your State will be: Maine, Portland; New Hampshire, Portsmouth; Vermont, Burlington; Massachusetts, Boston; Rhode Island, Providence; Connecticut, New Haven; New York, New York, Albany, Elmira; Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Harrisburg; New Jersey, Trenton; Delaware, Wilmington; Maryland, Frederick City, Baltimore; Virginia, Staunton, Wheeling, Gordonsville; North Carolina, Raleigh; Tennessee, Knoxville, Nashville; Arkansas, Little Rock; Kentucky, Lexington; Missouri, Saint Louis; Illinois, Springfield, Chicago; Indiana, Indianapolis; Ohio, Columbus, Cleveland; Michigan, Detroit; Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Iowa, Keokuk; Minnesota, Saint Paul.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Under this call the men furnished were as follows: Maine, 771; New Hampshire, 779; Vermont, 782; Massachusetts, 3,786; Rhode island, 3,147; Connecticut, 2,402; New York, 13,906; New Jersey, 3,123; Pennsylvania, 20,175; Delaware, 775; Virginia (western), 900; Ohio, 12,357; Indiana, 4,686; Illinois, 4,820; Michigan, 781; Wisconsin, 517; Minnesota, 930; Iowa, 968; Missouri, 10,591. In addition to the above the District of Columbia furnished 4,720, and the State of Kansas 650, making a grand total of 91,816.

** Pennsylvania quota reduced, by telegram of April 16, to fourteen regiments.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 106.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 15, 1861.

The officers named below are detailed to muster into the service of the United States for the States and at the stations set opposite their {p.70} names, respectively, the troops called out by the President’s proclamation of this date.*

They will acknowledge the receipt of this order, repair to the rendezvous designated, and report their arrival to the Adjutant-General of the Army and the Governors of the respective States, and will execute the duties assigned them with as little delay as practicable, reporting the progress and completion of their labors to the Adjutant-General of the Army direct.

In addition to these duties the mustering officers will perform such staff duties as may be assigned them by the chiefs of the supply departments of the Army.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* List (omitted) shows Maj. R. C. Gatlin, Fifth Infantry, detailed to the State of Arkansas, and thirty-nine other officers to the States of Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, and Wisconsin.

–––

NORWICH, CONN., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your requisition will have immediate attention.

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM, Governor.

–––

[APRIL 15, 1861.-For Cameron to Weightman, calling for one company of militia from the District of Columbia, see Series I, Vol. LI, Part I, p. 325.]

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 15, 1861.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

On behalf of the State of Indiana I tender to you for the defense of the nation and to uphold the authority of the Government 10,000 men.

O. P. MORTON, Governor.

–––

FRANKFORT, Ky., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your dispatch is received. In answer I say emphatically Kentucky will furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister Southern States.

B. MAGOFFIN, Governor of Kentucky.

{p.71}

–––

BANGOR, ME., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your dispatch is received, and your call will be promptly responded to. The people of Maine of all parties will rally with alacrity to the maintenance of the Government and of the Union.

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR., Governor of Maine.

–––

BOSTON, April 15, 1861.

Adjt. Gen. L. THOMAS, Washington:

Dispatch received. By what route shall we send?

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 15, 1861.

Governor JOHN A. ANDREW, Boston, Mass.:

Send your companies here by railroad.

IRVIN MCDOWELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, April 15, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have received telegrams from yourself and Adjutant-General Thomas, admonishing me of a coming requisition for twenty companies, of sixty-four privates each, and I have caused orders to be distributed to bring the men into Boston before to-morrow night to await orders.

Allow me to urge the issue of an order to the Springfield, Mass., Armory to double the production of arms at once and to push the work to the utmost.

If any aid of money or credit is needed from Massachusetts, I hope to be at once apprised thereof. An extra session of our General Court can be called immediately if need be, and, if called, it will respond to every demand of patriotism.

I beg you to permit me, in addition, to suggest the utmost activity at the Springfield Armory; to urge that the armory at Harper’s Ferry be discontinued, and its tools and machinery and works be transferred elsewhere, or that it be rigidly guarded against seizure, of the danger of which I have some premonitions.

If any more troops shall certainly be needed from Massachusetts please signify it at once, since I should prefer receiving special volunteers for active militia service to detailing more of our present active militia, especially as many most efficient gentlemen would like to raise companies or regiments, as the case may be, and I can receive enlistments of men who are very ready to serve.

Allow me also to suggest that our forts in Boston Harbor are entirely unmanned. If authorized, I would put a regiment into the forts at any the.

{p.72}

Two of my staff spent last Saturday in new experiments of the most satisfactory character with Schenkl’s new invention in projectiles, and so extraordinary was the firing that I have directed eighteen guns to be rifled and the projectiles to be made. May I commend this invention to the examination of the United States Government?

I am happy to add that I find the amplest proof of warm devotion to the country’s cause on every hand to-day.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

RALEIGH, N. C., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your dispatch is received, and if genuine, which its extraordinary character leads me to doubt, I have to say in reply that I regard the levy of troops made by the Administration for the purpose of subjugating the States of the South as in violation of the Constitution and a gross usurpation of power. I can be no party to this wicked violation of the laws of the country and to this war upon the liberties of a free people. You can get no troops from North Carolina. I will reply more in detail when your call is received by mail.

JOHN W. ELLIS, Governor of North Carolina.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will you communicate as fully as possible by telegraph details of the object of President’s proclamation?

Our Legislature may adjourn to-night, and it is important to have as full information as can be furnished.

E. D. MORGAN, Governor of New York.

[Indorsement.]

Reply, stating number of regiments required, &c.

–––

NEW YORK, April 15, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The city of New York will sustain the Government. The Herald will declare to-morrow for the Administration. Democrats are no longer partisans. They are loyal to the Government and the flag. The attack on Fort Sumter has made the North a unit. We are at war with a foreign power.

D. E. SICKLES.

–––

MADISON, WIS., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The call for one regiment of militia will be promptly met, and further calls when made.

ALEX. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

{p.78}

–––

SAINT JOHNSBURY, VT., April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I shall promptly respond to your call for one regiment.

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS, Governor of Vermont.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 15, 1861.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

What portion of the 75,000 militia you call for do you give to Ohio? We will furnish the largest number you will receive. Great rejoicing here over your proclamation. Answer immediately by telegraph. I await your answer to issue my proclamation.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Thirteen regiments.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your dispatch calling on Ohio for thirteen regiments is just received and will be promptly responded to by this State.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

STATE OF NEW JERSEY, QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Trenton, April 16, 1861.

General CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I am directed by His Excellency the Governor of this State to inquire of you whether the troops called for in your requisition of the 15th instant, when mustered into the service of the United States, will be furnished with arms and accouterments, clothing, camp equipage, and all other equipments necessary for active service by the United States. If not, what portion will be furnished by your Department? As this State is poorly provided with serviceable arms and accouterments, &c., an early reply is requested, that we may provide our troops with everything necessary preparatory to their taking the field at as early a day as possible, in obedience to the orders from your Department.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LEWIS PERRINE, Quartermaster-General New Jersey Militia.

–––

CONCORD, N. H., April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

New Hampshire responds to the requisition of the General Government, and will furnish the men required. Immediate and vigorous measures will be adopted for the formation of the companies.

ICHABOD GOODWIN, Governor of New Hampshire.

{p.74}

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 16, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS, Boston, Mass.:

We will muster your regiments after arrival. Send the first ready by rail to this place, and the next by rail to Baltimore, and thence by steam-boat to Fort Monroe, near Norfolk. The third regiment, if there be a third, to follow the first.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 16, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS, Boston, Mass.:

Send first regiment which is ready by rail here; the second by rail or sea, as you prefer, to Fort Monroe, near Norfolk; the third to follow the first. Reply by telegraph.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

Orders yesterday from War Department for one to take fast steamer to Fort Monroe; the other three to come by rail here. (By dictation from chief clerk War Department.-E. D. T.)

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Council Chamber, April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have transportation ample and economical by sea to Washington or Annapolis, safe against all but war risk in Potomac. Annapolis probably free from tills to [Fort Monroe?]. Requisition received from you. Expect telegraph.

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, United States, Washington City:

DEAR SIR: Much excitement exists at this time in this State in regard to state of hostilities between our Government and the so-called Southern Confederacy. Our people are willing and anxious to stand by and aid the Administration. Will you be kind enough to inform me immediately whether it is probable that Iowa will be called on by the President for troops, and how many and on what terms and in what way volunteers are usually mustered into the U. S. service? Some fifteen to twenty volunteer companies have already tendered me their services and I am almost daily receiving inquiries touching these matters. Be kind enough to give me as much and as early information as possible. One of my purposes in seeking this information is this:

Our General Assembly meets biennially. Our last session commenced January, 1860. It may be that an extra session of our General Assembly may be necessary. If so, I will call it promptly; if not, I wish to avoid the unnecessary expense.

{p.75}

Accept for yourself and the Administration my hearty thanks for the stand you have taken. Nine-tenths of the people here are with you, and will be so long as a similar policy is followed, and they will be with you in person as well as in sympathy whenever their services are required.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 16, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The six regiments will be full in three days. The rendezvous is at this city. Some companies will march into camp to-morrow morning. I can send you 500 men to Washington to-morrow, but they are not armed. I hope arms, tents, and stores will be sent immediately, and an officer to muster the men into service. Let the officer come at once.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Officer on the way. Arms will be furnished on being mustered.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 16, 1861.

Maj. Gen. R. C. WEIGHTMAN, Commanding Militia of the District of Columbia, Washington:

SIR: Under the twenty-fourth section of the act approved March 3, 1803, the President desires that you call out, to be mustered into the service of the United States, eight companies of militia (constituted preferably of uniform volunteer companies) in addition to the companies heretofore called out under orders from this Department.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* For previous calls see Series I, Vol. LI.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 16, 1861.

It will suffice if your quota of volunteers be at its rendezvous by the 20th of May.

SIMON CAMERON.

(Sent to Governor Austin Blair, Lansing, Mich.; Governor Israel Washburn, jr., Augusta, Me.; Governor Alexander W. Randall, Madison, Wis.; Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood, Des Moines, Iowa; Governor Ichabod Goodwin, Concord, N. H.; Governor Erastus Fairbanks, Saint Johnsbury, Vt.)

{p.76}

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 16, 1861.

Organizations for the militia force called for by the President of the United States April 15, 1861:

A company of infantry-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 ensign, 4 sergeants, 4 corporals, 1 drummer and 1 fifer, 64 privates.

A company of foot riflemen-the same, except there may be a bugler instead of the drummer and fifer; or about half the companies of a regiment or battalion may have a drummer and fifer, and the other companies a bugler.

A regiment of infantry or foot riflemen, to consist of ten companies-1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant, 1 regimental quartermaster, 1 surgeon, 1 assistant surgeon, 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 drum-major, 1 fife-major.

A brigade, to consist of four or more regiments-1 brigadier-general, 1 aide-de-camp, 1 brigade inspector.

A division, to consist of two or more brigades-1 major-general, 2 aides-de-camp, 1 division inspector.

Some of the companies composing a regiment may be of infantry and the others rifle, if desired.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Richmond, Va., April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I received your telegram of the 15th, the genuineness of which I doubted. Since that time I have received your communication, mailed the same day, in which I am requested to detach from the militia of the State of Virginia “the quota designated in a table” which you append, “to serve as infantry or riflemen for the period of three months, unless sooner discharged.”

In reply to this communication I have only to say that the militia of Virginia will not be furnished to the powers at Washington for any such use or purpose as they have in view. Your object is to subjugate the Southern States, and a requisition made upon me for such an object-an object, in my judgment, not within the purview of the Constitution or the act of 1795-will not be complied with. You have chosen to inaugurate civil war, and having done so, we will meet it in a spirit as determined as the Administration has exhibited toward the South.

Respectfully,

JOHN LETCHER.

–––

HARRISBURG, April 16, 1861.

General CAMERON, Washington:

Could you not accept Ringgold Artillerists of Reading? They had already started and are very superior in men and drill.

ELI SLIFER, Secretary Commonwealth.

Reply: Yes. [Indorsement.]

{p.77}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Troops will be in Harrisburg in considerable numbers in twenty-four hours from now, many of them without uniforms or arms. Troops are offering with horses. Will the Government accept horses? Important to have an early answer.

ELI SLIFER, Secretary Commonwealth.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Accept no cavalry.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 16, 1861.

His Excellency ANDREW G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg:

SIR: The President has modified the requisition made on you for troops from Pennsylvania so as to make it 14 instead of 16 regiments. You are, under this modified requisition, entitled to 2 major-generals, 4 aides, 2 division inspectors, 3 brigadier-generals, 3 aides, 3 brigade inspectors, 14 colonels, 14 lieutenant-colonels, 14 adjutants, 14 quartermasters 14 surgeons, 14 surgeon’s mates, 14 sergeant-majors, 14 drum-majors, 14 fife-majors, 140 captains, 140 lieutenants, 140 ensigns, 560 sergeants, 560 corporals, 140 drummers, 140 fifers, and 8,960 privates.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 16, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We can move two regiments this week, but they will not all be uniformed. Will that answer?

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Yes; send them on.

–––

WILLARD’S HOTEL, Washington, April 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to make the suggestions following to the Department of War:

First. That the Government raise as soon as practicable two regular regiments of infantry from the free colored people of the border States. The volunteers dread the night vedette and kindred duties in the aguish localities of Western Florida.

Second. That as soon as practicable the Government call for a certain number of regular troops, say fifty regiments, to be apportioned {p.78} among the States, and to be known as the New York regiments, or the Pennsylvania regiments, or any State regiment, as the case may be. Our large cities contain a numerous class of reckless and very able-bodied men, mostly firemen, who, if they elected their own officers, would go into a campaign without discipline, but if thoroughly disciplined by first-class officers would be the best troops for bayonet work in the service. The French Zouaves are of this class; their reckless character is undoubtedly the secret of their brilliant reputation.

I have the honor to remain, with the most profound respect, your obedient servant,

BURR PORTER, Ex-Major, Ottoman Army (three campaigns).

–––

DETROIT, April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: One of the most distinguished Democrats in the country says: Don’t defend Washington. Don’t establish batteries on Georgetown Heights. March your troops into Virginia. Quarter them there. Stand by the Union men there, and you will find plenty of them. By this bold policy you will save the border States. There is but one sentiment here. We will furnish you with the regiments in thirty days if you want them, and 50,000 men if you need them. General Cass subscribed $3,000 to equip the regiments. There are no sympathizers here worth hunting, and if there were, our population would diminish to the extent of their numbers forthwith.

Truly, yours,

Z. CHANDLER.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 17, 1861.

[SECRETARY OF WAR:]

SIR: Capt. George H. Gordon, of this city, proposes to me to raise a regiment of volunteers if it can be done in the following manner, in which I have assured him of the co-operation of this Commonwealth, and I now write in the same behalf to request your assistance, if the proposition shall be approved by you:

That the men being raised shall be enlisted as members of the Massachusetts volunteer militia, and be equipped by the Commonwealth as such; that then they shall be drafted as militia into the U. S. service, and continue therein until Congress shall, as is anticipated, authorize the raising of national volunteer regiments, when they shall be discharged by the United States and by the Commonwealth from further service as militia, and shall at once enlist in a body as volunteers under the act of Congress which they anticipate.

They would desire that during their service as militia they should not be summoned away from the State of Massachusetts, but assigned to duty here, say in the forts in Boston Harbor, where they could thoroughly perfect themselves in the drill and duties of a soldier, so as to be ready to enter the field as volunteers, disciplined, compact, acquainted with one another, and in every respect ready for immediate, active, and distinguished service in any part of the country whatsoever to which they should be ordered.

They would enlist with an understanding that, so far as pledges could be given in advance, this course should be taken in respect to {p.79} them. The proposition strikes me most favorably, and if you approve it also, nothing would remain necessary for it to be immediately initiated except the authority to garrison the forts in this harbor with militia, and the agreement to muster the regiment (when raised and equipped) into the U. S. service as militia, until an act of Congress shall enable it to assume an obligation to serve the United States for a term of years.

Captain Gordon is an officer who, I am informed, may confidently refer to Lieutenant-General Scott for assurance as to his capability and fidelity. He served during the Mexican war in the Mounted Rifles as lieutenant, and he is a graduate of West Point.

If you shall be inclined to sanction this proposition, will you be so kind as at your earliest convenience to issue the necessary orders respecting the forts, &c., to enable me to carry it into effect?

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

Two of our regiments will start this afternoon-one for Washington, the other for Fort Monroe; a third will be dispatched to-morrow, and the fourth before the end of the week.

[Indorsements.]

Will Lieutenant-General Scott read this letter, and return it with his advice on the subject referred to therein?

S. C[AMERON].

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, April 30, 1861.

Lieutenant-General Scott does not think it necessary to occupy the forts in Massachusetts by volunteers, nor does he think favorably of the plan Proposed within.

Respectfully submitted, by command:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

BOSTON, MASS., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

One regiment starts at 6 by rail for Washington; another to-night, half by propeller Spaulding, half by steamer State of Maine, from Fall River, both direct for Fort Monroe. Steamer State of Maine can take the whole up river to Washington if notified at Fort Monroe, if you [desire] that regiment in Washington. Another regiment starts tomorrow by rail for Washington, another within three days. Butler is brigadier. We work as fast as men can be properly equipped and moved.

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

BALTIMORE, April 17, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, Washington:

SIR: From the conversation I had yesterday in Washington with the Secretary of War and with Lieutenant-General Scott, I understood that the four regiments of militia to be called for from Maryland were to be {p.80} posted and retained within the limits of this State for the defense of the United States Government, the maintenance of the Federal authority, and the protection of the Federal capital. I also understood it was the intention of the United States Government not to require their services outside of Maryland except in defense of the District of Columbia. Will you do me the favor to state in reply whether I am right in this understanding, so that in responding to the lawful demand of the United States Government I may be able to give effective and reliable aid for the support and defense of this Union?

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

Th. H. HICKS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 17, 1861.

His Excellency THOMAS H. HICKS, Governor of Maryland:

SIR: The President has referred to me your communication of this date in relation to our conversation of the previous day, and I have the honor to say, in reply, that your statement of it is correct.

The troops called for from Maryland are destined for the protection of the Federal capital and the public property of the United States within the limits of the State of Maryland, and it is not intended to remove them beyond those limits except for the defense of this District.

I have the honor to be, yours, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will you receive more than six regiments from Indiana? I start you 1,000 men to-morrow.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Want no more now.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., April 17, 1861.

Hon. ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

DEAR SIR: The Governor’s call was published on yesterday and he has already received the tender of forty companies. In a day or two the six regiments will be full, but the Governor will continue to receive additional companies until further orders, provided that not more than double the number called for apply.

Reliable information from Union men in Saint Louis has been received here and civil war seems to be imminent, which ought to be averted by all means. The arsenal and the sub-treasury are the points most in danger. The Union men are not armed there. The State militia and municipal police are under the control of the secessionists. The best policy we can suggest-and, indeed, as far as we are concerned in Illinois it is the one indispensably necessary-is to require the commanding officer at the arsenal to furnish us 10,000 stand of arms and ammunition. The arms once in Illinois, we can supply the Union men in {p.81} Saint Louis with them. It would be best to withdraw as many guns as possible from that arsenal, as it may ultimately be lost. We understand that about $200,000 is about to be sent to the sub-treasury there. It ought to be stopped and all the money not immediately wanted ought to be drawn out.

It is the opinion of some that perhaps it would be best to have a separate army of the West, consisting of some 20,000 men, and to be concentrated at Saint Louis or in the immediate neighborhood. This would save Missouri certainly, and in a military point of view embarrass the Southern Confederacy very much. If Federal troops can be spared, with a few guns, they ought to be sent instantly to Cairo, that point being considered the most important and commanding point of the West.

The Governor has already telegraphed for arms for our Illinois troops. They are needed immediately, and of course can be had most conveniently in Saint Louis. We are anxiously waiting for letters and instructions by mail. Our people burn with patriotism and all parties show the same alacrity to stand by the Government and the laws of the country. Illinois is a unit, and will be true to her former reputation for courage and patriotism.

Please answer by messenger, Mr. Butler.

Very respectfully,

RICHD. YATES, Governor. LYMAN TRUMBULL. GUSTAVUS KOERNER. WILLIAM BUTLER, State Treasurer. JESSE K. DUBOIS, Auditor. O. M. HATCH, Secretary of State.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., April 17, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

A large number of companies have tendered services. Volunteers are assembling. Send requisitions for arms and accouterments.

RICHD. YATES, Governor of Illinois.

–––

NASHVILLE, TENN., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your dispatch of 15th instant, informing me that Tennessee is called upon for two regiments of militia for immediate service, is received. Tennessee will not furnish a single man for purpose of coercion, but 50,000, if necessary, for the defense of our rights and those of our Southern brethren.

ISHAM G. HARRIS, Governor of Tennessee.

{p.82}

–––

PROVIDENCE R. I., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have organized our regiment on the basis of my offer to the President of a force for the protection of the capital, and are about ready to move. To organize a regiment under the proclamation would take more time, but we shall commence that immediately, if desired. To avoid publicity, we shall report our whole force at Washington unless otherwise ordered. We are using every exertion to be first in the field.

WM. SPRAGUE, Governor of Rhode Island.

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Volunteers are arriving, many of them without arms, and most of those in use unfit for actual service. We have no ammunition. I wish to march them in large bodies and prepared to defend themselves. Shall I order the Philadelphia regiments to start?

A. G. CURTIN.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Order issued for arms.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Norwich, Conn., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your requisition for troops came by way of Hartford, and was not received until this afternoon. It requires them to muster at New Haven. Upon the receipt of your telegram I issued a proclamation requiring them to assemble in Hartford, as our arsenal and arms are there. When the regiment is ready I can move them to New Haven or deliver it to your officers at Hartford, as you shall elect. I telegraphed you this afternoon, and shall obey your first order unless countermanded for the convenience of your Department, as it will probably take one day longer to get the regiment ready at New Haven than at Hartford. All you have done strengthens my hands and cheers my heart.

I am, dear sir, yours, with high regard,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Jefferson City, Mo., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your dispatch of the 15th instant, making a call on Missouri for four regiments of men for immediate service, has been received. There can be, I apprehend, no doubt but the men are intended to form a part of the President’s army to make war upon the people of the seceded states,

{p.83}

Your requisition, in my judgment, is illegal, unconstitutional, and revolutionary in its object, inhuman and diabolical, and cannot be complied with. Not one man will the State of Missouri furnish to carry on any such unholy crusade.

C. F. JACKSON, Governor of Missouri.

–––

OMAHA, NEBR. TER., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I herewith tender to the Government a sufficient number of volunteers from this Territory to garrison Forts Kearny and Randall and to afford ample protection to the frontier settlements. The withdrawal of the troops from those posts has already caused much alarm among our people of trouble from the Indians. The absence of the troops from the forts will remove all restraint from them. Our past experience proves to us that we shall not escape their hostility in such a case. I deem it absolutely important that some measures should be taken to keep the Indians in check. I address this communication to you, as the lately appointed Governor, Hon. Alvin Saunders, has not yet reached the Territory.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

J. M. THAYER, Major-General of Nebraska Militia.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, Y. J., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: This morning yours of the 15th instant was received, calling for four regiments of militia from this State. Measures will be immediately taken to comply with the requisition. A few days will be necessary to ascertain when the men will probably be at the place of rendezvous, information of which will be sent you as early as possible.

Very respectfully, yours,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will General Government uniform and equip the volunteer militia raised by this State? Will it accept one or more regiments at New York now ready and transport them to Washington?

E. D. MORGAN.

[Indorsement.]

Reply: Not uniform, but equip. Will accept all.

{p.84}

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO. April 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Two regiments will leave for Washington within three or four days, the third within a week.

WM. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegraphic dispatch of the 15th instant as follows: “Call made on you by to-night’s mail for one regiment for immediate service.”

Acting upon this dispatch, I issued my proclamation for convening the Legislature, and at the same time commanded the adjutant and inspector general to call into service such of our volunteer companies of militia as were necessary to make up the complement of 780 officers and men.

I write to inform you that I have as yet received no communication from you by mail.

Our citizens throughout the State will respond with great enthusiasm to any call for sustaining the Government against the designs of the conspirators.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

PROVIDENCE, R. I., April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Our troops are leaving in detachments to-day. Will be pushed forward as rapidly as transportation can be obtained. One thousand men fully armed and equipped.

W. SPRAGUE.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 18, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We had made arrangements with the Baltimore and Ohio road to transport troops, and Mr. Garrett was anxious to take them until late last night, when he declined on the alleged ground that the Washington Branch will employ all his empty cars in transportation of troops. This looks ominous. We hope Harper’s Ferry is safe.

W. DENNISON, Governor.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Two regiments leave here to-morrow morning at 3.30 o’clock via Pittsburg. Col. [G.] W. McCook, of this State, will organize them for {p.85} mustering into service after their arrival in Washington on Saturday. Cincinnati in great peril. Authorize me immediately to make Cincinnati an additional place of rendezvous for such portion of the requisition as shall be enlisted in that county.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Companies are being ordered into rendezvous at Cleveland and Columbus. Please detail mustering officers immediately.

W. DENNISON.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the requisition of the President, dated the 15th, bearing your signature, for seventeen regiments of the militia force of this State, and to inform you that the requisite steps have been taken to comply therewith at the earliest moment.

Major-General Sandford has been directed to furnish, during the present week, either the Seventh Regiment, of about 800 men, or two smaller regiments of the First Division of State Militia, amounting to about the same number.

Very respectfully,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: We have served out all the rifled muskets we had when the Executive requisition was made upon us. Our State arsenal is emptied, and we have stripped the Boston Corps of Cadets and the Second Battalion in order fully to supply the men destined to Fort Monroe. Companies in the interior of the State have muskets and should retain them, but those in Boston are destitute. Cannot the Department spare any arms from the Springfield Armory? The product of the Government works there can be doubled, I understand. And may I add that I learn that the French Minie rifle may be bought abroad for $7 or under, and if purchased on account of the United States duties would be saved. The Federal Government might by such purchase make in a few weeks large accessions of effective arms.

Last evening half a regiment left via Fall River for Fort Monroe, to be taken by steamer from Fall River. This morning the other half left by steamer Spaulding. Last evening Col. Jones’ regiment left by Worcester railroad for Washington. Col. Munroe’s regiment leaves at 5.30 this p.m. by railroad for Washington. I hope to get the fourth regiment you requested off by Saturday. The men are ready even now.

{p.86}

The Boston banks have offered to lend the State $3,600,000 if needed, and have offered the Secretary of the Treasury to take Treasury notes to a large amount. Divers persons of military experience are enlisting soldiers into the militia with my consent and with a view to U. S. service. The men will be of a hardy class, more used to exposure than the volunteer militia commonly are, since our companies in peace are mostly made up of the best citizens. These new companies or regiments, if you wish them, will be under Mexican-war officers. Should you desire two such regiments, we will promptly respond.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt this evening of your requisition for a regiment of the Maine militia for the service of the United States, and also a dispatch advising me that it will be sufficient if the regiment is ready to be mustered into the service of the United States by the 20th of May. In reply I have to say that the troops will be ready at the rendezvous at the time mentioned.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Your dispatch of the 16th instant names Keokuk as the place of rendezvous for the regiment of this State. I had supposed this place (Davenport) a more suitable point. It is central on the Mississippi, connects directly with the East by railroad, and has a telegraph. Keokuk is in the extreme southeastern part of the State, has no direct railroad communication East, nor has any telegraph. If these considerations should make you think it advisable to change the place of rendezvous, please inform me. I have been and will be here for some days to have the benefit of the telegraph for organizing the regiment called for from this State.

Some uneasiness prevails in the western part of this State lest the withdrawal of troops from the frontier and the disturbed condition of our national affairs may induce the Indians on our northwestern frontier to attack the exposed settlements. The files of your Department will show that we have been annoyed by them for the last three or four years. If you could place 500 long-range rifles at Council Bluffs and the same number at Sioux City, in store, to be used by me in case of necessity, I will furnish the men, if the necessity shall arise. I should also be glad if you could place at each point a single U. S. Army officer, to command any troops that might be needed to use the arms for the above purpose. I shall await your answer to these suggestions with some concern.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

{p.87}

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Your telegraphic dispatches of the 16th and 18th instant, via Burlington, notifying me of a requisition for one regiment of troops, have been received. Dispatches will reach me sooner if sent to Davenport, and mail matter to Iowa City. The requisition by mail has not yet reached me. Your dispatches of the 16th were received on that day, and I immediately commenced measures for organizing a regiment. I have not convened the General Assembly of this State, for the reason that the banks of the State have placed at my disposal all the money I may need. I hope to be able to notify you that one regiment will be ready before May 20. As soon as the requisite number of companies are offered me I will notify you. Present indications are that more than enough companies for one regiment will be offered. If so, will more be received? I am acting on the presumption that the State will pay all expenses until the troops are mustered into the service of the United States; that the United States will furnish arms and accouterments; that the companies will elect their own officers. Am I right? Will the regiment elect its own officers? Will the United States furnish clothing? Please instruct me on these points.

Please assure the President that the people and the Executive of Iowa will stand by him unflinchingly. Ten days ago we had two parties in this State; to-day we have but one, and that one is for the Constitution and Union unconditionally.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have ordered four additional regiments to Washington, three of which are from New York and one from this city.

E. D. MORGAN, Governor.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

As I telegraphed you, I ordered four additional regiments to Washington this morning, three of which from New York, one from Albany. Those from New York will probably get off Saturday night or Sunday. I have since received your dispatch in following words: “Wait for further directions.” Shall the order for the New York regiments be countermanded?

E. D. MORGAN, Governor of New York.

{p.88}

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Seventh Regiment leaves for Washington to-day. I can send immediately to Washington additional regiments of our present militia force. Shall I do so or wait for volunteer regiments?

E. D. MORGAN, Governor.

–––

OMAHA, NEBR. TER., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I addressed a communication to you two days ago tendering to the Government a sufficient number of volunteers from this Territory to garrison the forts, Kearny and Randall, and to protect the frontier against the Indians. I wish it understood that we hold ourselves in readiness to serve wherever the Government requires our services.

Very truly, yours,

J. M. THAYER, Major-General Nebraska Militia.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Lansing, Mich., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 15th instant, calling for one regiment of militia of this State, in pursuance of the law of Congress of 1795. I have also your dispatch by telegraph to the effect that if the quota of Michigan shall be ready by the 20th of May it will suffice. I am enabled to say that the people of Michigan respond with the utmost enthusiasm to the proclamation of the President. The regiment will be ready to march by the 15th of May next, and will be at the rendezvous at Detroit at that time to be mustered into the service and pay of the United States. I can have them ready on the 1st day of May without inconvenience, if the Department desires it.

Allow me to say further that Michigan will send another regiment at the same time if the War Department at Washington desires it. In fact, the second regiment is very anxious to go.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUSTIN BLAIR.

–––

AUGUSTA, ME., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I wrote you to-day that Maine’s quota of troops under your requisition would be ready at the time and place which you have designated. I now write to say that if you are able to give me any intimation whether one or more regiments will be required soon from this State, it would be of essential service and accommodation to me to receive it.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

{p.89}

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed find a letter from Hon. C. Baldwin, one of the justices of the supreme court of this State, resident at Council Bluffs, touching the uneasiness felt on the western and northwestern frontier on account of the Indians. I wish you to consider it in connection with my request of the 18th, asking for a deposit of arms at Council Bluffs and Sioux City. Hon. John A. Kasson, First Assistant Postmaster-General, can give you reliable information on this subject.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

[Inclosure.]

DAVENPORT, IOWA, April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I have this day received letters from Council Bluffs advising me that since the withdrawal of the U. S. troops from Forts Randall and Kearny the people along the border of our State are alarmed somewhat, fearing that they may be annoyed by incursions from certain tribes of Indians, which of late years take every opportunity to commit outrages upon the frontier settlements. In our present national troubles we cannot expect much aid from the Federal Government, unless it would be to furnish us arms to defend ourselves with. I therefore beg leave to urge upon you the propriety of an early compliance with the request of the Governor of our State, and hope to hear from you favorably upon this subject.

Very respectfully,

CALEB BALDWIN.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Twenty-four hundred men in camp and less than half of them armed. Why has there been so much delay in sending arms? We have received none, and cannot learn that they have ever been shipped. No officer here yet to muster troops into service. Not a pound of powder or a single ball sent to us, or any sort of equipment. Allow me to ask what is the cause of all this?

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas an insurrection against the Government of the United States has broken out in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, and the laws of the United States for the collection of the revenue cannot be effectually executed therein conformably to that provision of the Constitution which requires duties to be uniform throughout the United States;

And whereas a combination of persons, engaged in such insurrection, have threatened to grant pretended letters of marque to authorize the {p.90} bearers thereof to commit assaults on the lives, vessels, and property of good citizens of the country lawfully engaged in commerce on the high seas and in waters of the United States;

And whereas an Executive proclamation has been already issued requiring the persons engaged in these disorderly proceedings to desist therefrom, calling out a militia force for the purpose of repressing the same, and convening Congress in extraordinary session to deliberate and determine thereon:

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, with a view to the same purposes before mentioned, and to the protection of the public peace and the lives and property of quiet and orderly citizens pursuing their lawful occupations, until Congress shall have assembled and deliberated on the said unlawful proceedings, or until the same shall have ceased, have further deemed it advisable to set on foot a blockade of the ports within the States aforesaid, in pursuance of the laws of the United States and of the law of nations in such case provided. For this purpose a competent force will be posted so as to prevent entrance and exit of vessels from the ports aforesaid. If, therefore, with a view to violate such blockade, a vessel shall approach, or shall attempt to leave either of the said ports, she will be duly warned by the commander of one of the blockading vessels, who will indorse on her register the fact and date of such warning, and if the same vessel shall again attempt to enter or leave the blockaded port she will be captured and sent to the nearest convenient port for such proceedings against her and her cargo as prize as may be deemed advisable.

And I hereby proclaim and declare that if any person under the pretended authority of the said States, or under any other pretense, shall molest a vessel of the United States, or the persons or cargo on board of her, such persons will be held amenable to the laws of the United States for the prevention and punishment of piracy.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this nineteenth day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have ordered the two regiments en route to Washington to proceed to Harrisburg to await orders.

W. DENISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your requisition upon me for one regiment for immediate service. I will reply definitely {p.91} in regard to the time when the regiment will be at its rendezvous immediately after the assembling of our Legislature, on the 23d instant. I have no doubt that the regiment will report itself before the time mentioned in your second dispatch-2Oth of May.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

MADISON, WIS., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will you accept two more regiments from this State, to rendezvous at Milwaukee at once?

ALEX. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

MADISON, WIS., April 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Let the President call for 100,000 more men. We have no parties now. The people will not be content to furnish one regiment alone.

ALEX. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Nashville, Tenn., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In refusing to comply with the demand which you have made upon me as Governor of the State of Tennessee for two regiments of militia to aid the Federal Government in subjugating those States which by formal act of their people have dissolved their former Federal relations and instituted for themselves others, I deem it proper that I should state briefly the grounds upon which my action is based.

The sages and patriots of the Revolution, when in the act of severing their connection with the mother country and establishing the great cardinal principles of free government, solemnly declared before the world that governments were instituted among men to secure their rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed; that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends it is the right of the people to abolish it and to institute a new government, laying its foundations on such principles and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evincing a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such government and to provide new guards for their future safety.

Recognizing and adopting these great principles, the people of Tennessee, in forming their constitution as a free and independent sovereignty preparatory to admission into the Federal Union, incorporated into their Declaration of Rights, as the basis of their superstructure, “That all power is inherent in the people, and all free governments are {p.92} founded on their authority and established for their peace, safety, and happiness. For the advancement of these ends they have at all times an inalienable and indefeasible right to alter, reform, or abolish the government in such manner as they may think proper,” and “that, government being instituted for the common benefit, the doctrine of non-resistance against arbitrary power and oppression is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.”

These truths were recognized by the other States of the Union as being in perfect conformity to the genius and character of our federative system by their assenting to the admission of Tennessee as a member of the confederacy.

Having adopted these principles and claimed these rights for her own people, it would not be consistent with common honesty, much less magnanimity, to deny them to the free people of every other sovereign State; and applying these principles to the facts as they exist in the States named by the President in his recent proclamation, Tennessee can regard the present coercive policy of the Federal Government in no other light than a wanton and alarming usurpation of power, at war with the genius of our republican institutions, and, so far as it may be successful, subversive of civil liberty. The loyalty of Tennessee to the Federal Government when constitutionally administered; the readiness with which her gallant sons have on all occasions responded to its call when threatened or invaded by a foreign enemy, will vindicate her present course in the eyes of the civilized world, while the duplicity of the present Administration in its manner of inaugurating this unjust, unnecessary, and unnatural warfare will be consigned to history’s darkest page. In such unholy crusade no gallant son of Tennessee will ever draw his sword.

Respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 20, 1861.

His Excellency WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM, Governor of Connecticut:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 17th instant, in response to the call of the General Government for troops from the State of Connecticut, is received. With such patriotic ardor and energy as your very prompt response to the call exhibits, the Administration cannot fail to maintain the authority of the Government and vindicate the majesty of the laws and Constitution. Both for your early action and kind words of cheer be pleased to accept my hearty thanks.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Norwich, Conn., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: In obedience to a call on the citizens of this State for volunteers, a second regiment will rendezvous at New Haven and be ready to be mustered into the service immediately after the first. They will {p.93} be armed with Colt patent-breech revolving rifles. I have the honor to tender their services to the President for the purpose of enforcing the laws and maintaining the dignity of the Government, and trust you will accept the same.

Waiting your orders, I am, yours, with high consideration,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 20, 1861.

His Excellency Governor YATES, Springfield, Ill.:

Please send two or three regiments of your quota of militia to support the garrison of the Saint Louis Arsenal, and to receive their arms and accouterments there. The commander of that arsenal will also have instructions from me to issue those arms and accouterments and 10,000 more to such agent as Your Excellency may appoint, for which extra arms and accouterments the State of Illinois will be held responsible to this Government.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I tender you six additional regiments. They are now forming, and can be in the field in six days. It is very important that we have twenty-four cannon of long range for State defense, for the defense of the river towns. Can they not be sent from Pittsburg at once? Will you not allow me to put the arms you send into the hands of the men in camp at once?

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

AUGUSTA, April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Our people are anxious to do something. Shall we commence in view of raising five regiments, and shall we prepare to send our troops by steamboat?

I. WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 20, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts:

DEAR SIR: I take pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of yours of the 15th and 18th instant, and of thanking you for the promptness and energy with which you have responded to the call of the Government. The order to furnish you with the required arms was transmitted to the superintendent of the armory at Springfield by telegraph. At present {p.94} you will not forward any other troops than those ordered already, but it seems quite probable that their services may be needed at no very distant day. In that event I feel assured that your State and yourself will cheerfully and promptly respond to any call the Government may make or the exigency demand.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 20, 1861.

His Excellency CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 17th instant, in answer to the requisition of the Federal Government for four regiments of troops from the State of New Jersey, is received. For your prompt and patriotic response to the call of the General Government I tender to yourself and the people of New Jersey my heartfelt thanks.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

TRENTON, N. J., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have been offered the services of two regiments ready to march within three days if armed and equipped. This is in addition to the quota from New Jersey. Do you want them; and if so, upon whom shall the quartermaster-general make requisition for arms and equipments? Answer immediately.

CHS. S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 20, 1861.

LEWIS PERRINE, Esq., Quartermaster of New Jersey:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 16th instant was received. All the information you desired was anticipated by telegraph, which I trust was satisfactory.

Very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 20, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN, Governor of New York:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge yours of the 18th instant, in response to the call of the Federal Government for seventeen regiments of troops from the State of New York. The alacrity and promptness with which you have met this requisition is alike honorable to the {p.95} great State of New York and yourself, as her Executive, and for which I beg to tender you my most grateful acknowledgments.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Four regular and two volunteer regiments have been to-day ordered to Washington by fast sailing steamers up the Potomac, making ten in all. Your dispatch of this date is received.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington City:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that in addition to the Seventh Regiment, which I suppose is now in Washington, I yesterday ordered the Sixth, Twelfth, and Seventy-first Regiments, all of the First Division, New York State Militia, to proceed at once to Washington. After receiving your dispatch of this date, I directed that they should proceed by fast steamer up the Potomac. I suppose they will get off tonight. I have to-day ordered two additional regiments from the First Division (General Sandford) and two regiments from the Second Division (General Duryea, Brooklyn), and also two volunteer regiments, respectively commanded by Colonel Ellsworth and Colonel Wilson. The four regular regiments ordered to-day will not be more than thirty-six hours getting under way. The volunteer regiments will follow almost immediately. At least two more volunteer regiments from this city and Troy will be ready next week.

I am, truly, yours,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, Ohio, April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I desire a suitable U. S. officer to be detailed at once to take command of the volunteers of Cincinnati and to provide for the defense of that city in co-operation with myself. I strongly desire an immediate affirmative answer, that I may assign the people of that city of the fact. The volunteers are outside of the State organization of militia, and the purpose of their organization is purely local. I am concentrating our artillery force at that point.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

PHILADELPHIA, April 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: A Committee of Public Safety, to look to the defense of this city, has been organized, and ten regiments, to be composed principally of military exempts, will be raised and equipped here in a short time.

{p.96}

We mean to overcome the great difficulty of procuring fire-arms of the most approved kind by obtaining them from Europe as speedily as possible, meantime making out with our old muskets and cannon as well as we can.

Our whole community have confidence in the patriotism and ability of the Administration at Washington, and it would give you heartfelt pleasure to hear the praises bestowed on your vigorous administration of the War Department amidst the difficulties by which you are surrounded.

You will see by the inclosed circular of what materials our committee is composed. We met this morning and adopted the name I have given above, and among other proceedings passed the following resolution:

Resolved, That the chairman be requested to make application to the Secretary of War, respectfully requesting him to detail Colonel Delafield, or some other competent U. S. officer, to take charge of the river defenses of this city.

In discharging this duty I beg leave to state that Major Delafield-I suppose now a colonel-was named because of his having been long stationed here, and of his being, therefore, thoroughly acquainted with our topographical position, and not with any view of dictation to you. Any competent officer whom you may find it convenient to detail for this service will be heartily welcomed.

I have the honor to remain, your most obedient servant,

WM. D. LEWIS, Chairman.

[Inclosure.]

CIRCULAR.]

PHILADELPHIA, April 19, 1861.

SIR: At an adjourned meeting of the retired and contributing members of the Washington Grays, and other citizens, held at Sansom-street Hall last evening, which was largely attended, Charles S. Smith, esq., in the chair, the following resolutions, offered by Mr. William D. Lewis and seconded by Col. J. Ross Snowden, were, after full discussion, unanimously adopted:

Resolved That in view of the impending danger to our homes and liberties it is indispensable that a body of not less than ten regiments of resident citizens, each regiment to be composed of ten companies of not less than eighty men each, to be organized as a home guard for the defense of this city and neighborhood, should be raised without delay.

And whereas it is well known that a deficiency exists of arms suitable to the present national emergency, and that extraordinary measures must be adopted to procure them as early as they may be needed, the cost of which, and of all other requisite materials of war, should be borne by the citizens and institutions whose lives and property it will be the object of this organization to protect, be it further

Resolved, That a committee of citizens be appointed by the chair to solicit subscriptions in furtherance of the above object to the amount of $250,000, to be disbursed under the directions of the said committee, in furtherance of the purpose above stated.

Resolved, That the committee appointed by the chair have authority to increase its numbers.

In pursuance of the foregoing proceedings I beg leave to inform you that you have been appointed a member of the aforesaid committee, which is composed of the gentlemen named below.

Your chairman requests me to notify you that the committee will meet at room No. 30, Merchants’ Exchange, at 12 o’clock noon to-morrow (Saturday), where you are earnestly requested to attend.

Yours, respectfully,

CHARLES S. SMITH, Chairman of the Meeting.

WILLIAM D. LEWIS, Chairman, et al.

{p.97}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Norwich, Conn., April 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I addressed you yesterday by mail, and lest my letter may have failed to reach you I beg to repeat my offer, and say that by my orders a second regiment of Connecticut Volunteers will rendezvous in New Haven immediately after the first. They will be armed with Colt patent-breech revolving rifles and with Sharps rifles. I have the honor of offering their services to the President, to be used for the execution of the laws and the preservation of the dignity of the Government, and trust you will accept the same and have them mustered into service.

I dispatch this by Col. William A. Aiken, a special messenger, in whom you may place entire confidence, and by whom I should be happy to receive any communication you may be pleased to make.

Yours, with high consideration,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

DETROIT, April 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: I inclose a communication from the adjutant-general of the State. The Governor has called out two regiments. One is full and ready to march at a moment’s notice, but is not properly uniformed and equipped. The other will be complete in two or three days. There are besides these regiments a large number of full companies not yet organized into regiments. I will esteem it a very great favor if you will officially call for at least four more regiments immediately from this State. We have raised about $100,000 by private subscription as a loan to the State to equip them.

Very truly, yours,

Z. CHANDLER.

[Inclosure.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Detroit, Mich., April 20, 1861.

Hon. Z. CHANDLER:

DEAR SIR: The Governor of this State has ordered into service two regiments, although the requisition from the War Department only falls for one. Will you please to use your influence with the War Department, so that both regiments may be received as a brigade, and to have the necessary instructions issued to the Governor to that effect?

Will you please answer?

Your obedient servant,

JNO. ROBERTSON, Adjutant-General Michigan Militia.

–––

MONDAY, April 21, 1861-5 p.m.

[General WINFIELD SCOTT:]

MY DEAR GENERAL: I received at midnight a dispatch from Larz Anderson, S. F. Vinton, Groesbeck, and several other influential men in Cincinnati urging me to get in some manner a message to you that you recommend George B. McClellan to Governor Dennison as a suit-

R R-SERIES III, VOL I {p.98} able man to be placed at the head of military affairs in Cincinnati, and requesting that the same communication be sent to the President, General Cameron, and Governor Chase.

My efforts during the day to induce the telegraph company to establish a steam communication by small fast tugs between Elkton Station and Annapolis having failed, I send a special messenger, who will deliver you this and bring back your reply, unless the telegraphic communication with Columbus be re-established, in which case I presume you will express your views to the Governor direct.

The Harriet Lane left Sandy Hook Sunday night at 8 o’clock, convoying the Baltic, R. R. Cuyler, Coatzacoalcos, Columbia, and one or two other steamers, with three full New York regiments (Sixth, Twelfth, Seventy-first), and mustering about 2,500 men, and Burnside’s Rhode Island regiment, 800 men, and Governor Sprague’s, 700 men, and others which I cannot remember, numbering in all 4,000, well armed and equipped; all the steamers with extra stores and supplies. The Ariel, De Soto, and other steamers have gone to-day with 2,000, mainly Massachusetts and Rhode Island men, and to-morrow others follow, with, it is thought, 2,500, including the Sixty-ninth (Irish) Regiment and Colonel Duryea’s Brooklyn.

I saw Captain Eldridge yesterday on his return from Fort Monroe, where he landed 1,000 Massachusetts men on Saturday, bringing back a requisition from Colonel Dimick for provisions. These leave this evening in the propeller Chesapeake, and having no troops, a small detachment of regulars (ten or twelve) will accompany the stores, and I have suggested a Dahlgren gun and ammunition, but now that Colonel Keyes has gone, I am at a loss how to procure action on my suggestion. Colonel Keyes left in the Baltic. She also took some sixty or sixty-five U. S. troops.

The steamers will with this weather reach Old Point Comfort in twenty-two to twenty-six hours after passing Sandy Hook.

Governor Morgan was in town yesterday, and needs, I think, a good adjutant-a West Point man. General Wool moves his headquarters to this city to-day.

Colonel Dimick expressed to Captain Eldridge his great need of a steamer to communicate with the navy-yard, &c. I have suggested to the quartermaster to allow the Chesapeake to remain at Fort Monroe until he could hear from Washington, and the vessel (under charter at $450 a day) be replaced by a less expensive one; but he has no authority, and unless the underwriters will sanction the expense, the vessels going in and out of the capes may have to take their chance until the Government can place an armed vessel on the station. It may be well to send orders in case she has been kept on pay. She is a large and rather fast propeller, and could mount four or six guns easily.

The enthusiasm is beyond all belief, and the community acting as one man to uphold the Government and to uphold order in the city. An attempt to get up a feeling to seize the Southern steamers here has utterly failed, and so also the attempt to arrest Southern deposits in our banks. It will be for the Government to decide on these matters. The New Orleans and other Southern banks have considerable deposits, and they will probably draw gold and order it home, but I have no doubt it will leave New York in safety whatever be its fate afterwards.

I leave with you, General, the request of our Cincinnati friends that their wishes be laid before the President and the other gentlemen named. Command me on all occasions, and believe me ever, sincerely, your friend,

WM. H. ASPINWALL.

{p.99}

The bearer, Mr. Dall, is every way reliable, and has unusual energy. It is enough to say he is a brother of Captain Dall, with whom you visited Oregon.

If the wires are yet down, a fast steam-tug could make three or four trips during the twenty-four hours between Elkton and Annapolis or Baltimore, if order is restored there.

U. S. steamship Niagara goes to Old Point Comfort from Boston to-day.

The propeller Monticello, armed with one 10-inch gun and two 32-pounders, left yesterday to convoy to Annapolis.

The steam-boat Yankee, with two 32-pounders, leaves to-day to convoy from Annapolis to Havre de Grace; six feet draft of water. Lieutenant Fox goes in her, and takes a memorandum from me about submarine telegraph from Washington to points on the Chesapeake and Potomac.

James S. Wadsworth went yesterday in large steamer Kill-von-Kull from Elizabethport to New York. Took horses, men, carts, and railroad tools, and also artillery and provisions to Annapolis. Can transport as many men as the Maryland.

The bearer, Ben. Holiday, beef contractor, from California, has unusual energy, intelligence, and will. He wants to make his suggestions, which you will find valuable.

The Cunarder Kedar leaves to-day with 1,000 barrels of beef, 1,000 barrels of pork, bread, and other stores, troops and artillery, under English flag, for Annapolis, unless ordered into Potomac.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 113.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 22, 1861.

...

2. The President has assigned Maj. E. S. Sibley to the charge of the Quartermaster’s Department as Acting Quartermaster-General ad interim.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Little Rock, Ark., April 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington City:

In answer to your requisition for troops from Arkansas to subjugate the Southern States, I have to say that none will be furnished. The demand is only adding insult to injury. The people of this Commonwealth are freemen, not slaves, and will defend to the last extremity their honor, lives, and property against Northern mendacity and usurpation.

R. M. RECTOR, Governor of Arkansas.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Hon. George S. Boutwell, ex-Governor of this Commonwealth, goes to Washington with full general authority to represent me in {p.100} regard to our military movements. It will be very useful to the United States to give us authority to take and hold all the places and forts of the United States, subject always to your order. We will protect them against surprise and secure the harbor of Boston, while at the same time we shall be preparing a levy of men by exact drill and discipline for active service. I wish 1,000 to 2,000 men, if possible-say two regiments-might be ordered into active service now as militia. There are at least two regiments of hardy, strong men who are anxious to go into immediate service, who cannot maintain themselves while they are drilling and learning tactics, but who would enlist under a new war bill into the U. S. Army as volunteers. Now they can only be militia. If you will order them to rendezvous in the forts, muster them in as militia, having it understood by a formal agreement (which I will see to) that they cannot have their pay as militia unless they agree to serve as army volunteers when their three months are out, if wanted, for at least one or two years, I doubt not I can thus raise and discipline you two regiments of hardy troops. It must be of great importance, I should think, to accomplish this end. Some other militia organizations still would go into camp without present or future pay while occupied in drilling-such as our New England Guards Battalion, in Boston-if we could have the arsenal at Cambridge free until you countermand the permission. The mayor of Springfield thinks the arsenal there ought to be guarded by soldiers constantly. We could keep a company there, with your permission.

Please allow full conferences with Governor Boutwell and regard him as a most confidential friend and agent of Massachusetts, and giving him and myself as much opportunity as possible to serve the United States you will aid in the development of the good will of all of our people into the highest efficiency of active efforts.

Your most obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

CONCORD, N. H., April 22, 1861. (Received 25th.)

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

New Hampshire tenders one or more additional regiments to the General Government. Will they be accepted?

By direction of the Governor:

JOSEPH C. ABBOTT, Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., April 22, 1861.

General SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have had no communication, telegraphic or otherwise, since Saturday last, and am painfully anxious to get news. I presume the War Department has guarded the Relay House and the Junction between Washington and the Annapolis Branch. It is thought these are important points in which to concentrate a strong force. In addition to those already advised, the Twenty-fifth Regiment-being the Albany regiment-has proceeded to New York today to enter the service of the Government, and will be transported to Washington immediately.

I am, truly, yours,

E. D. MORGAN.

{p.101}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, Ohio, April 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: On the 18th instant I sent you a telegraphic dispatch urgently asking that some heavy guns might be sent from Pittsburg to Cincinnati, to wit: Five 8-inch, five 10-inch, and one 12-inch columbiads; four heavy mortars, with complement of shot and shell; also grape and canister shot for field batteries. I have no reply to the message, and assume that it was intercepted. I also inclose a copy of a dispatch sent on the 20th, which I presume met the same fate.* This last I have since ordered to be taken from Harrisburg by special messenger, and I hope you have received it. Both these matters are of the gravest importance to us, and I hope you will make every effort consistent with duty to accord with both requests. Should you order the guns from Pittsburg for this State, please have them sent to this city in the first instance. Colonel Mansfield can inform you of the condition of our quartermaster’s department.

Hoping a speedy reply, I remain, very respectfully,

W. DENISON, Governor of Ohio.

* See p. 95.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, Ohio, April 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: Owing to an unavoidable confusion in the first hurry and enthusiasm of the movement of our people in Ohio in defense of the Government, I find that I have already accepted, and have in camp, or ready to march instantly to it, a larger force than the thirteen regiments named as the contingent of Ohio under the late requisition of the President. Indeed, without seriously repressing the ardor of the people, I can hardly stop short of twenty regiments. My belief has been that they would all be needed, and that the refusal on the part of several border States to supply their quota would make it proper for us to increase the force to that amount at least.

The moral effect of this movement of the people, in advance of our demand upon them, is so great, especially in impressing the insurgent and wavering States with the belief that the lion in us is thoroughly roused, that I am strongly desirous that the President may accept the number of troops I have offered above, i.e., twenty regiments. Is it not wise to make the movement so manifestly an overpowering one that the enemy must take the field, if at all, conscious that their cause is hopeless?

Let me know what I may expect in regard to this subject, and if the number of regiments is increased, let me know also what increase it will make in the number of general officers.

In the meantime I will let the organization be made to cover the twenty regiments, and have them make all the progress in drill they can. I need not impress upon you the demoralizing results of disbanding the surplus regiments. You will also see the necessity of authorizing the additional number of brigadier-generals.

As an additional reason for the increase of our quota, I would add that it seems to be a common expectation that southern Ohio must be {p.102} a base for important operations scarcely second to Washington. I have had no communication from Washington since Friday last. The result is that I am compelled to assume extraordinary responsibilities in connection with the troops, and must continue to do so in the absence of regular dispatches.

Respectfully and truly, yours,

W. DENNISON, Governor.

–––

MADISON, April 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have the honor to inform you that the First Regiment of Wisconsin active militia is enrolled and officered, and will be at the command of the Government at Milwaukee on Saturday of the present week.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 115.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 23, 1861.

1. Lieut. Col. James W. Ripley, Ordnance Department, is assigned to the charge of that department during the feeble health of its chief, and will enter upon the duties at once.

...

3. The amounts found to be due resigned officers from the States which claim to have seceded will be paid them from the U. S. funds heretofore sent to or deposited in those States.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Md., April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have 6,000 men in camp here, and will have 8,000 men by tomorrow night. Major Wood has mustered three regiments into the service of the United States, and is still engaged in the work. We will have four regiments mustered to-morrow. I will send the four regiments to Evansville, as directed, as early as the first of next week. Has the Government uniforms and clothing prepared for the men-that is, for the six regiments? If so, I want it forwarded at once. The long-range rifles selected, and which were to be furnished on the quota for 1862, have not been seen or heard of. It will take the 5,000 stand of arms which were to be sent to the depot to arm the volunteers now accepted. Can we have more arms sent to the State? On the southern border, along Kentucky, the people are much alarmed, forming companies, and demanding arms, which we have none to give. I am receiving deputations from day to day from the border towns asking arms. They are afraid their property will be destroyed by marauding companies from the other side of the river. I have made a requisition on the Government for twenty-four cannon, long range, large caliber, to which I have {p.103} received no answer. These cannon are necessary to the defense of river towns. I have also made a tender of six additional regiments, to which I have received no answer. I shall put the six additional regiments in camp and under discipline, and hold them subject to the Government’s order at least for a time.

It is important that the four regiments should be furnished with tents and other camp equipage without further delay. I want ammunition for the cannon service immediately. I have just received a dispatch from General Wool, New York, stating that no musket accouterments can be furnished at this time. This is a fact of which I have had no previous intimation. I shall take immediate steps to supply deficiency. Please answer by Capt. R. Stevenson immediately.

Very respectfully, yours,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The citizens of Portland feel that some provision should be made for manning one or both of the forts in the harbor of that city, and I have the honor to request that you will give your consent to their occupation for purposes of defense. I have further to ask whether I may receive the fixed ammunition for small-arms now at the Kennebec Arsenal for the use of the Maine troops, also whether I can take arms from the arsenal for the same uses? Can the United States furnish the rifled muskets or other efficient arms for the use of infantry, and, if so, when may they be had?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

SAINT PAUL, MINN., April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Minnesota regiment ready in ten days. Where will they obtain their uniforms?

IGNATIUS DONNELLY, Governor ad interim.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Concord, N. H., April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: We desire to be informed whether the Government will furnish rifled muskets to the New Hampshire troops. We have the plain percussion muskets, but desire the latest pattern of the rifled muskets. If they are in the possession of the Government and can be furnished we should want 2,000 immediately, which can be charged to this State on our quota if the exigencies of the service should permit any question as to the propriety of their delivery unconditionally. New Hampshire will respond promptly to any call which the Government may make for troops, even to the number of 20,000 men.

Please answer at once by telegraph.

Yours, respectfully,

JOSEPH C. ABBOTT, Adjutant-General.

{p.104}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 23, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Hon. ALEXANDER CUMMINGS:

In consideration of the extraordinary emergencies which demand immediate and decisive measures for the preservation of the national capital and defense of the National Government, I hereby authorize Edwin D. Morgan, Governor of the State of New York, and Alexander Cummings, now in the city of New York, to make all necessary arrangements for the transportation of troops and munitions of war in aid and assistance of the officers of the Army of the United States until communication by mails and telegraph is completely re-established between the cities of Washington and New York. Either of them in case of inability to consult with the other may exercise the authority hereby given.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, Ohio, April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: My friend the Hon. Edward Ball, formerly member of Congress from this State, is the bearer of this note as a special messenger, whom I have requested to visit you in order to get more full and confidential communication with your Department than seems to be possible by letter or telegram. General Ball is fully possessed of my opinions in regard to the present condition of affairs in this State, and I sincerely hope he will be able to bring me from you such full information that I shall have nearly all the advantages of a personal interview with you.

Assuring you of my extreme anxiety to co-operate most efficiently with the Administration in the present juncture, I remain, very sincerely, yours,

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

HDQRS. OHIO MILITIA AND VOLUNTEER MILITIA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Columbus, April 23, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have nothing from you since dispatch not to forward, &c. We are urgent that a requisition for the Kentucky quota should reach us soon. We have the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Regiments raised and can make the force 50,000 men. I speak upon due reflection and upon the figures. I shall organize six or eight regiments additional to our quota and put them under drill at any event, and the feeling is so intense that I do not limit the number. We will learn much by -; left this a.m. We have corn for the year, whether we plant much or not, and never could so well meet the issues of war. When the order is “Advance!” Ohio will go to the Gulf, if need be.

Yours, &c.,

H. B. CARRINGTON, Adjutant-General.

{p.105}

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Harrisburg, Pa., April 23, 1861.

Hon. ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

DEAR SIR: We have more than the requisition of troops called by the Federal Government now in the field. We can increase our force, and the Legislature, called to meet on the 30th, would justify my action if I continued to receive troops. I will be pleased to act as directed in this respect. In this connection I ask that communications from the Federal Government be made directly to me.

Yours, truly,

A. G. CURTIN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Montpelier, Vt., April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I desire to inquire if from any of the U. S. arsenals I can procure by purchase a quantity of rifled muskets of the improved pattern for the use of the regiment detailed for the service of the Government under your requisition upon me. Several of the companies are supplied with the improved arm, while others have smooth bores or rifles of a former pattern. We lack about 300 of the improved muskets in order to arm the regiments uniformly. I am informed by the adjutant and inspector general that the regiment can be at their rendezvous within ten days, and it will give me great pleasure if the above 300 muskets can be obtained before that time. Allow me to advise and to request that the place of rendezvous should be changed from Burlington to Rutland. Rutland is the residence of the adjutant and inspector general, and is more accessible to a majority of the companies than Burlington, and sixty-two miles nearer to New York. A free passage for the regiment has been tendered to me by the railroads between Rutland and New York.

You will please give early notice to the adjutant and inspector general (H. Henry Baxter, Rutland, Vt.) of your decision in regard to the foregoing premises.

I have the honor to be, with high consideration, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

P. S.-Will you please reply by telegraph and also by mail? If the muskets can be obtained, I am authorized to pay for them or to receive them on account of the Government, as you may direct.

–––

NEW YORK, April 23, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT:

MY DEAR SIR: You will see by the date of this note that I am here in New York. I have come for the purpose of conferring and advising with our friends here, and if you have any commands to give or suggestions to make I will be happy to receive them, and will endeavor to discharge them faithfully and promptly. Let me assure you the country is aroused, and it is heart-cheering to see with what alacrity the people rally to your support. I am confident it must be seen to be fully appreciated. The country will stand nobly by you in all your acts. Let them be full and ample; they cannot be too energetic. We are {p.106} sadly deficient, and we want and need and should have rifled cannon. Let me urge earnestly and frankly that the works at Chicopee be put in operation to their utmost capacity to furnish them. I speak the opinions of our best men here, and I feel there should be no delay. It is of the utmost importance.

Yours, truly,

H. HAMLIN.

[Indorsement.]

Let the suggestion of the Vice-President as to putting the Chicopee works into operation be duly considered by the War Department.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

NEW YORK CITY, April 23, 1861.

[General SCOTT:]

GENERAL: I will avail myself of this opportunity to communicate to you the part I have acted in the present state of the country. The first moment I was well enough I visited Albany, at the request of the Governor, to render such services as seemed indispensable under existing circumstances, as all direct communication was cut off with Washington. I did not hesitate to advise the most energetic measures, and to send troops as fast as they could get them ready to Washington. I gave orders to Colonel Tompkins to furnish transportation and to Major Eaton thirty days’ provisions. I have ordered, upon the application of the Governor of Pennsylvania, 10,000 muskets from the New York Arsenal and 400,000 cartridges from Watertown Arsenal to be sent direct to Harrisburg. I shall probably send 10,000 muskets and 400,000 cartridges, upon application from the Governor of Ohio, to Columbus. He says he has no ammunition or arms. We have received returns from the Allegheny, Frankford, and Kennebec arsenals and from Springfield Armory. At the Allegheny Arsenal we have 3,000 muskets, old pattern, 500,000 ball and buckshot cartridges, 20,000 elongated bullet cartridges, 800,000 rifle cartridges, .58-inch. Frankford Arsenal has been nearly emptied by orders from Washington. There are, however, 3,000 muskets and 117,000 cartridges for rifle muskets on hand at the last advices. At Watertown Arsenal there are, after deducting the arms and ammunition sent to Governors Curtin and Dennison, about 8,000 percussion muskets, .69-inch; 6,000 percussion rifles, .54-inch; 70,000 musket cartridges, percussion; 1,400,000 musket cartridges, flint-lock; 196,000 rifle cartridges, percussion; 717,000 rifle cartridges, flint-lock. At Kennebec Arsenal there are 43,000 musket cartridges reported “old,” and I fear they are unfit for service. At Springfield Armory there are 86,000 muskets of the old pattern and they are making 60 of the new pattern daily. No musket accouterments on hand at any of the above-named places.

Upon the application of the Committee of Safety of this city I have directed Colonel Tompkins to charter two light-draft steamers with the least possible delay to ply between Havre de Grace and Annapolis and to put on board as much provisions for the use of the troops South as will not impede their passage.

I have requested the Governor of New Jersey to send two companies of militia or volunteers to Fort Delaware for its protection. I have also put myself in communication with the Governors of Massachusetts, Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana, and shall use every exertion in my power to facilitate the Army and provide for the troops destined to {p.107} Washington. The people of the North are very apprehensive lest the capital should be taken, which they determine, however, shall not take place if men and money can prevent it. They can submit to no terms whatever without the South submits unconditionally. I should be pleased to learn the actual condition of affairs in Washington and whether it is safe or otherwise.

I have the honor to be, with considerations of the highest respect,

your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

P. S.-It is impossible to describe the excited state of the people of the North. New York City is ready to furnish 50,000 men for the defense of the Union and its preservation.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 23, 1861.

The Quartermaster-General is directed to procure forage caps, infantry trousers, flannel sack coats, flannel shirts, bootees, stockings, great coats, blankets, and such other articles as may be necessary to supply the wants of the troops of the different States in service under the requisition of the President, and furnish them with such articles as they are in immediate need of for their health and comfort.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

Miss D. L. DIX:

Be it known to all whom it may concern that the free services of Miss D. L. Dix are accepted by the War Department, and that she will give at all times all necessary aid in organizing military hospitals for the care of all sick or wounded soldiers, aiding the chief surgeon by supplying nurses and substantial means for the comfort and relief of the suffering; also that she is fully authorized to receive, control, and disburse special supplies bestowed by individuals or associations for the comfort of their friends or the citizen soldiers from all parts of the United States; as also, under sanction of the Acting Surgeon-General, to draw from the army stores.

Given at the War Department this twenty-third day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON, April 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I desire to inform you that I know of some 300 reliable colored free citizens of this city who desire to enter the service for the defense of the city.

I have been three times across the Rocky Mountains in the service of the country with Frémont and others.

I can be found about the Senate Chamber, as I have been employed about the premises for some years.

Yours, respectfully,

JACOB DODSON (Colored).

{p.108}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Md., April 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have just received a dispatch from the Pittsburg Arsenal, stating that but 3,500 arms will be sent to Indiana instead of 5,000, as per arrangement made while I was in Washington. This number will fall short over 1,000 of arming the troops we have assembled here in camp under the requisition of the President, and the State is left without arms. I am informed by a dispatch from General Wool, New York, received last night, for the first time, that no accouterments could be furnished for the muskets. This information was received after the camp was full of men waiting to be armed. I have issued orders to have those accouterments made, but it will take time. Cannot the State be furnished with more arms from some or any of the arsenals East or West? There is no State more loyal than Indiana, and none that will expend more blood and treasure in this war.

We have in camp to-night 10,000 men waiting arms and marching orders. It is a matter of the first importance that we be furnished with arms and accouterments without delay. Our river towns are full of alarm, and I am receiving numerous deputations calling for cannon and small-arms. I made a requisition for twenty-four cannon of long range and heavy caliber; can it not be increased to fifty? I learn that the cannon are in the arsenal at Pittsburg. Major Wood is busily engaged in mustering the troops into the service, and as soon as that is done I shall dispatch four regiments to Evansville, under the command of a brigadier-general, in pursuance of your order. I trust you will at once perceive the condition in which the camp is left in this city-two regiments of the contingent called out by the President are left unarmed, and the State is left wholly unprovided for-and make an order that more arms be sent to the State. I hope to hear from you by the bearer, Capt. W. Newman.

With high respect,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., April 24, 1861.

General SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that voluntary enlistments in this State, under the law of April 16, 1861, are proceeding with celerity. I believe the entire force called for by the President will be mustered into service sooner than they can be uniformed and equipped. The latter, however, is being pushed with energy. If the uniforms and equipments can be provided, one-half the force will be ready in ten days, and the remainder in ten days thereafter. I now refer to the quota for this State of seventeen regiments, and this is entirely independent of the regiments of the present militia force of the State which I have ordered to Washington to report to the President for the protection of the capital or for any other service. Of such I have ordered eleven regiments, as follows:

Seventh Regiment, Colonel Lefferts, 1,050; left 19th instant.

Sixth Regiment, Colonel Pinckney, 550; Twelfth Regiment, Colonel Butterfield, 950; Seventy-first Regiment, Colonel Vosburgh, 950; sailed on the 21st.

{p.109}

Twenty-fifth Regiment, Colonel Bryan, 500; Thirteenth Regiment, Colonel Smith, 400; left 23d.

Twenty-eighth Regiment, Colonel Bennett, 400.

Eighth Regiment, Colonel Lyons, 900; Sixty-ninth Regiment, Colonel Corcoran, 1,050; left 23d.

Twentieth Regiment, Colonel Pratt, 600; Seventy-ninth Regiment, Colonel McLeay, 700; about 26th. Total, 8,050.

Say 8,000 men in the present militia force of the State have already proceeded to or soon will be transported to Washington. I am quite ready to send several other regiments of the present force-indeed, the officers and men are perfectly impatient to start; but I need advices from Washington of the state of things before sending you too large a force.

I have the honor to be, very truly, yours,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., April 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Having tried in vain to communicate with your Department by mail and telegraph, I now send you Mr. Albert B. Dod, as special messenger, for the purpose of giving you the following information. He will bring back from you any reply or orders you may desire to send in answer to this communication.

The four regiments which the State of New Jersey was called upon to furnish by the requisition of the Federal Government are now ready. Lieutenant Torbert, who was sent here for that purpose, is mustering them into the service of the United States, but he is very much embarrassed for want of instructions. He cannot find Major Laidley, and he has received no instructions from Washington, and only a few muster-rolls-having received no reply from Washington to his call for them. He has also made a call on Major-General Wool for arms and accouterments, who replies that arms will be furnished, but he has no accouterments. He also desires instructions whether the troops are to be equipped for camp or garrison duty, and if for the former, where he is to draw for tents and camp equipage. We are also without orders as to where the New Jersey troops shall be ordered. They are impatient to march, and we are very anxious to get them into active duty immediately. Our people are full of patriotic ardor which it is important should not be dampened by any delay in the movement of our quota. Should the Federal Government need them we can furnish additional regiments as soon as they can be armed and equipped by the Government at Washington. Should you desire it the troops from New Jersey can be transported direct from Trenton by propellers to Annapolis or any other point to which they can be carried by such vessels. Propellers can be obtained from this point for this purpose.

Major Hexamer, of the Hudson County Artillery, having a corps of 105 men, fully armed and equipped with six brass pieces of artillery, 6-pounders, offers you his services and will proceed immediately to any point to which you may order him. If you desire his corps please send your orders for them by the bearer of this communication on his return.

Very respectfully, yours,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

{p.110}

–––

STATE OF VERMONT, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Montpelier, April 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I beg to repeat the considerations in view of which I request that Rutland may be designated as the place of rendezvous for the Vermont regiment, viz: Rutland is the residence of the adjutant and inspector general; his office is there; his official dispatches and letters are directed there. The quartermaster-general resides near Rutland. He has been charged with the duty of purchasing the equipment, arms, and outfit of the regiment, and has already accumulated much of this property at that point. A majority of the companies would pass through Rutland in reaching Burlington, only to be returned to the same place on their way to New York. I therefore respectfully request that orders may be sent to Lieut. Col. G. J. Rains, in accordance with the foregoing recommendations.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

HDQRS. MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON, Philadelphia, April 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I learn from sources entitled to confidence that the Governor of Delaware will not respond to the requisition of the President for troops, and I respectfully request that I be authorized to muster into the service of the United States one or more regiments of loyal Delawareans, and to transmit the names of officers, to be selected by themselves, to the Department for approval.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. PATTERSON, Major-General.

–––

ROCHESTER, April 25, 1861.

Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR:

Day before yesterday I sent a telegraphic communication to you soliciting your aid to procure the release of Capt. Elisha G. Marshall, of the Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, in order that he may accept a position in our New York volunteer force. We have men and money, but we very much need educated and experienced officers. One such man in a regiment will be of the greatest service. I am exerting myself to form regiments (of one I will take command), trusting to get command of a brigade, but I assure you that a little military knowledge at this time is at a high premium. I hope it will be consistent with the public interests to release Marshall without severing his connection with the Regular Army. He is a Western New York man, and will prove very valuable to us.

A few hints to you of the thoughts which are in the minds of people here. We want to make thorough work of secession now. This will cost lives and money, but I think they will never be furnished with more promptitude and alacrity. If through want of energetic preparation a great calamity should befall us, like the capture of Washington, with the public officers and offices, we may fear that the popular exasperation will be turned against the Government and we get embarked in an independent organization or involved in anarchy. The high, {p.111} painful excitement which is stirring the hearts of all men must have expression in action. Clear the road to the capital and keep it cleared. That is the first desire. We might form an efficient and temporary navy out of our commercial marine. All along the New England coast are thousands of vessels and men fit for this service by mixing with them the instructed naval officers of the country. Graduate the first and second classes at once at West Point (retaining Southern cadets) and scatter them among the communities from which they have been taken, to drill and aid the people. You cannot overrate the advantages of this instruction. For God’s sake and our country’s, let us take hold of the military spirit of our people and direct it aright now, when we can. We can have a long and exhausting war, or we can conquer a peace before the end of another winter if we will only organize and use our power promptly. These are very crude thoughts, but they express the wishes, and I may add the expectations, of our people.

Truly, yours,

J. H. MARTINDALE.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 25, 1861.

The Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: I take pleasure in introducing to your attention and consideration George L. Andrews, esq., and Wilder Dwight, esq., gentlemen of high professional and social standing in this community, who desire to communicate with you concerning the regiment proposed to be raised here by Major Gordon, about which I wrote to you under date of the 17th instant, a letter to which I have received no reply. I beg leave to refer to that letter in full explanation of my views upon this subject, and to say that so far as I am acquainted with the purposes of the gentlemen interested for the formation of this regiment (and they have been very fully explained to me) they meet my unqualified concurrence, and I hope that they may receive such assistance and co-operation on the part of the United States as can with propriety be afforded. Major Gordon, who will be called to the command of the regiment, is a gentleman of careful military education and large executive ability, and it will be officered by such gentlemen as Mr. Andrews and Mr. Dwight, gentlemen of the best standing in Massachusetts.

In the hope that you may be able to give attention in some manner to the proposals of these gentlemen, I subscribe myself, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 25, 1861.

The Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: My letter introducing Messrs. Dwight and Andrews will be shown to you.*

I desire, in addition, to say that we can send to you 4,000 more troops from Massachusetts within a very short time after the receipt of a requisition for them.

Do you wish us to send men as we may be able to get them ready, without awaiting requisitions? And can we send by sea up the Potomac? Cannot the river be kept open and safe to Washington? What {p.112} shall we do, or what do you wish us to do, about provisioning our men? Is Fort Monroe supplied with provisions?

Will you authorize the enlistment here and mustering into the U. S. service here of Irish, Germans, and other tough men, to be drilled and prepared here for service? We have men enough of such description, eager to be employed, sufficient to make three regiments.

Finally, will you direct some general instructions and suggestions to be sent to me as to anything-no matter what or how much-which you may wish from Massachusetts, and procure General Scott also to do so, and we will try to meet, so far as may be, every wish of the Government up to the very limit of our resources and our power.

Will you put the 6,000 rifles now at the U. S. Arsenal at Watertown at our disposal for our men, and send immediately orders for that purpose? We have sent to Europe Hon. Francis B. Crowninshield as agent of this Commonwealth, accompanied by an experienced armorer, with a credit of £50,000, for the purchase of arms for this Commonwealth, and we shall therefore be able to replace these rifles at an early day, if it shall be necessary.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor.

* Next, ante.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Topeka, Kans., April 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: As Governor of the State of Kansas, I would respectfully represent that our people, should the present secession movement continue until the State of Missouri is included, will be placed in a most peculiar position. With as loyal a people as any in the Union and influenced by as anxious a desire to maintain the integrity of the Government, we would, in that event, be entirely cut off from any communication whatever with other loyal States except by a circuitous land carriage through the State of Iowa, which would of necessity be not only very expensive, but so slow as to be almost entirely useless.

Standing in this isolated position, anxious to defend ourselves and to sustain the Government, we are-entirely unarmed, and unfortunately, like most countries recently settled, too poor to buy such arms as are necessary for our defense. Even if we were able to purchase arms, their transportation through Missouri would from this time forward be an utter impossibility.

There are now at Fort Leavenworth about 5,000 stand of arms of suitable character for the various portions of service required, which are not only not needed by the United States, but are in hourly danger of being taken by the secessionists from Missouri. If you will direct that these arms shall be turned over to the State of Kansas, I will be responsible as her executive officer that they shall be carefully kept and returned, if required, and also that they shall only be used in defense of our homes and sustaining the national flag. Without them we are a naked prey to any body of traitors who may choose to plunder us.

This request seems to us so reasonable and the necessity for it so urgent that we cannot imagine you will refuse us, as we are unwilling for a moment to believe that the Administration would wantonly sacrifice a whole people, who have in the most trying emergencies exhibited so much fidelity to our common country and to the principles of public liberty.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. ROBINSON.

{p.113}

[Indorsements.]

We fully indorse all the above statements, and urge the necessity of immediate action.

J. S. STONE, Major-General, Kansas Militia. SAMUEL WALKER, Major-General, Kansas Militia.

J. S. STONE, Major-General, Kansas Militia. SAMUEL WALKER, Major-General, Kansas Militia.

Governor Robinson’s statements are the facts in the premises. Living on the border, as I do, I know that if the Department think best not to give us arms to sustain ourselves, if necessary our people will at once lay hold of them. I cannot restrain them.

JAMES L. MCDOWELL, U. S. Marshal.

–––

GENERAL HDQRS., OFFICE OF COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, Springfield, Ill., April 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I have just addressed you by telegraph, stating that I was greatly embarrassed by the number of volunteers which have assembled. A less number of men are now being mustered into service in each company than the telegraph announced. To send these men home will have a demoralizing effect. Will not the Government accept additional regiments in this State? It is highly important. In my message to the Legislature I have recommended the raising of ten regiments in addition to the six regiments which you have authorized. You have directed four regiments to be stationed at Cairo and two or three regiments to support the garrison at Saint Louis Arsenal. Do we not need a requisition for more men, so that we may be fully prepared to meet any demand of the General Government for any emergency? We are deeply impressed here with the necessity for such a requisition. We have about 1,400 men now in Cairo and thirteen cannon, and are sending munitions forward as rapidly as possible. We expect to send two or three regiments to-night or to-morrow to Saint Louis.

At Cincinnati and in Indiana arrangements have been made to stop supplies of provisions and articles of commerce with the South. We have directed the officer in command at Cairo to seize munitions of war passing that point, but have not yet assumed the responsibility of preventing commercial intercourse. I would respectfully direct your attention to this subject, and the importance of instructing the officer in command at Cairo with reference to the commerce of the river. The troops that were sent to Cairo have not yet been mustered into service. There was no officer here to perform that duty when your order arrived, and the emergency of the occasion was such that it became necessary to send the troops forward immediately. I hope that an officer will soon be sent to muster them into service, and also one to assume the command at that point, with definite instructions concerning commercial intercourse with the South.

Respectfully, yours,

RICHD. YATES, Governor.

{p.114}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Dover, Del., April 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your communication of the 15th instant, requesting me to cause to be immediately detached from the militia of this State one regiment, consisting of 780 men, “to serve as infantry or riflemen, for the period of three months, unless sooner discharged.”

The laws of this State confer upon the Executive no authority whatever enabling him to comply with your requisition, there being no organized militia in the State nor any law authorizing such organization.

There are volunteer companies formed and their officers commissioned by the Executive, and others are being formed, but it is altogether optional with them to offer their service to the U. S. authorities, the Executive having no power vested in him to order them into its service.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM BURTON, Governor.

–––

NEW YORK CITY, April 25, 1861.

Lieut. Gen. WINFIELD SCOTT, Commander-in-Chief, &c.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report for your information that, upon the request of the various Governors, I have, since my communication of the 23d instant, ordered the following ordnance and ordnance stores to be issued:

To Governor Dennison, 10,000 muskets from Springfield Armory and 400,000 cart ridges from Watertown Arsenal. The muskets will go forward from this city to-day, and the ammunition was forwarded from the arsenal yesterday.

To the Governor of Indiana, 5,000 muskets and 200,000 cartridges from Watertown Arsenal, which will probably go forward to-day or to-morrow.

To the Governor of New Jersey, on the requisition of Lieutenant Torbert, U. S. Army, mustering officer, 2,880 rifles or rifle muskets, with the necessary accouterments; 256 non-commissioned officers’ and musicians’ swords, and 288,000 rounds of ammunition from the New York Arsenal. Major Thornton reports on the 24th that he has furnished 2,880 percussion muskets and will send the balance of the requisition as soon as possible.

To the Governor of Massachusetts, upon his requisition, 4,000 stand of arms from Watertown Arsenal, with the necessary ammunition and accouterments, if the latter are to be obtained.

To the Governor of Vermont, on his requisition, 300 rifles, caliber .58, from Springfield Armory.

In addition to the above I have directed 40 rifle muskets to be issued from the same place to Commissary-General Welch, of this State, on the application of General Dix, chairman of the Union Committee of Defense.

Having heard from the most reliable authority that two Southern privateers were cruising off Cape Henry, I requested Commodore Breese, commanding Brooklyn Navy-Yard, to furnish a convoy to accompany and {p.115} protect the vessels carrying supplies to Washington. He could furnish but one steamer, armed with a 10-inch and two 32-pounders, with forty men which sailed at 10 o’clock this morning. Two steamers are now loading with provisions for Washington, and will go properly armed for defense against the privateers reported off Cape Henry.

Thirty thousand rations have been sent to-day by Major Eaton to Washington, 30,000 will go to-morrow, and 30,000 each day, via Havre de Grace and Annapolis, until I receive orders to the contrary from Washington.

I have been informed by the highest authority that gun-boats have been ordered at Tyne, near Newcastle and Shields, for the U. S. rebels; the guns will probably be shipped from Sunderland, near Tyne. Those places ought to be closely watched. Will the consul at Newcastle do this? This subject is worthy the consideration of the Government.

Lieutenant-Colonel Pitman arrived here this a.m. with 500 men; sails per steamer Bienville as soon as he can obtain the necessary land transportation from Annapolis to Washington. He is particularly anxious that this information should be furnished Colonel Burnside and Governor Sprague.

I have the honor to be, with considerations of the highest respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

–––

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, April 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In view of the large number of troops now en route for this city and the approaching warm weather, I would respectfully suggest the propriety of instituting preliminary arrangements for the preservation of the health of the troops. This can be secured by the selection of healthy locations apart from the city, so far as they do not involve military operations or defensive measures. The medical purveyor in New York has been requested to put up supplies for 75,000 men, and subsequently instructed by telegraph to send supplies at once to this city. Supplies will be sent as certain points are indicated for the assemblage of large bodies of troops. Until the proper amount of equipage, tents, hospital tents, &c., can be furnished, which should be prompt in reference to the approaching season, suitable arrangements for hospital purposes can be procured in the city. Arrangements have already been made for the accommodation of 400 sick.

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. WOOD, Acting Surgeon-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency OLIVER P. MORTON:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 22d [23d] instant, forwarded by Capt. R. Stevenson, and I beg to tender you the thanks of this Department for the very prompt and efficient manner in which you have responded to the requisition made upon you. The Government, I regret to say, finds itself unable to furnish at once the uniforms and {p.116} clothing demanded by the large force suddenly brought into service. Arrangements have been made to supply to the greatest extent possible, but finding that with all the energy that can be exerted is to delay troops too long by depending upon this supply, many of the States are directing their attention to the supply of their own troops to meet existing necessities. It is not in the power of the Government to furnish your State at this time with the cannon asked for, nor can there be any additional arms sent to Indiana now. The 5,000 stand which have been ordered to Indianapolis will have to be appropriated for the use of your troops mustered into the service. No additional troops beyond the regiments called for are at present needed. If the six regiments put into camp by you should be disposed to volunteer for three years, unless sooner discharged, they would be accepted; not otherwise, at this time. The camp equipage will be furnished at the earliest possible moment. The delay is unavoidable, in consequence of its scarcity on hand. The same is the case with the musket accouterments. The interruption of both the mail and the telegraph is the cause of your having received no replies to your communications.

I am, sir, very truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Ill., April 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Four regiments are now mustered into service at this place. At Cairo we have 1,274 men not mustered. Two regiments will be mustered into service at Cairo in two or three days. To-morrow we send a regiment from this point to Cairo. Besides the four regiments, we have about twenty accepted companies at this point. There are also fourteen companies at this place not accepted, and ninety-three companies in different parts of the State who have tendered their services who are fully organized and partially drilled; also a company of dragoons of 171 picked men waiting at this point to be mustered into service.

Besides the above, a large number of companies have been organized at various points, but whose services have not yet been formally tendered.

Owing to advices received from General Wool, we have not sent the regiments to Saint Louis alluded to in my letter of yesterday.

Respectfully, yours,

RICHD. YATES, Governor.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Ill., April 26, 1861.

General SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: We this day received from the Saint Louis Arsenal 21,000 stand of arms, all complete, 110,000 musket cartridges, and two field pieces, all complete. There are left there 8,000 stand of arms. We stand very much in need of the following articles, and they should be furnished to us without delay:

Complete camp and garrison equipage (including Sibley tents) for 10,000 men; camp kettles and knapsacks; musket accouterments for 21,000 men; 2,000,000 rounds of cartridges for army percussion muskets; {p.117} bayonet scabbards and belts; two batteries of 12-pounders, necessary to command the Mississippi River, with 1,000 rounds of fixed ammunition for each gun; 1,000 rounds of fixed ammunition for forty 6-pounders; clothing for three months for 10,000 men; 500 cavalry sabers for officers. We would be glad to have the messenger who carries this letter provided with the requisition upon the proper point for above articles.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. YATES, Governor.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, April 26, 1861.

Col. E. D. KEYES, U. S. Army:

SIR: You will report by direction of the General-in-Chief to His Excellency the Governor of New York, to counsel and aid him in organizing the quota of troops called for from his State, as far as may be in your power.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

NOTE.-Colonel Keyes will return to Washington when the Governor can dispense with his services.

By command of Lieutenant-General Scott:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency Gov. WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM:

Your messenger, Colonel Perkins, called on me to-day to express your desire that the Government of the United States should accept at this time two regiments of militia or volunteers instead of the one called for in my requisition.

I am deeply sensible of the patriotism which induces the gallant men of Connecticut to come forward at this time of the country’s peril and of Your Excellency’s zeal, and regret that I cannot at this moment gratify your wishes; but I am authorized to say that immediately after the defense of the city is completed raw forces will be needed to keep the channels of communication open.

It is the wish of the Department of War that the forces to be called for hereafter shall volunteer for three years, unless sooner discharged, and in this connection I am directed to say that another regiment will be received at once, if volunteered for three years.

Very respectfully, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: It will be conceded, I presume, that there should be no delay in pressing forward those portions of the fortifications at Key West {p.118} and Tortugas that are indispensable to defense and efficiency. Equally necessary is it to push forward the works at Sandy Hook, New York Harbor, where now we are not ready for a single gun, but where by December we may be ready for between forty and fifty 8-inch columbiads most advantageously placed. As regards this last fort, it must be understood that until it can be brought into effect an enemy’s squadron can occupy the lower bay of New York and completely seal up the harbor without being under fire of a single gun or mortar. To do what seems to me indispensable will, besides some small grants from time to time for contingent services, and for the conservation of other works, need the following sums for the remaining months of this calendar year, making a total much below the sums appropriated for the works mentioned. And I beg on the part of this great military interest that the Treasury may be willing to meet the corresponding monthly estimates, it being understood that the disbursing officers shall be restricted absolutely to these amounts, and instructed to render their monthly calls lower if possible. I beg the earliest reply, so that I may direct the officers to make the requisite provisions for stopping work or for going on, according to the decision. I cannot take the responsibility of not putting forward this statement of the necessities of the Engineer Department, at the same time promising to keep down other expenditures on fortifications to the lowest possible sum; that is, stopping work thereon, and merely keeping them from damage.

I ask to be authorized to direct engagements for the three fortifications mentioned as stated below for each month till December, inclusive, making a total sum for the three of $213,000.

May$14,000October$27,000
June12,000November27,000
July30,000December29,000
August30,000Total213,000
September44,000

I am, &c.,

JOS. G. TOTTEN, Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa, Iowa City:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 16th and two of the 18th instant are received. Thanking you for the speedy and prompt action you have taken in response to the call of the President for troops, I have to say in answer that it is not contemplated to remove the troops from the State of Iowa that may be raised there, and should that contingency arise, steps have already been taken to see that sufficient arms for the protection of your people shall be furnished.

If it suits your convenience and that of the troops better, the place of rendezvous may be changed from Keokuk to Davenport. Until mustered into the service of the United States the troops will be at the expense of the State. The Federal Government will furnish arms and equipments for the troops. An officer of the U. S. Army will be detailed to inspect the troops at their place of rendezvous and muster them into service. The surgeons, as all other officers for the State militia of the respective States, are appointed or elected under the State authority, according to the laws of each particular State.

{p.119}

At present no more troops than those called for can be accepted, but the Department does not doubt that the loyal and patriotic people of Iowa are prepared to meet promptly any call the necessities of the Government may hereafter require.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

AUGUSTA, ME., April 26, 1861. (Received 30th.)

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

One regiment can march next Tuesday. Where and how shall it go? Can you give me orders for arms and fixed ammunition in Kennebec Arsenal? Another regiment can move in ten days.

I. WASHBURN, JR., Governor of Maine.

–––

AUGUSTA, April 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The regiment you called for from this State will be ready to be mustered into the service of the United States by Monday or Tuesday next, and the troops will be impatient to move. They can go by rail or steamer. There are good steamers to be had at Portland. Two or three more regiments may be in readiness in ten days. The ardor is irrepressible. Can Captain Gardiner obtain arms from the Kennebec Arsenal and fixed ammunition? They are wanted immediately. Requisitions have already been made upon the proper officer, which I fear have not been received.

Can Maine be furnished with arms-rifled muskets or other efficient arms-by the United States?

I have the honor to be, &c.,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR., Governor.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency ISRAEL WASHBURN, Jr., Governor of Maine:

MY DEAR SIR: I have to tender you the thanks of this Department for your prompt and patriotic response to the call of the President for troops from your State. In reply to your inquiry contained in your letter of the 19th instant I have already telegraphed you that if the troops could be immediately sent forward you should send a second regiment at once.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HAVRE DE GRACE, April 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

SIR: I have obtained an order from General Wool to garrison the forts and arsenals, but it is of the utmost importance to obtain authority to purchase at least three steamers and equip them for coast defense. {p.120} This can be done at a moderate cost, and the merchants of Boston are anxious to secure so great a protection to commerce. They can be used effectively upon the Southern coast. I trust that you will transmit an order to Governor Andrew by the bearer of this, Mr. Augustus H. Bixby.

I am, your obedient servant,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL.

–––

HAVRE DE GRACE, April 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

SIR: I have written upon the letter of Governor Andrew, which Mr. Bixby will hand to you.

I cannot too strongly impress upon the Government the importance of authorizing Governor Andrew to procure three steamers for the protection of the coast and to aid in a blockade of the Southern ports. The New York merchants are anxious to do the same. I hope you will grant the order. Governor Andrew will put the work of preparation into the hands of our best merchants, who will charge no commissions whatever.

The whole North is wild and determined in its enthusiasm. Should not the Government make another requisition? They will be needed, I fear, and a short and vigorous campaign around Washington will be advantageous in the highest degree.

I am, very truly, your obedient servant,

GEO. S. BOUTWELL.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency AUSTIN BLAIR, Governor of Michigan:

MY DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge yours of the 19th instant, in reference to the call of the President for one regiment of troops from the State of Michigan, and to convey to you the thanks of the President and myself for your very prompt and speedy action. At present no further troops than those called for are needed, but as the President is limited to the period of three months in his call it is quite probable that a further demand may be made upon the patriotism of your people. In that event an enrollment and organization now would enable you to comply very speedily with such a call, should it be necessary to make it.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey, Trenton:

DEAR SIR: I have Your Excellency’s letter of the 24th instant by Mr. Dod. The Department is unable at present to furnish accouterments, but they are being prepared as rapidly as possible and will be supplied as early as practicable. The New Jersey troops will be encamped, and not moved for the present. Your quota has been attached to the military district commanded by Major-General Patterson, and will be detailed for service by him as they may be required. The Government has no immediate use for such volunteer corps as Major Hexamer {p.121} proposes to furnish, and therefore I regret to say cannot accept his patriotic offer. No further troops beyond the quota of your State can be received at present unless they will agree to volunteer for the period of three years, if not sooner discharged. In that event and upon such terms one or two regiments more would be accepted from your State and mustered into service.

I am, dear sir, very truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN, Governor of New York:

DEAR SIR: I have to repeat the acknowledgment of this Department for your prompt and energetic action in sending forward the troops of your State. In regard to the suggestions contained in yours of the 22d instant, they have been made the subject of careful consideration, and such measures adopted by the officers in command as circumstances permitted.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency E. FAIRBANKS, Governor of Vermont:

MY DEAR SIR: Yours of the 18th instant, owing to the interruption of the mails, has just reached me. I beg to assure you that the President and myself highly appreciate the patriotic promptness with which you have responded to the call of the Government in the present emergency. From the high character of your people for loyalty I have no doubt they will cheerfully and enthusiastically respond to this demand upon their patriotism and aid in maintaining the Constitution and enforcing the laws of the country.

I am, dear sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

OFFICE OF THE ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD CO., New York, April 26, 1861.

The Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: The directors of the Illinois Central Railway have reminded the general superintendent of the duty of this company to keep its road an open highway for the use of the Government of the United States.

In the present emergency the directors presume that the Government will not be desirous to take any steps to provide itself with means for transportation, and as the directors are desirous to serve the Government to the best of their ability, they beg to advise you that they have in their control 110 engines and 2,600 freight cars, and about 3,500 men employed; that the regular business of the company shall be set aside at any moment, and every facility which the utmost energy and an {p.122} earnest desire to sustain the Government can bring to bear shall be afforded. The company will keep an account of the service, and leave the adjustment of the compensation for the use of its rolling-stock to be arranged in the future. Please direct that communications, if any are to be sent, shall be addressed to W. R. Arthur, general superintendent, Chicago, whose duty and pleasure it will be to execute the orders intrusted to him.

I have the honor to be, sir, your most obedient servant,

W. H. OSBORN, President.

–––

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas, for the reasons assigned in my proclamation of the 19th instant, a blockade of the ports of the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas was ordered to be established;

And whereas since that date public property of the United states has been seized, the collection of the revenue obstructed, and duly commissioned officers of the United States while engaged in executing the orders of their superiors have been arrested and held in custody as prisoners, or have been impeded in the discharge of their official duties without due legal process by persons claiming to act under authorities of the States of Virginia and North Carolina:

An efficient blockade of the ports of those States will also be established.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this twenty-seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 27, 1861.

His Excellency OLIVER P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana, Indianapolis:

DEALT SIR: Since writing mine of the 26th instant, yours of the 24th instant is received per special messenger. A part of the arms ordered to your State were from Harper’s Ferry Armory, which was destroyed before they could be sent, hence the failure to receive your complement. To supply this you are authorized to make your requisition on the commandant of the arsenal at Saint Louis for 1,500 arms, and to whom an order has been forwarded. Accouterments are being made with all dispatch and will be furnished as early as practicable. The other matters contained in your letter will be duly considered and you advised of the conclusions arrived at in due time.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.123}

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Omaha, Nebr., April 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I feel it to be my duty to call your attention to the condition of this Territory, arising out of the general troubles of the country and the withdrawal of the U. S. troops from Fort Randall and Fort Kearny. I need not say to the Department that a necessity exists for military defenses at many assailable points between the Missouri River and the mountains. The forces taken from Randall and Kearny could be but illy spared. I have not only corresponded, but have seen and conversed, with Colonel Miles, lately in command at Fort Kearny, and he agrees with me that something should be promptly done for the protection of our frontier. Besides, there are large amounts of arms of all kinds at Fort Kearny belonging to the United States, and only one single company of troops there.

I do not doubt but that serious troubles will result to this Territory from Indians and others unless we are in some way re-enforced or furnished with the means of defense. To the flag and Constitution of the United States the people of Nebraska are loyal and true. Volunteer companies are now organized, and others are organizing in different parts of the Territory, and I respectfully recommend and urge that provision be made for mustering as many as may be necessary into the service of the United States. It occurs to me that they might be of great service to the Government, and that through them not only the safety of the people would be secured, but that all the public property would thus be rendered entirely safe. On very short call Nebraska Territory could furnish seven or eight companies-one or two of dragoons and the remainder of infantry. I am informed by Colonel Miles that there are arms enough at Fort Kearny for at least eight companies.

Although I have been superseded in office, my successor has not yet arrived in the Territory, and will not be here for several weeks. Believing it to be vitally important that something should be done at once, I have taken the liberty of writing this letter. If in any way I can be of service in carrying out the plans of the Government, or your wishes or suggestions, please consider that I am already at your service.

Respectfully,

SAML. W. BLACK.

P. S.-Since writing the above I have received reliable information that hostile Indians in very large numbers have made their appearance in the Platte Valley. They are reported to be bands of Cheyennes, and some of the worst of the Sioux. One of the mail stations of the Western Stage Company has been entirely destroyed. This intelligence is brought by the Denver express messenger who arrived to-day.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., May 9, 1861.

It is understood that Nebraska is called upon for a quota of volunteers under the new call. The General-in-Chief is in favor of posting those volunteers, as in Minnesota, at the military posts, and withdrawing the regulars to where they are much more necessary.

Respectfully submitted.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.124}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 27, 1861.

Col. H. B. CARRINGTON, Columbus, Ohio:

DEAR SIR: I have yours of the 23d instant, and would tender to you, as I have already done to His Excellency the Governor of Ohio, the thanks of this Department for the promptness and energy with which you have met the call of the Government.

I regret that, according to the plan adopted and under which this Department is acting, we can only accept for the present the quota first called for from Ohio. You will do well, however, in organizing and drilling other regiments so as to be prepared to meet any emergency that may arise.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., April 28, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, Commanding Department of the East, New York:

GENERAL: The General-in-Chief directs me to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 25th instant and to say in reply that the very great necessity which exists for carrying out the business of the several staff departments with system, under their proper chiefs, compels him to request you will give no orders interfering with the purchase or issue of army supplies, such orders being, in all cases, dictated by the General-in-Chief himself. The General regrets your infirm health does not permit him to assign you to an important command away from your headquarters, and he recommends that you return to Troy to conduct the ordinary routine duties of your department and for the recovery of your health, known by him to be feeble.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-To prevent waste of the exceedingly liberal means offered by committees of private citizens for the use of the United States, the General has begged that the purchase and forwarding of all ordinary or regular army supplies by such committees may be made in consultation with the several staff officers charged with those duties in the principal cities. This, of course, does not apply to extra stores not authorized by any regulations which committees or friends may desire to provide for the volunteer troops.

Respectfully,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 28, 1861.

Maj. Gen. ROBERT PATTERSON:

SIR: Your letter of the 25th instant, requesting that you “be authorized to muster into service of the United States one or more regiments of loyal Delawareans,” &c., is before me, and in reply, beg leave to say that it has been the design of this Department to confer such authority {p.125} upon you, and you are hereby authorized to muster into service any company, battalion, or regiment of loyal Delawareans or Marylanders which may offer itself to you for service, the officers to be selected by the company, battalion, or regiment, as the case may be, and the list to be transmitted to this Department for approval. The President having determined to add twenty-five regiments to the Regular Army to serve for three years, unless sooner dismissed, you will make known to those Delawareans and Marylanders offering their services that they will be mustered into service for three years, unless sooner discharged.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Ind., April 28, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have the honor to inform you that the organization of the six regiments required of Indiana has this day been completed by the appointment of a brigadier-general, brigade major, six colonels, six lieutenant-colonels, and six majors. The names of officers appointed will be found in a schedule herewith inclosed, and the regiments to which they are attached. The officers and troops are now in camp in this city, and subject to your command. They are encamped in booths, being provided with but few tents, and having but a limited amount of camp equipage. I have not attempted thus far to provide tents and equipage except such as are necessary for present use, not knowing whether the Government was already prepared to furnish them, nor what might be the views of the Department on the subject. Discipline is going forward as rapidly as possible; the best of order prevails in the camp, and the men are in fine condition. Preparations will be made immediately to remove four regiments to Evansville, in accordance with your order bearing date April 19, and everything will be ready for their march as soon as their arms and accouterments shall have arrived. Fifteen hundred rifled muskets have been received from the Allegheny Arsenal and 2,000 more are expected this week, and we have been informed that no more can be obtained from that quarter. A dispatch received on the 25th instant from General John E. Wool states that 5,000 muskets and 200,000 cartridges would be shipped from Watertown Arsenal to this State, but no time was fixed for their shipment, and I have received no further information on the subject. As you will perceive, the arms received and those expected this week will fall short of arming six regiments nearly 1,000, and I regret to learn from the quartermaster that those received are of an inferior character, being old muskets rifled out, and in very many instances the bayonets have to be driven on with a hammer, and many others are so loose that they can be shaken off. No accouterments have been received, and I have no definite information when they will be. Orders have been issued for their manufacture, but our mechanics are not prepared for it, and the work proceeds very slowly. I regret to add that great dissatisfaction prevails in the army with regard to the quality of the arms furnished and the delay and uncertainty in the reception of stores and accouterments. I hazard nothing in saying that a finer body of men than those composing the six regiments has never been assembled on the continent, and if properly furnished and sent into the field would not fail to vindicate the {p.126} honor of our arms. It is now nine days since I have had the honor to hear from the Department, and from lack of information I am unable to take-such steps for furnishing accouterments, equipage, and supplies as I otherwise should.

In addition to the six regiments, there are in camp in this city 2,300 men, and the number will probably be increased to six regiments, who, will be mustered into the service of the State to serve during the war, and the number in different parts of the State who hold themselves ready to march upon notice can be put down as six regiments more.

I beg leave most earnestly again to call your immediate attention to the subject of furnishing our State with arms. The number on hand belonging to the State, good, bad, and indifferent, will not exceed 2,500, and only fifteen pieces of artillery of small caliber. The country along the Ohio River bordering on Kentucky is in a state of intense alarm. The people entertain no doubt but that Kentucky will speedily go out of the Union. They are in daily fear that marauding parties from the other side of the river will plunder and burn their towns. The demands upon me for arms for their defense are constant, to which I am compelled to reply that I have them not and know not when or whether I can get them. A bill will pass our Legislature, probably on to-morrow, appropriating half a million of dollars for the purchase of arms, but I am informed that the engagements of the Eastern manufactories are such that they cannot be procured perhaps for months.

This State is one of the four exposed by its geographical position to the immediate evils of civil war, and it does seem to me should be preferred, in the distribution of arms, over those geographically distant from the scene of conflict. If in your opinion these considerations are entitled to weight, I trust that at least 20,000 stand of arms will be promptly shipped to this State, with a large supply of artillery, which is indispensably necessary to prevent our river towns from being bombarded and burned by batteries erected on the other side of the river.

Indiana is loyal to the core, and will expend her best blood and treasure without limit for the successful prosecution of this war, and it is due to her loyalty that she be provided for by the General Government to the extent of its capacity.

The bearer of this dispatch is the Hon. John D. Howland, who will receive any communication.

With great respect,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Ind., April 27, 1861.

The following-named persons have been commissioned officers of the grades set opposite their names, respectively, in the quota of forces called for from this State under the President’s proclamation of the 15th instant. Their relative rank in each grade is determined by the order of precedence herewith announced. They will be obeyed and respected accordingly:

Brigadier.-Thomas A. Morris is assigned to the command of the First Brigade, Indiana Volunteers, mustered into the U. S. service.

Major.-John Love is announced as brigade major.

{p.127}

Colonels.-Ebenezer Dumont, Seventh Regiment; Joseph J. Reynolds, Tenth Regiment; Lew. Wallace, Eleventh Regiment; William P. Benton, Eighth Regiment; R. H. Milroy, Ninth Regiment; T. T. Crittenden, Sixth Regiment.

Lieutenant-colonels.-Silas Colgrove, Eighth Regiment; Ben. J. Spooner, Seventh Regiment; J. R. M. Bryant, Tenth Regiment; D. M. Dunn, Ninth Regiment; George F. McGinnis, Eleventh Regiment; Hiram Prather, Sixth Regiment.

Majors.-C. O. Wood, Eleventh Regiment; D. J. Woodward, Ninth Regiment; S. P. Oyler, Seventh Regiment; David Shunk, Eighth Regiment; M. D. Manson, Tenth Regiment; John Gerber, Sixth Regiment.

Colonel Reynolds will remain in camp until further orders.

O. P. MORTON, Commander-in-Chief.

–––

NEW YORK, April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have sent to Pennsylvania 23,000 stand of arms, all that has been required, excepting 1,600 rifle muskets, new pattern, which we have not on hand. I have sent 13,000 to Ohio and have ordered 5,000 more. I have sent 5,000 to Indiana. Altogether these, with the calls from the Governors of New York and Massachusetts, authorized by the War Department, have reduced the number on hand to a very few thousand.

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa, Iowa City:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 19th instant, inclosing Judge Baldwin’s letter in relation to the furnishing of arms at Council Bluffs, has been received. The matters embraced in it have been the subject of consideration by this Department. It is not intended to order the State troops from the West at present, and they will therefore be on hand to meet any want occasioned by the removal of the U. S. forces. Should they be ordered to other points, provision will be made to meet any of the emergencies Judge Baldwin apprehends.

I am, dear sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: I am without any communication from you since your requisition for one regiment of troops. I have not heard from Senator Grimes, who went to Washington at my special request. I have one regiment ready to be mustered in on any day. I am ordering a second regiment this day into the service of the State. It can be turned over to the United States at anytime, and a third regiment is anxiously waiting to be ordered into service. I can raise 10,000 in this State in twenty {p.128} days, but the State has not any arms. Receiving arms only upon the Congressional apportionment of 1850, the number received is so small as to amount to nothing, and being all the old-fashioned muskets, our boys don’t feel willing to carry them to the field to meet men armed with better weapons. I am daily receiving letters from our northwestern frontier expressing alarm on account of the Indians. Our people there are very uneasy, and have in my judgment good cause for fear. I don’t ask for anything but arms, accouterments, and ammunition. We have plenty of men willing to use them in their own defense and that of the Government. If no arrangement has yet been made for arms for this State, do, for God’s sake, send us some. We should have at least 5,000 beyond those required to arm the troops the United States may require-say, one-half rifles.

Your earliest possible attention will confer a great favor on your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency ISRAEL WASHBURN, Jr., Governor of Maine, Augusta:

MY DEAR SIR: In answer to yours of the 23d instant, I reply that you have the authority of this Department to occupy the forts named with such company or companies of the Maine troops as may be deemed necessary. The officer designated to muster your troops into service has full authority and directions to furnish them with arms, equipments, ammunition, &c., and in doing so will provide them with the best quality that can be obtained. I also have at this moment yours of the 26th instant, and add that the Maine troops mustered into service will remain at their rendezvous until they receive orders from the proper officer to report at some other point.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

DEAR SIR: I commend to your acquaintance Hon. E. R. Hoar, of Massachusetts, a judge of our Supreme Judicial Court, and one of our most eminent men. I trust he may have an opportunity for conference with the Government at Washington, especially in regard to our Massachusetts movements, opinions, and troops.

I wish to avail myself of this opportunity to urge again the propriety of your mustering some raw regiments into service here, and let them be drilled at the forts.

Yours, faithfully, &c.,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 29, 1861.

Messrs. WILDER DWIGHT and GEORGE L. ANDREWS:

The plan you communicate for raising a regiment in Massachusetts for service during the war meets my approval. Such a regiment shall {p.129} be immediately enlisted in the service of the Government as one of those which are to be called for immediately. The regiment shall be ordered to Fort Independence, or some other station in Boston Harbor, for purposes of training, equipment, and drill, and shall be kept there two months or more unless an emergency compels their presence elsewhere.

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, April 29, 1861.

Hon. Z. CHANDLER:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 21st instant, having inclosed in it a letter of the adjutant-general of your State soliciting your influence with this Department to secure the acceptance of a brigade instead of a regiment of troops, under the requisition made on your Governor. It would give me pleasure to be able to gratify your wishes, but this can only now be done in one way. The President has determined to accept no more for three months’ service than the number called for in the requisitions made upon the Governors of the different States, but to add to the Regular Army twenty-five volunteer regiments, whose members shall agree to serve for two years unless sooner discharged. This will enable this Department to accept the additional regiment from your State, provided it be willing to be mustered into service for two years unless sooner discharged.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

General J. M. THAYER, Omaha, Nebr. Ter.:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 19th instant is received. Your patriotic offer is honorable to yourself and command. In reply, I have to say that whenever it becomes necessary to withdraw the troops from Forts Kearny and Randall volunteers will be accepted to take their place.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

JOSEPH C. ABBOTT, Adjutant-General of New Hampshire, Concord:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 23d instant. The promptness and patriotic manner in which your State responded to the recent requisition of this Department, as well as the proffer you make to “respond promptly to any call which may be made for troops,” gives me great pleasure, and fills me with admiration for your people.

{p.130}

With every disposition to arm the State troops in the best manner, I am constrained, from the necessity of the case and consideration for the public interest, to decline complying with your request in relation to rifled muskets.

Very respectfully, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., April 29, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: I inclose you a copy of a communication received by me from E. R. V. Wright, major-general of the Second Division of the New Jersey State Militia, the object of which is to inform you through me that the officers of that division have unanimously resolved to tender to you the services of the said division, which tender is to continue as long as you may require such service. It is truly gratifying to me to be made the channel of transmission of so patriotic an offer.

I remain, with great respect, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

[Indorsement.]

MAY 4, 1861.

I recommend that the division named within be admitted into the new corps of volunteers just called for.

A. LINCOLN.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. SECOND DIVISION, NEW JERSEY MILITIA, April 27, 1861.

To His Excellency CHARLES S. OLDEN:

YOUR EXCELLENCY: In obedience to my request, the officers of the Second Division of the New Jersey Militia met at Military Hall, in the city of Newark, on Friday, April 26, 1861.

At such meeting, duly organized, the following resolution was adopted unanimously. I have the honor to inclose it:

Resolved, That the major-general be authorized to tender the services of the Second Division to the President of the United States through the Governor of this State, which tender is to continue as long as the President may require such service.

Wherefore, in obedience to such resolution, I hereby tender to His Excellency the President of the United States of America the services of the Second Division of the Militia of New Jersey, and respectfully request that you will communicate the same to His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States. There is treason in the land. Crush it out!

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. R. V. WRIGHT, Major-General Second Division, New Jersey State Militia.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN, Governor of New York:

MY DEAR SIR: I have yours of the 24th instant. This Department has again to acknowledge its many obligations to Your Excellency for {p.131} the promptness and dispatch with which you have sent forward your troops for the defense of the capital. I have to request that you will not send any more to this point until you are further advised.

I have the honor to subscribe myself, very truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency WILLIAM DENNISON, Governor of Ohio, Columbus:

DEAR SIR: I have Your Excellency’s several letters of the 20th and 22d instant, and in reply to the same would say that the application for ordnance to be used at Cincinnati has been referred to the bureau having that arm of the service in charge, with instructions to reply to the same; and your request to have an officer of the U. S. Army detailed to take command of the volunteer forces at Cincinnati has been referred to Lieutenant-General Scott for his action in the premises.

As to accepting additional regiments beyond the contingent of your State, I regret to say that they cannot be received under the requisition. But the President has authorized the raising of twenty-five additional regiments under the act of 1846, a copy of which has been forwarded to you, and should they agree to enter the service of the Government for three years, or during the war, a portion of them at least could be received in that way.

I am, dear sir, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Harrisburg, Pa., April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Washington:

DEAR SIR: The gentlemen who will hand you this letter will state to you the purpose of their visit to Washington. My attention has been directed for some time to the absolute necessity for prompt action for the protection of the loyal people on our borders, and but for the additional call on this State some arrangement would have been made to supply their wants. I take advantage of the means of communicating with you to say that we have about 14,000 stand of old arms in Pennsylvania on which we could place percussion locks, or they could be made breech-loading rifles at an expense of from $2 to $3 a musket. I suggest the propriety of doing this, so that they could be placed in the hands of our people. I will be most happy to meet the wishes of the gentlemen who carry this in any manner you may indicate.

Yours, truly,

A. G. CURTIN.

–––

1. Can the quota from Pennsylvania be increased, and to what amount?

2. Will the General Government provide for the soldier as soon as mustered into service direct, or is it expected to be done through the agency of the State?

{p.132}

3. Are blankets, knapsacks, haversacks, tents, accouterments, and every sort of soldier and camp equipage furnished by the General Government? If so, is it desirable that the State should furnish and settle with the Government for the same or will it be done directly by the Government?

4. Are the soldiers to be uniformed by the State? And if so, will the expense incurred by so doing be reimbursed to the State by the General Government?

S. Will the General Government assume the cost of transportation of troops from their homes to the place of rendezvous?

6. Is it desirable that the State should forward any clothing or equipments to the troops that have left their places of rendezvous and are now at Washington or on their way there? If so, what are the articles that should be provided?

7. Furnish copy of voucher that will be required by the General Government for all expenses that may be paid by the State for the same.

8. Will officers of the U. S. Army be permitted to take command of volunteers without losing their grade in the regular service?

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg:

DEAR SIR: In answer to the queries propounded by you to this Department,* and presented by A. J. Dickey, esq., I have the honor to reply:

First. That the quota of militia from Pennsylvania cannot be increased at present; but the President has authorized the raising of twenty-five regiments of volunteers, to serve for three years or during the continuance of the war. Under this call one or two regiments, on the conditions stated, will be received from Pennsylvania.

Second. The soldier, as soon as mustered into service, is provided for by the United States.

Third. Camp equipage is always supplied by the United States, but not being able to do so as rapidly as needed, would recommend to your State to do so, and present bill for the same. Clothing is sometimes issued to volunteers. Just at present we have not the supplies, but they are being prepared as rapidly as possible. The soldier receives a monthly allowance for clothing in addition to his pay.

Fourth. See above.

Fifth. The law provides pay as transportation from place of rendezvous to the place of muster.

Sixth. Not knowing the wants of the troops, it is difficult to answer this. Arms and equipments are furnished by the United States. Should the troops be in immediate want of any clothing or equipments and the State can furnish them, the United States Government will reimburse the expense of doing so; but being out of the regular order of furnishing supplies, I could not, of course, direct that it should be done.

Seventh. The Department has no regular form of voucher for the purpose desired. Any form that would specify the matter in such detail as to enable the matter to be passed upon would be sufficient.

{p.133}

Eighth. In consequence of the numerous resignations in the Army, the Department does not feel at liberty at present to detail any officers to the duty indicated.

I hope the foregoing will be sufficiently full and satisfactory for your purpose.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours, &c.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Next, acts.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

His Excellency ERASTUS FAIRBANKS, Governor of Vermont, Montpelier:

DEAR SIR: In answer to yours of the 23d and 24th instant, I have to say that you are hereby authorized to make the change in the place of rendezvous for the Vermont troops according to your request. On being mustered into service your troops will be supplied by the United States with arms, and of the best quality the Government can supply. I regret to say that I am not permitted to sell any of the arms belonging to the Government, and the supply, from causes of which you are aware, is so limited that we find some difficulty in furnishing what are immediately required by the wants of the Government.

Very truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April .29, 1861.

Hon. ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin, Madison:

DEAR SIR: It gives me pleasure to acknowledge your prompt and patriotic response to the requisition of the President for a regiment of troops from your State. Orders will be forwarded by the commanding officer in due time detailing them for such services as the exigency may require.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 29, 1861.

JACOB DODSON (colored), Washington City:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 23d instant, I have to say that this Department has no intention at present to call into the service of the Government any colored soldiers.

With respect, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 30, 1861.

The President directs that all officers of the Army, except those who have entered the service since the 1st instant, take and subscribe anew {p.134} the oath of allegiance to the United States of America, as set forth in the tenth Article of War.

Commanding officers will see to a prompt execution of this order, and report accordingly.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

NEW YORK April 30, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: Herewith I send you an official communication from Governor Washburn, of Maine. I trust you will order at least three more regiments from Maine mustered into the service of the United States, and they will be ready to march in a few days.

You must take the regiment which will be ready May 8.

Yours, truly,

H. HAMLIN.

[Inclosure.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta Me., April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The second regiment from Maine will be ready to march Wednesday, May 8. As it will be raised in the eastern part of the State, it will be convenient for it to rendezvous at Bangor. It can be moved to Boston without expense, as railroad companies and steamboats have tendered free transportation.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WASHINGTON, April 30, 1861.

The Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: By authority given to me by His Excellency Governor Andrew, of Massachusetts, I respectfully submit a proposition that Governor Andrew will cause to be enlisted in that State one or two regiments of soldiers in addition to the one to be raised under the authority granted to Messrs. Wilder Dwight and George L. Andrews, to serve during the war or for a period of three years.

The State of Massachusetts will furnish everything needed to secure the efficiency and comfort of the regiments that cannot be promptly furnished by the Government of the United States, with the understanding that the troops so raised shall be officered in the best manner and stationed for a period of two months in Fort Independence, or other forts in the harbor of Boston, unless an emergency shall sooner require their services elsewhere. It being further understood as follows:

First. The regiments to be forthwith mustered as part of the militia of Massachusetts into the U. S. service.

Second. On the passage of a law by Congress the men composing the regiments to be enlisted into the Army for the term of three years or during the war.

{p.135}

Third. Until such permanent and binding enlistment the regiment to receive only its rations from the Government, and each man to agree not to claim any pay unless he enlists for three years or during the war as soon as legal authority for such enlistment can be provided.

GEO. S. BOUTWELL.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 30, 1861.

GEORGE S. BOUTWELL:

SIR: The plan which you communicate for and in behalf of His Excellency Governor Andrew for raising two regiments in Massachusetts for service during the war meets my approval. Such regiments shall be immediately enlisted into the service of the Government as those which are to be called for immediately. The regiments shall be ordered to Fort Independence, or some other station in Boston Harbor, for purposes of training, equipment, and drill, and shall be kept there two months or more, unless an emergency compels their presence elsewhere.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

NAVY DEPARTMENT, April 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a letter of the 21st instant addressed to me by Col. Samuel Colt, of Hartford, in relation to matters concerning your branch of the public service, and to request that you will at the earliest day practicable inform me what answer I shall communicate to Colonel Colt.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

GIDEON WELLES.

[First indorsement.]

Referred to Chief of Ordnance for his opinion.

SIMON CAMERON.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, May 1, 1861.

Respectfully returned. Mr. Colt’s letter is not sufficiently definite as to the kind of arms he can furnish (whether muskets, rifles, or pistols, and of what calibers and patterns) to enable me to answer his inquiry. It is known that he makes pistols, of which we should have a sufficient supply of the latest pattern constantly on hand, and of which we now have none.

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT NICHOLAS HOTEL, New York, April 21, 1861.

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.:

I started for Washington with the purpose of ascertaining to what extent the Federal Government might desire to employ the forces at our {p.136} manufactory in Hartford, and am stopped here by sickness. We can produce if required 100,000 military arms this year, which amount may be afterward increased to an indefinite number. Please bring this subject before the President and Secretary of War, and telegraph me to what extent the Government may wish to employ our armory. Until then I shall suspend individual orders for military arms. Shall I send Mr. Root to see you?

SAM. COLT.

–––

TREASURY DEPARTMENT, April 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herein copy of a communication, dated 28th of April, 1861, Sunday morning, from Messrs. John A. Dix, R. M. Blatchford, and George Opdyke, special disbursing agents of the Government at New York, with the request that an early response thereto may be made.

Very respectfully,

S. P. CHASE, Secretary of the Treasury.

[Inclosure.]

UNION DEFENSE COMMITTEE OF CITIZENS OF NEW YORK, Office No. 30 Pine Street, N. Y., April 28, 1861.

Hon. S. P. CHASE, Secretary of the Treasury:

SIR: We wrote you yesterday in regard to the want of specific instructions for the expenditure of the $2,000,000 placed to our credit as U. S. agents.

Your letter of the 24th instant has just been received, with the Harrisburg postmark of the 27th (yesterday). We notice that “the purpose of this fund is to meet only such requisitions as may be directly consequent upon the military and naval measures necessary for the defense and support of the Government,” and that we “are therefore authorized and requested to pay such demands upon” us, “within the above limit, as are presented to” us “by the duly constituted agents of the Government.”

That we may be sure we understand rightly the scope of your directions we send a special messenger with this letter, and ask your reply to the following questions, viz:

First. Is the term “requisition” in your letter to be received by us in its strictly official sense, i.e., as emanating from one of the departments at Washington, or would it be sufficient for us to have requisitions, say, from the navy agent, the U. S. quartermaster, commissary, or ordnance officer on duty here, for moneys to meet naval and military expenditures, such requisitions being approved by Major-General Wool or Commodore Breese?

Second. Steamers have been engaged, under the direction of the Union Defense Committee, to transport troops to Annapolis, and are now actively engaged in that service. Can we, on the requisition of the committee, or of Major-General Wool, pay the amount agreed on? The communication with the Government having been cut off, and it being understood that the city of Washington was in peril, we had no alternative but to assume the responsibility of providing the necessary transportation for our troops.

{p.137}

Third. Colonel Dimick, at Fort Monroe, is greatly in want of a small armed steamer to protect parties from the fort sent out for water, &c. We decided last evening to dispatch one, the cost to be $100 per day. Can we pay the expense of arming; and, if so, on the requisition of what officer?

Fourth. A depot of coal is indispensable near Fort Monroe to supply our steamers on service in that quarter. We sent last evening to New Bedford, through Mr. Aspinwall, to ascertain if we could purchase one or two old whaling ships at a moderate cost, to be anchored under the guns of Fort Monroe, so that the steamers could run alongside and coal. Can this expenditure be met, and if so, on whose requisition?

Fifth. The Union Defense Committee have paid out over $100,000 in sending off troops for the defense of the city of Washington. Can the sums thus expended be repaid, and if so, on what requisition?

We make these inquiries because we understand the necessity of acting, if possible, within the restrictions of the law. Our duties would be much simplified if the funds intrusted to us could be paid out on requisitions from U. S. disbursing officers, approved by the army officer in charge of the district and the naval commandant at Brooklyn, so that all expenditures should be authorized and payments made by them. We understand that the capital is safe, and that no extraordinary responsibility need be assumed till we hear from you.

We are, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

JOHN A. DIX. R. M. BLATCHFORD. GEORGE OPDYKE.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 30, 1861.

Hon. JOSHUA R. GIDDINGS, Consul-General of the United States to the British North American Provinces:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 22d instant, communicating to this Department that Harrison Stephens, esq., of Montreal, is willing to open recruiting quarters at Rouse’s Point and raise a regiment of troops for our Government, is received. You will do me the favor to communicate to Mr. Stephens the high appreciation entertained by this Department of the kind and generous motives and sentiments which prompted his liberal offer; but be pleased at the same time to assure him that this Government relies confidently not only upon its great material resources, but also on the loyalty and devotion of a large majority of its people, to suppress the present attempt to overthrow the Republic. Our own citizen soldiery are rushing to arms in such vast numbers, and importuning the Government to accept their services in defense of the Constitution and laws, that it is obliged to decline the services of many more of them than it can accept. Under these circumstances it will not be difficult to convince Mr. Stephens that it is not from any want of confidence in his capacity as a soldier, nor lack of appreciation of the noble and generous impulse that prompted the offer, that I am compelled, on behalf of my Government, most respectfully to decline its acceptance.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.138}

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, April 30, 1861.

Major General PATTERSON, Commanding, &c., Philadelphia, Pa.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs me to say that the Secretary of War has decided no officer of the Regular Army can be spared to serve in the quotas of volunteers from States.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WASHINGTON, April 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In several parts of Maryland there is a strong disposition to respond to the call of the President for volunteers to defend the national capital, but in the existing state of things, the executive authority being controlled by an organization unfriendly to the object of the President of the United States in calling for troops, no commission could be obtained for the officers, either of a brigade or regiment, from the Governor of Maryland. My present purpose in addressing you is to inquire-

First. Whether the United States Government would have the authority to commission the officers of a brigade or regiment raised in Maryland independent of the State authority, but in pursuance of the call under which the troops of the several States are now being assembled in Washington?

Second. Whether in the event of possessing the authority to commission officers, under the circumstances referred to, it may be relied on to do so?

Third. If no authority exists to commission the officers of volunteer corps under the call of the President for three months’ volunteers, would such authority be exercised in the event of a brigade or regiment being raised for two years’ service under the late call of the President?

I should not have troubled you with a Written communication had I been able to obtain a five minutes’ personal interview with you. An answer addressed to me at Frederick, Md., will enable me to furnish the information sought to those for whose satisfaction I am troubling you.

Respectfully, yours,

JAMES COOPER.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Saint Paul, Minn., April 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor to state that pursuant to the requisition of the President, conveyed in your communication of the 15th instant, one regiment of 900 men has been detached from the militia of Minnesota, and is now rendezvoused at Fort Snelling, ready for active service, in charge of Col. Willis A. Gorman.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. RAMSEY.

{p.139}

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Harrisburg, Pa., April 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I received this evening the following telegram from General R. Patterson in reply to one directing him to accept a certain regiment:

PHILADELPHIA.

Governor ANDREW G. CURTIN:

Have no authority to receive Colonel Einstein’s regiment. The contingent called for by the General Government has already been exceeded, and I can take no more.

Shortly after receiving the above telegram Captain Simmons informed me that he had been instructed by Major Porter to stop mustering troops, having more than called for. On referring to copy of General Patterson’s letter of the 26th of April, 1861, herewith sent, you will note that I was called upon distinctly for “twenty-five additional regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry.” In pursuance of this call preparations have been made to raise the additional regiments. The companies are ready to march; many of them are on their way, and heavy expenses have been incurred by the people and the State. To publish this order of Major Porter will create intense excitement throughout the State and materially injure the cause, and destroy the public confidence in the Administration. I therefore most respectfully protest against this act of Major Porter, and rely on an immediate order being sent to General Patterson, instructing him to receive the twenty-five additional regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, as per his letter of the 26th of April.

Yours, truly,

A. G. CURTIN.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF WASHINGTON, Philadelphia, April 26, 1861.

His Excellency ANDREW G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania:

SIR: I feel it my duty to express to you my clear and decided opinion that the force at the disposal of this department shall be increased without delay. I therefore have to request Your Excellency to direct that twenty-five additional regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry be called for forthwith, to be mustered into the service of the United States. Officers will be detailed to inspect and muster the men into service as soon as I am informed of the points of rendezvous which may be designated by Your Excellency.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

R. PATTERSON, Major. General.

–––

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, May 1, 1861.

This department, cheerfully and thankfully recognizing the ability and zeal of Miss D. L. Dix in her arrangements for the comfort and welfare of the sick soldier in the present exigency, requests that each of the ladies who have offered their services as nurses would put themselves in communication with her before entering upon their duties, as {p.140} efficient and well-directed service can only be rendered through a systematic arrangement. It is further suggested that the ladies exert themselves to their fullest extent in preparing or supplying hospital shirts for the sick; also articles of diet, as delicacies may be needed for individual cases, and such important articles as eggs, milk, chickens, &c. Miss Dix’s residence is 505 Twelfth street, between E and F.

Respectfully,

R. C. WOOD, Acting Surgeon-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 1, 1861.

J. H. MARTINDALE, Esq., Rochester, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: Your letter directed to Hon. M. Blair, Postmaster-General,* is referred by him to this Department, and I regret to say that in consequence of the numerous resignations in the Army it is impossible to accede to any of the numerous requests for officers to take command of volunteer troops.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See April 25, p. 110.

–––

SAINT PAUL MINN., May 1, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Deeply impressed with the sentiments of patriotism, and grateful for the aid and protection extended to him and his people by the United States Government, Pug-o-na-ke-shick, or Hole-in-the-pay, the chief of the Chippewa Nation, desires me to tender to you, and through you to the President of the United States, the services of himself and 100, or a greater number, if acceptable, of his headmen and braves to aid in defending the Government and its institutions against the enemies of the country.

I will add, sir, that the chief is distinguished alike for his intelligence and gallantry and is sincere in his offer to serve the Government, and would undoubtedly, if accepted, be willing to conform to the usages of civilized warfare, as he is not a savage, but in many respects fully civilized and Christianized. He bids me further say that he could be in readiness at the call of the Government, and thinks that there are branches of the service in which both he and his people can be as efficient as any portion of the U. S. forces. He seems to be deeply impressed with the perils which he has been led to believe surround the nation, and evinces a deep solicitude for its preservation. He desires to be addressed through me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. COOPER.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 1, 1861.

To THE GOVERNORS OF THE SEVERAL STATES:

I have authorized Col. Carl Schurz to raise and organize a volunteer regiment of cavalry. For the purpose of rendering it as efficient as possible {p.141} he is instructed to enlist principally such men as have served in the same arm before. The Government will provide the regiment with arms, but cannot provide the horses and accouterments. For these necessaries we rely upon the patriotism of the States and the citizens, and for this purpose I take the liberty of requesting you to afford Colonel Schurz your aid in the execution of this plan.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, EXEC. DEPT., Council Chamber, Boston, May 1, 1861.

Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

GENERAL: I send this day an armed steamer (the Cambridge), belonging to this Commonwealth, with supplies of clothing and provisions for our Massachusetts militia. This steamer is directed, after taking out certain supplies and men at Fort Monroe, to go up the Potomac, understanding that river to be safe and open and to be protected by the war steamer Pawnee.

1. I desire our Massachusetts troops to receive and have the first benefit of our supplies, but, if need be, that others should share them.

2. That if you see any objection to the Cambridge going up the Potomac, you would give orders to Captain Matthews, her commander, who is instructed to receive your directions.

He cleared hence for Annapolis, under sealed orders, to proceed thence up the Potomac, it being thought necessary that he should carry some recruits and supplies to Brigadier-General Butler, and that the telegraph should not proclaim our ultimate destination. The Cambridge may be expected at Fort Monroe by Saturday, 4th instant, a.m., and if allowed to reach Washington the captain will call on and report to you, and if you need him and the steamer for the public service, then to obey your commands and perform the service; but in the absence of orders from you, to return to our employment immediately.

I am, with high respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF DIVISION, NEBRASKA MILITIA, Omaha, Nebr. Ter., May 1, 1861.

Hon. ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: The present condition of the frontier of this Territory affords sufficient excuse for my addressing you this communication. It is well known that the outermost settlements are exposed to frequent incursions and depredations from bands of hostile Indians, especially of the Sioux Nation. The presence of troops in considerable numbers at Forts Kearny and Randall has had a most salutary effect during the past year in keeping them in check. But the withdrawal of those troops and the existence of war at the South, which is already known among them, will, there is every reason to apprehend, embolden the Indians to commence attacks upon the settlers. The Sioux are now gathered in large numbers at different points in the Platte Valley.

There is another source of danger to which I desire to call the immediate attention of the Government. There is a strong secession feeling {p.142} at Saint Joseph and other points of Missouri along the river. There is very strong reason to apprehend that an expedition will be fitted out at Saint Joseph for the capture and holding possession of Fort Kearny, the object being to secure the arms and stores, &c., and the command of the route to Denver. I am aware that all the regular troops are now required for the defense of the Government at the East and South, and I therefore, as commander of the Nebraska Militia, tender the services of a regiment (640 men) for the purpose of garrisoning Forts Kearny and Randall and protecting the public property and the frontier against attack from any quarter. I also tender my services and those of the men under command for any duty that the Government may require in any quarter of the country. The people of Nebraska are a unit for the Union and the Stars and Stripes.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN M. THAYER, Major-General, Commanding the Nebraska Militia.

–––

SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Omaha, Nebr. Ter., May 1, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: I take pleasure in fully indorsing the letter of Major-General Thayer relative to the protection of our frontier by placing the forts in the possession of our own militia.* I earnestly pray Your Excellency to give us authority to protect ourselves, and supply us with the necessary munitions, stores, and arms from Fort Kearny. Major-General Thayer is an officer of experience upon the Western plains, and well understanding Indian character and the mode of savage warfare, is eminently fitted for the position indicated. Prompt action is demanded. Your Excellency’s own experience in the Black Hawk war, and the troubles and privations and losses of property and life to which the settlements were then subjected, will, I have no doubt, at once convey to your mind a more accurate idea of our necessitous condition than anything I may be able to say.

Hoping for an early granting of our request, I remain, sir, Your Excellency’s most loyal servant,

J. STERLING MORTON, Secretary of Nebraska and Delegate to the Thirty-seventh Congress.

* See next, ante.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., May 1, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: This communication will be handed to you by Capt. Isaac M. Tucker, whom I have dispatched to you as my special messenger for this purpose.

I am exceedingly embarrassed by the fact that, besides the four regiments called for by the President’s requisition, there are already in this State, organized or nearly organized, enough volunteer companies who have expected to make a part of our four regiments, now about moving, {p.143} to make four additional regiments. I must now either encourage these men that they will have an opportunity of entering the U. S. service, and speedily, or I must advise them to disband.

The spirit and enthusiasm of our people are excited to the highest pitch, and the consequences here of disbanding these men would be extremely injurious. I should be greatly relieved if you would accept the services of two additional regiments from New Jersey, and forward to me, if possible, by the bearer hereof, the necessary orders for that purpose. My special messenger (Mr. Tucker) will explain to you in full, if you desire it, the urgent reasons which have impelled me to send him to you for the purpose of this application. It is impossible for me to do justice to them in this dispatch.

One of our four regiments called for by the President’s requisition has moved forward to-day, and the remainder will follow to-morrow, I hope. They are moving in accordance with the orders of Major-General Patterson.

We have had great difficulty in equipping the four regiments we are now sending. The arms furnished to them by the United States are of inferior quality, being flint-lock muskets percussioned. It is earnestly desired that they may, if possible, on arriving at Washington be provided with arms superior to those they now have. The United States have provided us with little besides these arms, yet our troops are on their way, prepared to defend the Government of their country.

I learn by yours of the 26th instant that it is contemplated to accept men for three years. If so, I would be glad to be informed if there is a certain number allotted to the several States, and if so, what will be the quota of New Jersey, with any instructions you can give me respecting the raising of them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

WASHINGTON, May 1, 1861.

HON. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: On behalf and by order of the Board of Officers formed under and by the act of the Legislature of the Stata of New York of April 16, 1861, I beg to submit:

That by the said act the said Board are authorized to raise a volunteer militia, for two years’ service, unless sooner discharged, of 30,000 men, and that that Legislature appropriated and laid a tax for $3,500,000 to arm and support such force as the Board might raise under its provisions.

The requisition of the Federal Government upon the State was subsequently made for seventeen regiments of 780 men each, but such is the patriotic zeal of the people of the State that it will be a great disappointment to them if they are not permitted to raise thirty-eight regiments for the public service instead of seventeen. At the same time the State unexpectedly finds that the most improved arms cannot be at once furnished by the United States Government to arm this force, and the Board have provided for the purchase of such arms at an early day, and also for the complete uniform and equipment of the force.

The expenditures for these purposes will so far exhaust the means at the disposal of the Board as to leave them without the necessary resources until the next meeting of the Legislature to pay and subsist the force after the troops shall arrive at the depots, without infringing {p.144} a constitutional inhibition against the contraction of a debt except in case of actual invasion of the State or insurrection therein. The Board, therefore, respectfully request that the United States Government will receive from the State of New York, at such depots within the State as the United States Government may choose to indicate, thirty-eight regiments of volunteers for two years’ service, unless sooner discharged, of such arm of service as it may require, and assume at the depots the instruction, pay, and subsistence of such troops.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. G. MYERS, Attorney-General of New York and one of said Board.

–––

RUTLAND, VT., May 1, 1861-10.15 p.m.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Vermont regiment will be mustered at this place to-morrow and can go forward immediately. Please give orders accordingly by telegraph.

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 2, 1861.

WILLIAM H. OSBORN, President of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, New York:

DEAR SIR: I have to acknowledge yours of the 26th ultimo, and to tender to yourself and the company you represent the thanks of this Department for your kind and patriotic offer of the facilities of the great railway over whose interests you so ably preside for the use of the Government. I doubt not that in the progress of the war I shall often have occasion to avail myself of the kind offices of yourself and those associated with you in the management of the great Western thoroughfare.

I have the honor to be, very truly, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 2, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

In your dispatch of the 26th ultimo you say that-

No additional troops beyond the regiments called for are at present needed. If the six regiments put into camp by you should be disposed to volunteer for three years, unless sooner discharged, they would be accepted; not otherwise, at this time.

I understood you to intend by the above the six additional regiments mentioned by me in my letter of the 23d, forwarded by Captain Stevenson, and not the six regiments mustered into service of the United States by Major Wood under the first call.

Will the Department accept of a cavalry regiment in addition?

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

{p.145}

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 2, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

My messenger (Mr. Ball) has returned. He informs me that you sent dispatches last week, none of which I received. I have not had a letter from your Department since the call of the President.

Will you accept ten additional regiments now organized in Ohio for three years, unless sooner discharged, and will you receive a larger number, and how many?

Please answer immediately.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Rutland, Vt., May 2, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

SIR: I have the honor to inform Your Excellency that the First Vermont Regiment, armed with improved rifle muskets and fully equipped, is mustered at this place and ready for the U. S. service. By a recent act of the Legislature I am “authorized and required to raise, organize, and muster into the service of the State, without delay, two regiments of soldiers “-and at my discretion four regiments more-to arm and equip them and muster them into encampment until such time as they shall be called into the service of the United States on the requisition of the President. An appropriation of $1,000,000 has been made for defraying the expense of the militia of the State.

I am desirous that this first regiment should be ordered forward at once. For reasons which I have communicated to the Secretary of War I have mustered the regiment at this place, whence it can proceed direct to New York without expense to the Government.

With the assurance that Vermont is ready and anxious to respond to any requisition from the General Government for suppressing the rebellion and executing the laws,

I am, sir, with high consideration, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

MADISON, WIS., May 2, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have 3,000 muskets at Springfield, Ill., assigned to this State on order of General Wool. Governor Yates says there are no accouterments. Many of our men use the Western weapon, the rifle. Can we not get 1,000 rifles? We have seven regiments enrolled, but no arms, even for drill.

ALEX. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas existing exigencies demand immediate and adequate measures for the protection of the National Constitution and the preservation {p.146} of the National Union by the suppression of the insurrectionary combinations now existing in several States for opposing the laws of the Union and obstructing the execution thereof to which end a military force, in addition to that called forth by my proclamation of the fifteenth day of April, in the present year, appears to be indispensably necessary:

Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy thereof, and of the militia of the several States when called into actual service, do hereby call into the service of the United States 42,034 volunteers, to serve for the period of three years, unless sooner discharged, and to be mustered into service as infantry and cavalry. The proportions of each arm and the details of enrollment and organization will be made known through the Department of War.

And I also direct that the Regular Army of the United States be increased by the addition of eight regiments of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, and one regiment of artillery, making altogether a maximum aggregate increase of 22,714 officers and enlisted men, the details of which increase will also be made known through the Department of War.

And I further direct the enlistment, for not less than one nor more than three years, of 18,000 seamen, in addition to the present force, for the naval service of the United States. The details of the enlistment and organization will be made known through the Department of the Navy.

The call for volunteers, hereby made, and the direction for the increase of the Regular Army, and for the enlistment of seamen, hereby given, together with the plan of organization adopted for the volunteers and for the regular forces hereby authorized, will be submitted to Congress as soon as assembled.

In the meantime I earnestly invoke the co-operation of all good citizens in the measures hereby adopted for the effectual suppression of unlawful violence, for the impartial enforcement of constitutional laws, and for the speediest possible restoration of peace and order, and, with these, of happiness and prosperity throughout the country.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this third day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

–––

NEW YORK CITY, May 3, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 28th ultimo, in which I am instructed by the General-in-Chief to return to Troy. It was received late in the evening of the 1st instant. You will please to inform the General-in-Chief that I shall proceed there as soon as I can close up my unfinished business here-probably to-morrow.

I have the honor to inclose a communication from the Governor of Illinois, just received by special messenger. Application has been {p.147} previously made to me by the Governor of Illinois for long-range guns to be stationed at Cairo. I immediately telegraphed to Major Symington, Allegheny Arsenal, who replied that he had ready only 32-pounder guns, the carriages of which required some refitting. I telegraphed him to refit them immediately. He replied, “All will be ready in eight days. They will be sent off in parcels as they are repaired.” I gave him no orders to send them away. The Governor has telegraphed to me again that he is extremely anxious to have the guns. I have informed him for all further action in the case he must apply to Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General,

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 8, 1861.

Respectfully referred to the Colonel of Ordnance for perusal. To be returned.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, May 9, 1861.

Respectfully returned. Attended to.

J. G. BENTON, Captain of Ordnance.

[Inclosure.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Ill., April 30, 1861.

General JOHN E. WOOL:

DEAR SIR: Your telegram of 29th instant was duly received requesting me to deliver, on the requisition of the Governor of Ohio, 5,000 muskets and accouterments. I have this day complied with said requisition and directed 5,000 muskets and such accouterments as were in our possession to be delivered to the messenger of the Governor of Ohio. We hope no further requisition may be made upon us for arms. We are so situated that it may become absolutely necessary to use every musket in our possession for our own defense as well as the protection of our loyal friends in Missouri. We have now about three regiments in Cairo and one at Alton, and perhaps 4,000 troops at this place. We are continually receiving letters and telegrams from Cairo and its vicinity urging the immediate concentration of a large force at Cairo and other towns in its neighborhood, in anticipation of an attack from a well-organized and powerful force to be sent from Memphis and other points on the Mississippi, as well as the Ohio River.

The security of Cairo and the southern portion of the State of Illinois demands that a large force should be sent there as soon as possible. Four regiments have been directed to be sent there by the War Department, and a much larger force may become necessary to repel an attack and to protect not only Cairo, but other places in Southern Illinois.

A military encampment is to be held at Saint Louis this week under the direction of the Governor of Missouri. Our friends in Saint Louis deem it very necessary for their encouragement, and it may be for their protection, that we should immediately send another regiment to Alton, {p.148} so that they may be prepared for any emergency. They anticipate serious difficulties with the secessionists, and think a large force should be well armed and stationed near Saint Louis in order to preserve the public peace. Our friends are also demanding that a regiment should be located at Quincy in order to prevent any outbreak in Northern Missouri, and to protect the loyal citizens of that section of country. You will readily perceive that, situated as we are, with so much territory bordering on slave States, with so many important points to protect, and with the southern point of our State penetrating so far toward the South, that we ought not to be deprived of our arms when a crisis seems to be rapidly approaching in which every musket we can obtain will be absolutely necessary for the defense of ourselves and our immediate neighbors and loyal citizens.

We received from Saint Louis no accouterments with the muskets except the bayonet. We are destitute of cartridge-boxes, belts, and bayonet-sheaths. Will you direct a supply of these to be sent to us immediately? We desire to place ourselves in as efficient a condition as possible in the shortest possible time, for if we are known to be thoroughly armed and well organized we can the more readily check the efforts of the enemies of the Government and suppress their treasonable designs.

Respectfully, yours,

RICHD. YATES, Governor.

–––

UNION DEFENSE COMMITTEE, New York, May 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: We have the honor to inclose for the information of the War Department information this day received by the committee from thirteen States as to the number and preparation of their forces. This information came to the committee by telegraph, and in answer to the telegraphic inquiry addressed to the Governors of these States.

We are, with great respect, your obedient servants,

S. DRAPER, Chairman Executive Committee. P. M. WETMORE, Secretary Executive Committee. WM. M. EVARTS, Secretary.

[Inclosure.]

UNION DEFENSE COMMITTEE, New York, May 3, 1861.

Synopsis of replies from Governors of States, received by telegraph this day.

1. Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania: 25 regiments, all full and armed; 15 of these uniformed.

2. Governor Olden, of New Jersey: 4 regiments start to-morrow, well prepared. We want ammunition to protect them to Washington. If General Wool fails to help us, can the Union Committee do so?

3. Governor Andrew, of Massachusetts: 4 regiments (about) ready in the field; as many more at brief notice. Probably 10,000 drilling, hoping for call.

{p.149}

4. Governor Fairbanks, of Vermont: 1 regiment waiting for orders.

5. Governor Buckingham, Connecticut: 1 regiment in service.

6. Governor of Rhode Island, by Adjutant-General Mauran: 1 regiment in field; 1 battery light artillery, 150 men.

7. Governor of Michigan, by Adjutant-General Robertson: 1 regiment ready; 1 field battery, 4 guns, ready in four days; 2 regiments armed and nearly equipped; 3 regiments ready to be called-enrolled, waiting arms.

8. Governor Washburn, of Maine: 1 regiment ready, 3 nearly so; enough enlisted for 10 regiments. We wish to send a regiment of lumbermen and drivers, over 6 feet.

9. Governor Ramsey, of Minnesota: 1 regiment mustered; another in two weeks.

10. Governor Randall, of Wisconsin: 1 regiment called and ready, another in camp; 2 more ready at day’s warning; 3 more registered.

11. Governor Dennison, of Ohio: 22 regiments in camp, under drill, of which 13 under President’s call. Legislature has appropriated $3,000,000.

12. Governor Kirkwood, of Iowa: 1 regiment, 1,000 strong, a week under drill, and I regiment now full and drilling; 3d ready.

13. Governor of New Hampshire, by Adjutant-General Abbott: 1 regiment mustered; 2 others, perhaps 4, will be tendered by the State.

By order of committee:

P. M. WETMORE, Secretary.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Please answer my inquiry of yesterday at once. It is very important.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 3, 1861.

Governor OLIVER P. MORTON:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 27th [28th] ultimo, giving this Department a very full account of your action in response to the requisition made upon you from this Department for troops, and I beg to tender you the thanks of the Government for your very prompt and efficient action.

It gives me pleasure to inform you that a large supply of artillery has just been ordered by the General-in. Chief to be sent to Major-General McClellan at Cincinnati, which it is confidently believed will be all-sufficient to command the Ohio River. Every effort, I beg to assure you, is being made to provide ordnance supplies, but it is impossible to distribute them properly unless requisitions are limited to the actual wants of the troops called into Government service. The number and kind of troops for which supplies are required should be stated in each requisition, and evidence also given that they have been mustered into service.

It is contemplated to make another requisition for additional troops, to be mustered into service to serve during the war. As soon as determined you will be informed of the number desired from your State, which I trust will be in a day or two.

{p.150}

I referred your letter to the Chief of Ordnance, who reports that the following arms have been issued to your State: 3,000 percussion muskets, new; 1,000 rifled muskets (Maynard primer); 4,500 accouterments; 20 rounds of ammunition for each musket; and that there have also been sent to you by the order of General Wool 5,000 flintlock muskets altered to percussion, and 200,000 cartridges-no accouterments being sent with these arms; that the number of arms required for the regiments ordered from your State is 4,683, and the total number sent of all kinds is 9,500; also that all the arms sent are serviceable, and many of them of superior quality.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., May 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 26th of April I have to say that the Second Regiment from Maine will be sent forward as soon as the Government will authorize it to be mustered into the service. It is now at quarters at Bangor. The First Regiment has been mustered into the service of the United States, but has not marched for the reason, as I am informed, that no order to that effect has been given to Captain Gardiner. When you want a third, a fourth, or a fifth, you shall have them. I desire that you may authorize Fort Sullivan and its grounds at Eastport to be used by our troops for drilling, &c.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

I. WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 3, 1861.

Governor OLDEN:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 1st instant, by the hands of Capt. Isaac M. Tucker, and I hasten to give you such information in reply as I can. Before doing so allow me, however, to tender you the thanks of this Department for the very prompt and efficient manner in which you and the people of your State have responded to the requisition made upon you.

I fully appreciate your embarrassments from my own daily experience. It is impossible to accept the two additional regiments under the former requisition of this Department, but it is in contemplation by the President to make another requisition, or rather to accept more troops to serve during the war. As soon as determined, and able to let you know how many are desired under this call from your State, you will be duly informed, when the opportunity will present itself to the two regiments now desiring to be accepted to be mustered into service for the war.

The arms furnished your troops may not be the best, but they are the best the Government at the present time is able to furnish them.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.151}

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Two or three regiments of the present uniformed force are now ready to embark. Shall they be received by the General Government or sent to their homes?

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 3, 1861.

Hon. CHARLES G. MYERS:

DEAR SIR: I have yours of the 1st instant on behalf of the Board of Military Officers of the State of New York, in which you tender to the United States Government thirty-eight regiments of troops, to be armed and equipped by the State of New York, and to rendezvous at such place or places within the State as this Department may indicate, to serve for two years, unless sooner discharged, this Government to assume at the depot the pay, instruction, and subsistence of such troops.

I have the honor on behalf of the Government of the United States to inform you that this offer will be accepted on the conditions stated, and the regiments of New York’s uniformed militia now in the service of the Government will be relieved when the troops you have tendered shall have been mustered into service.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 3, 1861.

Gov. ANDREW G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

General Patterson had no authority to make any requisition on you for twenty additional regiments, and you will understand me to say distinctly they cannot be mustered into service. In a day or two another call will be made for a large number of troops to serve during the war, and Pennsylvania will have her quota to supply under that call, and is confidently relied on to do so.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 15.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, May 4, 1861.

The President of the United States having called for a volunteer force to aid in the enforcement of the laws and the suppression of insurrection, and to consist of thirty-nine regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, making a minimum aggregate of 31,506 officers and enlisted men, and a maximum aggregate of 42,034 officers and enlisted men, the following plan of organization has been adopted, and is directed to be printed for general information:

Plan of organization of the volunteer forces called into the service of the United States by the President.

The volunteers called into service under the proclamation of the President of the United States dated the 3d day of May, 1861, will be {p.152} subject to the laws and regulations governing the Army of the United States, and the proportion and organization of each arm will be as follows:

1. INFANTRY.

Thirty-nine regiments of volunteer infantry will be raised. Each regiment will consist of ten companies, and each company will be organized as follows: Minimum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 1 wagoner, 64 privates; aggregate, 83. Maximum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 1 wagoner, 82 privates; aggregate, 101.

The commissioned officers of the company will be appointed by the Governor of the State furnishing it, and the non-commissioned officers, until the company shall be embodied in a regiment, will be appointed by the captain; afterward by the colonel, on recommendation of the captain.

Each regiment will be organized as follows: Minimum-830 company officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster (a lieutenant), 1 assistant surgeon, 1 sergeant-major, 1 regimental quartermaster-sergeant, 1 regimental commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward, 2 principal musicians, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 866. Maximum-1,010 company officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster (a lieutenant), 1 assistant surgeon, 1 sergeant-major, 1 regimental quartermaster-sergeant, 1 regimental commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward, 2 principal musicians, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 1,046.

The field officers of the regiment will be appointed by the Governor of the State which furnishes the regiment.

The adjutant and regimental quartermaster will be selected from the company officers of the regiment by the colonel, and may be reassigned to companies at his pleasure.

The non-commissioned staff will be selected by the colonel from the non-commissioned officers and privates of the regiment, and the vacancies so created will be filled by appointment, as is prescribed above.

2. CAVALRY.

One regiment of volunteer cavalry will be raised, and will consist of four, five, or six squadrons. Each squadron will consist of two companies, and each company will be organized as follows: Minimum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 buglers, 2 farriers and blacksmiths, 1 saddler, 1 wagoner, 56 privates; aggregate, 79. Maximum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 buglers, 2 farriers and blacksmiths, 1 saddler, 1 wagoner, 72 privates; aggregate, 95.

Volunteer cavalry may be mustered into the service by companies or squadrons.

When two squadrons shall have been received, a lieutenant-colonel will be appointed to their command; and when two more squadrons shall have been received, a colonel and major will be appointed, and the four squadrons will be organized into a regiment. Two additional squadrons may be mustered into the regiment without affecting the organization of its regimental field and staff.

{p.153}

For the regiment there will be-1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster, 1 assistant surgeon, 1 sergeant-major, 1 regimental quartermaster-sergeant, 1 regimental commissary-sergeant, I hospital steward, 2 principal musicians, 16 musicians for band. And the minimum aggregate will be-if the regiment consists of four squadrons, 660; if the regiment consists of five squadrons, 818; if the regiment consists of six squadrons, 976. And the maximum aggregate will be-if the regiment consists of four squadrons, 788; if the regiment consists of five squadrons, 978; if the regiment consists of six squadrons, 1,168.

All officers of volunteer cavalry will be appointed and selected in the same manner as infantry officers of like rank.

3. GENERAL ORGANIZATION.

This force will be organized into three divisions of from three to four brigades.

Each brigade will consist of four regiments and 1 brigadier-general, 1 aide-de-camp (a lieutenant), 1 assistant adjutant-general (a captain), 1 surgeon, 1 assistant quartermaster (a captain), 1 commissary of subsistence (a captain).

All of the above officers will be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, except the aide-de-camp, who will be selected by the brigadier-general from the company officers, and who may be reassigned to his company at the pleasure of the brigadier-general.

Each division will consist of three or more brigades, and of one major-general, 2 aides-de-camp (captains or lieutenants), 1 assistant adjutant-general (a major).

The above officers will be appointed and selected as prescribed above for the additional officers of a brigade.

4. MEMORANDUM.

The officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates organized as above set forth will, in all respects, be placed on the footing, as to pay and allowances, of similar corps of the Regular Army: Provided, That their allowances for clothing shall be $2.50 per month for infantry and $3 per month for cavalry, and that each non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer of cavalry shall furnish his own horse and horse equipments, and shall receive 50 cents per day for their use and risk, except that in case the horse shall become disabled, or shall die, the allowance shall cease until the disability be removed, or another horse be supplied. Every cavalry volunteer who shall not keep himself provided with a serviceable horse shall serve on foot.

Every volunteer non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer who enters the service of the United States under this plan shall be paid at the rate of 50 cents, and if a cavalry volunteer 25 cents additional in lieu of forage, for every twenty miles of travel from his home to the place of muster-the distance to be measured by the shortest usually traveled route-and when honorably discharged an allowance, at the same rate, from the place of his discharge to his home, and in addition thereto the sum of $100.

Any volunteer who may be received into the service of the United States under this plan, and who may be wounded or otherwise disabled in the service, shall be entitled to the benefits which have been or may be conferred on persons disabled in the regular service, and the legal {p.154} heirs of such as die or may be killed in service, in addition to all arrears of pay and allowances, shall receive the sum of $100.

The bands of the regiments of infantry and of the regiment of cavalry will be paid as follows: One-fourth of each will receive the pay and allowances of sergeants of engineer soldiers; one-fourth, those of corporals of engineer soldiers; and the remaining half, those of privates of engineer soldiers of the first class.

The wagoners and saddlers will receive the pay and allowances of corporals of cavalry.

The regimental commissary-sergeant will receive the pay and allowances of a regimental sergeant-major. The company quartermaster-sergeant, the pay and allowances of a sergeant of cavalry.

There will be allowed to each regiment one chaplain, who will be appointed by the regimental commander on the vote of the field officers and company commanders on duty with the regiment at the time the appointment is to be made. The chaplain so appointed must be a regularly ordained minister of some Christian denomination, and will receive the pay and allowances of captain of cavalry.

5. PROMOTION FROM THE RANKS.

Two-thirds of the company officers of the regiments to be raised under this plan will be appointed at the commencement of the organization of each regiment, and the remaining one-third, when the regiment shall have its full complement of men, will be appointed from the ranks, to be taken from among the sergeants on the recommendation of the colonel of the regiment, approved by the general commanding the brigade.

After the completion of the organization of a regiment of cavalry or infantry, one-half of all the vacancies which may occur in the lowest grade of commissioned officers, by promotion or otherwise, will be appointed as above from the ranks.

Corporals will be taken from the privates; sergeants from corporals. The first sergeant will be taken from the other sergeants of the company by the captain.

The regimental non-commissioned staff will be appointed from the sergeants of the regiment by the colonel.

6. RECAPITULATION.

Minimum.Maximum.
39 regiments of infantry33,77440,794
1 regiment of cavalry6601,168
34,43441,962
Brigade staff6060
Division staff1212
Aggregate34,50642,034

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, May 4, 1861.

The President of the United States having directed an increase of the Regular Army of the United States by the addition of eight regiments of infantry, one regiment of cavalry, and one regiment of {p.155} artillery, making a minimum aggregate of 18,154 officers and enlisted men, to be augmented, at the discretion of the President, to a maximum aggregate of 22,714 officers and enlisted men, the following plan of organization has been adopted, and is directed to be printed for general information:

Plan of organization for the increase of the force of the Regular Army of the United States, as directed by the President.

1. INFANTRY.

Eight regiments of infantry, in addition to those now in service, will be raised.

Each regiment will consist of two or more battalions.

Each battalion will consist of eight companies.

Each company will be organized as follows: Minimum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 64 privates; aggregate, 82. Maximum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 32 privates; aggregate, 100.

Each battalion will be organized as follows: Minimum-656 company officers and enlisted men, 1 major, 1 battalion adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 battalion quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward; aggregate, 663. Maximum-800 company officers and enlisted men, 1 major, 1 battalion adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 battalion quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward; aggregate, 807.

Each regiment will be organized, supposing three battalions to constitute a regiment, as follows: Minimum-1,989 battalion officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 regimental adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 drum major, 2 principal musicians, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 2,020. Maximum-2,421 battalion officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 regimental adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 drum major, 2 principal musicians, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 2,452.

2. CAVALRY.

One additional regiment of cavalry will also be raised, and will consist of three battalions. Each battalion will consist of two squadrons, and each squadron will consist of two companies, each of which will be organized as follows: Minimum-I captain, 1 first lieutenant, I second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 2 farriers, 1 saddler, 1 wagoner, 56 privates; aggregate, 79. Maximum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 2 farriers, 1 saddler, 1 wagoner, 72 privates; aggregate, 95.

Each battalion will be organized as follows: Minimum-316 company officers and enlisted men, 1 major, 1 battalion adjutant, 1 battalion quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward, 1 saddler-sergeant, 1 veterinary-sergeant; aggregate, 325. Maximum-380 company officers and enlisted men, 1 major, 1 battalion adjutant, 1 battalion {p.156} quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 1 hospital steward, 1 saddler-sergeant, 1 veterinary-sergeant; aggregate, 389.

Each regiment will consist of two or more battalions, organized, when consisting of three battalions to a regiment, as follows: Minimum-975 battalion officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 regimental adjutant (lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (lieutenant), 2 chief buglers, 16 musicians for band; aggregate, 997. Maximum-1,167 battalion officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 regimental adjutant (lieutenant), 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (lieutenant), 2 chief buglers, 16 musicians for band; aggregate, 1,189.

3. ARTILLERY.

One additional regiment of artillery will be raised, and will consist of eight or twelve batteries, and each battery will be organized as follows: Minimum-1 captain, 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 4 sergeants. 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 2 artificers, 1 wagoner, 58 privates; aggregate, 80. Maximum-1 captain, 2 first lieutenants, 2 second lieutenants, 1 first sergeant, 1 company quartermaster-sergeant, 6 sergeants, 12 corporals, 2 musicians, 6 artificers, 1 wagoner, 122 privates; aggregate, 156.

The regiment will be organized, supposing it to consist of twelve batteries, as follows: Minimum-960 company officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 3 majors, 1 adjutant, 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 2 principal musicians, 1 hospital steward, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 997. Maximum-1,872 company officers and enlisted men, 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 3 majors, 1 adjutant, 1 regimental quartermaster and commissary (a lieutenant), 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, 2 principal musicians, 1 hospital steward, 24 musicians for band; aggregate, 1,909.

4. GENERAL ORGANIZATION.

This force will be organized into two divisions of two brigades each. Each division will have 1 major general, 2 aides-de-camp (a captain or lieutenant), 1 assistant adjutant-general (a major from the Adjutant-General’s Department), 1 quartermaster (from the regular staff of the Army), 1 commissary of subsistence (from the regular staff of the Army).

A brigade will have 1 brigadier-general, 1 aide-de-camp (a lieutenant), 1 assistant adjutant-general (a captain from the Adjutant-General’s Department), 1 assistant quartermaster (a captain), 1 assistant commissary (a captain).

To provide for the foregoing, there will be added to the Adjutant-General’s Department 1 lieutenant-colonel, 4 captains, and to the Commissary Department 2 majors.

5. MEMORANDUM.

The officers and enlisted men, raised in pursuance hereof, will receive the same pay, emoluments, and allowances, and be on the same footing, in every respect, with those of corresponding grades and corps now in the service.

The bands of the regiments of infantry, artillery, and cavalry will be paid as follows: One-fourth of each will receive the pay and allowances {p.157} of sergeants of engineer soldiers; one-fourth, those of corporals of engineer soldiers; and the remaining half, the pay and allowances of engineer soldiers of the first class. The wagoners and saddlers will receive the pay and allowances of corporals of cavalry. The battalion sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and commissary-sergeant, will receive the same pay and allowances as the sergeant-major of the regiments to which they belong.

The saddler-sergeants, veterinary-sergeants, company quartermaster-sergeants, and drum major, will receive the pay and allowances of sergeants of cavalry.

The battalion adjutants and battalion quartermaster and commissary will receive the emoluments now provided for regimental adjutants.

There will be added to the quartermaster’s department as many wagoners, with the pay and allowances of corporals of cavalry, and as many master wagoners-with the rank, pay, and allowances of sergeants of cavalry-as the exigencies of the service, in the judgment of the President, may require.

There will be allowed to each regiment one chaplain, who will be appointed by the regimental commander, on the vote of the field officers and company commanders on duty with the regiment, at the time the appointment is to be made. The chaplain so appointed must be a regularly ordained minister of some Christian denomination, and will receive the pay and allowances of a captain of cavalry.

6. PROMOTION FROM THE RANKS, ETC.

Two-thirds of the company officers of the infantry and cavalry regiments will be appointed in the same manner as the officers of like rank in the existing Army; and the remaining one-third, when a regiment shall have its full complement of enlisted men, will be appointed from the ranks, to be taken from among the sergeants, on the recommendation of the colonel of the regiment, approved by the general commanding the brigade.

After the completion of the organization of a regiment of cavalry or infantry, one-half of all the vacancies which may occur in the lowest grade of commissioned officers, by promotion or otherwise, will be appointed, as above, from the ranks.

Non-commissioned officers will be appointed by the colonels of regiments, on the nomination of the captains, approved by the majors commanding battalions.

Corporals will be taken from the enlisted men; sergeants from corporals.

The first sergeant will be taken from the other sergeants of the company by the captain.

The battalion non-commissioned staff will be appointed from the sergeants of the battalion by the major commanding.

The regimental non-commissioned staff will be appointed from the sergeants of the regiment by the colonel.

7. RECAPITULATION.

Minimum.Maximum.
Infantry-8 regiments (3 battalions each)16,16019,616
Cavalry-1 regiment (6 squadrons)9971,189
Artillery-1 regiment (12 batteries)9971,909
Aggregate18,15422,714

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.158}

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The accouterments now manufacturing at Pittsburg Arsenal are needed for Indiana troops immediately, and have so advised Major Symington. Can we have them? We have six regiments in the field and not an accouterment.

O. P. MORTON.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Ind., May 4, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: Many of the citizens of Indiana have large supplies of provisions, hay, &c., which they desire to sell and ship to the South, and many of them are now carrying on a brisk trade with Kentucky, from whence these articles are sent South. The mass of our people are greatly opposed to this trade, and in many instances have interfered and prevented it, partly by force. It is possible, may be probable, that Kentucky will maintain substantially a neutral position, which is the most that their so-called Union men pretend to hope for. For all purposes of trade, that is as fatal to us as though we were at war with them, more especially as the sympathies of Kentucky are all with the South. While I am very anxious not to unnecessarily multiply our enemies, will it not be well to cut off all trade with the States which refuse to fill your call for volunteers? The true Union men of those States will not object, I am sure, and the traitors cannot. I desire your attention to this matter, that you may cause such advice and instructions to be given as will enable the citizens of Indiana to act consistently with the views of the Federal Government, with which they are desirous to conform, and only complain that more men are not called for.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Des Moines, Iowa. May 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 29th of April is just at hand. A glance at the map of Iowa will show you that the troops raised in this State will at Keokuk be at least 300 miles from the nearest point (Council Bluffs), and 400 miles front the point (Sioux City) most exposed to Indian depredations. This will not afford any protection to the northwestern frontier. All I ask is arms and ammunition; not any men. I hope you will give this matter further consideration. If you have time to consult the files of your Department you will find there evidence of the massacre of some fifty men, women, and children some three or four years ago in that region. If you cannot spare arms let me know the fact and I will try to purchase them.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

{p.159}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., May 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The State of Maine is desirous of raising and tendering (after they shall [have] been sufficiently drilled) to the United States a battalion of flying artillery, and the battalion will be raised and put under drill and instruction immediately if it can be understood that it will be received by the Government. All the volunteers from Maine are enlisted for two years, and there is no authority under the laws of the State to enlist for a longer time. The quotas already called for can be retained for that term. On this account it may be considered advisable for the United States to accept a larger number of regiments than if they could be retained but for three months. It is felt by our citizens on the Penobscot that prudence requires that a few men should be placed in Fort Knox, and I would respectfully ask for authority or advice in this regard.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 4, 1861.

Maj. BURR PORTER, Trenton, N. J.:

DEAR SIR: The regiments to be raised will most probably be apportioned among the different States, to serve during the war, and I therefore will have to refer you to His Excellency Governor Olden, for his acceptance of the regiments you raise. Should a different course be adopted and power be given to this Department to accept independent regiments, your proposition shall receive an early and favorable consideration.

Very respectfully, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Columbus, Ohio, May 4, 1861.

Requisition for ordnance and ordnance stores for the use of the Ohio militia in the service of the United States and State of Ohio:

Smooth-bore muskets, 25,000; rifled muskets, 1,200; Harper’s Ferry rifles, 1,300.

Remarks.-I trust the Secretary of War will find it consistent with his sense of public duty to furnish these arms. With our extended frontier, exposed to border raids, &c., we need a largely increased amount of arms beyond what we have to be distributed among the people on the border. Other pressing exigencies also demand these arms in Ohio. If placed in the charge of my agents, Col. N. H. Swayne and Judge J. R. Swan, of this city, they will be safely brought here, though as to the manner of forwarding the Secretary will please determine.

Respectfully,

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

The arms, I am informed, are in the Washington Arsenal.

{p.160}

–––

BOSTON, MASS., May 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Before the recent order to General Wool he called for two more Massachusetts regiments. One is ready to march-an old Boston regiment. Shall we send it to Annapolis or up the Potomac?

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

GLENWOOD, May 5, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON:

MY DEAR SIR: Reached home last night by way of New York. You have no conception of the depth of feeling universal in the Northern mind for the prosecution of this war until the flag floats from every spot on which it had a right to float a year ago. If the Administration fails to prosecute the war to that end, it will sink in the popular heart below that of Buchanan. There is but one feeling with all classes, parties, and sects-that the rebels must be made to lay down their arms everywhere, the traitors hung, and the union of the States restored before this contest closes. There is great dissatisfaction in New York at the ordering of Wool back to Troy, instead of acknowledging his services at a very critical point of time when all communication with Washington was cut off. For four or five days they heard nothing from Washington, and no one received any orders. If you could devise some way to have all that offer received, to remain, however, in the States till they are called for. The men who have left their business cannot wait long without pay from some source. In my judgment the enthusiasm of the hour ought not to be repressed by flat refusals on the part of the Government, but let them be held in readiness (in some way) in the States. The people in New York and the cities are very impatient for Baltimore to be opened, and on the rumor that the Government would not invade Virginia they were perfectly indignant, and I wish to say to you that if the Government adopts that policy there will be a universal execration go up from the North, and you will be as powerless in thirty days as you are now powerful. I saw many of the solid men in New York, and they have embarked their all in this contest, provided the Administration will prosecute it to the bitter end, if need be, to quell insurrection and hang traitors, so that no madcaps will ever try the experiment again.

I beg your pardon for trespassing so long on your attention. My object was briefly to assure you that any measures the most efficient, no matter what the cost, in prosecuting this war would be most satisfactory, if it has for its object the foregoing results. I give you this state of public feeling, for I am anxious that you should meet its expectation, as I confidently believe you will.

Most truly, yours,

GALUSHA A. GROW.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 5, 1861.

Governor BUCKINGHAM, New Haven, Conn.:

Send immediately three regiments, including Colonel Tyler’s, of Connecticut Volunteers, to this city by sea via the Potomac River.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.161}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 5, 1861.

Governor O. P. MORTON, Indianapolis, Ind.:

Major Symington at Pittsburg has been advised to forward you the accouterments which he was ordered to furnish as soon as ready.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 6, 1861.

Hon. H. HAMLIN, New York:

MY DEAR SIR: Please advise me at the close of each day what troops left during the day, where going, and by what route; what remaining at New York, and what expected in the next day. Give the numbers, as near as convenient, and what corps they are. This information, reaching us daily, will be very useful as well as satisfactory.

Yours, very truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 6, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, Troy, N. Y.:

MY DEAR SIR: Appreciating as I do your long, able, and faithful services to the Government, and knowing your zeal in and loyalty to the cause of the country, I write merely to request that no requisition for troops or orders for their removal be hereafter issued without first communicating with this Department.

You will, my dear sir, not consider this as any reflection on anything you may have heretofore done, but merely to avoid any conflict of orders or confusion of arrangements, and that the Department may at all times know the number of troops called out, and how they may be made available at the shortest notice, without interfering with any previous order.

With sentiments of the highest personal regard and the strongest appreciation of your valor and patriotism, I have the honor to be, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 6, 1861.

It is desired preferably that all the regiments mustered into the Service of the Government from your State not already actually sent forward should be mustered into service for three years or during the war. If any person belonging to the regiments already mustered for three months, but not yet actually sent forward, should be unwilling to serve for three years or during the war, could not their places be filled by others who are willing so to serve?

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Sent to the Governors of Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Wisconsin.)

{p.162}

–––

NEW HAVEN, CONN., May 6, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your order to Governor Buckingham, who is in Washington, has been received. I will see that the First and Second Connecticut Regiments embark so soon as the Second Regiment is mustered in. The Third Regiment will follow so soon as its clothing is complete.

DANL. TYLER, First Regiment Connecticut Volunteers.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, INN., May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Can you not say to-day how many regiments of three-years’ men you will take from Indiana? It is important to know, as many companies are waiting in camp.

O. P. MORTON, Governor.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 6, 1861.

Governor SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Iowa City:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo, and have the honor to inform you, in reply, that you will be afforded the opportunity, under the second call for troops just issued by the President, to muster into service the troops from your State which could not be received under the first call of the President. The number called into service from Iowa under the first proclamation is 780. Arms for that number were retained at the Saint Louis Arsenal when the shipment was made thence to Springfield. These arms were intended to be forwarded to Keokuk or Davenport, or the place where the troops would be mustered into service, the officers mustering the troops into service being designated to receive them. I may add that it is essential, to avoid confusion and difficulty, that supplies should be furnished in order. First the troops called into immediate service of the United States must be provided for, and further issues must be postponed until such troops are supplied. It would in no way expedite matters to hurry off arms before troops are mustered.

In regard to furnishing arms to the militia of your State at this time, in view of the apprehensions of being troubled by the Indians, I can now only say that the Chief of Ordnance advises that 1,000 stand of arms ought to be forwarded to Keokuk, to be there taken in charge by Colonel Curtis or some other responsible person, to be used in case of an emergency. If this arrangement should answer the purpose, you will please inform this Department.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

DAVENPORT, IOWA, May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

How many more regiments will be required from Iowa and for how long? I am overwhelmed with applications.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

{p.163}

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, May 6, 1861.

General JOHN E. WOOL, New York City:

DEAR SIR: Some time since certain gentlemen of Chicago, composing a military committee at that place, had made an arrangement with you, as I understand, by which 5,000 rifle muskets, or long-range rifles, were ordered from Springfield Arsenal to Chicago, and were started on the way. They were subsequently stopped in transitu, upon information being received from the Governor of Illinois that that State had been supplied with arms from Saint Louis.

This State is destitute of arms. The quota furnished us yearly, based on the census of 1850, has been so small and so utterly disproportioned to our actual population, and the arms sent having been, until last year, the old flint-lock musket altered to a percussion lock, that I may say the State is without arms. Besides, what few we have we distributed in the hands of volunteer companies in different parts of this large State, and could only be got together by long and expensive land carriage, we having as yet but few railroads.

I had applied to the military committee at Chicago, to whom you were sending the 5,000 arms from Springfield, for a loan of 1,000 stands, in view of the want of this State in that regard, and they had very generously promised, if possible, to let me have them.

As soon as I learned that Governor Yates had received from Saint Louis a supply largely in excess of the requisition in his favor I sent a special messenger to him asking him for a portion of them, but he declined letting me have any. His refusal to give me any portion of the Saint Louis arms, and his information to you that his State was supplied-by means of which the 5,000 on the way to Chicago were stopped, and I, of course, prevented from getting any portion of them-have left me, as yet, wholly unprovided for. We need arms and must have them in some way. I can’t get them in any reasonable time from private manufacturers. We have filled, and will promptly fill, all requisitions made on us by the United States for men, but our southern border is exposed to incursions of reckless men from Missouri for plunder and our western border to Indian depredations. The U. S. troops have been withdrawn from Forts Randall and Kearny; large bodies of Indians are on our northwestern border, excited by the news that our country is engaged in civil war, and I am daily in receipt of letters from that portion of our State that the danger of an attack by the Indians is imminent. They are already in the State in small bands, as I am informed, stealing horses.

Under these circumstances the General Government must furnish us arms and ammunition, unless it is wholly unable to do so. If you have the power to do so, I hope you will at once send me, to this point, 5,000 long-range rifles or rifle muskets and accouterments, with proper ammunition, or as near that amount as you can.

If you have not the power, please forward this letter to the War Department, with such indorsement by you as your judgment dictates. A prompt reply will confer a great favor on

Your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

{p.164}

–––

BOSTON, MASS., May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

What officers will muster in men under the proclamation? How many regiments will you take? I want to give six now.

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, May 6, 1861.

To His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

SIR: I have duly received your favor of the 4th instant, stating that you would recommend to the War Department that the services of General Wright and the Second Division of New Jersey State Militia be received into the new corps of volunteers for which your proclamation is issued. Permit me to say that I have to-day a dispatch from the Secretary of War that our State will probably not be entitled to more than two regiments of this new corps. That being the case, it would be best to have the quota of New Jersey generally distributed throughout the State, rather than to take the entire Second Division, which would probably exhaust the whole number New Jersey is entitled to. When the Secretary is ready for the new corps he probably will inform me, and I will make such distribution of the privilege of volunteering as will give general satisfaction in all the counties of our State. Many companies are waiting, whom it would not do to disappoint by sending an entire division.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

[Indorsement.]

Referred by the President to the Honorable Secretary of War.

JOHN G. N[ICOLAY].

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 6, 1861.

His Excellency CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey, Trenton:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 27th 29th] ultimo to the President was referred by him to this Department, and I have the honor to reply that under the late call of the President for additional troops it will be in the power of Your Excellency to gratify, at least to some extent, the wishes of Major-General Wright and the officers associated with him.

I am, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

STATE OF NEW JERSEY, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Expecting that the Government would want as many volunteers as could conveniently be provided, a tender of the services of {p.165} General Wright and the Second Division of New Jersey State Militia was made to the President, and he writes me that he shall recommend your Department to accept the services of General Wright and the Second Division as part of the new corps of volunteers. It is proper for me to say to you, since many in our State will be disappointed, that it will not be politic to take the whole division and disappoint many in various parts of the State. Since the number of volunteers is limited, when the quota of New Jersey is fixed, on information being given me, I will make such distribution of the privilege of volunteering as will be generally satisfactory throughout the State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo, containing a request that no more troops be sent from New York to Washington until further advised, &c.

I avail myself of this occasion to state the force already sent forward in compliance with the requisition of the National Executive:

Seventh Regiment, Colonel Lefferts, 1,050 men; left New York April 19, 1861.

Sixth Regiment, Colonel Pinckney, 550 men; Twelfth Regiment, Colonel Butterfield, 950 men; Seventy-first Regiment, Colonel Vosburgh, 950 men; left New York April 21, 1861.

Twenty-fifth Regiment, Colonel Bryan ,500 men; Thirteenth Regiment, Colonel Smith, strength not ascertained; Eighth Regiment, Colonel Lyons, 900 men; left New York April 23, 1861.

Fifth Regiment, Colonel Schwartzwalder, 600 men; left New York April 27, 1861.

Twenty-eighth Regiment, Colonel Bennett, strength not ascertained; left New York April 30, 1861.

Eleventh Regiment, Colonel Ellsworth, 1,050 men; left New York April 29, 1861.

Sixty-ninth Regiment, Colonel Corcoran, 1,050 men; left New York April 23, 1861.

In addition to the above there are ready for muster into the U. S. Service a sufficient number of the volunteer regiments to complete the President’s requisition on this State so soon as they shall be formally accepted by the Board of State Officers.

Since the foregoing was written I have received from the general commanding the New York depot of volunteers a communication containing the wishes or Lieutenant-General Scott that “all the authorized quota of three-months’ volunteers be dispatched to Washington and Fort Monroe as soon as equipped.” In reference to this last point (of equipment), in the absence of any definite instructions, I desire information. Will the United States Government furnish clothing, tents, and camp equipage, with transportation for the same, ammunition, subsistence, and all other stores requisite for the troops in the field after they shall have been mustered into the U. S. service? If not all the above, what part? What portion shall be sent to Fort Monroe and what to Washington?

{p.166}

This State is desirous of sending her troops into the field in an efficient condition, and to do so should have reliable instructions, and directly, on the above subject, at the earliest possible day.

I have the honor to be, my dear sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. MORGAN

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 6, 1861.

Major-General SANDFORD, New York:

Send without delay every regiment of the New York quota in and about your city, as soon as equipped for service, to this place, via the ocean and the Potomac River.

WINFIELD SCOTT

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your telegraph just received.* It leaves me in doubt as to the number of regiments you will receive from Ohio for three months and three years. The thirteen regiments under the first call are nearly all mustered in for three months. We have nine additional organized and one more provided for by law. What I desire to know is how many of these last ten regiments you will receive for three years under the last call. It is important for me to know this forthwith, as they should be mustered in immediately.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

* See May 6, p. 161,

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Ohio regiments are in camp. It is important for us to know how many of them will be required under the three-years’ enlistment. The mustering officers are here. Please advise by telegraph.

W. DENNISON, Governor.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 6, 1861.

S. P. CHASE, Secretary of the Treasury:

Will you see Secretary Cameron immediately and learn whether he will accept all our ten regiments under the three-years’ enlistment. If so, I will have them mustered forthwith. The mustering officer is here. I have no reply about the guns from Washington Arsenal. If possible, let me hear from you to-night.

W. DENNISON.

{p.167}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I received your dispatch.* General Patterson anticipated you by the countermand of his order for twenty-five additional regiments. It would be well for me to understand how authority is divided, so that we can move with certainty, and the ardor of the people of this State should not be again cooled by changes. I will be guided by my powers under the constitution, and as thus directed will obey the orders of the Federal Government. Pennsylvania will answer to any requisition made on her.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania.

* See May 6, p. 161.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 6, 1861.

Col. JAMES CAMERON, Pennsylvania:

DEAR SIR: Having full confidence in your ability and discretion, and knowing your loyalty to the Government, I have to request, and hereby authorize, you to visit the several cities of Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Providence, Boston, Hartford, and any other places you may deem necessary, and there and then, acting in conjunction with the several district attorneys and other officers of this Government at the respective places, you will take such measures as to you and them may seem advisable to secure all correspondence by telegraph from such points to and with persons residing in Southern States in rebellion against this Government in relation to the furnishing of ordnance, arms, equipments; ammunition, provisions, or supplies to such States or rebels; and I have to invite and request that all officers of the Government will be assisting you with all the means and power at their command to carry this into successful execution.

I am, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Madison, Wis., May 6, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: A meeting of the Governors of several of the Western and border States on the evening of Friday last, at Cleveland, Ohio, resulted in a determination to make you some suggestions in regard to the supposed condition of portions of the country and to ask advice from the President. Messengers were selected to confer with you. The extreme anxiety we feel, and the anxiety felt by the people of the border and Northwestern States, must be our sufficient warrant for urging some more definite course of policy in regard to the relations between the Government and these States. We are prepared, and the people of the States we represent are prepared, to sustain you and your Administration in every measure, however extreme, for the suppression of this untoward rebellion and for the punishment of the treason. We appreciate also most fully the difficulties under which you labored in taking {p.168} the reins of Government at a time when its Treasury was empty and its credit exhausted; when its Army was scattered; its ships dismantled and disabled in foreign ports, and its arms secured by deposit in the hands of traitors. We appreciate also the anxieties incident to the known or supposed treachery of a multitude of civil, military, and naval officers. We can understand the immense labor that must have been performed to bring back the Government to the point it has now reached. We approve most fully of whatever has been done by the Government, and are prepared to expect still further exhibitions of energy, such as the public exigencies demand.

But now we wish to urge upon you the absolute necessity, since Washington is safe, of giving more attention to the country immediately contiguous to the line between the free and the slave States. The fierceness of this wicked rebellion is to exhibit itself through the last-named extent of country more than anywhere else, and on the law and government side of that line there is less preparation than almost anywhere else. From Pittsburg and Cincinnati to the mouth of the Ohio, on the northern side of the river, the country is almost entirely defenseless against an armed enemy. Cincinnati and numerous small towns on the river could be utterly destroyed and the country about them laid waste, without the means of resistance. It would require no very heavy battery and no very large army to take Cairo and for a long time to hold it. The commanding positions for defense or attack are on the south side of the Ohio. It is a matter of absolute necessity, not only for the Northern border States but for all the Northwestern States, to be able to control the business and commerce of the Ohio River and the Upper Mississippi in order to reach a vital part of this rebellion. We must be able to cut off all supplies of breadstuffs, and also to stop the transit or transportation of arms or munitions of war. An enemy to our common Government cannot be permitted to hold an important point like Cairo. The Mississippi and the Ohio Rivers must be kept at all times open to the legitimate commerce and business of the Northwest. The vast lumber and mineral interests of Wisconsin, independent of her commanding produce and stock trade, bind her fast to the North border States, and demand, like them, the free navigation of the Mississippi and all its tributaries from the highest navigable waters to their months.

It requires but slight knowledge of the country and of the character of the States to see all this. The necessities I have named being great, we must look to the means necessary to do what ought to be done in the least possible time. It needs men, will, arms, and munitions of war. One hundred and sixty thousand men can be rallied in four weeks for this purpose, and among the swarming millions of the North border and Northwestern border States there is but one pulse beating to-day and but one purpose-to hold up your hands, sustain the integrity of the Government, and aid in executing the laws in every State alike. The Northwest needs a better military organization and a military head to which it can communicate its necessities without tedious and mischievous delays.

I know full well that the Government will do for the Northwest and border States just as fast as it seems to see a necessity. We see a necessity now, not only for the safety of the Government, but for the safety of the free border States, for immediate action. There is no occasion for the Government to delay, because the States themselves are willing to act vigorously and efficiently. I must be permitted to say it, because it is a fact, there is a spirit evoked by this rebellion {p.169} among the liberty-loving people of the country that is driving them to action, and if the Government will not permit them to act for it, they will act for themselves. It is better for the Government to direct this current than to let it run wild. So far as possible we have attempted to allay this excess of spirit, but there is a moral element and a reasoning element in this uprising that cannot be met in the ordinary way. There is a conviction of great wrongs to be redressed, and that the Government is to be preserved by them. The Government must provide an outlet for this feeling or it will find one for itself. If the Government does not at once shoulder this difficulty and direct its current there will come something more than a war to put down rebellion-it will be a war between border States, which will lose sight, for the time, of the Government.

If it was absolutely certain that the 75,000 troops first called would wipe out this rebellion in three weeks from to-day it would still be the policy of your Administration and for the best interests of the Government, in view of what ought to be the great future of this nation, to call into the field at once 300,000 men. The majesty and force of the Government, if it has either, should be manifested now, so that the world may see it. When the people see that their uprising has put down the rebellion they will be satisfied, and not before, because they understood the Government to be theirs, and that they are a part of it.

The border and Northwestern States cannot wait to see their towns and cities upon navigable streams sacked and burned and the contiguous country wasted, and then content themselves with retaliations. They should have the means of preventing disasters of the kind. These States cannot be satisfied with call after call of raw troops to be put into the field as soon as mustered, without discipline or drill. They would not be soldiers, but marks for an enemy to shoot at. We want to understand the use of arms to be efficient soldiers, either in defending ourselves or in aiding the Government. We cannot learn their use until we get them. We want authority to put more men into the field, and we want arms for the men. The soldiers must go into camp, and learn the use of weapons and the duties of soldiers. If the Government cannot at once furnish arms, the States are ready to do it, and wait upon and aid the Government. Unless something of this kind is done, I much fear that what we count our greatest strength will prove our most dangerous weakness. It should be determined now to what extent the Government expects aid from the States, so that the States can be preparing that aid, both in furnishing men and providing arms, and so that, when mustered into service, the army may be efficient.

If the Government authorizes the States to act efficiently in organizing military forces and in arming them, it can then better hold the control of those forces, and by distributing arms to the States, or authorizing the purchase of them by the States for the use of the Government, it would have the right as well as power of ultimate direction and control, without the confusion that otherwise might arise between the States and the Government.

In Wisconsin we need arms now. Illinois has but a trifle over double the population of Wisconsin, and the call for six regiments from Illinois and but one from Wisconsin was so disproportionate as to excite extreme dissatisfaction. Companies for five regiments instead of one are drilling now without arms, and two regiments but partially armed are in camp. I have endeavored time after time to ascertain, both by messengers and letters, to what extent service would be required or Proffered service received, and to what extent it was expected the States would arm, equip, and uniform the men.

{p.170}

The Government, in order to retain the confidence of the people, must show some confidence in the people. The people are anxious to know what and how much is expected of them, and they are ready to respond.

While the details of the policy of the Government should not be made public, information of the general purposes of the Government should be lodged somewhere in each loyal State, so that there can be an authoritative assurance of what the Government expects and intends.

I received a request to send to Saint Louis for arms, but before my messenger reached there the arms had been removed to Illinois. I received then an order from General Wool upon the Governor of Illinois for 3,000 stand of arms; enough, with what Wisconsin already has, to arm five regiments of men. While my messenger was on his way to Springfield a dispatch from General Wool stated that his powers had been suspended, and the Governor of Illinois, of course, could not answer the order.

I have to request that arms be furnished to arm such troops as are likely to be called into service from this State, so that our soldiers may become accustomed to the use of them, or that a license be given to purchase arms to be used for the same purpose, and ultimately turned over to the Government after its troubles are quieted upon its border.

You will excuse the frankness and freedom of this communication. The great interests involved and the anxiety of the whole people have induced me to thus address you, and I feel assured that you will receive it with the good-will with which it is intended.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I believe a majority of those mustered into service in the six regiments would go for three years, but whether the discharge now of such persons as have enlisted for three months, but will not go three years, would be right and proper is a question I will leave the Department to determine. I have many companies in camp waiting your decision as to the number of additional regiments you will take for three years.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor O. P. MORTON, Indianapolis:

The Adjutant-General will give you full instructions in a day or two. There will probably be two regiments called from your state, under the second requisition of the President.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

DAVENPORT, IOWA, May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have received requisition for only one regiment; that regiment is for three months, and has gone forward. I will muster the rest for {p.171} three years, or during the war; but how many shall I muster in? How many more do you want from this State? Shall I uniform the men you yet want? Answer.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor S. J. KIRKWOOD, Davenport, Iowa:

The Adjutant-General will in a day or two give you full information as to the quota, &c., under the second call of the President.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

[MAY 7, 1861.-For Lincoln’s authority to Anderson for the organization of volunteer troops from the State of Kentucky and from the western part of the State of Virginia, see Series I, Vol. LII, Part I, p. 140.]

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 7, 1861.

His Excellency I. WASHBURN, Jr. Governor of Maine, Augusta, Me.:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 3d instant. It gives me pleasure to authorize Fort Sullivan and its grounds at Eastport to be used by your troops for drilling, &c.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor J. A. ANDREW, Boston:

Your dispatches referred to the Adjutant-General,* who will advise you immediately.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See May 4 and 6, pp 160, 164.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In presenting W. L. Burt, esq., of the Suffolk bar, I impart my entire confidence that he will correctly represent my wishes, which I think are in accordance with the good of all and which are entertained with entire deference to your counsels. My main desire is that Massachusetts may be allowed to furnish six regiments, at least, to the corps of three-years’ volunteers, and I desire also to receive the order under {p.172} which they may enlist, showing when, where, and how they are to be mustered into the U. S. service, so that I may move immediately in preparing for your service.

We have several regiments of men enlisted under the militia laws of Massachusetts who would readily turn themselves over to the United States, if acceptable, and if they had the course proper to be pursued pointed out.

I think we have some claim to march six regiments over the ground in Baltimore where our people fell.

Yours, obediently,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

But one of our regiments of volunteers under our act of April 16, 1861, has been sent forward. The men who will constitute the remaining thirty-seven regiments are all or nearly embodied, and moving to the depot, under an act for two years’ service, as recognized in your acceptance of the propositions of the State of 3d instant. The period of enlistment cannot be changed; though no doubt required two years, [sic] the force can be filled at the end of that time.

E. D. MORGAN, Governor of New York.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

Cannot yet give Ohio quota under second call of the President. Probably two or three regiments.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

Your dispatch requesting muskets and rifles to be forwarded has been referred to the Chief of Ordnance, from whom you will hear on the subject.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

The Adjutant-General will in a few days give you full instructions for mustering troops under the second call of the President. I repeat, in regard to those raised under the first call, it is desirable, preferably, that all the regiments not already actually sent forward should be mustered into service for three years, or during the war. If any persons in {p.173} those regiments should be unwilling to serve for three years, or during the war, could they not be got to consent to have their places filled by others who are willing so to serve, and thus enable the regiments to be mustered into service during the war?

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I hope you will accept the two Kentucky regiments now in camp near Cincinnati.

W. DENNISON, Governor.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

Governor ANDREW G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

Your dispatch of yesterday is at hand, and I have the honor to reply that this Department recognizes no divided authority, and that its authority is paramount to that of General Patterson, who in making the requisition upon you acted without its knowledge or advice.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The troops are all mustered into the service of the United States for three months, and any change in the time of service can only be made by Federal authority. I have no power to change the relations of the Government and would not interfere. We can fill our quota of the call for three years immediately if the order is made.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 7, 1861.

His Excellency Governor CURTIN:

The troops at Harrisburg will be much increased within a very few days. I beg for them your most generous hospitality.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 7, 1861.

Governor SPRAGUE:

His Excellency Governor Sprague, of Rhode Island, is hereby authorized to raise one regiment of infantry, to be mustered into the service of the United States for three years, unless sooner discharged; and his offer to furnish a battery of light artillery, in addition to the one now serving with the Rhode Island troops in this city, is hereby accepted.

{p.174}

At the request of Governor Sprague, Maj. John S. Slocum and Surg. Francis L. Wheaton will accompany him to Providence, R. I., and are detailed to aid him in the organization of said regiment. As soon as the enlistments in the said regiment shall warrant, and the officers commissioned in accordance with the laws of the State, Governor Sprague is authorized to make requisition upon the Ordnance and Quartermaster’s Departments for the necessary arms, equipments, camp and garrison equipage for said regiment of infantry and battery of artillery, and be mustered into the service of the United States. The regiment of infantry will be organized in accordance with the mode prescribed by the Adjutant-General’s Department of the Army of the United States, which will be hereafter made known to Governor Sprague.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Rutland, Vt., May 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to your telegram advising that no more troops from this State should be mustered into service for three months or for less than three years, I beg to inform you that the regiment now in rendezvous at this place, awaiting your orders to go forward, was, under your requisition of the 15th ultimo, detailed by companies from the regiments composing our uniform militia, the call being for three months’ service. They are not volunteers, but regular militia uniform companies.

At the late extra session of the Legislature an act was passed (of which I have sent to your address a copy) directing me to enlist and organize without delay two regiments, and in my discretion four more, for the term of two years from and after the 1st day of June, 1861. These two regiments will be enlisted very shortly and put under drill. I have no legal authority to enlist troops for three years, the law specifying that the enlistments shall be for two years from and after the 1st day of June, 1861, unless sooner discharged. Now, unless the General Government can accept troops from this State enlisted or drafted for two years I shall be unable to comply with any future requisition without calling another extra session of the General Assembly.

In regard to the regiment now in rendezvous, it is composed in great part of citizens in business life, who are patriotic and willing to respond to the call of their country in its emergency, but who could not feel willing to enlist for a two or three years’ service. Such troops can be raised, and sufficient numbers are pressing into the volunteer ranks, but they are generally of a different class from the uniform companies. I strongly desire that this regiment may be moved forward, if it be but for a frontier service, fearing if they should be ordered back it would dampen the ardor of the many who are now volunteering under the two-years’ leave.

Colonel Rains passed by this place to-day, sending word that he will return to-morrow to inspect the regiment.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

P. S.-This first regiment is now quartered in bell tents. Will it be expected that these tents shall go forward with the regiment, or will the General Government provide

E. F.

{p.175}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 8, 1861.

To the SEVERAL BUREAUS:

SIR: I transmit herewith copy of appointment of John Tucker, esq., as general transportation agent of this Department, and you are hereby instructed to cause to be communicated to him the requirements of your Bureau as they may arise, giving him such reasonable notice of any demands upon him as the nature of the service and the circumstances of the case may allow.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

JOHN TUCKER, Esq.:

SIR: In the present exigencies of public affairs and the requirements of the military branch of the public service it has become imperatively necessary to appoint a general agent of transportation for the Government, to whom shall be confided the duties consequent upon the transportation of men, supplies, and munitions of war.

Relying on your well-known integrity and high character, you have been selected, and are hereby appointed, as such general agent of transportation, and you are requested to enter upon the duties thereof at the earliest day practicable. Being thus appointed, you are hereby desired to proceed forthwith to Philadelphia and New York, and hold yourself subject to any orders of the Secretary of War, communicated to you either direct or through the proper officers.

It is the purpose of this Department that you provide, and you are hereby authorized to purchase (with the sanction of the Department), charter, or in such manner as may be the best for the public interests, the speediest means of transportation for all troops and those connected with the Army, all munitions of war, and all supplies of whatever nature of which you may be informed by this Department, using every economy in procuring such necessary means of transportation, whether in so purchasing, chartering, or hiring water conveyance or in engaging transportation by land, whatever the character of such conveyance.

You will keep the Department advised of your movements, that communications by mail or by telegraph may reach you without delay. You will keep a careful record of your proceedings, and report to the Department from time to time your action under this authority.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

JOSEPH H. DICKSON, Quebec:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26th ultimo, addressed to the President of the United States, expressing your cordial sympathies in behalf of the American Union, and tendering your services to support and sustain the Stars and Stripes. Accept the thanks of this Government for your truly patriotic offer. I cannot doubt your services would be valuable to the Government in this emergency, but I beg to remind you that we are engaged in a contest to put down rebellion, and it behooves us to {p.176} exhibit to the world the power of the American Union to vindicate its authority by the hands of her own citizens, and I am happy to add that we rest in the confident assurance of the ability of the loyal citizens of this Government to accomplish this result. I am constrained, therefore, to decline your services.

I am, sir, very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

D. MCDONALD, Halifax, N. S.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 20th ultimo, addressed to the President of the United States, and I beg leave to say in reply that, while it is highly gratifying to this Government to learn that the people of Nova Scotia sympathize with it in its determination to suppress rebellion, it cannot accept their services in the Army. Be assured, sir, the difficulty of the President of the United States now is, not the want of men to march to the rescue of the Government, but to resist the pressure upon me to accept all who offer their services from the different States of the Union.

Thanking you for your services, I am, sir, respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 8, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts, Boston:

SIR: Lieutenant-General Scott has had the honor to receive your letter of the 1st instant, with a copy of the communication dated April 30 to General Butler, in relation to the transport Cambridge.* The Cambridge arrived at Fort Monroe the 4th instant, landed there the camp and garrison equipage intended for the Massachusetts volunteers at that post, and proceeded by the Potomac to this city with the rest of the equipage and all the stores for the Massachusetts volunteers. The supplies have been directed as you desire. General Scott being exceedingly pressed with business and not in good health, commands me to express his gratification and his thanks for the timely re-enforcement of Fort Monroe by Massachusetts troops, and the opportune arrival of camp equipage and supplies for them.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Andrew to Butler, Series I, Vol. II, p. 613.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

Hon. ALEXANDER RAMSEY, Saint Paul, Minn.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ultimo, informing me that one regiment of 900 men has {p.177} been detached from the militia of Minnesota and is now rendezvoused at Fort Snelling, ready for active service.

You will please accept the thanks of this Department for the prompt response to the call of the President on the patriotism of the citizens of your State.

Respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

Governor CHARLES S. OLDEN, Trenton:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, respecting the tender of the services of General Wright and his division of New Jersey militia. Concurring with you most fully in the views which you express on the subject, I shall endeavor to have them carried out in the matter.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Albany:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, giving the regiments, strength, and date of departure from New York of the force sent forward from your State in compliance with the requisition of the President, and I again thank you for the very energetic and efficient service you have rendered the Government in the present emergency.

In reply to your inquiry I beg leave to say that “ammunition, subsistence, and other stores requisite for the troops in the field, after they shall have been mustered into the U. S. service,” are furnished them by the Government. So are “tents and camp equipage, with transportation for the same.” Clothing is also furnished them, but finding it difficult to supply all promptly, some of the States have furnished their troops with it, relying upon the Government to refund the expenditure.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., May 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your letter of the 3d instant, written in reply to Mr. Attorney-General Myers’ communication of the 1st instant to the War Department, accepting from the State of New York thirty-eight regiments of volunteers for two years, unless sooner discharged, and assuming, at such depots within this State as the War Department may indicate, the instruction, pay, and subsistence of such troops, has been laid before {p.178} the Board of Officers formed under an act of the Legislature of the State of New York, passed April 16, 1861, whereupon the following formal action was taken by them:

Resolved, That the report of the attorney-general be received and entered upon the minutes of the Board. That the agreement entered into by that officer, in behalf of the State, with the Federal Government, be, and the same is hereby, approved and adopted.

I take this occasion to acquaint you with the fact that six of the volunteer regiments are ready to be immediately mustered into the service of the United States (besides Colonel Ellsworth’s, now in the field) and that the rest may be expected to be ready in ten days.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

NEW YORK, May 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will the States be called upon for their quota of the last requisition, or will the President accept companies, regiments, or brigades at large? If the latter course be adopted, I can offer a regiment or a brigade already organized and ready for service as U. S. Volunteers. Please answer.

D. E. SICKLES.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 8, 1861.

Governor ANDREW G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

In reply to your telegram of yesterday, I beg leave to say that the inquiry which I had the honor to make of you the day before yesterday was not whether Pennsylvania can fill her quota of men for three years’ service, or during the war, under the second call of the President, for it is well known to this Department that she can and will do it; nor was it to ask you to exercise any power not belonging to you. It simply was to inform you that it is now preferred to have all the regiments already mustered into service for three months, which are not actually sent forward, remustered into service for three years, or during the war, should they be willing to do so. To accomplish this end your aid was invoked to confer with the officers and men of these regiments and make known to this Department their disposition on the subject. To this, the material part of the telegram, there is no reply in yours of yesterday. I am happy to say, however, that a telegram has just been received from the colonel of one regiment expressing the willingness of his command to be mustered for service during the war, as I doubt not all the others are if the desire of the Government be made known to them by you. I may add that one of the brigadier-generals of your State has by letter expressed the same willingness, with but few exceptions, on the part of his command. The desire of the Government to have them mustered for three years is, indeed, superinduced by the pressure upon it by three-months’-service troops to be so remustered.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.179}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Your telegram is received. I have prepared a circular to be sent to the colonels of all the regiments not sent forward, embracing and recommending most heartily the suggestions in your dispatch, and requiring immediate report to be made to me by the colonels of the regiments of those willing to change time of service. I presume you will instruct the proper officers to remuster those who are willing to change time of service and to reform the regiments according to term of service.

Any deficiency can readily be made up from the camp here.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania.

–––

MADISON, May 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

How many regiments of men enlisted for three years, unless sooner discharged, will be accepted from Wisconsin? Let me know, if possible, that we may proceed to equip them.

A. W. RANDALL.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST, Troy. N. Y., May 9, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: Be pleased to accept my grateful acknowledgments for your communication of the 6th instant. It is especially gratifying to learn that my conduct hitherto in relation to the affairs of the Union merits your high approbation. Although I am aware that with the press of business you have but little time to read letters, yet, as my conduct in connection with the Union Defense Committee of the city of New York may not be properly understood or appreciated by all in authority at Washington, I avail myself of this occasion to present you with a condensed history of the part I performed in the forwarding of troops and supplies for the protection and defense of Washington, which at the time was reported to be in imminent peril.

It was under such circumstances that I visited Governor Morgan at Albany on Saturday, the 20th of April, who informed me that Washington was in great danger of being taken possession of by the rebels. Whilst in consultation with him he received a dispatch to hurry troops to Washington. I did not hesitate to advise the most prompt and energetic measures. At the same time I gave orders to Colonel Tompkins, assistant quartermaster-general, to furnish transportation, and Major Eaton, commissary of subsistence, to supply thirty days’ rations to the troops ordered by water to Washington.

On Monday, the 22d ultimo, I repaired to the city of New York. The following day I was visited by General Dix, Messrs. Simeon Draper, Blatchford, Grinnell, General Wetmore, and others of that noble, generous, and patriotic Union Defense Committee. They considered Washington in danger of falling into the hands of the Southern rebels, and no time was to be lost in forwarding troops for its defense, as also supplies. They presented me with their plan to save the capital, which {p.180} I approved and accepted in behalf of the United States, and immediately adopted prompt and energetic measures for carrying it out. Ships were chartered, supplies furnished, and troops forwarded with the utmost dispatch to Washington, via the Potomac River and the Chesapeake Bay to Annapolis. Steamers were sent to protect the ships from capture by two privateers reported to be off Cape Henry. All the vessels carrying troops and supplies were either armed or convoyed to their places of destination. The steamship Quaker City, after landing her troops at Annapolis, was ordered to report to Colonel Dimick, commanding Fort Monroe, to prevent the transportation of cannon, &c., from Norfolk to Old Point Comfort to besiege that fort, and also to look out for privateers, and to protect our vessels going up the Potomac and the Chesapeake Bay.

On the requisition of Colonel Dimick I ordered provisions, carriages, ammunition, and implements to Fort Monroe.

Being informed that the troops at Washington were short of provisions, I ordered Major Eaton, until otherwise directed, to send by Perryville to Annapolis 30,000 rations daily; all which was promptly, efficiently, successfully, and without any accident whatever executed, and, as was reported, saved the metropolis from the ravages of war.

Upon the application of the various Governors, I ordered to Pennsylvania 26,080 muskets and 1,037,889 cartridges; to Ohio, 10,000 muskets and 400,000 cartridges; to Indiana, 5,000 muskets and 200,000 cartridges; to Massachusetts, 4,000 stand of arms; to Illinois, 200,000 cartridges; to New Hampshire, 2,000 muskets and 20,000 cartridges; to Vermont, 300 rifles; to New Jersey, 2,880 muskets; to General Sandford, of New York, 16,000 muskets; and to Commissary-General Welch, of New York, at the request of Hon. Mr. Dix, 40 rifles.

I requested the Governor of Illinois by telegraph to secure the arsenal at Saint Louis, and at the same time sent a special messenger to the Hon. Frank P. Blair, urging him to assist in its preservation, by all which means 21,000 stand of arms were secured and sent to Springfield, Ill. Out of these I requested the Governor to furnish to Ohio 5,000 muskets in addition to those previously sent there, and to Wisconsin 3,000 stand of arms.

At the request of Governor Andrew I permitted him to use the forts in Boston Harbor to drill and discipline two regiments of Massachusetts Volunteers, out of which I directed one company should be sent as speedily as possible to Watertown Arsenal and two to protect the armory at Springfield.

Upon a like application from Governor Goodwin, of New Hampshire, I consented to his taking such measures as were indispensably necessary, without any extraordinary expenditure, to place the navy-yard and harbor of Portsmouth in a defensive condition, including such troops as were absolutely required. I further gave my concurrence to the occupancy of Fort Adams by the force ordered there by Governor Sprague, subject to the approval of the War Department. I sanctioned also, upon application of a committee on behalf of the common council of New Bedford, the erection of defensive works at Clark’s Point, provided all expense incurred should be paid by the local authorities and the works surrendered to the Federal Government when demanded.

Finally, I issued the necessary orders for the occupancy of Fort Schuyler by Colonel Duryea’s regiment, of this State.

Such in part were the duties I performed in the course of ten days, without orders from any quarter. During this time I reported to Lieutenant-General Scott, on the 23d and the 25th ultimo, what I had done {p.181} and was doing, without obtaining any reply. Anxious to learn whether the part I was acting met the approbation of the General-in-Chief or the War Department, and apprehensive that my communications might not have been received, I sent Mr. Schuyler, volunteer aide-de-camp, with verbal messages, desiring to learn the wishes of the authorities at Washington, and whether what I was doing met their approbation, being unable to obtain any reply or information. Consequently I remained in ignorance of the wishes of the authorities until late in the evening of the 1st of May, when I received a communication, dated the 28th ultimo, from Lieutenant-General Scott, in which I was directed to repair to my headquarters in this city.

It was reported in New York that I was engaged in making contracts for supplies of various kinds to further the objects of the Union Defense Committee, and that these reports have reached Washington. It is due to myself to say that I made no contract of any kind whatever for the committee or in behalf of the Government. At the request of the committee, however, I signed two charter parties for the ships to transport troops and supplies to Washington. I had nothing whatever to do with chartering the ships. I understand the committee paid the expense out of the city funds.

I have the honor to be, with considerations of the highest respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., May 9, 1861.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN, President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: The citizens of Chicago, with their usual liberality, have been to a very large expense in preparing and fitting for active service a regiment of infantry for war. One citizen, Solomon Sturges, esq., has contributed the sum of $20,000, and it is the purpose of the city to equip the whole regiment and furnish it with all the arms required, and render it efficient, except Government rifles. One company, however, has 100 new Sharps rifles and 8,000 cartridges. A committee of the citizens of that locality have requested me to ask of Your Excellency that you will make a requisition on me for one additional regiment to come from Chicago, and to be called the Chicago Zouave Regiment, under the command of Col. W. S. Johnson, jr. I cheerfully comply with their patriotic wish, and would respectfully ask of you, if possible, to grant their request. The regiment is composed of the very best material and well officered, and I have no doubt will be very efficient in service.

With much respect, I remain, yours truly,

RICHARD YATES.

P. S.-Telegraph Col. William S. Johnson, jr., Chicago, if you will make the call and accept the regiment.

R. Y.

–––

PORTLAND, ME., May 9, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

MY DEAR SIR: I write simply to say that I am rejoiced to see you conducting affairs with so much spirit and energy. Rely upon it, you {p.182} cannot at Washington fairly estimate the resolute determination existing among all classes of people in the free States to put down at once and forever this monstrous rebellion. The masses are far ahead of the politicians in this feeling. I have been surprised as well as gratified to find that our most cautious and money-loving men say that now is the time to establish our Government upon a permanent basis and one that cannot be shaken; that as a matter of business-of dollars and cents-no amount of money necessary to accomplish this object is too great, and that blood shed for such a purpose is well shed. The only fear existing in men’s minds is that the Government will stop short of its whole duty; that when the work is half done, and the end clearly seen, parties will spring up among us urging a compromise or something short of entire subjugation, and that we shall yield to the clamor. This, they say, would be a betrayal of the cause of social order. The people are now at your back, full of enthusiasm and wrath. Take advantage of it, and relax no effort until the cause of Government is vindicated and the traitors doomed. While mere invasion is to be avoided, I hold that wherever the public property has been seized it must be repossessed, and wherever rebels appear in arms to resist the laws they should be dispersed. The Government owes protection to good citizens, oppressed by lawlessness, in all the States, and I trust that protection will be afforded.

Excuse me for saying thus much. I could not avoid saying how heartily I approve what you are now doing, and am hoping every day to hear of some decided blow. Our first regiment is all ready, and only deteriorates while staying here. It should be ordered into active service at once.

Your friend, truly,

W. P. FESSENDEN.

–––

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, EXEC. DEPT., Council Chamber, Boston, May 9, 1861.

Lieut. Gen. WINFIELD SCOTT, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The propeller Pembroke, gun-boat, in the employ of this State for transport service, will start on Thursday from this port with two companies of troops to fill up the Massachusetts regiments at Fort Monroe. She will have on board a quantity of stores, as per memorandum herewith attached,* to be landed at Fort Monroe, unless otherwise ordered by yourself or the War Department. It not being known whether the Commissary Department of the United States will take charge of the stores, they will be consigned to the senior officer of the Massachusetts troops at that post, who will be authorized to deliver such of them as the Commissary-General of the U. S. Army may be ready to receive.

The Pembroke, after discharging men and stores, will be directed to return forthwith to Boston, unless otherwise ordered by yourself or by the Department, at whose service she is placed. The vessel has been bought and armed jointly by the merchants and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. A description of the vessel is annexed,* and she may be useful as a gun-boat, transport, or tender. She ought to reach Fort Monroe in about sixty hours of good weather.

{p.183}

The stores placed on board are such as are deemed needful for troops, are carefully bought both as to price and quality, and, with certain exceptions indicated in the invoice, they are all intended to be at the disposal of the Department, supposing we could incidentally render no better service than this, and they may be carried up to Washington, left at Fort Monroe, or carried around to Annapolis, as the Government shall wish.

Yours, most respectfully and faithfully,

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor.

* Omitted.

–––

NEW YORK, May 9, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

My brigade will be uniformed and equipped as regulars by the city of New York. I have twelve officers who served in Mexico under General Scott; some of them with distinction. Capt. Don Williamson, late of the U. S. Army, Engineer Corps, is my brigade inspector. He will command one of my regiments if you accept us. The 3,000 troops called for from this State are all mustered, and unless you take us I must disband two splendid regiments eager for service. The city has ordered twelve steel rifled cannon for me. We will go for three years or longer, or for the war, or as regulars. Please answer as soon as possible.

D. E. SICKLES, Colonel Excelsior Regt. and Actg. Brig. Gen., City Hall, N. Y.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 9, 1861.

Governor WILLIAM DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, containing a requisition for 25,000 muskets, 1,200 rifled muskets, and 1,300 Harper’s Ferry muskets, and I beg leave to say in reply that arms and accouterments at this time can be furnished only to troops mustered into the service of the United States. On examination at the Ordnance Department I find that at least 15,000 muskets have already been furnished to your State, chiefly by orders from General Wool, while the total quota thus far called out by the President from your State does not exceed 10,000 men. This being the case, I feel the less reluctant to decline to meet your requisition at this time, as I feel obliged to do. It is not possible to meet demands for arms to be distributed among the people without very soon exhausting our entire supplies and making disproportionate distributions to different parts of the country. I may, moreover, add that the Government has no Harper’s Ferry rifled muskets on hand, and that the small supply of rifled muskets it is obliged to reserve for troops mustered to serve during the war.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.184}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 9, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have sent following letter to the colonels of all the regiments, and will advise you as I hear from them:

HEADQUARTERS COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF, Harrisburg, Pa., May 9, 1861.

COLONEL REGIMENT STATIONED AT ___:

SIR: I have been requested by the Secretary of War to let the regiments now in the service of the State know that it is preferred to have all the regiments already mustered into service for three months, which are not actually sent forward, remustered into service for three years or during the war, should they be willing to do so. I therefore deem it proper that you immediately ascertain the preference of your regiment upon this question and communicate the result forthwith to me. Those who do not desire to re-enlist for this additional period can be formed into regiments, or have such arrangements made as to enable them to retire with honor in accordance with their enlistment.

I cannot refrain from saying that it would afford me pleasure to see the regiments so promptly and patriotically offered to the State give this additional and more enduring evidence of continual devotion to their country.

Very respectfully, yours,

A. G. CURTIN, Governor and Commander-in-Chief.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 9, 1861.

Hon. D. COOPER, Saint Paul:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant, in relation to Pug-o-na-ke-shick, or Hole-in-the-Day, and his braves of the Chippewa Nation. You can say to him that the President as well as this Department is much pleased by his fidelity to the Government, as manifested “by the offer of the services of himself and 100 or a greater number of his headmen and braves to aid in defending the Government and its institutions against the enemies of the country.” To yourself I can say it is wonderful with what eagerness the people flock round the standard of our great Republic. It is not possible at this time to ascertain their number, but that number is further increased --- the present emergency. Now this fact, but more especially the nature of our present national troubles, forbids the use of savages and makes it imperative upon this Department to decline the offer of the Chippewa chief, but with admiration of the sentiments, as expressed, which prompted it.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas an insurrection exists in the State of Florida, by which the lives, liberty, and property of loyal citizens of the United States are endangered;

And whereas it is deemed proper that all needful measures should be taken for the protection of such citizens and all officers of the {p.185} United States in the discharge of their public duties in the State aforesaid:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, do hereby direct the commander of the forces of the United States on the Florida coast to permit no person to exercise any office or authority upon the islands of Key West, the Tortugas, and Santa Rosa which may be inconsistent with the laws and Constitution of the United States, authorizing him at the same time, if he shall find it necessary, to suspend there the writ of habeas corpus and to remove from the vicinity of the U. S. fortresses all dangerous or suspected persons.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this tenth day of May, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 10, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Eleventh Indiana Regiment of Zouaves started to Evansville last night in pursuance of your order. They are in fine condition and well disciplined. The other three regiments will match for the same point as soon as they receive their accouterments. It would relieve me from munch embarrassment to learn how many regiments of three-years’ men you will take.

O. P. MORTON.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, May 10, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: I have just received yours of the 6th instant. The First Iowa Regiment is in rendezvous at Keokuk, and I hope will soon be supplied with arms. It will, under the authority of the telegram from you of the 6th instant, have 970 men.

In regard to furnishing arms for the militia, you propose to place 1,000 stand of arms “at Keokuk, in charge of Colonel Curtis, or some other responsible person, to be used in case of emergency.” In reply I can only say that if by this it is intended that the arms shall remain in Keokuk until an attack is actually made by Indians, and then be used to repel such attack, such arrangement will not be of practical benefit. Keokuk is at least 300 miles front Council Bluffs, and nearly or quite 400 miles from Sioux City, in which region the Indians will be troublesome, if at all. Between Keokuk and either of these points there are only about 80 miles of railroad, and the balance of the way arms, &c., must be carried by wagon. The Indians might invade our State, do incalculable injury, and be gone beyond our reach long before an express could reach Keokuk and the arms taken to the point of attack. The arms to be available to us must be near the points exposed.

{p.186}

Please consult Colonel Curtis on these matters. He is familiar with the geography of our State, and can give you important and reliable information.

Permit me to repeat that much alarm and uneasiness exist along our southern border. I am daily in receipt of letters from that part of this State, informing me that our people fear a border war with Missouri. We have no arms. I cannot, after diligent inquiry, learn where any can be bought. The quota heretofore sent to this State was based on the census of 1850, and has been very small. So far as arms are concerned, we are defenseless, and must remain so unless supplied by you. Arms in the hands of our people along the Missouri border would not only be a protection to us, but would be of great moral support to the true men in Missouri. I must be allowed to urge again the absolute necessity of sending a liberal supply to this State beyond the quota to arm the troops raised here for the service of the United States. Illinois has received 21,000 stand of arms. She has but a small border exposed and it well settled. She had before a good supply of arms, based upon her population. We were unprovided for, and are so yet.

I know well that at this tune you are overwhelmed with business, but must entreat that this matter have careful consideration.

Colonel Curtis, with whom you are acquainted, and Hon. John A. Kasson, First Assistant Postmaster-General, can give you full information, and I trust you will consult them.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

HARTFORD, CONN., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

How many regiments will you receive from Connecticut for three-years’ service?

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM, Governor.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Hartford, Conn., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: When in Washington a few days since your Adjutant-General named two regiments as the quota of troops for Connecticut to furnish under the call of the President for troops for three-years’ service. Will you have the goodness to name that number in a letter to my address? I have already accepted one regiment for three years, and will be obliged if you will direct Colonel Loomis to muster them into the service.

I am, dear sir, yours, with high regard,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Hartford, Conn., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor of informing you that the Second Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers, commanded by Col. Alfred H. Terry, embarked {p.187} last evening on board the steamship Cahawba, and sailed from New Haven for Washington. The Third Regiment will be in good condition to move next week, and I shall forward them in the same manner.

Trusting the troops will render valuable services to our country, and assuring you of the support and cordial co-operation of this State in your efforts to sustain the authority of the Government, I am, with high regard, your obedient servant,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Detroit, Mich., May 11, 1861.

General SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I am authorized by the Governor of this State to say that four regiments (a brigade) are ready for U. S. service, to be mustered for three years, unless sooner discharged. The Governor desires that they may be accepted as a brigade and move together, if the interests of the service will permit. The regiments are fully equipped, except arms and accouterments for two regiments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. ROBERTSON, Adjutant-General Michigan.

P. S.-Men enough are enrolled for seven regiments.

–––

PORTSMOUTH, N. H., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The First Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers waits your orders. We can furnish immediately another regiment for the war.

ICHABOD GOODWIN, Governor of New Hampshire.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have dispatched to you, as my special and confidential messenger, Col. John G. Stevens, to lay before you the condition in which I am placed with regard to the proposed call for volunteers for three years. Colonel Stevens is thoroughly conversant with my views and embarrassments and the importance of keeping public sentiment right in New Jersey and doing nothing to cause a revulsion of that patriotic feeling which has exhibited itself so nobly in this State.

The written communication* which he carries with him will be of secondary interest and importance to you compared with the oral representations he will make to you, because it is impossible to place upon paper and represent in full force the many facts and considerations which I have charged him to lay before you.

I am, sir, very respectfully, yours,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

* See next, post.

{p.188}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The recent proclamation of the President of the United States calling for volunteers to serve the United States Government for three years has excited the ardor of the people of this State, and I am overwhelmed with applications from regiments and companies eager to enlist under that proclamation.

I conceived it to be my duty to accept conditionally the offer of many of them, in order that the State might be prepared to furnish her share of the permanent force requisite to sustain the General Government, and I am now subsisting a large force, who are now ready to be immediately mustered into service for three years. These men ought not to be subsisted and withdrawn from their ordinary pursuits unless they are really to be received by the General Government, nor ought the State to be subjected to the burden of their maintenance if they are not needed.

It is of the utmost political importance to this State that at least three regiments of three-years’ volunteers should be accepted from the State. I am aware that you do not probably need them at present at Washington, but I would suggest that you should order them to be mustered into service and encamped here at Trenton. Major Laidley, U. S. Army, is now here under orders for this duty, but without instructions to proceed to muster in the volunteers for three years. I earnestly request that he be ordered immediately to muster them in. They could be thoroughly drilled here in camp, and equipped and uniformed at leisure. They would then be ready for active service whenever needed, and they could be transported hence with great facility, either by land or water, to any point to which the Government might at any time order them. Any action desired of this State will be taken by me when authorized by you, and detailed instructions as to the officering, subsistence, and equipment of the troops would be earnestly desired.

Permit me again to impress upon you the great importance to this State of encouraging the present patriotic impulses of its people and of taking permanent pledges for the stability of public opinion by securing the services for three years of at least three regiments of its active population.

I am advised by a dispatch from Brigadier-General Runyon, now commanding the New Jersey brigade at Washington, that he is unable to procure from the U. S. Commissary Department the necessary subsistence for his men and the utensils for cooking their food, He has subsisted them in the best way he could, and has drawn on me for a heavy amount to pay the expense he has thereby incurred. I wish you would give Col. John G. Stevens, the bearer hereof; such directions, instructions, or orders on the U. S. commissariat as will secure the comfortable subsistence of the New Jersey brigade.

Regretting that I have to trespass so much upon your time, I am, sir, very respectfully, yours, &c.,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acquaint you that the following regiments of New York Volunteers were ordered to be mustered into the U. S. {p.189} service at the places and dates specified below under the first requisition of the War Department:

New York City.-First Regiment, Colonel Allen, May 9, 1861; Fifth Regiment, Colonel Duryee, May 8, 1861; Seventh Regiment, Colonel Bendix, May 10, 1861; Fourth Regiment, Colonel Hudson, May 10, 1861.

Albany.-Second Regiment, Colonel Carr, May 10, 1861; Third Regiment, Colonel Townsend, May 8, 1861; Fourteenth Regiment, Colonel McQuade, May 10, 1861; Sixteenth Regiment, Colonel Davies, May 10, 1861.

Elmira.-Twelfth Regiment, Colonel Walrath, May 8, 1861; Thirteenth Regiment, Colonel Quinby, May 8, 1861.

Colonel Ellsworth, Eleventh Regiment (New York Firemen), is already in the field, where, it is presumed, it was mustered into the U. S. service. The irregularity of its leaving the State before the requirements of the law and regulations were complied with is not chargeable to this office.

These regiments will be clothed and armed and equipped forthwith, and will be subject to the orders of the War Department, which I have to request may be communicated for the information of the commander-in-chief At the same time it is desirable to be instructed as to the subsistence of these regiments after they shall have been mustered into the U. S. service.

I am, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 11, 1861.

Governor ERASTUS FAIRBANKS, Rutland:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 7th instant, and having already anticipated the answer of it by telegraph, nothing more is necessary than its acknowledgment.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Madison, Wis., May 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Wisconsin is anxious to furnish at least five regiments of volunteers for the war, for three years or during the war, or for any definite period. Ten thousand men are offered if needed, but we ask to furnish the number of regiments above stated.

Very respectfully,

ALEX. W. RANDALL.

–––

[MAY 13, 1861.-For Tucker to Cameron, in regard to water and rail transportation, see Series I, Vol. II, p. 635.]

{p.190}

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Frederick City, Md., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

DEAR SIR: I herewith transmit a copy of a letter from Brigadier-General Stites, tendering his brigade for special service. So soon as I can get the necessary papers ready I shall call out the four regiments for which the President has made a requisition upon me. They will be composed of volunteers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. H. HICKS.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., MARYLAND MILITIA, Elkton, May 10, 1861.

His Excellency THOMAS H. HICKS:

DEAR SIR: Your proclamation of the 6th instant reached me this morning, and as it was not my purpose to issue a brigade order in obedience to General Tilghman’s orders, it was quite gratifying to know that I was not liable to censure.

I entirely approve of Your Excellency’s course in relation to the position our State should occupy at the present juncture. Secession would be ruin and desolation to two-thirds of our dear old State, and I offer you my most cordial congratulations on the position you occupy. The opinions of all our correct-minded citizens will indorse you, and Cecil County will sustain you fully.

If it should meet your approbation, I would request as a favor that you offer to the Government of the United States the volunteer force of my brigade-say 500 men, or 1,000 if necessary-to guard the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad from the Delaware line through Cecil and Harford counties; and if the offer is accepted I can muster the men into service in three days after receiving the order. The German troops who are at present stationed here could be withdrawn, and I will pledge my own individual honor and the honor of the whole brigade for the fidelity of the guard.

I have this moment had a consultation with Colonel Howard and other officers of the brigade, who most cordially approve of my making the offer, and are ready at a moment’s notice.

Believe me, sincerely,

H. S. STITES, Brigadier-General.

I should be glad to know the result of the offer as early as may suit your convenience.

–––

WASHINGTON, May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In the new requisition upon the States for troops will companies of cavalry be received? If so, I am authorized to tender at least one company, who, under the care of Capt. James Starkey, have already a partial organization and have requested me to tender their services to the President. Other companies are organizing for the same purpose.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. RAMSEY, Governor of Minnesota.

{p.191}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 13, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

Send to this city by sea and Potomac five regiments of three-years’ volunteers. Forward no three-months’ men without special orders from the War Department or General-in-Chief.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have your telegraphic dispatch of this date. I shall forward by sea and Potomac, as directed, five regiments as soon as they can be armed and equipped-certainly during the present week.

I am, very respectfully,

E. D. MORGAN;

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 13, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN, Albany:

You will send on immediately the ten regiments returned by Adjutant-General Read to this Department as being mustered into service, but they are expected to come to serve three years or during the war. They may come by sea or by rail through Pennsylvania. Answer immediately.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. Y., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Applications are made to me for the discharge of volunteer militia companies that have been accepted and subsisted by the authorities of this State now in depot, for the purpose of volunteering directly to the Government of the United States, claiming that the Government of the United States will accept their services directly.

Permit me, therefore, to inquire whether, in case the authorities of the State of New York discharge such companies and they are subsequently accepted as militia by the Government of the United States, they are to form and be a part of the thirty-eight regiments which the Government of the United States is to receive front the State of New York.

If they are to be considered as part of the thirty-eight regiments, as above, their requests will not be complied with. If they are not to be So considered, upon certain conditions they will be. It is necessary to have this matter definitely understood.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

E. D. MORGAN.

{p.192}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 13, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: I have deputed Abraham Van Vechten, esq., to proceed to New York and Albany and communicate to you the views and wishes of this Department in regard to the quota of troops to be furnished by your State, their term of service, and the number to be forwarded immediately to this place.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have the honor to say that our regiments at York and Chambersburg are in excellent condition, and will soon be ready for active service. I suggest that the three regiments in Philadelphia, commanded by Colonels Lyle, Morehead, and Lewis, should be removed from the city. I fear they are becoming demoralized. Their removal to any point out of the city will meet my suggestion.

A. G. CURTIN.

–––

MAY 13, 1861.

His Excellency A. G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

How many Pennsylvania regiments that have been mustered into service for three months are willing to be remustered for three years?

How many regiments have been mustered into service for three years that are equipped and ready for movement, and have any regiments of this class actually been sent forward?

How many regiments have been mustered in that have not been equipped and have been deemed excess troops by General Patterson? Give the numbers of these particular regiments, and will they serve three years if accepted and provided for now by General Government?

How many regiments are organized in Pennsylvania that have not been mustered into the service of General Government that would be willing to serve three years?

Please answer the foregoing by telegraph and send copy by mail.

SIMON CAMERON.

–––

POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, Philadelphia, May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I am authorized by members of our advanced class in topographical engineering, who expect to graduate in June, to offer their services to the General Government. Accustomed to field practice, as well as to office work, they will be happy to act in any capacity in which their professional knowledge will best advance the great, all-absorbing cause of Union. They are natives of Pennsylvania and other central free States, are in age about twenty-one-say nineteen to twenty-four-and may be relied upon either for instrumental observations, with field transit and level, for mapping and the drawing of plans and elevations, {p.193} and for the direction of the ordinary operations of the sapper corps. I am the more pleased to be the means of communicating this offer to you now, because I learn from Professor Mahan, of West Point, that one branch of the Engineer Corps, the sappers, are “all away on service,” and because the students of U. S. Military Academy are needed, as soon as competent, for drill officers. The services of the patriotic young engineers, whose wishes I represent, would seem indeed to be just those most needed in the present juncture. Awaiting your early reply,

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED S. KENNEDY, President Faculty.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

MY DEAR SIR: At the suggestion of many whose opinions are entitled to consideration I have been considering the offer you made me.

The Rhode Island regiment is enlisted for three months, which only fits it for efficient service when the time expires. The second regiment from Rhode Island is now nearly ready. When that is in the field we shall have a force of, say, 2,000 infantry, two batteries of rifled cannon, equal to 2,000 men; in all, a force equal to 4,000 men. I think that if I were serving officially with these troops that I could re-enlist the first regiment at the expiration of their present term by again enlisting them for another three months, and so continue until the expiration of the war.

If, therefore, you consider that the interest of the service would admit of your making me a major-general, and this without any remuneration from the Government, I will suggest the matter to our Legislature, soon to be in session, and have our law so altered as to admit of my acceptance.

The people of Rhode Island would not permit my wholly severing my connection with them, and they would likewise be averse to my holding or accepting a commission of less rank than the one I now hold. Were it otherwise, I would as freely shoulder a musket as wear a sword. I am only anxious for the energetic prosecution of this war to an honorable peace, which can only be obtained by a conflict of arms; and then, if God so wills it, I will resume my business avocations, in which lies my only ammunition.

I think the cause might be strengthened and our enemies somewhat depressed by such an appointment. Of this you are the best judge. I am not obliged to sever my connection with our forces until about the 20th instant, at which time our Legislature will be in session.

If you think favorably of this matter, the within memorandum will be sufficient to present to our Legislature for their action.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. SPRAGUE.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., May 1861.

Governor Sprague is hereby tendered the position of major-general in the Army of the United States, and he is permitted to delay his acceptance until after the action thereon by the Legislature of his State.

{p.194}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., May 13, 1861.

L. THOMAS, Esq., Adjutant-General U. AS. Army:

SIR: I have appointed recruiting officers, and directed the immediate enlistment of two regiments of soldiers for the service of the State and the United States, under the provisions of an act of the Legislature of Vermont, approved April 26, 1861, a copy of which I herewith inclose.

I require, in addition to the arms now on hand for these two regiments, 1,360 rifle muskets, and I would respectfully solicit an order from your department upon the superintendent of the U. S. Armory at Springfield for said muskets, to be delivered so soon as the twenty companies of these two regiments shall have been inspected and organized under the superintendence of the adjutant and inspector-general of Vermont.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

[First indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, May 17, 1861.

Respectfully referred to the Colonel of Ordnance for so much as relates to arms.

By order:

JAS. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, May 18, 1861.

Respectfully returned. Arms can be issued only to troops actually mustered into the U. S. service. Our supplies will not admit of furnishing any other than smooth-bored arms.

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

[Inclosure.]

AN ACT to provide for raising six special regiments for immediate service for protecting and defending the Constitution and Union.

It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont as follows:

SECTION 1. The Governor is hereby authorized and required to raise, organize, and muster into the service of this State, without delay, two regiments of soldiers; and at such a time as in his discretion it may appear necessary, four other regiments, each regiment to consist of the regimental officers following; that is to say, one colonel, one lieutenant-colonel, one major, one surgeon, surgeon’s mate, and chaplain, with such staff officers as are provided for by the laws of the United States; for each company one captain, one first lieutenant, and one second lieutenant. Each of said regiments to consist of ten companies and of 780 officers and men.

SEC. 2. In order to raise such regiments, the Governor is authorized and directed to establish such recruiting stations, and appoint such recruiting officers as he shall think fit for the recruiting of able-bodied volunteers for said regiments; and in case the two regiments to be {p.195} mustered into service without delay shall not be filled within six days next after any further requisition shall be made on this State by the President of the United States for military aid, and before the 10th day of June, A. D. 1861, he shall cause a sufficient number of the citizens of this State able to do military duty to fill said regiments to be drafted for service in said regiments from the several towns in this State, in proportion to their population; but such drafts shall be made as to make the number of each town, both volunteers and drafted men, as nearly equal as practicable in proportion to the population of the various towns; and in case the four regiments provided for in the discretion of the Governor shall not be filled in fifteen days after the issuing of an order therefor, the same shall be filled by draft, as aforesaid.

SEC. 3. No person shall be received as a volunteer pursuant to this act whose age shall be less than twenty-one years, except by the written consent of his guardian, if he has one, or who shall be less than five feet four inches and one-half in height, or who shall have any such physical infirmity as to render him unfit for actual service.

SEC. 4. Such volunteers and drafted men, or such suitable substitutes as shall be furnished by them, shall be required to serve this State, and the United States, when duly called for, for the period of two years from and after the 1st day of June, A. D. 1861, unless sooner discharged from service.

SEC. 5. Each officer, volunteer, and drafted man, or substitute, from the date of his commission of volunteering, or being drafted or substituted, shall be subject to the rules and articles provided for the government of the armies of the United States now in force, or which may be hereafter in force.

SEC. 6. The Governor shall provide suitable and sufficient instruction in drill and the military art in general for such men as fast as they shall volunteer, or be drafted or substituted as aforesaid; and as fast as a sufficient number shall be received as volunteers, or be drafted or substituted, as aforesaid, they shall be formed into companies and regiments, under the direction of the Governor, as provided in section 1 of this act.

SEC. 7. As fast as such companies shall be so raised and formed the same shall be duly uniformed, armed, and equipped, and shall be regularly drilled and instructed at such places as shall be selected by the Governor for that purpose, and shall for that purpose go into barracks or encampment until ordered into actual service.

SEC. 8. The colonels, lieutenant-colonels, majors, chaplains, and quartermasters for said regiments shall be appointed and commissioned by the Governor, and the colonels shall appoint the staff officers of their respective regiments, and the surgeon and surgeon’s mate shall be selected by the regimental officers. The quartermasters upon entering upon the duties of their office shall give bonds to the treasurer of the State in such sum and with such sureties as the Governor shall direct and approve, which bonds shall be filed in the office of the treasurer, and in case of breach, prosecuted under the direction of the auditor of accounts.

SEC. 9. Each company shall elect officers. The commissioned officers shall receive their commissions from the Governor; the war rant officers their warrants in accordance with the usages in the Army of the United States.

SEC. 10. The commissioned officers shall receive the same pay and rations as are received by like officers in the Army of the United States. The non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates shall receive {p.196} from the time of their enlistment until they shall be ordered into actual service the same pay provided for like officers, musicians, and privates in the Army of the United States, and $7 per month each additional thereto; and after they shall be mustered into the service of the United States they shall receive, in addition to the compensation paid by the United States, the sum of $7 per month each.

SEC. 11. The $7 per month pay provided for non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates by this act shall not be paid at the expiration of each month, but shall remain in the treasury of the State. The amount there accumulated to the credit of any soldier shall be used and appropriated by the treasurer to pay such orders as may be drawn on him, under authority of law, for the support and maintenance of the family of such soldier. But if the pay so accumulated to the credit of any soldier shall not be drawn from the treasury on such orders, it shall be paid to such soldier or his legal representatives at the expiration of his term of service.

SEC. 12. The Governor is hereby authorized and directed to procure immediately a sufficient quantity of arms and equipments for the six regiments herein provided for.

SEC. 13. When it shall be necessary to draft men in pursuance of any of the provisions of this act, it shall be done in the manner provided by the fourth section of an act entitled “An act relating to the militia, approved October 30, 1844.”

SEC. 14. Whenever any company of the uniformed militia of this State shall be ordered into service by the Governor agreeably to the provisions of this act, the officers and men comprising such company or companies shall be subject to the same regulations and entitled to the same pay as the officers and men comprising companies organized under the provisions of this act.

SEC. 15. The listers of any town neglecting to make the returns required by this act shall forfeit and pay to the State treasurer for the benefit of the State the sum of $50, and it is hereby made the duty of the auditor of accounts to prosecute the same to effect; and it shall be the duty of the adjutant and inspector general to forward suitable blanks to the town clerks of the several towns in this State for the listers to fill, to carry out the provisions hereinbefore enacted.

SEC. 16. The provisions of this bill shall in no manner interfere with the present organization of the uniformed militia.

SEC. 17. This act shall take effect from its passage.

Approved April 26, 1861.

–––

PHILADELPHIA, May 14, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON:

MY DEAR SIR: I am earnestly devoting my energies to saving money for the Government, and you may depend upon it that there is occasion for it.

Owing to the sickness of Mr. Thomson and the absence of Captain Loper (at Washington), I could not till to-day obtain a list of the vessels chartered by them, and it may now be incomplete. In it I find nine charters “by the day,” and fifteen “by the month or as long as waned,” beginning from April 20 to May 7. Of these chartered by the day I have already got rid of all but two, besides having ordered some of the others to return here before I could get the information as to the terms of the contract. I will see that all of them are discharged before their {p.197} term expires, except such as are absolutely required, which in my judgment can be reduced for the transportation between Perryville and Annapolis to two steamers for passengers and three good propellers. Some of the charter party are at enormous prices.

I shall go to New York to-morrow night if necessary, to discharge all vessels engaged by parties there that can be dispensed with. I hear of parties who have gone to Washington to sell their vessels. I assure you with the utmost confidence that for transportation purposes there is no occasion for you to be in haste about buying anything. Anything that is required for this purpose can be bought or chartered without any difficulty and at fair prices.

As to gun-boats or steamers for blockading purposes, the case may be different. I inclose a description* of a new propeller, La Union, which I should think would be about what is wanted for blockading small ports. She is entirely new, the price about $25,000, which, I suppose, means something less. I will have an exact description of another smaller propeller to-morrow, also entirely new. I find that I can have a large number built of any description of gun-boats in sixty days. Unless the emergency is great, do not buy old ones, which will be constantly out of order. I will send plans and bids in a day or two from experienced and honest contractors.

I am most anxious to protect you from imposition, and if you will refer the parties who have vessels for sale or charter to me the Government interests shall be protected.

Yours, very respectfully,

JOHN TUCKER.

–––

PHILADELPHIA, May 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

MY DEAR SIR: The great discomforts of the troops which I have witnessed in Washington (and you will remember our visit to a Pennsylvania regiment at the Inauguration ball room) has caused me much reflection as to how it could be properly remedied. Here, too, we have constant and well-founded complaints about the suffering and almost starvation of the troops. Many of them are literally beggars. At Harrisburg the soldiers, I bear, have been at times treated more like brutes than men, and this, too, when an abundance of army rations are at command. The great difficulty seems to be in distributing and serving the food properly. We all know that the efficiency of an army depends on their health; we know equally well that their health cannot be preserved without proper regard to their food. In a conversation on this subject with my friend, A. S. Devin, esq., who informs me that he has taken an active part in providing barracks and food for the troops at Elmira, I have been so much impressed with the great advantages of that system over any that I have witnessed, I have prevailed upon him to go to Washington to see you and to give you the full details of it, which he can do so much better than I can in a letter. If this system strikes you as favorably as it does me, Mr. Devin will give you all information as to the cost of it in full detail, and if desired, will introduce you to parties who will enter into a contract to carry the proposed plan of so greatly adding to the comfort of the men by a proper system into effect, and who will execute it in strict good faith, and, as I believe, all things considered, with economy to the Government. I want you {p.198} to listen to Mr. Devin, although I know how much you are pressed for time. I feel the importance of the subject so much that were it not for other matters, about which you know, I would accompany him to Washington.

The Ohio troops now here have been on our streets as beggars for food, and unless there is some more regard for our patriotic soldiers I fear our great movement will be demoralized.

Yours, very respectfully,

JOHN TUCKER.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, Troy, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from Governor Kirkwood, of Iowa, referred to this Department by you.*

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Kirkwood to Wool, May 6, p. 163.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM, Hartford:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two letters of the 11th instant, and in reply beg leave to inform you that one regiment is fixed as the quota from Connecticut under the call of the President for troops for three years’ service, or during the war. The Adjutant-General will immediately give directions for mustering into service your regiment.

I am happy to inform you of the safe arrival of the troops from your State under the first call of the President, and I beg to thank you for the very cordial and efficient co-operation of your State in the efforts of this Government to sustain its authority.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, INN., May 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

By telegraph April 20 and written dispatch April 23, I tendered you six additional regiments, stating that I should put them in camp subject to the Government order, at least for a time. By written dispatch of April 26 you say that if the six regiments put into camp by me should be disposed to volunteer for three years they would be accepted. By written dispatch of May 3 you say it is contemplated to make another requisition for troops to serve during the war. By two different telegraphs received May 3 you say as soon as determined how many regiments will be received from this State which will be in a day or two, I should be informed. By telegraph of May 7 you say the {p.199} Adjutant-General will give full instructions in a day or two, and that probably two regiments would be called from this State. We have received no information from Adjutant-General or any other source, although I have telegraphed frequently asking answer.

The men are on hand in camp at heavy expense to the State, and it is due to them and the State that an answer be promptly given.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor ISRAEL WASHBURN, Augusta:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, tendering the services of a battalion of flying artillery. I regret to say that it is deemed inexpedient by the General-in-Chief to accept such a volunteer corps, nor is it deemed advisable at this time to put a force in Fort Knox.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

BALTIMORE, May 14, 1861.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you, in obedience to orders from His Excellency Thomas H. Hicks, Governor of Maryland, that 1 have issued orders to the colonels commanding two regiments of my brigade, Maryland militia, to call out volunteers for their respective commands, for service in the Army of the United States, in pursuance of the requisition of the President of the United States of date the 15th ultimo.

The colonels commanding the two regiments of Maryland militia (to complete the quota from this State) have been ordered by His Excellency Governor Hicks to report to me for orders; and, awaiting your orders, I have the honor to be, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

JOHN R. KENLY, Brigadier-General, Maryland Militia.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HEADQUARTERS MARYLAND MILITIA, Frederick, May 14, 1861.

–––

1. Brig. Gen. John R. Kenly, of the Third Brigade, Maryland Militia, is assigned to the command of the four regiments Maryland militia called out in pursuance of the proclamation of the President of the United States dated at Washington the 15th day of April, 1861.

2. The commanding officers of the regiments designated for the service of the United States by general orders from these headquarters of this day’s date will report to General Kenly for orders and Instructions.

THO. H. HICKS, Governor and Commander-in Chief of the Maryland Militia.

{p.200}

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor AUSTIN BLAIR, Jackson, Mich.:

General Scott requests Your Excellency to send the regiment of volunteers under Col. O. B. Willcox without delay to this city, via railroad to Baltimore and this city.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant. General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor ALEXANDER RAMSEY, National Hotel:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 13th instant, and beg leave in reply to inclose a copy of General Orders, No. 15, from which you can obtain the desired information.*

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See p. 151.

–––

WASHINGTON, May 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I am authorized by a telegraphic dispatch received late last evening from Adjt. Gen. John B. Sanborn to tender the President a second regiment of Minnesota Volunteers for three years, or the war, and I would respectfully ask that their services may be accepted, as from their frontier experience they are already familiar with whatever of hardship there is incident to the life of the soldier, and will, I assure you, prove themselves among the most gallant and useful of the immense host now entering the service of the Government. The following is a copy of the dispatch referred to, viz:

SAINT PAUL, May 13, 1861.

Hon. ALEXANDER RAMSEY:

The Twenty-third Regiment Minnesota Militia, Colonel Robertson, is full, and tenders its services for three years, or during the war. Hope it will be accepted. Answer.

JOHN B. SANBORN, Adjutant-General Minnesota Militia.

I will remain in this city during the week, and can be addressed at the National Hotel; after that, address me Saint Paul, Minn.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. RAMSEY.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor ALEXANDER RAMSEY, National Hotel:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 14th instant, tendering the services of Colonel Robertson’s {p.201} regiment, and in reply beg leave to say that the quota of troops assigned to the State of Minnesota will be furnished by you as its Chief Magistrate, to whom he should properly make his application.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

Governor CHARLES S. OLDEN, Trenton, N. J.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two letters of the 11th instant, presented to me by Col. John G. Stevens, and it gives me pleasure to say that I believe Mr. Stevens’ interview with the Department has been entirely satisfactory to him. Having fully advised him in regard to the troops yet desired from New Jersey, he has departed for home, and will be much better able verbally to inform you in regard to the inquiries of your letters than I can by writing.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 14, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN, Albany, N. 17.:

This Department has accepted the Seventy-ninth Regiment, New York Highlanders, for three years’ service.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Advised you by mail yesterday that five regiments would be forwarded to Washington the present week. I intend to accomplish it. Nothing can prevent but equipments. Five others will follow, in all, next week. The above ten regiments will be for two years or for the war.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 14, 1861.

Governor A. G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

Send on immediately over the Northern Central road through Baltimore three regiments, if armed and equipped and willing to be mustered into service for three years or during the war, of the troops which are in excess of the quota of your State, and could not be accepted by you under the first requisition of the President.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.202}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Have received answer from General Keim that of his division of six regiments that most, if not all, would go for three years; also from seventh regiment, accepting. No regiment as yet mustered in for three years; no officer here to attend to it. But one regiment entirely equipped, but are equipping one regiment per day. Some five or six regiments not mustered into service would go for three years. Will answer more fully by mail this evening on receipt of necessary information.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

ANDREW G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed herewith you will find the plan for the organization of the volunteers for three years’ service.* Ten regiments are assigned to Pennsylvania, making, in addition to the thirteen regiments of three-months’ militia already called for, twenty-three regiments.

It is important to reduce rather than enlarge, and in no event to exceed it. Let me earnestly recommend to you, therefore, to call for no more than twenty-three regiments, of which ten only are to serve for three years, or during the war, and, if more are already called for, to reduce the number by discharge.

In making up the quota of three-years’ men you will please act in concert with Lieut. Col. Andrew Porter, who will represent this Department, and, so far as possible, make it up by taking in preference regiments already offered for three months, having, of course due regard to a fair distribution of the forces among the different sections of the State.

If it should be agreeable to Your Excellency it would be especially gratifying to this Department to have some of those regiments offered for three-years’ service from Allegheny and other western counties, including the Wildcat District, brought into service under the quota for your State.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See General Orders, No. 15, p. 151.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 14, 1861.

Governor A. G. CURTIN, Harrisburg, Pa.:

A report just received from General Patterson* renders it necessary to countermand the dispatch sent to you this morning. Do not act until a special messenger, who will be sent by the train of cars this afternoon, will reach Harrisburg and confer with you.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Series I, Vol. II, p. 636.

{p.203}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

ALFRED S. KENNEDY, Esq., Philadelphia:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 13th instant, tendering the services of the graduating class of the Polytechnic College of the State of Pennsylvania to the Government. You will please answer these young gentlemen that this Department fully appreciates the patriotism which prompts their offer, and that it shall receive the consideration which it deserves. It might be well for you to communicate the names of the students, their respective ages, residences, &c.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 14, 1861.

SPENCER F. BAIRD, Esq.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 11th instant, inclosing the communication from students of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institution, tendering their services to the Government. You will please assure these young gentlemen that this Department fully appreciates the patriotism which prompts their offer, and that it shall receive the consideration which it deserves.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 15, 1861.

Governor JOHN A. ANDREW, Boston, Mass.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to forward you, inclosed herewith, the plan of the organization of the volunteers for three years, or during the war.* Six regiments are assigned to your State, making, in addition to the two regiments of three-months’ militia already called for, eight regiments. It is important to reduce rather than enlarge this number, and in no event to exceed it. Let me earnestly recommend to you, therefore, to call for no more than eight regiments, of which six only are to serve for three years, or during the war, and if more are already called for, to reduce the number by discharge. In making the quota of three-years’ men, you will please act in concert with the mustering officers sent to your State, who will represent this Department.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Same to Governors of other States, May 16, 1861, for their several quotas, as follows:

Connecticut.-One regiment for three years, or the war, in addition to the two regiments of three-months’ militia already called for.

Illinois-Six regiments in addition to six three-months’ regiments.

Indiana.-Four regiments in addition to six three-months’ regiments.

Iowa.-Two regiments in addition to one three-months’ regiment.

{p.204}

Maine.-One regiment in addition to one three-months’ regiment.

Michigan.-Three regiments in addition to one three-months’ regiment.

New Hampshire.-One regiment in addition to one three-months’ regiment.

New Jersey.-Three regiments in addition to four three-months’ regiments.

Ohio.-Nine regiments in addition to thirteen three-months’ regiments.

Vermont.-One regiment in addition to one three-months’ regiment.

Wisconsin.-Two regiments in addition to one three-months’ regiment.).

* See General Orders, No. 15, p. 151.

–––

OMAHA, NEBR., May 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Is Nebraska to have the honor of furnishing any portion of the ninety-days’ volunteers for the U. S. service?

ALVIN SAUNDERS, Governor of Nebraska.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 15, 1861.

Governor RAMSEY, Saint Paul, Minn.:

The quota of troops from your State for three years or during time war, under the second call of the President, is one regiment. The plan of organization contained in Order No. 15 has already been forwarded you by mail. As soon as the regiments are ready the mustering officer sent to your State will muster them into service, who has already been instructed to do so.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Same to Governor Robinson, Kansas, and to the Governor of Nebraska.)

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 15, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN, Albany, N. 17.:

You will send immediately five regiments to this city and nine regiments to Fort Monroe of three-years’ volunteers, all of which are now in the city of New York.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of. War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. 17., May 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I am in receipt of your telegram of this date, of which the following is a copy:

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN:

Your letter informing me of the action of your military board leaves no doubt of a misunderstanding as to the acceptance of troops from your State. It was my intention {p.205} to accept only twenty-eight regiments, and not thirty-eight. This Department can now accept only eleven under the second proclamation of the President, to serve for two years, or during the war.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

As a singular misunderstanding seems to exist between the Government of the United States and that of the State of New York in regard to the troops to be furnished by the latter for the service of the former, permit me to call your attention to the facts upon which the government of the State has acted.

Before any requisition was made by the General Government upon the State of New York for troops, the Legislature of this State had passed the act, a copy whereof is hereto attached, marked A,* and had also passed another act appropriating $500,000 for the purpose of procuring arms, which latter amount has already been sent to Europe for the purpose authorized by the act.

Your requisition for seventeen regiments was filled, so far as necessary, from the uniformed militia of the State, and the State government proceeded to organize the force of 30,000 men authorized by the act annexed; but as it was apparent the means provided by the Legislature, after so large a remittance for the purchase of arms, as above mentioned, would not enable the government to pay and subsist this force, and would only be sufficient to uniform, arm, and equip it, and as the constitution of our State prohibits the contraction of any debt not authorized under its provisions by law, the Board of Officers formed under the said act, on the 29th day of April last, dispatched to the seat of the General Government the attorney-general of this State, one of the said Board, to treat with the General Government as to the disposition of the force they proposed to raise. The attorney-general reported to the said Board that he had made a communication to the Secretary of War of the United States, a copy of which is hereunto annexed, marked B, bearing date the 1st instant,** and your reply thereto, which is hereunto annexed, marked C, bearing date the 3d instant.***

Au examination of these documents will show that an explicit agreement on behalf of the United States is contained therein to receive from the State of New York, at the depots in this State, thirty-eight regiments of men, to serve for two years, unless sooner discharged, and to assume the instruction, pay, and subsistence of that force. Upon the faith of this agreement the Board of State Officers formed by said act, marked A, have accepted the services, enrolled, and formed into companies all of said force;, have organized already more than half into regiments, and the remaining companies await only the necessary action of being formed into regiments and the election of regimental officers. In the mean time the State has incurred very heavy expenses in the pay and subsistence of the men to compose this force and in transportation to depots; has made contracts, now in progress of rapid fulfillment for uniform and equipment, including tents and necessary camp equipage, for the use of thirty-eight regiments, and thus provided for the expenditure of the whole of the liberal appropriation made by its Legislature in and for the General Government.

If under these circumstances the course intended to be pursued by the General Government is truly indicated by the telegram above copied, it is apparent that the troops already raised by this State beyond twenty-eight regiments must be at once disbanded, and the large amount expended in the equipment, or contracted for, and the faith of the State pledged for the fulfillment of the contracts on her behalf {p.206} must be lost to the public, besides producing, it is to be feared, a most unfavorable influence in repressing the patriotic zeal of the State. I am persuaded if the above telegram was dictated by you it was done without recurring to the terms of the agreement entered into with this State, copies of which are, as above, hereto annexed, and the originals of which are on file in your office, and do not doubt that upon an examination of the case the General Government will execute in good faith its agreement with this State.

I beg further to suggest that although the voluntary exertions of unofficial persons and bodies may evince commendable patriotism, yet their intervention between constituted authorities leads to irregularity, uncertainty, and inextricable confusion. The interference of private and unofficial persons, claiming to act under some kind of order from the General Government, with the movement of troops of this State has already been productive of mischief, and the offer by like persons of troops from this State to the General Government has, I presume, been the source of misunderstanding. This State will insist upon the regiments raised by its legally constituted authorities being received by the General Government, without regard to any you may receive tendered by individuals claiming to come from this State, some of whose offers are reported to have been accepted by the United States; and I beg that any orders requisite as to troops here not mustered into the service of the United States may be addressed and transmitted directly to the undersigned, commander-in-chief of the militia of this State.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

E. D. MORGAN.

* Seep. 250.

** See p. 143.

*** See p. 151.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 15, 1861.

Hon. HAMILTON FISH, Chairman, &c.:

DEAR SIR: The Governor of New York has been requested to send immediately to this city five regiments and to Fort Monroe nine regiments of troops, to serve during the war. Should the Governor decline to do so, you are hereby authorized to do it. These troops are to be made up of the fourteen regiments now in New York City, which are to be designated by the Union Defense Committee of said city.

Yours, respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 15, 1861.

ABRAHAM VAN VECHTEN, Esq., Albany. N. Y.:

That there may be no further misunderstanding on the subject, the Secretary directs me to inform you that this Department can accept only eleven regiments to serve for two or three years, or during the war, making twenty-eight regiments from New York in all; that is to say, seventeen for three months and eleven for the war.

J. P. SANDERSON, Chief Clerk.

{p.207}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 15, 1861.

His Excellency WILLIAM SPRAGUE, Governor of Rhode Island:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant, and respectfully beg leave to inform you in reply that it has received the consideration due to its distinguished source.

It is not doubted that if you were serving officially with the Rhode Island troops now here in service your influence with and over them would be such as to induce them to re-enlist at the expiration of their present service for another period of three months, and so continue until the expiration of the war, and it would afford this Department great pleasure to adopt this suggestion, if practicable in other respects, and thus secure to the Government the benefit of the valuable services you could render it in the manner suggested. But I regret to say this mode of retaining troops in service appears to me, after mature consideration, to be attended with such serious objections in other respects that I would not be justified to adopt it. Others now in service would regard it as a precedent for themselves, and claim it to be applied to themselves, and the result to be feared flowing from it might be the demoralization of the troops mustered into service for the war. Fearful of this, and unwilling to make a larger draft upon the patriotism of your gallant State than is absolutely necessary, the Government prefers to content itself with the service of one regiment from Rhode Island for three years, or during the war, rather than adopt a mode of retaining that now in service which might possibly prove injurious in its influence upon the troops now in service for the war.

In regard to the other suggestion of your letter, I can only say now that, with all my own inclinations in favor of it, I am yet met with obstacles in the way of its consummation which are embarrassing and difficult for me to overcome at this time. The President and his official advisers have deemed the interest of the public service to demand the promotion of General Benjamin F. Butler, and he has accordingly been appointed a major-general. This gives the New England States one officer in the Army of the new appointments of the highest rank, and as theme will be at present necessarily only a few of this grade, the President will be obliged in making the selections [to choose from] another part of the Union. Still anxious, however, to secure to the Government your services during the war, may you not yet be able so to arrange matters as to enable you to serve as a brigadier-general?

With assurances of my high regard, I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 15, 1861.

Governor ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, Madison, Wis.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant, addressed to the President of the United States, and by him referred to this Department, giving an account of the proceedings of a meeting of the Governors of a number of the States, held at Cleveland, on the 6th [3d] instant, and containing suggestions in regard to the condition of public affairs.

{p.208}

The assurance of those who composed the meeting that the people of the States whom they represented are prepared to sustain the President and his Administration in every effort which may be made to suppress the present rebellion is gratifying to the President and those connected with him in the administration of the Government, and honorable to the people of the States those high functionaries represented at the meeting.

Concurring fully with you and your associates as to the necessity of giving attention to the country immediately contiguous to the line between the free and slave States, I beg leave to assure you that all the steps deemed necessary to be taken have already or are now being taken. Before this letter reaches you you will have received a dispatch from this Department informing you of the number of regiments desired from your State to serve during the war, which will he mustered into the service as soon as practicable, and ordered to be marched into the field where they may be most needed.

I learn from your communication that in Wisconsin there is a need for arms now. These, I beg to assure you, will be furnished immediately to all your regiments on being mustered into service. Difficulties like those you mention to have occurred under the first call of the President, in regard to the arms for Wisconsin, are naturally incident to an occasion like that then existing, and I trust that it will not happen again. I regret that the people of your State should for a moment doubt the disposition of the Government to do full justice to them, and to give them as large a quota of troops to be furnished for the war as can consistently be given to her, and I trust the requisition now made will be entirely satisfactory to them.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have this day ordered five of the new regiments to report to Major-General Dix without delay. They will be equipped and ready to march on Saturday.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 16, 1861.

His Excellency Governor MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

SIR: The President is afraid that the fourteen regiments he agreed to accept from the New York Committee of Safety yesterday, for three years, may be deducted from the long-term volunteers he had before accepted from Your Excellency, and I write, by his desire, to say that the former are not to be deducted, but added to the latter. Five of the fourteen regiments are wanted here at once, and the other nine at Fort Monroe as soon as practicable. Please hold the other long term volunteers, which have not advanced, ready to proceed to the points which I shall designate to-morrow.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

{p.209}

[Indorsement.]

MAY 17, 1861.

The accompanying paper will speak for itself. It was sent to be shown to the Secretary of War, but, failing to find him, the telegram was dispatched to Governor Morgan, as time pressed.

It will be seen that I said to His Excellency that I would to-day indicate the disposition the War Department wished him to make of the remaining long-term New York Volunteers, some thirty-odd regiments; I know not precisely how many. As I am not able to see the Secretary, I beg to suggest that he will request the Governor or authorize me to request as follows:

First. That five of those remaining regiments be sent here as soon as armed, equipped, &c.

Second. That the remainder of the New York quota, say all west and north of Albany, be collected in healthy camps of instruction, near wood, water, and abundant supplies of food and straw, and convenient to railroads or navigable waters; no camp to exceed four regiments, or a brigadier’s command.

My meaning is that we should first make ourselves, particularly the Government, safe in this capital; then send the next seven or eight regiments to occupy and intrench themselves on Arlington Heights; then the next surplus force in an expedition against Harper’s Ferry, &c. In the meantime nine or ten regiments, over and above the garrison at Fort Monroe, will have arrived there for aggressive purposes. Who shall command that fort and direct the operations alluded to?

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 17, 1861.

Governor S. J. KIRKWOOD, Davenport:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant,* and beg leave to inform you that the same has been referred to the Chief of Ordnance for his consideration and action.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Kirkwood to Wool, p. 163.

–––

HEADQUARTERS KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS, Camp Clay, May 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

The two Kentucky regiments are organized and in camps. Majors Burbank and Oakes have in my presence mustered them in for three months. They were accepted for the war. Please send orders for mustering in, as they were accepted. Equipments are here and on the way from New York.

Respectfully,

GUTHRIE AND TERRELL, Colonels, Commanding.

{p.210}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 17, 1861.

His Excellency THOMAS H. HICKS, Governor of Maryland:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communications of the 13th and 14th instant, informing this Department that-

In pursuance of the requisition of the President of the United States of the 15th day of April, I (you) have issued orders to Brig. Gen. John R. Kenly, of the Third Brigade, Maryland Militia (Baltimore), to take command of the four regiments of Maryland militia which I (you) have ordered to he called out to be mustered into the service of the United States.

It becomes my duty to inform you in reply that the United States Government has now no occasion for the services of the four regiments of militia for three months’ service called for by the proclamation of the President of the 15th of April last, and does not desire said regiments to be mustered into service now. It is proper that I should add, for your information, that the President has commissioned the Hon. James Cooper, of Frederick, to accept the services of volunteers to serve for three years, or during the war, to make up the quota assigned to Maryland under his second proclamation, and that in pursuance of said commission he has already accepted a sufficient number of companies to fill that quota, and reported to this Department their readiness to be mustered into the service.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 17, 1861.

Governor SAUNDERS, Omaha, Nebr.:

None of the Territories have been called upon to furnish troops for three months. I telegraphed you yesterday that Nebraska was called upon now to furnish a regiment for three years.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 17, 1861.

The GOVERNOR OF NEW MEXICO:

SIR: I have the honor to forward you, inclosed herewith, the plan of the organization of the volunteers for three years, or during the war.* Two regiments are assigned to your Territory. In making up this quota of three-years’ men you will please act in concert with the mustering officers sent to your Territory, who will represent this Department.

Hon. F. P. Stanton has been specially delegated to proceed to Kansas and New Mexico to give attention to the interests of those affected by the present condition of affairs and the consequent movement of troops, with whom you will please to confer on the subject. The troops called into service from your Territory are intended for its protection, both against hostile Indians and domestic foes. They will be posted by order of the proper commanding officer with a view to these objects. {p.211} The regular troops now in service will be mostly withdrawn from your Territory, and it is intended that the troops raised by you shall take their place.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See General Orders, No. 15, p. 151.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 17, 1861.

Governor E. D. MORGAN:

You will order the troops rendezvoused at Elmira when ready to come on to Washington, to come by way of Williamsport, Harrisburg, and York.

SIMON CAMERON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 17, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Albany:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two letters of the 13th instant, the one informing this Department that you should forward five regiments during the present week, and the other inquiring whether, in case the authorities of your State discharged companies which had been accepted by you and they are subsequently accepted by this Department, they may become a part of the number of regiments which it has been agreed to receive from New York. The misunderstanding which has arisen about the acceptance of volunteers from New York, and which will be made the subject of reply to a letter just received from you by the hands of a special messenger, has caused this inquiry from you, and I will answer fully at my earliest convenience.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ALBANY, May 17, 1861.

General WINFIELD SCOTT:

Your telegram 16th instant is received. I dispatched Judge-Advocate-General Anthon with a letter to the Secretary of War, which is intended to explain the position of our military engagement with the General Government. I earnestly desire that you should see it. Twenty-five regiments have been organized for two years. The remaining companies for thirteen regiments are enrolled for the same period, and the regimental organization for such thirteen will be completed probably in one week, as directed. Five of the above will be sent to Washington and nine to Fort Monroe. The remaining regiments will be subject to your orders. Maj. Gen. John A. Dix will control the force at New York. He will command the First Division, consisting of two brigades-nine regiments. Maj. Gen. James S. Wadsworth will have charge of the Second Division, of two brigades-eight regiments. The remaining twenty-one regiments will be divided and officered in the Same manner,

E. D. MORGAN.

{p.212}

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We have forty organized companies not attached to any regiments. I see you have accepted additional regiments from New York, making forty-two in all from that State. In this you have done right. I ask immediate authority to add our forty companies for three years to the Ohio contingent.

The condition of Western Virginia, the uncertainty of Kentucky, make this increase every way important.

This will give Ohio twenty-six in all.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, &C., Department of the Interior, Washington, May 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, &c.:

MY DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 15th in answer to mine of the 13th. Your views as to the three-months’ enlisted troops are undoubtedly correct. I am in hopes with the permission of the Department that those from Rhode Island will continue through the war. I am highly gratified in having your favorable consideration to my proposition, and see that the action of the President and his legal advisers will prevent its consummation at this time. Your kind remarks as to a desire for my services as proposed is highly appreciated, but for reasons contained in my note, as well as for other considerations, I am led to believe I can be of more service to the cause in my present position than in that you honor me by offering. I am, however, at your disposal, and beg to be used in any manner so as to be made, in however slight a degree, serviceable.

With high regards, I am, your obedient servant.

WM. SPRAGUE.

–––

SAINT JOHNSBURY, May 17, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

I shall respond without delay to your requisition for another regiment. Volunteers for three years are already enlisted, awaiting equipments and arms.

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 17, 1861.

Governor ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, Madison, Wis.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 11th instant, informing this Department that your State is anxious to furnish at least five regiments. Anxious as your people are to furnish the volunteers, they are no more so than I am to gratify their wishes; but this I cannot do, but have done the best I could by giving you three regiments-one for three months and two for three years.

Truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.213}

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 22.}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, May 18, 1861.

Paragraph 4, General Orders, No. 15, of May 4, 1861, fixing the money value of clothing for volunteers, is modified so as to allow to the militia in the service of the United States the same money allowance for clothing as is provided for the Regular Army.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Hartford, Conn., May 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Your favor of the 16th instant is at hand, in which you say “one regiment is assigned to your State in addition to the two regiments of three-months’ militia already called for-three regiments.” You also add:

Let me earnestly recommend to you, therefore, to call for no more than three regiments, of which one only is to serve for three years, or during the war, and if more are already called for, to reduce the number by discharge.

Allow me to say that this communication presents the subject in a different light from that in which I have been acting. The position of matters stands in this manner with me: You first made a call for one regiment for three months. I called that, and, independent of your action, organized two others for three months, and tendered their services to the War Department, which were declined. I then went to Washington and stated my position first to General Scott, as I first saw him, and he said the Department could not use the three-months’ men to advantage, but wanted men for three years. I told him that if he would accept the two regiments already organized, I would organize two more to take their places when their time should expire. He said that under such circumstances or with such assurances the Department would accept them. I called on Your Excellency the next day and merely stated in a very brief manner my business, and I understood Your Excellency to say that you had decided the previous day to meet my wishes in the matter. I did not enter upon any explanation at length, but as your decision must have been based upon the arrangement made with General Scott, I felt that I could not be mistaken in regard to the number of regiments to be raised. I accordingly returned to send forward as soon as they could be made ready the two additional regiments for three months and two others for three years. I was also desirous of tendering the Government a third regiment for the war, to be furnished with and drilled in the use of Colt’s breech-revolving rifle, with the further idea that the same would be incorporated into the Regular Army. My design, in connection with Colonel Colt, who tenders and offers to arm the regiment without expense to the Government, is to make that regiment the best and most complete of any offered from any State, and to drill them at the expense of this State until it shall be thoroughly prepared for active service.

For this purpose I dispatched Col. William A. Aiken to inquire whether you would accept such a regiment in addition to the two for three years. The verbal message brought by Colonel Aiken was that the Department would not accept the regiment of riflemen in addition to the two for three years, but that it would be accepted in connection {p.214} with one for three years. I have therefore acted in accordance with the above understanding, and the third regiment for three months embarked to-day on board the Cahawba steamer. The fourth regiment, or the first for three years, is now rendezvoused in this city and ready to be mustered into service, and I trust Your Excellency will direct Colonel Loomis to perform this service.

The regiment of riflemen is also rendezvoused, and we are now drilling the men by companies, and do not propose to have it mustered into service for fifty or sixty days. I need not say that if, in my desire to render essential service, I have been the means of embarrassing the Government, it will cause me deep regret. My desire is to have this State co-operate with your Department in the most thorough and efficient manner. With this brief statement I beg Your Excellency to confirm the views herein expressed, with the assurance that no State, large or small, shall send you better troops or stand by you in all your embarrassments and perplexities more firmly than this Commonwealth.

I am, sir, yours, with high consideration,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., May 18, 1861.

Col. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND:

The six additional regiments for three years, or the war, called for from Illinois, are ready. It is important they should be received immediately, as they are in camp at expense of State.

These six and also four other regiments were raised by the State for thirty days, pledged to enter service when called for, and all of then want to go. Urge that instructions be sent immediately to muster as many of these regiments as you can into service. It will save thousands daily.

RICHD. YATES, Governor of Illinois.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, Y. J., May 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 16th instant, inclosing plan of organization of the volunteers for three years, or during the war, and assigning three regiments to this State.

The three regiments are now ready, and only await orders to the mustering officer, Major Laidley, who is now here awaiting orders, to be mustered into the service. I have not called out more than the three regiments, because I have not been authorized to do so by you; but if the occasion required their services this State would willingly furnish twice as many regiments to serve during the war.

I have consulted the mustering officer, Major Laidley, and it is our intention to encamp these regiments at Trenton as soon as they are mustered in, and I shall then proceed at once to furnish them with clothing, camp and garrison equipage, pursuant to my contract recently entered into with the Quartermaster-General of the United States. Permit me to hope that the mustering officer will receive immediate orders to muster them into service, that they may at once be drilled daily and systematically.

{p.215}

It is my intention to officer these regiments with skillful and competent officers. The colonels will probably all be retired officers of the Regular Army, and I believe I shall be able to find experienced gentlemen for all the field appointments.

It is my desire and shall be my care to make these regiments fit to take and keep the field against any enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 18, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN, Governor of New York:

SIR: The President has instructed me to say that the order for the fourteen regiments from the State of New York, made the 15th day of May, A. D. 1861, included the brigade of five regiments commanded by General D. E. Sickles.

Yours, truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Same to Hon. Hamilton Fish, chairman Union Defense Committee, New York.)

–––

UNION DEFENSE COMMITTEE OF CITIZENS OF NEW YORK, Office No. 30 Pine Street, New York, May 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: We learn from a telegram received from you that Mr. Sickles has represented to your Department, or it has been represented in his behalf, that there are in this city five regiments attached to his brigade, and we are requested, or it is expected, that the said regiments will make a part of the fourteen regiments ordered by the President through this committee to be sent to Washington and Fort Monroe. There is no such brigade as the one referred to in this city known to General Sandford, General Dix, or General Ewen, nor to this committee. Probably the action of the Department is based upon the expectation of some future organization of a brigade, but of its actual existence now no information is possessed by this committee.

Your obedient servant,

S. DRAPER, Chairman Executive Committee.

–––

NEW YORK, May 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

In your orders to Governor Morgan have you not forgotten to add the concluding words of your order to our committee, viz: “The fourteen regiments are to be selected by the Union Defense Committee of New York “? We are carrying out your order to us strictly and rapidly. We ask the above question because we hear that the Governor is going to send five regiments to Washington and nine to Fort Monroe.

S. DRAPER, Chairman.

{p.216}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 18, 1861.

General DANIEL E. SICKLES:

SIR: I have been instructed by the President to say that the five regiments from the city of New York forming your brigade are accepted for the war, and are included in the order for the fourteen regiments from the State of New York, made the 15th day of May, A. D. 1861.

Yours, truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HDQRS. ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER MILITIA, FIRST BRIGADE, Camp Defiance, Cairo, Ill., May 19, 1861.

Hon. A. LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: I am authorized by the colonels of regiments constituting the First Brigade of Illinois Volunteers, now in service of the General Government, to tender their services with the command to you for the war or for three years. I deem it my duty to say to you that as the call has been made for more force from this State, and we having been mustered in for three months, having been uniformed and equipped, we should be pleased to hear that we are to be accepted. I therefore make the tender to you of the First Brigade of Illinois Volunteers, which I have the honor to command.

Very respectfully,

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

(Same to Simon Cameron, Secretary of War.)

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 19, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF NEW YORK, Albany, N. Y.:

The President having accepted the fourteen regiments of long-term volunteers equipped by the New York Committee of Safety, in addition to the thirty-eight tendered directly by Your Excellency, exclusive of the three-months’ men now here and the fourteen having been called to this place and Fort Monroe, I will ask that six of the thirty-eight regiments be also sent here as soon as equipped, and the remainder of the two-years’ regiments be assembled at rendezvous, to become camps of instruction, in Northern and (preferably) Western New York. These Your Excellency best can choose. A rolling surface or porous soil should be chosen. Other conditions are proximity to wood, water, abundant subsistence for men and horses, and railroad or canal transportation. Each camp should be the rendezvous of four or eight regiments. As most of these regiments are not likely to take the field much before frost, they will have ample time for the discipline and tactical instructions, without which they would be unequal to the campaign for which they are intended.

Very respectfully, &c.,

WINFIELD SCOTT.

{p.217}

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

Your letter of the 16th received to-day, advising that only nine regiments will be received for three-years’ service from Ohio, confounds me, and unless promptly revoked and all of the twenty-two regiments be received for that full term, will be fatally destructive. Messrs. Swayne and Wolcott leave immediately for Washington at my special request to remonstrate against any reduction.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

–––

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, May 20, 1861.

In reference to the national reputation of Miss Dix as connected with objects of philanthropy and usefulness, she is authorized to exercise a general supervision of the assignment of nurses to the hospitals, general and regimental, occupied by the troops at Washington and its vicinity, subject to the advisement and control of the Surgeon-General’s Office in matters of detail, numbers, &c. and excepting such hospitals as already have a permanent organization of nurses. This is respectfully recommended to all commanding officers and enjoined on all medical officers of the regular and volunteer forces to aid her in her benevolent views.

R. C. WOOD, Acting Surgeon-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 20, 1861.

Governor YATES, Springfield, Ill.:

The Adjutant-General has given instructions to the U. S. mustering officer to muster the three-years’ men of the Illinois quota.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 20, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN M. THAYER, Omaha, Nebr. Ter.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant, with accompanying inclosures, addressed to His Excellency the President, and by him referred to this Department. The subject more particularly alluded to in your letter has engaged the attention of this Department, and such measures have been or will be taken as are commensurate with its acknowledged importance.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 20, 1861.

SIMEON DRAPER, Esq., New York:

The concluding words of my order to your committee were not intended to confer authority to send on troops independent of Governor Morgan, {p.218} but were meant to give such authority only in case of Governor Morgan’s refusal to comply with the order. John Tucker is the only duly authorized transportation agent of this Department, and no obligations contracted for that purpose can be recognized or acknowledged if made by any one else.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, Harrisburg, Pa., May 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of time 13th instant, and in reply desire to say that the regiments that have been mustered into the service of the State for three months are, so far as I am at present able to ascertain, willing to be mustered in for three years, and although some recruiting may be necessary at the end of the three months to fill the ranks of the regiments, it is known that this can be done with such ease and promptness that little if any delay will occur thereby. No regiments have as yet been mustered in for three years. Several of the regiments are already equipped and have gone forward.

I learn that General Patterson, under an order given him by me, claims that his entire division has been mustered into service. Au order was issued by me on the 17th of April last, under what was then deemed the immediate danger to the capital of the country, directing Major-General Patterson to march his division at once. Under this order General Patterson now claims that the following regiments, viz, First Regiment Artillery, Col. F. E. Patterson; Second Regiment Infantry, Col. W. D. Lewis, jr.; Third Regiment Infantry, Col. J. T. Owen; Fourth Regiment Infantry, Col. T. G. Morehead; Fifth Regiment Infantry, Col. Peter Lyle; Sixth Regiment Artillery, Col. Charles P. Dare; Seventh Regiment Rifles, Col. John F. Ballier, and a regiment of infantry, commanded by Colonel Gray, commonly called the “Scott Legion,” which regiments General Patterson contends were mustered because the first seven named had a legal existence in his division at the time of my order, and the eighth was at once taken to make up the division. I make this explanation in justice to Major-General Patterson, and desire also to express my obligations to him for valuable assistance and advice, but I respectfully submit that the order to advance his division on the l7th of April, the greater portion of which was not carried out until the 14th of May, as will be seen by the fact that Colonels Lyle’s, Lewis’, and Morehead’s regiments only left Philadelphia on that day, while I was compelled, in my great anxiety to protect the General Government, to throw into Washington City regiments without uniforms, arms, or accouterments. Under such circumstances, would it not be manifestly unjust that the men who fell into line early and marched weeks ago in obedience to my orders should now be called “excess regiments,” while those who remained at their homes and (perhaps more wisely) secured full uniforms, arms, and accouterments are to be preferred? It cannot be denied that it would demoralize the whole force, and destroy the effect of our now united State feeling, were any of the regiments now organized, encamped, and almost ready to send forward to be disbanded, or, indeed, turned over to the State. They were regularly mustered in by the authorized officer of the U. S. Army selected by the War Department, and I respectfully submit that they {p.219} should all be taken care of by the United States. I therefore append a list* of all, noting those that were mustered in by my direction and those claimed to be admitted by the order to Major-General Patterson.

It is almost impossible to say how “many regiments are organized in Pennsylvania that have not been mustered into the service of the General Government that would be willing to serve three years.” I know of eight or ten regiments so organized and about 300 companies pressing upon me for admission, all apparently eager and willing to serve for any period you may see fit to indicate. I feel quite safe in saying that in one week Pennsylvania could furnish twenty additional regiments and throw them into camp ready to be mustered into the service of the United States.

I have been thus explicit in relation to this subject because I regard this question as one of vital importance to the service, and upon the decision of which by the War Department much of its efficiency will depend.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. G. CURTIN.

* Omitted.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., May 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have applications in two or three instances for permission to organize cavalry companies to be offered for the U. S. service. The present militia laws of this State make no provisions for cavalry, and the object of this note is to inquire whether if one or more companies of cavalry should voluntarily organize and offer their services they will be accepted by the Government, it being understood that they will enlist for three years or during the war, their arms being furnished them by Government.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

Governor RICHARD YATES, Springfield:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt [of your letter] of the 8th [9th] instant, and in reply regret to say that it is impossible to accept any more troops from Chicago, however strongly disposed to do so.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Shall be in Washington Thursday night, with offer of our six regiments of three-months’ soldiers for the whole war. I pray you accept them.

SCHUYLER COLFAX.

{p.220}

–––

MAY 21, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

The undersigned colonels, commanding the six regiments composing the First Brigade of Indiana Volunteers, now in the service for three months from the 27th day of April, 1861, tender the services of the brigade for three years, unless sooner discharged. We would ask leave to recruit vacancies caused by the prolongation of the term of service.

E. DUMONT, Colonel Seventh Regiment. LEW. WALLACE, Colonel Eleventh Regiment. WM. P. BENTON, Colonel Eighth Regiment. R. H. MILROY, Colonel Ninth Regiment. T. T. CRITTENDEN, Colonel Sixth Regiment. M. D. MANSON, Colonel Tenth Regiment.

[Indorsement.]

MAY 24, 1861.

If the Secretary of War can accept the regiments named within I shall be greatly gratified.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Iowa:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of two letters from you dated on the 10th instant, in regard to furnishing arms, and suggesting that there is a large quantity of arms and ammunition at Fort Kearny. This Department is not advised of any surplus arms and ammunition at Fort Kearny. If there are any such, the commanding officer’s duty would be to send them to an arsenal. Government arms and ammunition can be supplied only to troops mustered into service.

Very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Des Moines, Iowa, May 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Your telegraphic dispatch of May 15, informing me that two more regiments of volunteers were required of this State, reached me on the l7th instant. I immediately ordered the ten companies selected as the Second Regiment to rendezvous at Keokuk by the 25th instant, there to be mustered into the service of the United States. I have also selected the companies to form the Third Regiment, and have sent orders to them to rendezvous at the same place by the 3d of June proximo at furthest. I hope both regiments will be promptly at Keokuk by the time named.

{p.221}

The want of telegraphs and railroads in the interior of our state causes delay in the transmission of orders and the movement of troops, or these regiments would be at the place of rendezvous much sooner. I received May 18 Orders, No. 15, giving plan of organizing these regiments, but have not yet received the official requisition for them. I have taken measures to furnish these regiments with tents and uniforms as speedily as possible. I regret that I could not learn from your office whether it would be desirable for me to furnish these things. Had such information been given me in reply to my dispatch of May 6, I could have had tents and uniforms ready for the Second Regiment on its arrival at Keokuk. As it is, they will be there as soon as they can possibly be procured.

Should it be desirable to designate outside the Regular Army an officer of rank higher than colonel to command the Iowa regiments, I respectfully suggest that the appointment of Hon. S. R. Curtis, of this State, to that position would in my judgment be a good one, and very satisfactory to the troops and the people of this State.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

Governor CHARLES ROBINSON, Topeka, Kans.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to forward you, inclosed herewith, the plan of the organization of the volunteers of three years, or during the war.* One regiment is assigned to your State. In making up this quota of three-years’ men you will please act in concert with the mustering officers sent to your Territory [State], who will represent this Department. Hon. F. P. Stanton has been specially delegated to proceed to Kansas and New Mexico, to give attention to the interests of those affected by the present condition of affairs and the consequent movement of troops, with whom you will please confer on the subject. The troops called into service from your State are intended for its protection both against hostile Indians and domestic foes. They will be posted, by order of the proper commanding officer, with a view to these objects. The regular troops now in service will be mostly withdrawn from your State, and it is intended that the troops raised by you shall take their place.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See General Orders, No. 15, p. 151.

–––

AUGUSTA, May 21, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: One regiment of Maine Volunteers was mustered into the service of the United States in April by Captain Gardiner, U. S. Army, and is now at Portland. This is the First Regiment. Another regiment, the Second, was forwarded on Tuesday, the 14th instant, from Bangor, upon the authority of a letter and telegrams from Senator Morrill, saying that it was the request of the Department. This regiment is, I {p.222} learn, now at Willets Point, N. Y., where it has been detained by the breaking out, since the regiment left, of the measles. These regiments are well uniformed and equipped, and provided with tents, camp equipage, &c., and are composed of hardy and vigorous men, who will make admirable soldiers. They are already enlisted for and bound to serve two years, and are officered as directed in the President’s requisition of April last. There is another regiment ready to be tendered, well uniformed, equipped, and otherwise provided for, to make up Maine’s quota under General Orders, No. 15, May 4, 1861. This regiment is now at Rockland, and if rendezvoused there could be forwarded to Boston direct by steam-boat. I will be very much obliged to you if you will advise me what officer of the U. S. Army will be detailed to muster this regiment into the service of the United States and of the time when it may be mustered. This regiment is enlisted for three years.

In addition to the above there are in this State a sufficient number of companies organized for three more regiments for three years’ service, or during the war, which I have supposed it would be well, in whole or in part, to put into camp at some convenient and healthy place within the State for drill and instruction, to the end that if there shall be occasion for more troops from Maine hereafter they will be ready to march at a moment’s notice and be well instructed and disciplined troops. Your letter of the 16th was received yesterday.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

JOHN ROBERTSON, Adjutant-General, Detroit, Mich.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 11th instant, informing me that the Governor of Michigan desires that the four regiments referred to in your letter “may be accepted as a brigade and move together, if the interests of the service will permit.” However desirable and gratifying it would be to the regiments mustered into the U. S. service from Michigan to serve together as a brigade, the interest of the service will not permit it. I inclose you a copy of General Orders, No. 15, which will indicate the plan of organization adopted by this Department, and to which the regiments from all the States must conform.*

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See p. 151.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

GOVERNOR OF NEBRASKA:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to forward you, inclosed herewith, the plan of organization of the volunteers of three years or during the war.* One regiment is assigned to your State [Territory]. In making up this quota of three-years’ men you will please act in concert with the mustering officers sent to your Territory, who will represent this Department. The troops from your Territory just called into service are intended to {p.223} take the place of the regulars withdrawn from the forts and posts in your Territory; in a word, they are not intended to be marched elsewhere, but assigned for the protection of your own people and interests against hostile Indians and foes.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 21, 1861.

Hon. CHARLES S. OLDEN, Trenton, N. J.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 18th, containing information that the three regiments from New Jersey are now ready. With many thanks for the prompt and satisfactory manner in which you have responded to the call of the President for the quota of troops assigned to New Jersey,

I remain, truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, N. 17., May 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The Department has already been informed of the appointment of two major-generals (Dix and Wadsworth) to command the seventeen regiments of New York Volunteers called out under the President’s first proclamation. Many of the additional twenty-one regiments specially accepted from the State by you have been mustered into the service of the United States and the others will speedily follow. The question very naturally arises, What provision is to be made for officering the brigades and divisions to be composed of these twenty-one regiments? If the same organization as that of the first seventeen regiments be contemplated, then your authority for the appointment of two additional major-generals and four brigadiers, with their staff officers, and for their muster into the service of the United States, is respectfully requested. Two of the two-year’s volunteer regiments will leave New York to-morrow.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

NEW YORK, May 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

All right about brigade with Union Defense Committee and Governor. Please telegraph Hamilton Fish, chairman, 30 Pine street, that my brigade will go into encampment on Staten Island for the further order of the Department. Please do this immediately and send duplicate to me by telegraph.

D. E. SICKLES, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.224}

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 21, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: Why cannot Colonel Small’s Philadelphia regiment be received? I sincerely wish it could. There is something strange about it. Give these gentlemen an interview, and take their regiment.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 21, 1861.

Capt. JOHN S. WILLIAMS, Washington City:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 14th instant, tendering the services of the “Defenders of Washington” as a home guard for the defense of the city.* As your company is composed exclusively of soldiers who served their country nobly and patriotically in the war of 1812, this tender has afforded the Department great pleasure, and it would gratify me very much to be able to accept it, but the Government has already mustered into its service so large a force from this District that I feel compelled, very reluctantly in your case, to decline accepting any more. Relying upon the well-tested patriotism and loyalty of the “Defenders of Washington,” should any occasion arise hereafter rendering their services necessary,

I remain, very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* This tender of service was accompanied by a list of members, consisting of Capt. John S. Williams, First Lieut. Edward Simms, Second Lieut. Landon W. Worthington, Third Lieut. Fielder R. Dorsett, and seventy-two others.

–––

ATTORNEY-GENERAL’S OFFICE, May 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: A short time since, by request, I sent instructions to several district attorneys toward the North to co-operate with your special agents in making effectual your orders to take possession of the written messages in various telegraph offices. Several of the attorneys have made report to me of the seizure of the papers and other reports are expected daily.

Having no important matter to communicate, I only notify you of these facts and of my desire to co-operate with you in full.

Most respectfully,

EDW. BATES.

–––

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, May 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The sudden and large increase of the Army, more especially of the volunteer force, has called the attention of this office to the necessity {p.225} of some modifications and changes in the system of organization as connected with the hygiene and comforts of the soldiers, more particularly in relation to the class of men who, actuated by patriotism, have repaired with unexampled promptness to the defense of the institutions and laws of the country. The pressure upon the Medical Bureau has been very great and urgent, and though all the means at its disposal have been industriously used, much remains to accomplish by directing the intelligent mind of the country to practical results connected with the comforts of the soldier by preventive and sanitary measures. The Medical Bureau would in my judgment derive important and useful aid from the counsels and well-directed efforts of an intelligent and scientific commission, to be styled “a commission of inquiry and advice in respect of the sanitary interests of the U. S. forces,” and acting in co-operation with the Bureau in elaborating and applying such facts as might be elicited from the experience and more extended observation of those connected with armies with reference to the diet and hygiene of troops and the organization of military hospitals, &c.

This commission is not intended to interfere with, but to strengthen the present organization, introducing and elaborating such improvements as the advanced stage of medical science might suggest-more particularly as regards the class of men who in this war of sections may be called to abandon the comforts of home and be subject to the privations and casualties of war.

The views of this office were expressed in a communication of May 18, 1861, in a crude and hasty manner as to the examination of recruits, the proposed organization of cooks, nurses, &c., to which I beg leave to refer.* The selection of this board is of the greatest importance. In connection with those gentlemen who originated this investigation, with many others, I would suggest the following members, not to exceed five, to convene in Washington, who should have power to fill vacancies and appoint a competent secretary:

(1) Rev. Henry W. Bellows, D. D.

(2) Prof. Alexander Dallas Bache, LL. D.

(3) Prof. Wolcott Gibbs, M. D.

(4) Jeffries Wyman, M. D.

(5) W. H. Van Buren, M. D.

It would be proper also to associate with this board an officer of the medical staff of the Army, to be selected by the Secretary of War, familiar with the organization of military hospitals and the detail of field service.

Respectfully submitted.

R. C. WOOD, Acting Surgeon-General.

* Omitted.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 22, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM MCKEE DUNN, or Hon. DAVID KILGORE, Washington, D. C.: (Care of J. D. Defrees.)

I wish you to go to the War Department and to the President and tender the six regiments of three-months’ men for three years. They are in fine condition, well uniformed and disciplined. Urge their immediate acceptance and instructions to muster into service.

{p.226}

By a dispatch dated May 6 I was authorized to accept them for three years. I now tender them, and want instructions sent to the mustering officers.

The four regiments in the last call will be ready in a few days. Answer by telegraph. Don’t delay.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 22, 1661.

Hon. DAVID KILGORE:

By an agreement gotten up with two or three colonels, Colfax has gone on to tender the six regiments of three-months’ men for three years. This could only be done properly by the Governor. The attempt is to supersede me with the men and officers. He will be there to-morrow morning. Push the matter I gave you in charge by the former dispatch.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

WASHINGTON, May 22, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

I wish to see you face to face to clear these difficulties about forwarding troops from New York.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., May 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that of the thirty-eight regiments accepted by the Federal Government from this State thirty-one regiments have been ordered to be mustered into the service of the United States, and that the remaining seven will be ready in three or four days.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 22, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, U. S. Army:

SIR: You are directed to proceed without delay to New York City and make known the views and wishes of this Department to the Governor of New York and the members of the Union Defense Committee in relation to the troops to be furnished from the State of New York, and you are hereby authorized to express to those gentlemen the views of the Department, which have been fully made known to you, and exhibit this letter to them as your authority for so doing.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.227}

–––

NEW YORK, May 22, 1861.

General SIMON CAMERON:

I have telegraphed to General Scott that my brigade awaits his orders. Shall address the General-in-Chief in due form to the same effect by mail this evening. This will, I hope, remove all difficulty and meet your approval.

D. E. SICKLES, Acting Brigadier-General, City Hall.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 22, 1861.

His Excellency WILLIAM DENNISON, Governor of Ohio, Columbus:

SIR: By the President’s call for 75,000 militia for three months’ service you are requested to furnish thirteen regiments, and by the call for additional troops for three years’ service a demand was made upon you for eight other regiments, making a total of twenty-one regiments. I understand they have all been mustered into the service for three years, and I now desire to say to Your Excellency that they will all be received for that period.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 22, 1861.

Governor ANDREW G. CURTIN, Harrisburg:

By reference to General Orders, No. 15, of the War Department, a printed copy of which I herewith forward you,* giving the plan of organization of the volunteer forces called into the service of the United States by the President, you will perceive that all regimental officers of these volunteers, from colonel down to second lieutenants, inclusive, are appointed by the Governors of States. Having thus confided to you the appointment of all these officers for the regiments furnished by your State, you will, I trust, excuse this Department for impressing upon you in advance the necessity of an absolute adherence in your appointments to the following suggestions, which are deemed of the highest importance by the General-in-Chief, under whose advice they are submitted to you:

First. To commission no one of doubtful morals or patriotism and not of sound health.

Second. To appoint no one to a lieutenancy, second or first, who has Passed time age of twenty-two years, or to a captaincy over thirty years, and to appoint no field officer (major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel) unless a graduate of the U. S. Military Academy, or known to possess military knowledge and experience, who has passed the respective ages of thirty-five, forty, forty-five years. This Department feels assured that it will not be deemed offensive to Your Excellency to add yet this general counsel: that the higher the moral character and general intelligence {p.228} of the officers so appointed, the greater the efficiency of the troops and the resulting glory to their respective States.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Same to Governors of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Kansas, New Mexico, and Nebraska.)

* See p. 151.

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., May 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We are about to forward fifteen regiments under our late law and desire to muster them into service. Will you please to permit Captain Simmons or Captain Hastings to do the duty for us? It is important it should be commenced in the morning. Answer.

A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 22, 1861.

His Excellency WILLIAM SPRAGUE, Governor of Rhode Island:

DEAR SIR: It is the desire of this Department that as soon as the Second Regiment of Rhode Island Volunteers are ready to be mustered into service and ready to move forward, you will please take charge of the same and bring them on to this city by railroad, via New Jersey Central, East Pennsylvania, Lebanon, and Northern Central Railroads.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 22, 1861.

Hon. ERASTUS FAIRBANKS, Saint Johnsbury, Vt.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 20th instant, and beg leave to say in reply that but one regiment of cavalry is to be raised under the proclamation of the President calling for volunteers, and that regiment will be assigned to the Western States.

Respectfully, yours, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 23, 1861.

To all whom it may concern:

Col. Thomas A. Scott has been appointed to take charge of all Government railways and telegraphs or those appropriated for Government use.

All instructions in relation to extending roads or operating the same on Government account must emanate from his department.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.229}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 23, 1861.

Governor MORTON, Indianapolis:

The quota for Indiana of three-years’ service is four regiments and no more. You have the selection of the regiments, and can select from among those mustered into service for three months, or from others offering to serve for three years. The whole matter is in your hands. The Department cannot accept beyond the quota assigned. This is in reply to your dispatch to Messrs. Dunn and Kilgore.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON, May 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: As you have long since been informed, a regiment has been mustered in on the part of Minnesota for three years or the war. This regiment has in a manner been broken up under the requisition of your Department for a detail of six companies to relieve the regulars in the several posts on our Indian frontier. I trust, therefore, for many reasons that will speedily occur to you, that the State may be allowed to furnish a second regiment for three years or the war.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. RAMSEY, Governor of Minnesota.

–––

NEW YORK, May 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Governor Morgan considers the first ten regiments received as thirty-days’ men, outside of the call for three-months’ men. He considers himself entitled to send thirty-eight regiments additional. The Defense Committee has dispatched two regiments to Washington, two more to Old Point to-day. The other ten are full. The men are all enrolled and are to be inspected Saturday. They are selected from over thirty organizations, which enlisted when the authority for fourteen was given.

Sickles has no brigade. He has merely a regiment, which is not one of the fourteen. Bartlett’s acceptance produces a bad effect. Governor Morgan will be here to-night. I will try to reduce the number of his regiments, but until I see him can give you no encouragement. I understand that a committee goes on to-night about Sickles and Bartlett.

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry, U. S. Army.

–––

CIRCULAR.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 24, 1861.

As soon as the regiments of three-years’ volunteers comprising the quotas called for from your respective States are organized and equipped I will ask that those not otherwise ordered be assembled at rendezvous to become camps of instruction. These Your Excellencies best can choose.

{p.230}

A rolling surface or porous soil should be chosen. Other conditions are proximity to wood, water, abundant subsistence for men and horses, and railroad or water transportation. Each camp should be the rendezvous of four or eight regiments.

As some of these regiments may not be called into activity much before frost, they will have ample time to acquire discipline, habits of obedience, and tactical instruction, without which they would be unequal to the campaign for which they are intended.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(To the Governors of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana. Illinois, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, and Minnesota.)

–––

NEW YORK, May 24, 1861.

General JOSEPH G. TOTTEN, Chief Engineer:

SIR: The military authorities of the State of New York have determined to substitute rifle guns for the 6 and 12 pounder smooth-bore batteries now constituting the equipment of its artillery to the extent of one gun per 1,000 men of the force the State is called upon for service in the field, the desire being to have such artillery ready whenever the General Government should ask for that arm, or the State should need it at home. The same description of rifle gun has been adopted as lately ordered by the Ordnance Department from the West Point foundry. The State has ordered a gun for the 12-pounder carriage to carry rifle shot (hollow) of 2 1/2 diameters in length for distant range, 2 diameters for medium range, and 1 1/2 diameters for short ranges. For the 6-pounder carriage a lighter gun is ordered to fire a rifle shot of 2 and 1 1/2 diameters, and from the two all the present ammunition, as solid, spherical case, grape, and canister, can be indiscriminately used. The bore of those two guns is that of one present 6-pounder field piece, to wit, 3.67 diameters. The 1 1/2 diameter shot will be used as spherical case, the 2 and 2 1/2 diameter shot with bursting charges. The caissons to be provided with a small proportion of grape and canister for very short ranges and rapid fire. The Ordnance Department has ordered a lighter and a heavier gun, one of the 6-pounder carriage of 2-inch bore, the other for an 18-pounder siege carriage of the present 12-pounder bore. You will observe this State has ordered guns exclusively for the 6-pounder bore, calculated to fire indiscriminately all the present 6-pounder ammunition as well as the elongated shot for the two guns, excepting the 2 1/2 diameter shot, which must be confined to the heavy gun and for long ranges. The weight of this gun will be about 200 pounds less than that of the brass 12-pounder gun now in use mounted on the same carriage. The only difficulty in the introduction of these rifle guns with elongated shot is to carry a sufficient number of rounds in the caissons and in the limber chests. To this end the shot of different diameters in length are to be apportioned with same rounds of grape and canister in the ammunition chests, whereby the entire load shall be kept within that capable of being rapidly maneuvered by six horses.

The guns are now in process of construction and are to be delivered at the rate of one per day from and after the 26th instant, with 200 {p.231} rounds of shot. The State has nearly all the 12 and 6 pounder carriages and caissons in its arsenals ready to receive this new armament to the extent it is now prepared to introduce it, but it has no battery wagons and no forge wagons either in its arsenals or in possession of its organized militia. Four 12-pounder carriages and caissons, four battery wagons, and four forge wagons have to be provided with the usual implements to complete the material, together with the harness, for these rifle batteries. They are on hand in considerable numbers at the Watervliet Arsenal.

Now, the object of this communication, written by request of Governor Morgan, is to request that the State be allowed to receive these carriages, caissons, wagons, &c., to the extent specified, either as a part of the annual quota of arms that may now or hereafter become due or to receive them at once, and be replaced by the like to be made in the arsenal at the expense of the State; or, if either of these arrangements can be authorized, that the officers at the arsenal be authorized to employ additional workmen and purchase the necessary material to make up the requisite number at the expense of the State. As this last arrangement would cause considerable delay, it is very desirable that one or other of the preceding arrangements be authorized.

Will you do me the favor of learning the views of the Ordnance Department on the most satisfactory arrangement its interest will permit, and procure the authority of the Secretary of War to carry it into effect?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. DELAFIELD, Major, Corps of Engineers.

[First indorsement.]

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, May 27, 1861.

Respectfully referred to the Ordnance Department for its opinion on the within proposition and its alteratives and commended to all the favor it feels authorized to show.

J. G. TOTTEN, Brevet Brigadier-General and Colonel of Engineers.

[Second indorsement.]

ORDNANCE OFFICE, May 27, 1861.

Respectfully returned. There is nothing due to the State of New York on account of quota under the law for arming the militia, and issues in advance on such accounts are forbidden. Loans of Government supplies or their issue, except to troops actually mustered into the U. S. service, are also forbidden. Sales of ordinance stores are restricted to such as are condemned on regular inspection as damaged or otherwise unserviceable. Work at U. S. arsenals except for Government purposes is forbidden at all times, and now the full capacity of those arsenals is not more than sufficient to supply urgent demands for the U. S. service. There is thus want of authority to comply with the written requests and lack of means to furnish at this time supplies for State or home troops unless to the delay of those needed for Government purposes.

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

{p.232}

[Third indorsement.]

ENGINEER DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1861.

As the requests of the within letter come through Major Delafield from the Governor of the State of New York it is necessary that they be laid before the honorable Secretary of War, to whom, therefore, they are respectfully submitted, with the above remarks of the officer in charge of the Ordnance Department.

[J. G. TOTTEN.]

–––

MOUNTAIN CITY, COLO. TER., May 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Here in these mountains we have hundreds anxious to contribute to the support of the Government and to assist in maintaining the integrity of the flag of our country. If we organize companies will the Government accept our services? If we had the assurance that the volunteers would be accepted there would be no lack of men inured to toil and hardships ready to enlist for the war.

Yours, respectfully,

HENRY M. TELLER.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 24, 1861.

Col. B. M. PRENTISS, Cairo, Ill.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, and in reply beg leave to inform you that this Department cannot accept the volunteers for either three months, or three years, or during the war, except through the Governors of the respective States, to whom you should properly make your application. This Department assigns the quota to be furnished by each State, and they will be furnished to it by the Governors.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., May 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We ask the Government to accept the Indiana three-months’ men for three years.

We have just visited the camp and find them in fine condition.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio. RICHD. YATES, Governor of Illinois. GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, U. S. Army

{p.233}

–––

PORTLAND, ME., May 24, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I wish to be informed whether a regiment of picked men outside of the State militia to serve during the war would be accepted and equipped by the Government? I am assured that such a regiment can be ready in ten days, and urged to procure its acceptance. They would be of the right sort.

W. P. FESSENDEN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 24, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM PITT FESSENDEN, Portland, Me.:

It is impossible for this Department at this time to accept any more troops from Maine than its quota.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 24, 1861.

Hon. E. D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 21st instant, and beg leave to say in reply that this Department does not at this time desire the appointment of additional major or brigadier generals by Governors of States. I inclose you a copy of Orders, No. 15,* by reference to which you will perceive that these officers are appointed by the President to command the second quota of your troops.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See p. 151.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 24, 1861.

J. MEREDITH READ, Jr., Adjutant-General, Albany, N. Y.:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 22d instant, informing this Department of thirty-eight regiments accepted by the Federal Government-thirty-one have already been ordered to be mustered into the service, and the remaining seven will be ready in a few days-has been received. The number mustered is in direct contravention of the positive order of this Department requesting only twenty-eight to be so mustered.

I am, sir, very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

NEW YORK, May 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Governor Morgan telegraphed that he could not come here. Too late to allow me to go to Albany last night. I must see the regiments of {p.234} the Defense Committee to-morrow p.m., and therefore cannot go to Albany until morning. The transport business appears to be properly managed.

W. B. FRANKLIN.

–––

GALENA, ILL., May 24, 1861.

Colonel L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Having served for fifteen years in the Regular Army, including four years at West Point, and feeling it the duty of every one who has been educated at the Government expense to offer their services for the support of that Government, I have the honor, very respectfully, to tender my services until the close of the war in such capacity as may be offered. I would say that, in view of my present age and length of service, I feel myself competent to command a regiment if the President, in his judgment, should see fit to intrust one to me. Since the first call of the President I have been serving on the staff of the Governor of this State, rendering such aid as I could in the organization of our State militia, and am still engaged in that capacity. A letter addressed to me at Springfield, Ill., will reach me.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, May 25, 1861.

I. The plan of organization for the volunteer forces designated in General Orders, No. 15, of May 4, 1861, is so modified as to allow one surgeon and one assistant surgeon to each regiment, to be appointed by the Governors of the respective States after having passed an examination by a competent medical board appointed by the Governors of the States; the appointments to be subject to the approval of the Secretary of War.

General Orders, No. 22, of May 18, 1861, is revoked, and the first two paragraphs of article 4, “Memorandum,” General Orders, No. 15, are amended to read as follows:

4. MEMORANDUM.

The officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates, organized as above set forth, will in all respects be placed on the footing, as to pay and allowances, of similar corps of the Regular Army: Provided, That their allowances for clothing shall be $3.50 per month, and that each company officer, non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer of cavalry shall furnish his own horse and horse equipments, and shall receive 40 cents per day for their use and risk, except that, in case the horse shall become disabled or shall die, the allowance shall cease until the disability be removed or another horse be supplied. Every cavalry volunteer who shall not keep himself supplied with a serviceable horse shall serve on foot.

Every volunteer non-commissioned officer, private, musician, and artificer, who enters the service of the United States under thins plan, shall be paid at the rate of 50 cents in lieu of subsistence, and if a cavalry volunteer, 25 cents additional in lieu of forage, for every twenty miles of travel from his place of enrollment to the place of muster-the distance to be measured by the shortest usually traveled route; and, {p.235} when honorably discharged, an allowance at the same rate from the place of his discharge to his place of enrollment, and, in addition thereto, the sum of $100.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., May 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication to the Governor of this State of the 22d instant, containing suggestions in regard to the provisions of General Orders, No. 15, from the War Department. By the Governor’s directions I inform you that the thirty-eight regiments of volunteers have been organized and ordered to be mustered into the service of the United States.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, May 25, 1861.

Hon. ROBERT CAMPBELL, Lieutenant-Governor:

DEAR SIR: It gives me pleasure to inclose to you a copy of a resolution of the Board of State Officers, passed at their meeting on the 24th instant, and beg to ask that you will consent to visit Washington and discharge the grave duties to which the resolution relates.

I am, very truly, yours,

E. D. MORGAN.

[Inclosure.]

At a meeting of the Board of State Officers named in act entitled “An act to authorize the embodying and equipment of a volunteer militia and to provide for the public defense,” passed April 16, 1861, held at the executive chamber on the 24th day of May, 1861, it was-

Resolved, That a member of this Board to be designated by the Governor, be, and he hereby is, requested to proceed to Washington and present to the General Government the respectful claim of this Board to have the proportionate number of general officers appointed or elected by the State authorities of this State to the force organized by this Board, so that this State shall have her due position in rank with her sister States in the ratio of her troops in the field as compared to theirs.

I certify the foregoing to be a true extract from the minutes of the Board.

J. H. LINSLY, Secretary.

–––

NEW YORK, May 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will you please issue orders immediately to the mustering officer at Elmira to muster into the service of the United States four regiments {p.236} full and waiting. Captain Elliott hesitates. I have ordered two regiments (Colonels Quinby and Walrath) to proceed to Washington immediately via Harrisburg and Baltimore.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

NEW YORK, May 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I inclose herewith a copy of a letter which I handed to the Union Defense Committee this morning. It explains the position of things with regard to the fourteen regiments which it is to furnish. I am afraid it will not entertain my proposition, but will insist upon raising six regiments instead of four, making ten the whole number furnished by the committee instead of fourteen. The Governor is here now. He read me this morning written authority from you permitting him to furnish thirty-eight regiments in addition to ten already in the field, making forty-eight in all. He is doing his best to get his regiments organized and off. Two have been ordered from Elmira to Washington to-day. This makes five in all dispatched to Washington. I hope and expect that five regiments from the Governor will leave for Old Point in twenty-four hours, but the unlooked-for clashings and delays have made me suspicious of any statements made to me, and it is physically impossible for me to verify them by personal inspection.

I saw General Sickles yesterday. He asserts that he has authority from the Department to raise five regiments-I have not seen his papers-and he requires two or three days’ notice, he says, to bring his men together. I have no idea that he can raise them.

Bartlett’s Naval Brigade has about 300 men, entirely disorganized and without discipline. I will know more definitely about them to-morrow. My conviction is firm, however, at present that both Sickles’ and Bartlett’s bodies of men ought to be disbanded and dispersed. The authority for their organization was obtained by misrepresentations made to the President and Secretary of War.

I go to Albany to-morrow with the Governor, and will telegraph to you anything of interest that may occur.

Very respectfully, yours,

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

NEW YORK, May 25, 1861.

Hon. HAMILTON FISH, Chairman Union Defense Committee:

SIR: When I had the honor of meeting the Union Defense Committee on Thursday, the 23d instant, in obedience to orders from the War Department, which I read to the committee, a memorandum was handed to me by one of the members of the committee, of which the following is a copy:

Second [and] Fourteenth already in Washington.

Ninth [and] Seventy-ninth paraded in uniform yesterday; ready to leave in six hours.

Ten regiments to be inspected on Saturday, 25th instant; all enrolled, but not yet inspected. These are selected from over thirty organizations.

Although my orders from the Department were explicit that I should find out the number of men under the control of the committee, and {p.237} express to it the desire of the Department that these men should at once be sent forward, organized as regiments, whether they came up to the full number of regiments which the committee was authorized to furnish or not, yet the express statement of the committee that the ten regiments yet to be furnished would certainly be paraded on Saturday induced me to telegraph the Department the substance of the memorandum quoted above, and to await the result of the contemplated inspection.

The committee is aware of the result of the inspection. Ten regiments did not make their appearance, and the total number of men did not probably exceed 4,500. Of these, it is my opinion, from the cursory examination I was able to make, that at least one-eighth ought to be rejected on account of physical disability, youth, disease, &c., and that therefore there were not present at this inspection more than enough men to make four regiments organized according to the orders of the Department. As it is to be presumed that the officers presenting the regiments had full notice of the time and object of the inspection, I can only conclude that the ten regiments cannot be furnished by the committee in the time contemplated by the Department.

I therefore respectfully recommend to the committee that four regiments be formed by it instead of the ten heretofore contemplated, and that these four be organized in all respects according to the plan of organization given in War Department General Orders, No. 15, dated May 4, 1861. I believe that these four will absorb all of the good officers and men who paraded on Saturday, and I think that the muster of the men whom I have stated above ought to be rejected will demoralize the regiments, and will do no credit to the committee, the city, or the State.

The War Department will, I am sure, be relieved if the committee organize four instead of ten regiments, for the number of regiments called from New York largely exceeds its share, not counting those to he furnished by the committee. I give these suggestions with diffidence, knowing as I do the energetic manner in which the committee has pushed the work it has undertaken; but I am sure that what I have written expresses the wishes of the Department, and I have considered it my duty to bring the matter to the attention of the committee at length.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry, U. S. Army.

–––

NEW YORK, May 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: Although the number of regiments to be taken from this State is probably diminished six by the joint action of the Governor of the State, the Union Defense Committee, and myself, under the orders of the Department, there is nevertheless much confusion and clashing caused by the adverse opinions and interests of those engaged in raising and equipping these regiments. I believe that the knot will be cut at once if an officer of high rank be ordered here to take charge of this whole business. He may be either regular or volunteer, provided he have experience and power enough be given him to stop all unauthorized organizations, and that he be informed of all orders given by the {p.238} Department concerning the organizations. Under this officer the orders should be given that no regiment shall leave for the seat of war except by his authority after it shall have been mustered into the service of the United States. The state of the equipment should be looked into by him, and even should a regiment be sent forward improperly equipped under some emergency, he could afterwards send the proper articles forward. No regiment leaves here now that is not unprovided with many things that it is entitled to and that are really indispensable. The deficiency is caused by the ignorance of the persons having the matter in charge. They have had but little advice from experienced officers, and no assistance from any such persons. I have seen several officers of volunteer regiments which are now in Washington. They appear to have come back to get articles of camp and garrison equipage which were forgotten when they started off. These trips should, if possible, be prevented, as they only add to the existing confusion.

It may be objected to my proposition to have a commanding officer here to take charge of this business that Colonel Scott represents the commanding general here. That is true, but he keeps quiet, seems to take but little interest in the whole matter, and is, in short, of no use. The whole of the trouble about this business would have been avoided had the Department had here an energetic and reliable officer, who could have answered questions, given orders, have communicated daily with the Department, and have received all of its orders. It is not too late now to save munch trouble and much money by the appointment or detail of such a person. Colonel Keyes is here, and would, I think, like to have a volunteer brigadier-general’s commission, probably giving up for it his Army commission. I do not know that he is the best man for the purpose, but I suggest him if no one else be mentioned.

Very respectfully, yours,

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry, U. S. Army.

–––

NEW YORK, May 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The difficulty between the Governor and the Defense Committee is only partially healed, but there is one regiment aboard ship for Old Point, and two are to leave for Washington to-night, unless some obstacle arises now unforeseen. Having seen the Governor, I do not go to Albany.

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry. U. S. Army.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 27, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, U. S. Army, New York.

Let me know how many regiments for three months accepted by Governor Morgan have been mustered into service, and by whom each is commanded. Also how many for three years accepted by him have been mustered into the service, and who commands each regiment. Answer by telegraph.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.239}

–––

COMMISSARY-GENERAL’S OFFICE, New York, May 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

SIR: By request of His Excellency Governor E. D. Morgan, I make the following report for the information of the War Department:

His Excellency has conversed fully with Colonel Franklin, Twelfth U. S. Infantry, who was authorized by the Secretary of War to see him and the Union Defense Committee on the subject of the troops to be furnished by this State to the General Government. Of the fourteen regiments which the Union Defense Committee agreed to send to Washington two have gone. The Governor has authorized the committee to raise four other regiments, to be organized in conformity with the provisions of Army Order No. 15, of May 4, which will be commissioned by him and sent to Washington as soon as they are mustered into the service of the United States. The Governor has also given permission to the committee to send to Washington the Ninth and Seventy-ninth Regiments of the regular New York State Militia, provided those regiments will agree to serve three years unless sooner discharged. It is probable that the eight regiments enumerated above are all that will be sent by the Union Defense Committee. Five regiments of Major-General Dix’s division have been sent to Fort Monroe and Washington. Of the remaining four regiments of the First Division, three are under orders for Fort Monroe and one for Washington. Of the Second Division, the regiments of Colonels Taylor and McChesney will be sent to Fort Monroe, and Colonel Wilson’s to Washington City. It may be necessary to send forward two regiments to Washington without arms or equipments, which it is understood can be furnished there If not, please notify me here. Colonels Walrath and Quinby, with their regiments, have been ordered to proceed to Washington to-day from Elmira via Harrisburg and Baltimore. The utmost dispatch will be employed in sending forward the above-named regiments, and no delay is anticipated except what may arise from the want of an immediate supply of arms and equipments for such as may be ordered to Fort Monroe. The balance of the troops required from this State will be placed in camps of instruction unless otherwise directed.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES, U. S. Army, Acting Aide-de-Camp to Governor Morgan.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 27, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

Colonels Carr, Duryee, Bendix, and Allen (four regiments) were last week sent to Fort Monroe and four to Washington, besides six to be sent by the Union Committee. These are to make good what you expected from the Union Committee and the six ordered by the General-in-Chief, on the 19th instant, to be sent by the Governor to Washington.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., May 27, 1861.

General CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I am just unformed that U. S. officer at Elmira has mustered several of the thirty-eight regiments for but three-months’ service. Will you {p.240} give him immediate orders to muster for two years, or for the war? It is absolutely necessary that directions should be given to this effect by the War Department. At New York and Albany all have gone right in this respect.

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Will you please notify Colonel Anderson, mustering officer, by telegraph that you authorized twenty regiments from Ohio for three years, and that the form of oath will be for three years, if the war so long continues, agreeably to information received by me from Governor Chase. We desire to muster in some regiments immediately. The threatening condition of the border demands it.

W. DENNISON, Governor.

–––

ORDERS.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 28, 1861.

The six regiments of troops in Indiana and the six regiments in Illinois, all which are now in the service of the United States, and commonly called three-months’ men, or any one or more of said regiments, may forthwith or as soon as practicable report their readiness to Major-General McClellan, and by him, or under his order, be received in and attached to the longer service, commonly called three-years’ men; provided that no officer or private is held under obligation to such change, and no one of said regiments shall be received into said longer service in which regiment more than one-fifth their number decline the change; and in cases of regiments received, the individuals declining, being not more than one-fifth of the whole, may be discharged at once, their places to be supplied as fast as possible by voluntary recruits. Any of the aforesaid regiments not being transferred to the longer service, according to the terms of the order, will remain in their present three-months’ service.

By special order of the President:

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

[Indorsement.]

MAY 28, 1861.

Let this order be entered as it now stands, I holding for further consideration the subject-matter of what I have erased.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1861.

Governor WASHBURN, Augusta, Me.:

You are authorized by this Department to organize and have mustered into service two regiments from your State for three years, or during the war.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.241}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.

If they will be mustered into service for three years, or during the war, the mustering officer may so muster them, but not for two years.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, May 28, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In compliance with the authority conferred upon me by the requisition from your Department under date of the 15th ultimo, I appointed John A. Dix, of the city of New York, a major-general on the 8th instant, and advised the Secretary of State of that fact on the 11th instant, and on the 16th I appointed James S. Wadsworth, of Livingston County, to the other major-generalship, and immediately advised the Secretary of State of such selection, to take command of the two divisions (seventeen regiments) called for by your requisition. Of the character of these two gentlemen it is quite needless for me to speak. They are too well known to you to require that. The proximity of New York and the facilities there afforded for transportation demanded that the several regiments (with two exceptions), then immediately required for the temporary defense of Washington, should be taken from the First Division, New York State Militia (regulars), Major-General Sandford’s. After placing these in the field propriety required that General Sandford should proceed to Washington to take charge of his division while it remained there. For reasons which I trust are without foundation Generals Dix and Wadsworth are somewhat apprehensive that they may not be recognized at Washington. But believing as I do that they will render eminent service to the country, that their acceptance would be in strict conformity with the requisition already referred to from your Department, and in conformity with the expectations of the people of this State, who have furnished forty-six regiments to the war, beside eleven sent in April to defend Washington, I confidently expect a favorable acknowledgment.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

NEW YORK, May 28, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have finished with the Union Defense Committee and the Governor. Things are now harmonious between them. I await orders.

W. B. FRANKLIN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1861.

Col. W. B. FRANKLIN, U. S. Army, New York City:

If you have accomplished all you can you will return and report in person.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.242}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 28, 1861.

Governor DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

The mustering officer may muster into service for three years, or for the war, any of the three-months’ regiments already accepted by you and mustered into service, and this will serve as his authority for so doing.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., May 28, 1861.

Hon. SOLOMON FOOT, Washington:

MY DEAR SIR: The Governor is to leave here in the morning and is so hurried that he requests me to acknowledge your letters of the 24th and 26th , received to-night, and to add, referring you to the accompanying act, that unless both of the regiments now raised go into “actual service under the requisition of the President,” &c., he will have no power to aid in the support of volunteers’ families, although in encampment, and to all intents and purposes powerless to maintain them. He receives with pleasure the encouragement that our men are to have the Minie musket.

Very respectfully, yours,

GEO. A. MERRILL, Secretary, &c.

[Indorsement.]

MAY 28.

GEORGE A. MERRILL:

I shall be glad to have the two regiments from Vermont if not beyond the quota of that State.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

Approved:

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Topeka, Kans., May 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Your favors of 21st instant, with inclosures, are received. The regiment will be organized at once, and I trust will give a good account of itself.

Very respectfully,

C. ROBINSON.

–––

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Let me earnestly recommend that the companies of three-months’ men at Camp Dennison be received as three-years’ men, with their {p.243} present organization of officers. It will cause much dissatisfaction to require one third of the company officers to be taken from the sergeants, and may altogether defeat the enrollment of excellent companies. One of the very best Ohio regiments refuses to go for three years unless its officers remain.

W. DENNISON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 30, 1861.

Major-General BUTLER:

SIR: Your action in respect to the negroes who came within your lines from the service of the rebels is approved.*

The Department is sensible of the embarrassments which must surround officers conducting military operations in a State by the laws of which slavery is sanctioned.

The Government cannot recognize the rejection by any State of its Federal obligations, nor can it refuse the performance of the Federal obligations resting upon itself. Among these Federal obligations, however, no one can be more important than that of suppressing and dispersing armed combinations formed for the purpose of overthrowing its whole constitutional authority.

While, therefore, you will permit no interference by the persons under your command with the relations of persons held to service under the laws of any State, you will, on the other hand, so long as any State within which your military operations are conducted is under the control of such armed combinations, refrain from surrendering to alleged masters any persons who may come within your lines. You will employ such persons in the services to which they may be best adapted, keeping an account of the labor by them performed, of the value of it, and of the expense of their maintenance. The question of their final disposition will be reserved for future determination.**

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Butler to Scott, May 24 and 27, 1861, Series I, Vol. II, pp. 52, 648.

** Copies of this and of Cameron to Butler, August 5, 1861, on same subject, furnished to Brig. Gen. T. W. Sherman (commanding expedition to the coast of South Carolina), October 14, 1861. See Series I, Vol. VI.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Indianapolis, Ind., May 30, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The Hon. Sol. Meredith, the bearer of this dispatch, will present to you the condition of the arms held by the Eighth and Tenth Indiana Regiments. Rifles have been specially sent to Colonel Wallace’s and Colonel Milroy’s regiments. These regiments are no better in any respect than the others, and the special favor granted them has created intense dissatisfaction in the others, which are left, in great part, with old muskets altered from flint-locks. These special favors to the regiments named were obtained by Messrs. Colfax and Nelson. Mr. Nelson had no authority of any kind from me, and Mr. Colfax had instructions to procure arms generally, and not for any particular regiment. While I was very glad to have that number of good arms come into the State, yet the manner of their distribution has given rise to great trouble and {p.244} dissatisfaction. It is the opinion of all military men here that it would be little better than murder to send troops into battle with such arms as are a large majority of these muskets altered from flint to percussion locks.

Without intending the slightest disparagement to the troops of other States, I feel safe in saying that the Indiana Volunteers are not inferior in material and discipline to any that have entered the field. All officers from other States who have witnessed their maneuvers are most lavish in their praises. Their drill is incessant, and no expense has been or will be spared to put them into the best possible condition and equipment. The reputation of Indiana suffered by incompetent officers in the Mexican war, and the determination is that it shall be redeemed, cost what it may. All we ask is a chance-is a chance.

I have two regiments of State troops enlisted for one year, in addition to those already accepted by the Government, which are in most excellent condition and eager for the fray, and which I hereby tender to the General Government.

On yesterday (the 29th) I loaned from the treasury of the State $20,000 to Lieutenant Davis, acting U. S. quartermaster, to pay transportation and expenses of troops that have just moved from this State into Western Virginia.

Having so often appealed to you on the subject of arms and with such poor success, I present the subject again with great reluctance, but from a sense of necessity and duty.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 30, 1861.

Governor ANDREW, Massachusetts:

MY DEAR SIR: I thank you sincerely for the suggestions contained in your letter of the 28th instant,* and regret very much that I had not the good fortune to meet you here during your short visit.

You will have no cause to complain of the want of vigor in the prosecution of the expedition now on foot to suppress the rebellion in our Southern States. The whole power of the Government, with all the resources of our Northern people united, will be used to settle the disturbing elements for all time to come. I have no doubt of the result, and I feel persuaded that as the policy of the Government develops itself to the public it will leave no doubt in your mind.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Not found.

–––

HAYTIAN BUREAU OF EMIGRATION, No. 8 Washington Building, 221 Washington Street, Boston, June 1, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War of the United States:

SIR: I notice that since the decision of your Department that “the slaves held by rebels who may seek protection in our camps are to be {p.245} reported as contraband articles of war” has been published, a great number of negroes have flocked to the fortresses, forts, and war headquarters of our troops now stationed in the rebellion States. Since the number of these contraband articles will soon become too great to be employed in the labors of intrenching, &c., and must occasion great embarrassment to the troops, I take the liberty of making two suggestions to you, and of offering at the same time to carry them out without expense for my personal services to the Government of the United States:

First. The establishment of a central station, to which all living contraband articles (of a black and colored complexion), who may not be needed by the regiments from whom they seek protection, shall be sent until the war is over, or until the Cabinet may decide what final disposition to make of them.

Second. The shipment of all such said articles to Hayti as by the conduct of their former holders, or the decision of the Cabinet, may be declared free to the Republic of Hayti.

As a citizen of the United States I offer to superintend free of charge such a central station as is here recommended. As the agent of the Government of Hayti I offer to provide every negro whom you may confiscate with a comfortable home and a farm in Hayti.

Respectfully submitted.

JAMES REDPATH.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: This office not having received any official information as to the entire military force which will be in service, and such information being essential for making its preparations to supply the stores which it is its province to furnish, proposes to assume as a basis an aggregate force of 250,000 men of all arms, cavalry, artillery, and infantry, and to give orders for providing the requisite supplies, and to make its estimates accordingly. Your instructions on this subject, either on the specified basis or such other as you may designate, are requested. In connection with this matter of providing supplies for arms, &c., I deem it proper to report that I suggested, some five weeks since, when my views on this subject were requested, the propriety of obtaining from abroad from 50,000 to 100,000 small-arms and eight batteries of rifled cannon, a note of which was taken at the time, but I have not been advised whether any measures have been taken to carry out that suggestion.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 3, 1861.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

SIR: The Secretary of War having directed that the three-months’ regiments of the Ohio Volunteers may be retained in service for three years, you are directed to have them mustered for that period, if {p.246} there are any who do not wish to engage for three years, they may be discharged immediately, or remain and serve out their three months, at their own option; and in case of discharge you are authorized to fill their vacancies.

By order:

Very respectfully, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 3, 1861.

HENRY M. TELLER, Esq., Mountain City, Colo. Ter.:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 24th ultimo, asking if the Government would accept of any troops from Colorado Territory, I beg leave to say that this Department has no desire at present to raise troops at so great a distance from the scene of action, the pressure from the States nearer home for admission into the Army being so great as to compel us to decline troops every day.

Very truly, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 3, 1861.

Governor BUCKINGHAM, Norwich, Conn.:

Send on to this place your three-years’ regiments as soon as organized. Report when.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Similar dispatches to Governors of Maine, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Wisconsin)

–––

WAN DEPARTMENT, June 3, 1861.

Governor ANDREW, Boston, Mass.:

Send to this place via Easton and Harrisburg all your three-years’ regiments as soon as organized. Please report the number.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 3, 1861.

Governor EDWIN D. MORGAN, Albany, N. Y.:

MY DEAR SIR: Yours of the 24th ultimo has been received by this Department, announcing that you had appointed John A. Dix and James S. Wadsworth as major-generals in command of the volunteers from the State of New York. By the General Orders, No. 15, which I {p.247} inclose you,* it will be perceived that the President has reserved to himself the appointments referred to, and in order, therefore, to entitle these gentlemen to command, it would be essential that they should be appointed by the President and be confirmed by the Senate. The high character and eminent abilities of the gentlemen assigned by you to these positions are fully known to and appreciated by this Department, and I am sure that it would have afforded me great pleasure if in the organization of the forces they could have been assigned to the positions for which you have designated them and for which I doubt not they are fully qualified; yet to have suspended the order in this case would have required the President to surrender the appointments to the State authorities in nearly or quite every other case.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See p. 151.

–––

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor herewith to inclose two extracts from private letters of the 12th ultimo, addressed to me by Mr. Sanford, our minister resident at Brussels, and to call your attention to the subject to which they relate.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosures.]

Mr. Sanford to Secretary of State.

I have vainly expected orders for the purchase of arms for the Government, and am tempted to order from Belgium all they can send over immediately. Colonel Frémont, who leaves next week, wishes to buy for the Government on some provisional contracts he has made in England, but Mr. Dayton seems to fear taking the responsibility of directing him to do so on behalf of the Government. Meanwhile the workshops are filling with orders from the South. I have taken steps to find what we can get here and in Belgium, and may get the newly-arrived diplomat to join me in a purchase, to be paid for on delivery. It distresses me to think that while we are in want of them, Southern money is to take them away to be used against us.

Mr. Sanford to Secretary of State-Interview with Mr. Thouvenel.

One of the objects of my interview was to be informed concerning large sales of arms which it was said were being made at the Government arsenals at Toulon to agents of the Southern States, M. Thouvenel assured me, in reply to my question, that no such sales had been made to such agents. I went on to say that he would give a practical proof of his sympathy for the Union by refusing to supply arms to such agents or permitting the export of arms or munitions of war to those States. He said that since my former residence here they had charged their legislation with respect to traffic in arms, in consequence of the competition of Belgium and England, and it was now absolutely free, and no {p.248} permission was necessary for their export, as formerly. He could not, therefore, interfere with it. The Government had itself sold a good many arms of the old pattern to other States-had even sold to Garibaldi, I understood him to say-but they would not sell to Southern agents. I expressed my gratification at this, and asked him if his Government would be willing to sell us Minie rifles or rifled cannon. With respect to the last, he said they had uniformly refused to dispose of any; had lately declined to sell to the Government of Denmark. With respect to Minie rifles, they were not in a position, in the present warlike aspect of things in Europe, to part with any arms of this character-only arms which were replaced by Minie. Still, if the legation would make an application, he would see what could be done.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, N. J., June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Thinking it desirable that you should have more full information as to the situation of the three New Jersey regiments enlisted for three years than I was able to give by telegraph yesterday, I make this communication. The regiments are all full and are here in camp. They have tents and camp equipage, but we have not undertaken to provide ambulances or wagons. The regiments have the best officers it was in my power to obtain. Colonel Montgomery, who commands one regiment, has seen some thirty years’ service, and is still in the vigor of life. Colonel McLean, educated at West Point and in service in Florida, commands another regiment, and Colonel Taylor, educated for a time in the Navy, and in service in Mexico, has command of the other regiment. The lieutenant-colonels and majors are efficient men, as I believe. The troops themselves are hardy, able men. This State was authorized by General Sibley, acting quartermaster, to furnish these regiments with clothing, uniforms, knapsacks, &c. Under this authority the State has made contracts for these articles, and our troops will be equipped in two weeks in a mariner which has been approved by an inspector sent from Philadelphia by General Thomas to examine the samples after which the equipment is being made.

Major Laidley, the mustering officer here, has made a requisition for arms, which are expected by the time the troops are uniformed. It is, of course, desirable that the troops have their uniforms before they leave here, but they are now at the disposal of the Government, and in an exigency could leave at any time after they are provided with arms.

I consider it very desirable that these regiments should not be separated, but that they serve in the same brigade.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

–––

BREVOORT HOUSE, New York, June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I received your dispatch of yesterday, asking “How many of the three-years’ regiments south of Albany are organized? Order immediately to this place by Harrisburg all that are ready.”

{p.249}

There could be no doubt that the three or two years’ regiments now at Elmira are meant by the dispatch. I learned from the Governor on Saturday that they only required mustering into the service to make them ready, and I telegraphed him this morning to have them mustered and sent. They have not been mustered before because the mustering officer had been suddenly ordered away. I spoke to General Scott on the day I left Washington about an order to make the organizations of the regiments from the different States conformable to General Orders, No. 15. He seemed to think that it was a matter that ought to be handled very delicately, and that at present it might be an impolitic move. I think, therefore, that it will be well for you to have some conversation with him on the subject before the order is issued. I inclose you a draft of a letter to Mr. Astor, who received the sharp reply from the Department on the subject of the rifled cannon. If you like it, it can be copied, signed and sent to him.

I also inclose an unsigned order to me for my first journey here and back. I respectfully ask that it may be signed and sent back to me, in order that I may draw my transportation from the quartermaster. It is not my business to be criticizing the staff departments, but I find that one of the troubles here arises from the fact that Colonel Tompkins will not issue anything to the volunteers unless the requisition be made out in strict conformity to the Army Regulations. This, at first sight, appears proper enough, but as the raw regiments know nothing of the regulations and cannot learn them fast, the insistence upon regulations is a great source of delay. Perhaps the allowance of more clerks in the office here might remedy that defect-the clerks to make out the requisitions in form, to instruct the volunteers. I telegraphed you this morning to ask you whether your order to send all of the three-years’ men south of Albany to Washington via Harrisburg included those now here with other orders or not. As the three regiments at Elmira will require the road for two or three days, there will be no delay in the execution of the order.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. FRANKLIN, Colonel Twelfth Infantry, U. S. Army.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I deem it important to place before you as matter of public record the resolution of the Board of State Officers of the State of New York* under which I was deputed to wait upon you and have the interview which yesterday took place between us. At the same time I leave with you a copy of the act of the Legislature of New York, under which the Board of State Officers has acted in the organization of a force of State militia, to be placed at the disposal of the Government of the United States to aid in suppressing the present formidable insurrection. A copy of a memorial addressed to the Governor of the State of New York, which embodies in argumentative form what is deemed to be the right of the State of New York to appoint its general officers, is also herewith transmitted. The contents of these papers were substantially repeated in the conversation with you yesterday. You announced to me in that {p.250} interview had with you the irrevocable determination of the Government of the United States to appoint the general officers for the forces furnished by the government of New York, and to refuse to receive those forces in the event that such determination should not be acceded to. I deem it my duty, respectfully but firmly, to protest against this determination. It imposes on the Board of State Officers, unless they submit to it, the necessity of violating the laws and constitution of the State of New York, which have been framed in conformity to the Constitution of the United States. It destroys and dishonors the distinctive character of the militia of the States which is adapted to the habits and endeared to the minds of the people. It does not agree with the written arrangement which was heretofore made with you by the attorney-general of the State, acting in behalf of the Board of State Officers, and in pursuance of which written arrangement they have organized thirty-eight regiments of volunteer militia. To the undersigned it seems to be an unnecessary and invidious determination, which, while it may command a temporary acquiescence under the pressure of the great dangers impending over the country, will be deliberately revoked when the present exigency shall have been passed so that it may be safely and circumspectly considered. It only remains for the undersigned to report to the Board of State Officers of New York the determination which you have emphatically expressed, in order that they may take such action as in their judgment the occasion requires.

I have the honor to be, with high consideration, yours, &c.,

ROBERT CAMPBELL, Lieutenant-Governor of New York.

* See inclosure, Morgan to Campbell, May 25, 1861, p. 235.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

AN ACT to authorize the embodying and equipment of a volunteer militia, and to provide for the public defense.

[Passed April 16, 1861.]

The people of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:

SECTION 1. The Governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, comptroller, attorney-general, State engineer and surveyor, and State treasurer, or a majority of them, are hereby authorized and empowered to accept the service and to cause to be enrolled and mustered into the service of the State for two years, unless sooner discharged by the order of the said officers above named, volunteers, in their discretion as to the number, not to exceed 30,000 men, to be officered, organized, and equipped in such manner as the said officers or a majority of them may order and direct, and to be formed and organized without regard to existing military districts; the said force hereby authorized being in addition to the present military organization of the State, and a part of the militia thereof.

SEC. 2. The officers of such organization of volunteers shall be elected and appointed in the manner prescribed by section 2 of article 11 of the constitution of the State, and commissioned by the Governor, and he is hereby authorized and empowered to prescribe such rules and regulations as he may deem proper to carry out the provisions of such article of the constitution relative to election and appointment: Provided, however, That when any vacancy shall occur among such volunteers while they are absent from the State, the Governor is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint and to commission the requisite officers to fill such vacancies.

SEC. 3. The officers and men of the said force shall receive the same pay and rations, while in service under the provisions of this act, as {p.251} officers and men of the same rank and arm of service in the Army of the United States, and shall be liable at all times to be turned over to the service of the United States, on the order of the Governor, as a part of the militia of this State, upon the requisition of the President of the United States.

SEC. 4. The officers and men of the said force, except when in actual service, shall be paid only for the time actually spent in their organization, drilling, and instruction.

SEC. 5. The captains of the respective companies organized by virtue of this act, except when in the actual service of the General Government, shall make monthly returns of the service performed by all the members thereof to the colonel of the regiment. The said colonel shall make hike returns of the service of the regiment, based upon tire said company returns and the service of the regimental officers, to the adjutant-general; and the comptroller, on the certificate of the paymaster-general, shall draw his warrant upon the treasurer in favor of the respective regimental paymasters therefor; and the paymasters of the respective regiments, before entering upon the duties of their office, shall enter into a bond to the people of the State in such sum as the Governor small direct, and with such sureties as he shall approve, to be evidenced by his indorsing his approval on such bond, conditioned for the faithful application, according to law, of all moneys he shall receive by virtue of his office; and which bond shall be filed in the office of the comptroller, and in case of breach, prosecuted under his direction by the attorney-general.

SEC. 6. All expenditures of arms, supplies, or equipments necessary for the said force shall be made under the direction of the Governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of state, comptroller, attorney-general, State engineer and surveyor, and State treasurer, or a majority of them, and the moneys thereof shall, on the certificate of the Governor, be drawn from the treasury on the warrant of the comptroller, in favor of such person or persons as shall from time to time be designated by the Governor.

SEC. 7. The force hereby created, when called into actual service, shall be subject to all the rules and articles applicable to the troops in the service of the United States, but no volunteers under this act shall be discharged from service anywhere except in the county where they were organized, unless by his or their request.

SEC. 8. The sum of $3,000,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby appropriated out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to defray the expenditures authorized by this act, or any other expenses of mustering the militia of this State, or any part thereof, into the service of the United States.

SEC. 9. There shall be imposed, for the fiscal year commencing on the 1st day of October, 1861, a State tax, for such sum as the comptroller shall deem necessary, to meet the expenses hereby authorized, not to exceed two mills on each dollar of the valuation of real and personal property in this State, to be assessed, raised, levied, collected, and paid in the same manner as the other State taxes are levied, assessed, collected, and paid into the treasury.

SEC. 10. This act shall take effect immediately.

Article 11, Section 2 of the Constitution.

Militia officers shall be chosen or appointed as follows: Captains, subalterns, and non-commissioned officers shall be chosen by the written votes of the members of their respective companies. Field officers of {p.252} regiments and separate battalions by the written votes of the commissioned officers of the respective regiments and separate battalions; brigadier-generals and brigade inspectors by the field officers of their respective brigades; major-generals, brigadier-generals, and commanding officers of regiments or separate battalions, shall appoint staff officers to their respective divisions, brigades, regiments, or separate battalions.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

MAY 30, 1861.

His Excellency EDWIN D. MORGAN, Governor of the State of New York:

Public attention in Western New York has been arrested by the extraordinary collision between the General and State governments on the important subject of the appointment of officers for our militia, which we have aided to organize for service in the impending struggle for constitutional liberty. The heart, mind, and soul of our people have been concentrated in an outburst of patriotic emotion and action to sustain the Government of the United States. It is important that we should not be misled into the commission of an irreparable wrong to the cause we are all so anxious and eager to sustain. In a moment of imminent peril, when the forms of law were consuming time in which it was needful to provide on the instant for the preservation of the Government itself, those forms might well be omitted. To follow them might have been the circuitous and therefore the certain path to destruction. Again, those processes of law, ordained for the preservation of personal liberty, like the writ of habeas corpus, may well be and must be suspended when higher and paramount principles, on which the whole fabric of constitutional government reposes, demand the suspension.

We therefore can share the general amazement and scorn excited by the senile attempt to exalt the authority of a single judge, through the process of the habeas corpus, so as to paralyze the military arm of the Government when raised to suppress an insurrection of unparalleled atrocity and danger. We are prepared to concede and maintain that forms of law shall neither be followed nor regarded when employed as the means of overthrowing the Constitution itself. But on the other hand, unnecessary, inconsiderate, and dangerous violations of the Constitution of the country in a vital part ought not to be tolerated, even by that excited and self-sacrificing patriotism which in this crisis is ready to endure and forgive much.

The President of the United States has called on the several States for the militia “to suppress the insurrection” led by ambitious traitors, and “to execute the laws of the Union” which those traitors have violated and trampled under foot. In this he has obeyed the laws of Congress, framed under a specific grant of power in the Constitution. But the same section of the Constitution which confers this power also provides in the consecutive subdivision that Congress shall have power “to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the States respectively the appointment of the officers, and the authority to train the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress.”

What public exigency demands that this reserve power “to make the appointment of the officers” should be disregarded in respect to the general officers, while it is obeyed in the selection of regimental and company officers?

{p.253}

There was a deep and prophetic jealousy of military power which was embodied in these provisions of the Constitution. The military arm was subjected to the paramount direction and government of the national authority, but the right arm, whose million sinews are strung in the militia alone, was guarded by rooting it in the local pride and spirit and subordinate sovereignty of the States.

What is gained to New York, and Western New York especially, by withholding from our organized regiments of militia general officers of their own or their State’s appointment? Why should they be deprived of the supervision, discriminating care, and influence which belong to those higher positions? In the single instance in which an officer has been commissioned in this State as a brigadier-general without the co-operation of the State government has the selection been such as to furnish us any assurance that this unconstitutional and usurped authority will be discreetly wielded? Is Western New York so destitute of military ability that it is needful to violate the Constitution to compensate for her weakness? Is State pride, district pride, local pride so useless an element in military character that it may be disregarded and insulted, and that, too, by an inconsiderate violation of law which wears the appearance of an attempt to retain in the hands of the national Administration the distribution of commissions of general command like so much patronage which has long been appropriated in the distribution of civil offices by successful parties as the perquisites of victory, “the spoils of war?”

To-day regiments are assembled at the depot at Elmira not mustered into the service of the United States, doubting whether they will be so mustered at all, while expectant officers are sounding the drum beat in our streets for recruits to a single brigade in the city of New York, which seems to have received a roving commission to organize an independent force in utter disregard, not to say contempt, of the executive authorities of the State.

It is a great mistake to suppose that this course of administration will be overlooked or forgotten. These regiments, organized under a law for arming 30,000 volunteer militia and appropriating $3,000,000 for the purpose, are entitled to precedence in this conflict before any other bodies of men who may have been put forward by local committees or aspiring and presumptuous individuals acting without the sanction or supervision of the State.

It will not do to confound the provisions of the Constitution which give Congress power “to raise and support armies” with those other provisions which provide for calling out, organizing, and governing the State militia under which Congress has passed an existing law and under which the President has made his requisition for military aid. Confusion and disorder will inevitably ensue from the unconstitutional experiment which has been inaugurated to divide between the national and State governments the appointment of the officers, conceding to the States the appointment of regimental and company officers and retaining in the national Government the appointment of general officers. Acceptance of regiments from the States thus commanded explodes the idea that they are not militia. Practically it would be impossible to organize them without conceding to the States the appointment of the subordinate officers. The spirit of our agricultural, mechanical, and commercial population, warlike, impulsive, and patriotic as it is, would revolt at the idea of surrendering the appointment of those officers to the General Government. But when these regiments of State militia are thus organized, commanded by officers whose commissions proceed from the States, they cannot be transformed {p.254} into a standing army, disassociated from their respective States by calling them volunteers.

Neither will it do to say that the President has only taken the responsibility of a series of acts without authority of law, trusting for his justification to the public exigencies and peril and to the sanction of Congress, by public law, when it shall assemble in July. There was no need for taking such responsibility, because the existing laws authorizing the President’s call for State militia were ample and adequate to the exigency, and having invoked the State authorities in their sovereign capacity as States for aid, and having received from the States bodies of men which have been enrolled as militia, there can be no good reason, as there certainly is no power, in Congress to retain them in any other character. What else than militia could the national Government summon from the States? What else had the States to enroll and send forward in response to the summons? The whole spirit of the Constitution is against this experiment to divide commissions, prerogatives, and responsibilities. This is not a foreign war like the war against Mexico, but it is the very case specified in the Constitution-a case of insurrection and resistance to the execution of the laws of the Union, in which the State militia is named as the power to be invoked and employed. If the New York militia has been summoned to the field to aid in suppressing the existing insurrection-if that militia, clothed and armed at the expense of the State, and mustered in the service of the United States, is to remain just what it was created to be, then there is no power in Congress to confer on the President the prerogative of appointing its officers. An example of fearful import may grow out of this mode of appointment if it shall now be persisted in. Who can fail to perceive that it is a wide departure from the jealous fear of military power and despotism, breathed into the Constitution by its framers? Why was it specified in that sacred instrument that the militia, though armed, organized, disciplined, and governed by the United States when mustered into its service, should be commanded by officers appointed by the respective States? This was the great safeguard in time of fervid patriotism and excitement like the present, against the abuse of that patriotism by a concentration of military power for ambitious purposes which might be made subversive of liberty.

In the creation of a standing army, let the Government open its recruiting stations and accept its volunteers; but let us never sanction the attempt now inconsiderately made to appropriate and absorb for such a purpose the power of the State over its own militia.

We call on the Executive Council of this State to persevere in a firm and respectful maintenance of its rightful authority over its militia, and on our members of Congress to unite in holding the national Administration to a strict conformity in this regard to the letter and spirit of the Constitution.

M. B. ANDERSON. H. HUMPHREY. O. M. BENEDICT.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Saint Johnsbury, Vt., June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I received, yesterday, your telegraphic dispatch, ordering the Second Vermont Regiment of Volunteers to be sent forward by rail to {p.255} Washington. The companies comprising this regiment having remained at their several recruiting stations until now, will be mustered into encampment the present week, at Burlington, and be ready for inspection by the U. S. inspecting officer on Monday next, June 10, and on receiving their rifle muskets, which, I understand, are to be furnished upon the order of such inspecting officer, I shall lose no time in ordering them forward.

These companies are raw recruits, but men of great physical force, being, most of them, laborers from farms.

I have term more companies of three-years’ volunteers, which I shall order into encampment at Saint Johnsbury early next week, forming the Third Vermont Regiment, which will be held subject to a future requisition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ERASTUS FAIRBANKS.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 5, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, and have already telegraphed you to have the regiments at Elmira, that are ready, organized and mustered, and then moved on to Harrisburg. It is desirable that in the organization of the regiments for service during the war the plan of organization as announced in Orders, No. 15, be strictly adhered to. The order for your first journey to New York and back has been forwarded to you by mail. I have also addressed the letter proposed by you to Mr. Astor.

If the allowance of one or two additional clerks to do duty in the quartermaster’s office at New York will remedy the evil mentioned by you, I am entirely willing they should be employed, in which event it is my desire to designate J. B. Saulsbury, esq., residing in Jersey City, but doing business until recently in New York, as one of them. There will be no difficulty in transporting the troops from Elmira to Harrisburg on short notice.

Truly,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 5, 1861.

Hon. CHARLES ROBINSON, Topeka, Kans.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo, stating that your regiment will be organized at once.

Thanking you for the promptness with which you have responded to the call of this Department upon you, and assured that the Kansas regiment will prove itself worthy of your trust,

I am, sir, respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., June 5, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The Third Regiment Maine Volunteers, 1,000 strong, left this city to-day and will reach Washington probably Friday. I think you {p.256} will like the looks of them. I sent with the regiment forty-five horses and harnesses, costing about $100 each. My impression is that the horses are very good ones and that they have been purchased at reason able prices. More can be furnished, with or without wagons, with the next regiment if desired. The Fourth Regiment will be ready to move in a week if it goes without horses and wagons, and in a week from Monday if with. The Fifth and Sixth Regiments are under instruction and will be concentrated in a few days near Portland, where grounds will be secured for a camp of instruction. I will thank you to inform me whether you think there is any prospect of their being called for soon.

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, yours,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Harrisburg, Pa., June 5, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I would respectfully call your attention to the conversation which I had with you on the 21st of May in reference to a grant of arms to this Commonwealth by the United States Government. You are aware that the State of Pennsylvania has already raised on her own account fifteen regiments of volunteers to serve for three years. It is intended that this force shall go into camp immediately, to receive military instruction, and to be ready to respond to a call for their services at any time from the President of the United States. These troops are now being fully uniformed and equipped in the best manner and have at their head Maj. Gem. George A. McCall, one of the first military men of the country, which fact will be an additional guaranty of their efficiency, either in protecting the southern boundary of this State or in making an aggressive movement on hostile neighbors. The difficulty under which the State labors is the want of suitable military arms to place in the possession of its soldiers. By an inquiry at the Ordnance Office I learned from Colonel Ripley that the department has on hand a large number of altered muskets which would suit the purposes of our military. This gentleman fully concurred in the propriety of having the public arms applied to the wants of this Commonwealth under existing circumstances. An order for 10,000 muskets or rifles, or a proportion of both, either of the new or old style, will enable this department to supply the wants of the volunteers of this Commonwealth, who will form, when armed, a reserve force which may be of the highest importance in the military operations of the Government.

Hoping to have a favorable reply to the foregoing request, I am ,very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. BIDDLE, Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, June 5, 1861.

Governor FAIRBANKS, Saint Johnsbury, Vt.:

The two additional regiments of three-years’ troops, or during the war, are accepted by this Department.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.257}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 5, 1861.

His Excellency ALEXANDER W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the resolution of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Wisconsin, expressive of the satisfaction it would give it to have a brigade formed of the regiments of infantry called into service from Wisconsin, and give the command of the same to the Hon. Rufus King, in whose fitness and capacity the people of the State have the most implicit confidence. It would give this Department great pleasure to meet the wishes of the General Assembly of Wisconsin, and if it can be done without embarrassment or injury to the public service, its wishes, permit me to assure you, will not be disregarded; but I regret to say that at this time, and in the present state of the organization of the Army, it is impossible for this Department to do so.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

DENVER CITY, COLO. TER., June 6, 1861-9 a.m.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Accept by express the inclosed letter from Capt. A. Pleasonton, with my indorsement. This Territory is at peace, devoted to the Union, and full of energy. The production of gold is very great, and daily increasing in amount.

Very respectfully,

WILLIAM GILPIN.

[Inclosure.]

BEAR RIVER CROSSING, May 30, 1861.

His Excellency Governor GILPIN, Colorado Territory:

DEAR GOVERNOR: Knowing the deep interest you take in the welfare and advancement of this country, I wish to call your attention to the necessity which exists for keeping open the overland communication with California. From what I see and hear I am satisfied that this cannot be done if the military force is removed from the country. The present force is not adequate for all the necessities of the service, and if removed will lead to great disorders and losses on the part of the Government, as well as individuals. I am sorry to say that many of our men are deserting, and some of the officers are resigning, which gives an appearance of disaffection to the whole mass; but such is not the case, and they only need encouragement from the Government by being supplied with recruits and an assurance of support to meet every emergency that may arise. I know you have influence with the Government, and I do not hesitate, therefore, to ask your assistance in urging this matter to their notice, with a request for speedy action. I have been using all my exertions with the officers I have met to induce them to remain at their posts, and I am happy to say have met with Success with several. Rest assured I shall do all in my power to {p.258} advance the public interest, and I shall be glad to aid you at any time you may think I can do so.

Excuse this hasty note, and believe me to be, Governor, very truly, your friend,

A. PLEASONTON.

P. S.-I shall be glad to hear from you. My address will be Fort Crittenden, Utah.

A. P.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 6, 1861.

His Excellency CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, and I avail myself of the occasion to express the thanks of this Department to you for the prompt and satisfactory manner in which you have responded to the call of the President. Your letter has been referred to the Adjutant-General, who will give it immediate attention and issue the necessary orders.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

[JUNE 6, 1861.-For McClellan to Scott, in regard to organization of troops in Western Virginia, and Scott’s reply authorizing their muster-in, see Series I, Vol. II, p. 666.]

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 6, 1861.

JAMES REDPATH, Esq., Boston, Mass.:

DEAR SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 1st instant. The subject to which you refer is an important one which deserves careful consideration, and shall receive it at my hands as soon as I may find a leisure moment to give it thought.

Should your views be adopted you may hear from me again on the subject.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 7, 1861.

MIXED COMMISSION, Medical Bureau:

The Secretary of War has learned with great satisfaction that at the instance and in pursuance of the suggestion of the Medical Bureau, in a communication to this office dated May 22, 1861, H. W. Bellows, Prof. A. D. Bache, LL. D.; Prof. Jeffries Wyman, M. D.; Prof. Wolcott Gibbs, M. D.; W. H. Van Buren, M. D.; Samuel G. Howe, M. D.; R. C. Wood, surgeon, U. S. Army; G. W. Cullum, U. S. Army; Alexander E. Shiras, U. S. Army, have mostly consented, in connection with such others as they may choose to associate with then, to act as a commission of {p.259} inquiry and advice in respect to the sanitary interests of the U. S. forces and without remuneration from the Government. The Secretary has submitted their patriotic proposal to the consideration of the President, who directs the acceptance of the services thus generously offered.

The Commission in connection with a surgeon of the U. S. Army, to be designated by the Secretary, will direct its inquiries to the principles and practices connected with the inspection of recruits and enlisted men, the sanitary condition of the volunteers, to the means of preserving and restoring the health and of securing the general comfort and efficiency of troops, to the proper provision of cooks, nurses, and hospitals, and to other subjects of like nature.

The Commission will frame such rules and regulations in respect of the objects and modes of its inquiry as may seem best adapted to the purpose of its constitution, which, when approved by the Secretary, will be established as general guides of its investigations and action.

A room with necessary conveniences will be provided in the city of Washington for the use of the Commission, and the members will meet when and at such other places as may be convenient to them for consultation and for the determination of such questions as may come properly before the Commission.

In the progress of its inquiries the Commission will correspond freely with the Department and with the Medical Bureau, and will communicate to each, from time to time, such observations and results as it may deem expedient and important.

The Commission will exist until the Secretary of War shall otherwise direct, unless sooner dissolved by its own action.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Augusta, Me., June 7, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR:. A regiment (the Fourth Maine Volunteers) will leave Rockland Monday, June 17. It will be 1,000 strong, well uniformed and equipped, and will take twelve camp baggage-wagons, newly made and of the army size, pattern, &c., two hospital wagons, about fifty horses and harnesses. The regiment goes from the home of Knox and will not unworthily represent the old hero.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

ISRAEL WASHBURN, JR.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 7, 1861.

Hon. ERASTUS FAIRBANKS, Governor of Vermont, Saint Johnsbury, Vt.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, informing me that one regiment of Vermont Volunteers will be ready for service by the 10th instant and that you will hold another in reserve.

Thanking you for the promptness and efficiency of your action in response to the calls upon you from this Department, I am, sir, respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War,

{p.260}

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Since the receipt of your letter of the 6th ultimo every attention possible on the part of this office has been given toward obtaining the necessary data for responding to the various questions therein. In ordinary times, and without the confusion as to the condition of ordnance supplies which was occasioned by irregular and, it is believed, unwarranted orders for taking them from the arsenals, it would not have been difficult to have made a prompt answer to your letter. As it was, immediate measures were taken to answer, which involved the necessity of a correspondence with the respective arsenals. Most of them have responded, and a tabular statement is in preparation, exhibiting in a concise form, convenient for easy reference, the facts called for by the first and fifth questions of your letter. There are still some blanks necessarily left in this statement, from the non-receipt of replies from some of the arsenals, which will be filled as fast as they come in, and the complete statement submitted to you. I ought not probably to have delayed an immediate answer to your letter, as far as was possible, but my desire to answer it in full has caused me to do so. I now reply to the second, third, and fourth questions, and will not defer answers to the others longer than is absolutely necessary to enable me to do so. The cost of manufacturing rifle muskets is $13.93 per arm, including appendages, such as screw-drivers, wipers, spring vices, and bullet-molds. The Government has no foundry and purchases its cannon. The prices heretofore paid have been 6 cents per pound for iron cannon unchambered, and 6 1/2 cents for chambered; for bronze cannon, 46 cents per pound, except the mountain howitzer, for which 75 cents per pound is paid. No muskets have been purchased. For cavalry carbines, which are patented arms, the price is $30 each; and for cavalry pistols, Colt revolvers of the latest pattern, $25. The only work for supplying arms owned by the Government is the armory at Springfield. The present capacity of that armory can give a product of about 2,500 arms a month. Measures are now in as rapid progress as possible to provide additional machinery, tools, and fixtures to double at least that capacity. The orders from this office to the superintendent give him full powers of increasing the product without limit. The service is now deficient in rifle muskets; in siege and field artillery, with carriages and harness; in some calibers of heavy artillery, and carriages for the same; in accouterments and horse equipments; in artillery horses, and in powder and lead. When I say deficient, I mean that the quantities of these articles on hand are not an adequate stock for the present contemplated military force in service. We have supplies of all to meet immediate exigencies, except of rifle muskets, and our supply of this arm, smooth-bored, of good and serviceable quality, will for the present meet this deficiency. All these deficiencies must be supplied by manufacture at the U. S. Armory and arsenals and by purchases from private establishments. These two sources will keep up our supply to meet immediate wants, and in one year, it is estimated, will afford a good stock in store. The estimates of this Bureau, which will be submitted in a few days, will exhibit this subject in full detail. These estimates will not be for less than $500,000 for the remainder of the present fiscal year, and $6,000,000 for the next year, to meet liabilities contracted for and probable future expenditures.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAMES W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

{p.261}

–––

KEOKUK, IOWA, June 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

MY DEAR SIR: John W. Rankin, a citizen of Iowa and a member of the Senate, leaves for Washington on Monday. The Legislature at its late special session directed me to tender to the Government of the United States a regiment of cavalry. The regiment is organized, with Col. Fitz Henry Warren as colonel. Iowa, through Mr. Rankin, tenders you the regiment, and earnestly urges on you the acceptance. It is composed of bold, brave, able-bodied men.

The three regiments of infantry placed at the disposal of the President are at the rendezvous in this place, anxiously awaiting arms. May I ask you to confer freely with Mr. Rankin, as he will fully represent my views and wishes. I hope that his known partiality for the Secretary of War and his untiring exertions for the success of Mr. Lincoln, as well as his devotion to the Government in the hour of its peril, will give him an easy access to you. Iowa is now ready to do its entire duty. I am overrun with applications of companies for admission into the national service. Our people are loyal, patriotic, and devoted. Their hearts are with you in the national struggle. Their prayers daily ascend for the President, the members of the Cabinet, and for glorious General Scott. Their desire is that the war be speedily terminated, and that 200,000 men in addition to what you have be called, if necessary, to extinguish the unnatural rebellion.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

KEOKUK, IOWA, June 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

MY DEAR SIR: The Iowa Legislature has directed me to urge upon the President of the United States the constitution of a brigade out of the Iowa regiments, or the Iowa and Nebraska combined, and the appointment of a general. I heartily concur with the Legislature, and through you urge a compliance. Such an officer is very much needed. If deemed better our State will promptly furnish a fourth regiment. The Hon. Samuel R. Curtis, colonel of the Second Regiment, is very generally named in connection with the chief officer of the brigade, and I heartily recommend him. In all your engagements I hope you will not overlook the young but loyal and gallant State which by the votes of the people I have the honor to represent.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor.

J. W. Rankin will fully represent me in this matter.

I join in the foregoing recommendation of Governor Kirkwood, and respectfully but urgently commend the matter to your favorable consideration. Colonel Curtis enjoys in an eminent degree the confidence of all our citizens, and his selection for the position of a brigadier-general would gratify us in the highest degree.

Very respectfully,

WM. VANDEVER, Second Congressional District of Iowa.

{p.262}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 8, 1861.

Governor ISRAEL WASHBURN, Augusta, Me:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 5th instant, and again thank you for the promptness of your action and the excellent manner in which the troops from your State are equipped and fitted out for service. If the two remaining regiments are equipped in the same way, and can be at once mustered and moved hither, let me know by telegraph, and I may immediately have them mustered and ordered here.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WILLARD’S, Washington, June 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: His Excellency Governor Andrew directs me to inform you that the first of the six three-years’ regiments allotted to Massachusetts will march in three or four days, the remaining five to follow at intervals of four or five days if ordered, fully equipped in every particular. He adds, “We could easily give the men for six more regiments.” His Excellency furthermore asks leave to furnish a battalion of 400 picked men under the command of an able officer, furnished with the Burnside rifle.

Very respectfully,

C. H. DALTON, Agent for Massachusetts.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 31.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 9, 1861.

Women nurses will not reside in the camps nor accompany regiments on a march; but those who apply for service and are highly accredited, having certificates from two physicians and two clergymen of standing, and will forward the same to Miss D. L. Dix, at Washington, will receive a certificate in return accrediting them for service in any military hospital of the United States where such services are required.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., June 10, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the return of my report of the 3d instant indorsed by you:

The Secretary of War approves of the within report of the Chief of Ordnance, but has no recollection of the report about purchasing arms therein mentioned, and desires a more full report on that subject.

{p.263}

In compliance with that desire I have to report: In my letter of the 3d instant it was stated that I had suggested the propriety of obtaining from abroad some small-arms and rifled cannon, not that I had made any formal report on the subject. The circumstances attending that suggestion were as follows:

In the latter part of April last, between the 23d and 27th, I had a conversation with General Scott in relation to procuring with dispatch additional supplies of small-arms and field artillery, which it was then thought might be obtained from abroad by sending an agent to purchase them. I suggested 100,000 rifled muskets and eight batteries (forty-eight pieces) of rifled cannon. The person who was then thought of as the agent was Mr. D. Tyler, of Connecticut, now General Tyler, who was then here and about to return home, but who staid over until something more definite on the subject should be determined. I accordingly mentioned to you at your office the suggestion above referred to, to which you replied in substance that you considered it preferable to obtain the articles at home rather than abroad. In the multiplicity of public affairs then and since pressing on you it is not to be wondered at if this conversation should have escaped your memory. A short time after I was sent for by General Scott, whom I found with the Assistant Secretary of State, when my views on this same subject were asked for, and as my previous suggestions seemed to be considered rather too liberal in regard to the quantity of arms, &c., I stated that I might and would so modify it as to include 50,000 muskets and eight batteries. I have not since learned whether any measures have been taken to carry out either suggestion.

Respectfully,

JAS. W. RIPLEY.

–––

WASHINGTON, June 11, 1861.

The Government has already accepted ten regiments from the State of Indiana. I think at least six more ought to be received from that State, two to be those of Col. James W. McMillan and Col. William L. Brown, and the other four to be designated by the Governor of the State of Indiana, and to be received into the volunteer service of the United States according to the “plan of organization” in the General Orders of the War Department, No. 15. When they report to Major-General McClellan in condition to pass muster according to that order, and with the approval of the Secretary of War, to be indorsed hereon, and a copy left in his Department, I direct that the whole six, or any smaller number of said regiments, be received.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The present condition of our supplies of sabers, swords, and pistols renders it necessary that measures should be taken to increase our stock in time to admit of manufacture before its exhaustion. I therefore propose to order 15,000 cavalry and artillery sabers, 7,000 non-commissioned officers’, musicians’, and artillerymen’s swords; 4,800 swords for staff mounted, and foot officers, and 5,000 Colt pistols; each kind of swords and sabers in due proportion to the probable requirements of the service.

{p.264}

I also propose to obtain from France, as samples and for the purpose of examination, one of each caliber, both rifled and smooth bore, of the field cannon known as the “Napoleon” gun.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Ordnance.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, June 11, 1861.

Notes on subject of contracting for small-arms.

A great evil now specially prevalent in regard to arms for the military service is the vast variety of the new inventions, each having, of course, its advocates, insisting upon the superiority of his favorite arm over all others and urging its adoption by the Government.

The influence thus exercised has already introduced into the service many kinds and calibers of arms, some, in my opinion, unfit for use as military weapons, and none as good as the U. S. musket, producing confusion in the manufacture, the issue, and the use of ammunition, and very injurious to the efficiency of troops. This evil can only be stopped by positively refusing to answer any requisitions for or propositions to sell new and untried arms, and steadily adhering to the rule of uniformity of arms for all troops of the same kind, such as cavalry, artillery, infantry. The U. S. muskets as now made have no superior arms in the world. I say this with confidence, from my entire familiarity with the manufacture of these arms, and from the fact that the celebrated Enfield rifle of England is the result of a long visit and minute examination and close study of the arms made at Springfield Armory and of the machinery and tools and mode of conducting operations there, by three British officers, who were selected by their Government for the special service. They had the machinery for the Enfield Armory made in the vicinity of Springfield from U. S. patterns, and they engaged the services of several of the armory mechanics, one to take the general charge of the Enfield works as master-armorer, and others to take charge of the stocking, forging, and other principal departments of manufacture. It is, in my opinion, decidedly objectionable to enter into contracts for any other arms than those of the regular U. S. patterns. Although there are many persons urgent and clamorous for contracts, and ready to promise the delivery of any kind of arms, of any patterns, and in a short time, I know of none, and I do not believe there are any, who have the requisite machinery, tools, and fixtures for making such arms, and but few who can prepare them in less than one year’s time. Even Mr. Colt, who has the most complete private armory in the United States or probably elsewhere, and greater means and facilities for commencing the fabrication of the Government pattern arms than any one else, states that it will require six months for him to make the first delivery. All who seek these contracts want orders for large quantities of arms, which I consider it certain they will not be able to deliver under many years’ time, not probably until the present demand for them is over. The Government, however, will be bound to take and pay for all these arms. The best and only proper course to pursue in this matter is, in my opinion, to make no contract now for more than 25,000 arms, with a stringent condition in regard to the time of delivery-I should say {p.265} an entire forfeiture of the contract. In this way the ability of each contractor to meet his engagements, both as regards time and the quality of his work, will be ascertained, when additional contracts may be given to those who prove themselves worthy, and the Government will thus obtain arms without disappointment and without involving itself in unnecessary liabilities. The present capacity of Springfield Armory is the product of about 2,500 arms per month, and measures are in rapid progress to double at least that product, with orders to put no limit to the extent of work. The cost of the rifled muskets made there is $13.93 each, including the bullet-molds, screw-drivers, wipers, and spring vices. I have little doubt they will be made for less than $13.

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Ordnance.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 11, 1861.

Governor O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana:

SIR: It has been determined to accept six additional regiments of volunteers from Indiana, to be mustered into service for three years, or during the war, according to the plan of organization in General Orders, No. 15, of which regiments those of Col. James W. McMillan and Col. William L. Brown shall be received, and the remaining four to be designated by Your Excellency. All of said regiments when mustered into service, or if the whole number are not mustered such as are, to report to Major-General McClellan.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., June 11, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

By Friday evening the four regiments of three-years’ men from Indiana will be completely organized, armed, uniformed, and equipped for the field. Two are stationed at Indianapolis, one at Terre Haute, and one at La Fayette. I have also two regiments and one battalion of five companies of State troops enlisted for one year, armed, uniformed, and equipped, ready to take the field.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

[JUNE 11, 1861.-For Cameron to Lyon, authorizing enlistment of loyal citizens of State of Missouri, &c., see Series I, Vol. III, p. 384.]

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 12, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:

GENERAL: The President has just learned from the Governor of Ohio of the existence of much dissatisfaction and an increasing excitement among the volunteers at Camp Dennison, growing out of the {p.266} partial conversion of the original regiments of three-months’ volunteers into regiments organized for three-years’ service.

The President greatly regrets this state of things; he only consented to the measure of endeavoring to convert the three-months’ into as many three-years’ regiments upon such urgent representations, addressed to him by the authorities and by influential citizens of the State of Ohio, of such being the unanimous desire of the volunteers themselves, that he could not doubt but that, in yielding to the solicitations thus made to him, he was deferring, in fact, to the popular will. As the result unfortunately has not been in unison with the anticipations which he had been led to form, and since it appears that serious consequences are apprehended at Camp Dennison unless promptly diverted by the application of some effectual remedy, there remains but to see what remedy will best apply to so embarrassing a case. That proposed by the Governor of disbanding the three-months’ men, after paying them off, does not meet with the President’s approval. In his view this would not only be to disappoint too rudely the patriotic ardor of these gallant volunteers, but it would be a breach of the public faith under which they were induced to volunteer their services. Upon reflection, therefore, the President has decided that the three-months’ men who had been thrown out from their old regiments in consequence of refusing to engage for the term of three years, shall be at once restored to and incorporated into their former regiments and companies, with the same rank, on the same footing, and upon the same terms precisely, in every respect, as when they were thrown out, and with this single difference between them and their new comrades, that their term of service will of course be for a shorter period, and that their old officers and non-commissioned officers who shall be re-enlisted with them will take rank next after those of the same grade already appointed over these three-years’ men.

A large excess over the organization prescribed for the three-years’ regiments will be in this way occasioned, but it is foreseen and fully sanctioned. All recruiting for these regiments, however, will be instantly stopped, nor will it be resumed until after they shall have fallen below the standard prescribed for regiments of three-years’ service, either by the disbandment of the three-months’ men upon the expiration of their term of service or by the ordinary casualties of service. Nor shall any more officers or non-commissioned officers be elected or appointed in any of these regiments until after the number mustered with the regiments shall have fallen below the complement prescribed in General Orders, No. 15. Then, and not before, vacancies may be again filled in the manner laid down in that order.

I am, general, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 12, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN:

SIR: You will muster into service for two years all the regiments or companies which have been enrolled into the State service by the Governor of New York, the number so to be mustered mot to exceed twenty-two regiments. This order is issued with the understanding with Governor Morgan that the regiments mustered and to be mustered shall move forward to the command of Major-General Patterson within three days from this date, and that about one regiment daily thereafter shall {p.267} so move forward until all are forwarded. If this understanding be interfered with by the want of arms to supply the regiments when otherwise ready to move forward, you are authorized to make a requisition on the Springfield Armory for the arms necessary to supply the deficiency.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 12, 1861.

Col. W. B. FRANKLIN, U. S. Army:

SIR: The President having accepted the five regiments of volunteers tendered by General Sickles, you will muster the same into the service of the United States for three years, or during the war, and on being so mustered into service make report thereof to the Department.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ELMIRA, N. Y., June 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report my arrival at this place yesterday morning, and to submit the following statement of the strength and condition of the volunteer forces assembled here:

The aggregate is 5,422 officers and men, consisting of seven regiments under the command of Brig. Gen. R. B. Van Valkenburgh, of the State militia. Two of these regiments (the Twenty-first and Twenty sixth) have been mustered into the service of the United States for three months. The remaining five are volunteers in the service of the State for two years. The Twenty-first and Twenty-sixth are supplied with arms, accouterments, uniform clothing, and camp and garrison-equipage; are in good order and under fine discipline, considering the short time they have been in service. They could take the field at short notice. They are willing to be mustered in for two years, and probably two-thirds of the Twenty-first would go for three years or during the war. It is also the anxious desire of the remaining five regiments to enter the U. S. service for two years: They will be supplied with clothing and arms within two weeks’ time.

The instructions for the mustering officer at this point are not recent or definite, and I respectfully request that instructions may be sent to me with reference to these terms of two and three years. Applications have been made to me to muster in some additional men for the three-months’ regiments already formed; but as they are already up to the minimum strength required I have declined, as it would only add to a useless body of men and to the expense of the Government.

I cannot conclude without asking leave to mention something of the appearance and condition of the quarters occupied by the troops. The grounds about the place are eminently favorable for large encampments of troops, affording excellent facilities for drills and exercises and easy access to an abundance of pure water. The most favorable locations have been selected and quarters erected for the troops upon a grand scale. They are constructed of boards, and great attention has been {p.268} paid to uniformity and regularity. Buildings for the different companies of each regiment, ninety feet in length by eighteen in width, arranged in parallel lines and at uniform distances from each other, with fine parade and drill grounds in front, and officers’ quarters and mess halls in rear, present a magnificent appearance. In the quarters the bunks are arranged with great uniformity, and each regiment has a mess hall in which the entire regiment can be seated at once. In the kitchens the same comfortable regularity prevails, the cooking being done by steam supplied from small engines and boilers in the most expeditious and wholesome manner. Everything that could contribute to the discipline and comfort of the troops has been done in a very systematic and expeditious manner through the indefatigable exertions of the general commanding them, aided by his quartermaster, Colonel Walker.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. W. AVERELL, Second Lieutenant, Regiment Mounted Rifles.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., June 12, 1861.

General HIRAM WALBRIDGE, New York:

SIR: In relation to that energetic method of prosecuting the war which you suggest I have to say that if you can procure, in addition to the last requisition upon this State for six regiments-which will undoubtedly be in the field by the end of this month-a further requisition for ten regiments, thoroughly armed, equipped, clothed, and provided with tents, baggage train, rations, and subsistence stores, these advances will be made by this State and such a requisition answered to the letter within forty days from the reception of the order here; men enlisted for three years, unless sooner discharged. We have already enlisted organized companies enough to make six regiments of the ten referred to as a proposed requisition, and entirely independent of the six regiments already ordered and of any troops now in the field.

I am, very truly, your friend and servant,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

–––

SAINT PAUL, MINN., June 12, 1861.

General S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

First Minnesota Regiment, Colonel Gorman, is ready for marching orders. If wanted, answer.

RAMSEY, Governor.

–––

SAINT PAUL MINN., June 13 [12], 1861.

General S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Do you want a Minnesota regiment? If so, Colonel Gorman’s is well drilled and armed and can be in Washington in ten days. A full new regiment could not be got up in ten days, but I can have the forts relieved in less time. Answer.

RAMSEY, Governor.

{p.269}

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 13, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: There is, it seems, a regiment in Massachusetts commanded by Fletcher Webster, and which Hon. Daniel Webster’s old friends very much wish to get into the service. If it can be received with the approval of your Department and the consent of the Governor of Massachusetts I shall indeed be much gratified. Give Mr. Ashmun a chance to explain fully.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 13, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: I think it is entirely safe to accept a fifth regiment from Michigan, and with your approbation I should say a regiment presented by Col. T. B. W. Stockton, ready for service within two weeks from now, will be received. Look at Colonel Stockton’s testimonials.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 13, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: This Department Wishes to procure from France a sample of Napoleon gun, or one of each caliber, both rifled and smooth bored, if there be more than one caliber and kind. Will you be so good as to make known to the U. S. minister at Paris the wishes of the Department in this respect and to request his aid in carrying them out? As you will see by the inclosed copy of a letter from Mr. Forbes,* Mr. W. S. Stilman is recommended as a suitable agent to procure the sample gun or guns.

As regards payment, I would suggest, as probably the most convenient way, that our minister be authorized to make a draft on this Department for the amount, to be charged to appropriation for ordnance and ordnance stores and supplies. It will be well to procure also samples of projectiles for rifled cannon of different kinds, if there be more than one, which are used in the French service, with notes as to the modes of rifling both field and heavy cannon and of using them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Omitted.

–––

DETROIT, MICH., June 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Third Michigan Regiment leaves to-day for Washington via Cleveland, Harrisburg, and Baltimore, fully equipped and armed, including ammunition.

JOHN ROBERTSON, Adjutant-General.

{p.270}

–––

SAINT PAUL, MINN., June 13, 1861.

General S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Please answer my dispatch of yesterday. The regiment can be with you in ten days, if wanted, and the forts supplied.

RAMSEY, Governor.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 13, 1861-4 p.m.

Governor ALEXANDER RAMSEY, Saint Paul, Minn.:

If your regiment that is ready has been mustered into service for three years, or during the war, it may come at once on to Washington, by way of Harrisburg.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 13, 1861.

General E. M. BIDDLE, Adjutant-General Pennsylvania, Harrisburg:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to inform you that the Chief of the Ordnance Bureau of this Department has been this day ordered to forward to the address of Governor Curtin, at Harrisburg, smooth-bore muskets to supply the fifteen regiments of volunteers now enrolled and in the service of your State.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, June 14, 1861.

H. BERDAN, Esq.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief, under the reference to him of the subject of sharpshooters by His Excellency the President and the honorable Secretary of War, as set forth in your letter of June 13, 1861, desires me to say he was very favorably impressed with you personally; that a regiment of such sharpshooters as are proposed by you, and instructed according to your system, would be of great value and could be advantageously employed by him in the public service.

Respectfully, yours,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON, Lieutenant-Colonel and Military Secretary.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 14, 1861.

Lieut. W. W. AVERELL, Mounted Rifles, Elmira, N.Y.:

SIR: Your report of your arrival at Elmira, condition of troops, barracks, &c., has been received at this office. With regard to the regiments {p.271} which have entered the service of the State for two years, with a view of being mustered into the service of the United States for the same period, a recent decision of the War Department authorizes their acceptance. You will, therefore, when cases of this kind occur, muster them into the service for two years.

By order:

W. D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HARTFORD, CONN., June 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The three-years’ regiment will be ready in a few days, and I will forward the same, and advise you as requested.

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

BOSTON, MASS., June 14, 1861.

A. LINCOLN, President of the United States:

DEAR SIR: Fletcher Webster has raised a capital regiment. It is well organized and well officered. Its lieutenant-colonel, Cruiger [Bryan?], a West Pointer. Governor Andrew can’t well accept it as one of the six. Do, I pray you, accept it. Telegraph me at once.

HENRY WILSON, U. S. Senate.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 14, 1861-4.11 p.m.

Hon. HENRY WILSON, Boston, Mass.:

I refer you to Governor Andrew. If he is agreed, Mr. Webster’s regiment shall be accepted in addition to the six already accepted. It may be mustered into service for the war.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1861.

Hon. AUSTIN BLAIR, Governor of Michigan:

SIR: A regiment under command of Col. T. B. W. Stockton, of Michigan, has been offered to this Department for acceptance to serve for three years or during the war. The President is willing to accept this regiment if it meets with your approbation, and if it can be got ready for service, full, the roughly organized and uniformed within two weeks from this date.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.272}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 14, 1861-10.50 a.m.

Governor RAMSEY, Saint Paul:

Send to Harrisburg to await further orders Colonel Gorman’s regiment. Replace the companies at the forts with companies of the Second Regiment. Report the day the regiment will be at Harrisburg.

S. CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

MADISON, WIS., June 14, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Second Regiment will start on Tuesday, the 18th of June. We have no arms. Where will they be procured? Fully provided otherwise.

A. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., June 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: General McClellan has just sent the following dispatch to General L. Thomas:

In Secretary’s order of May 30, authorizing five companies of cavalry and artillery to be mustered in Illinois, the Governor interprets it as meaning five companies of each. What is the intention? I think the service requires at least five companies of each arm, and hope that is the intention. There are in all ten cavalry companies raised by the State of Illinois. I would recommend that all be accepted by the General Government.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

Now, Mr. Cameron, please do get General Scott to accept my ten cavalry companies. We want to be fully ready to take the starch out of the Missouri secession chivalry.

Very respectfully,

RICHD. YATES, Governor.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., June 15, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I think it proper to acquaint you of the difficulties encountered in procuring the requisite supply of ammunition for the volunteer regiments which the Executive of this State has engaged to put in motion for the field in the next ten days. If there should be any failure to comply with the terms of the arrangement made by the Governor when in Washington, it will be for want of ammunition, as the regiments should not move without a supply. I send herewith a copy of my letter of the 14th instant to the Chief of Ordnance respecting ammunition for Enfield rifles, and hope the request to have it supplied by the Ordnance Department will be complied with.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

{p.273}

[Inclosure.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., June 14, 1861.

CHIEF OF THE ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I beg to inform you that the authorities of this State have ordered the purchase and manufacture of 20,000 Enfield rifles and muskets, some of which have been received from England, and with which one regiment of volunteers have already been armed. The issue of this arm will be made from time to time to the troops of this State, and as the supply of the proper kind of ammunition is important, I inquired of the commanding officer at Watervliet whether it could be fabricated by him, and he said it could not. I ought to say that the caliber of the arms already received is .57, and that 100,000 rounds have been furnished to the regiment having the arms; but to continue the preparation of this ammunition and send it forward to regiments in the field is what can hardly be expected from this State. I therefore respectfully ask whether the Ordnance Department will undertake to furnish this ammunition as it does in other cases. It is to be regretted that the caliber is .57, but that was the only arm that could be purchased ready made. Those to be fabricated will be .58, so that the ordinary ammunition can be used. An early reply by telegraph is respectfully asked.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Ill., June 16, 1861.

Hon. ABRAHAM LINCOLN:

DEAR SIR: When at Washington you were of the opinion that no more troops would be accepted from Illinois. The recent movements in Tennessee and Missouri, I am sure, will change your views on this subject. The hard fighting in this war is to be dome on the Ohio and Mississippi, with the Tennesseeans and Missourians, and I think you will yet receive every man in Illinois who will volunteer for the war.

In view of the change of your programme to meet the necessities of the case, I wish to recommend the acceptance of the “Yates Phalanx,” a regiment composed of hardy mechanics and substantial citizens of Chicago. The colonel of the regiment was in Washington to urge their claims some three weeks ago, but could not get access to the Departments. I hope this regiment may be accepted. Its ten companies are full (there will be no deception on this point) and ready and eager for the fight. They have made application to get into the Missouri army without success. Do, if possible, accept this regiment.

Truly, yours,

RICHD. YATES.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 16, 1861.

Hon. A. W. RANDALL, Madison, Wis.:

If the Second Regiment does not get its arms before leaving, it will be supplied with them here.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.274}

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 17, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: With your concurrence, and that of the Governor of Indiana, I am in favor of accepting into what we call the three-years’ service any number not exceeding four additional regiments from that State. Probably they should come from the triangular region between the Ohio and Wabash Rivers, including my own old boyhood home. Please see Hon. C. M. Allen, Speaker of the Indiana House of Representatives, and unless you perceive good reasons to the contrary, draw up an order for him according to the above.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 17, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: With your concurrence, and that of the Governor of Ohio, I am in favor of receiving into what we call the three-years’ service any number not exceeding six additional regiments from that State, unless you perceive good reasons to the contrary. Please see Hon. John A. Gurley, who bears this, and make an order corresponding with the above.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 17, 1861.

RODMAN G. MOULTON, Manchester, England:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo, with inclosures, informing me of the shipment of the guns necessary to complete the battery of Whitworth cannon, together with ammunition and machine for manufacturing projectiles, which have been presented to the Government of the United States by a large number of American citizens now resident abroad. Rest assured, sir, that the Government will take good care to place this battery in the hands of those who know how to make it serve the patriotic purposes of the donors.

Thanking you for your kind attention in keeping the Department advised as to the shipment of these guns,

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON, June 14, 1861.

Memorandum of battery of six guns, Whitworth cannon with carriages, ammunition, &c., presented to the Government of the United States by American citizens in Europe, consigned to H. F. Spaulding, city of New York; all charges paid to the port of New York.

Arrived per steamer Persia, May 22: Two guns without carriages, 100 rounds projectiles, canister, wads, and fuse (no probe). Arrived per City of Washington (steamer) June 8: Two guns with carriages, 800 {p.275} rounds as above. Shipped per steamer City of Baltimore, sailed June 5, due about 20th: Two guns with four carriages, 1,700 rounds as above, to complete the battery of six, to arrive per - some time in July, a machine and all its parts capable of making 200 projectiles a day for the use of these guns.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 17, 1861.

HIRAM WALBRIDGE, New York:

SIR: I have read with pleasure the letter of His Excellency Governor John A. Andrew, addressed to you under date of the 12th instant, stating that if you can procure a further requisition by the Government for ten additional regiments from the State of Massachusetts besides the last requisition for six, they will within forty days be sent, thoroughly armed, equipped, clothed, and provided with tents, baggage train, rations, and subsistence stores; men enlisted for three years, unless sooner discharged.

You will please advise Governor Andrew that the necessary requisition will immediately be made, and for your action in the premises accept the thanks of this Department.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

NEW YORK, June 17, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

DEAR SIR: The Hon. Robert Dale Owen is authorized to present for your consideration our cavalry regiment being now raised upon the border. It will be composed of the best material both in men and horses. Mr. Owen will present to you the peculiar claims and condition of the border, differing from the border of any other State. I trust Your Excellency may find it consistent with your views and the public interest to accept of this regiment.

Very respectfully,

O. P. MORTON.

[Indorsement.]

JUNE 22, 1861.

If agreeable to the Secretary of War, I approve the receiving one of the regiments already accepted from Indiana, organized and equipped as a cavalry regiment.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 17, 1861.

His Excellency CHARLES ROBINSON, Governor of Kansas:

SIR: The Department will accept for three years or during the war two regiments of volunteers from Kansas in addition to the one commanded by Colonel Deitzler and mustered already into service, said regiments so accepted to be the ones commanded by Colonels Phillips and Mitchell, respectively, and the mustering officer ordered by the Adjutant-General to muster them into service is hereby directed to make {p.276} such requisitions as may be necessary to supply them with arms, ammunition, clothing, &c., they may require, and also to supply any deficiency that may exist in Colonel Deitzler’s regiment.

Respectfully, yours,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

DETROIT, MICH., June 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Fourth Regiment of Michigan Infantry is mustered into U. S. service, and ready to march if it has arms and accouterments. Can they be forwarded to it immediately?

AUSTIN BLAIR, Governor of Michigan.

–––

CONCORD, N. H., June 18, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Second Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers, numbering 1,046 men, with camp equipage and baggage train, are ready for service. Unless orders are received to the contrary, the regiment will leave Portsmouth June 20, and will proceed directly to Washington as per your order of June 3.

NATHANIEL S. BERRY, Governor of New Hampshire.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT Washington, June 18, 1861.

Hon. CHARLES S. OLDEN, Governor of New Jersey, Trenton:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter covering copies of resolutions of the Legislature of New Jersey, urging upon the General Government “the necessity of taking the necessary steps to complete the battery now under contract with the Messrs. Stevens in the shortest practicable time.”

The subject referred to in the resolutions is one of acknowledged importance, and demands, and will receive, the earnest attention of this Department. It will be necessary, however, to have the action of Congress upon it before any decisive steps are taken, and it will accordingly be referred to that body for its consideration when it assembles in extra session on the 4th of July next.

With the highest respect, I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, N. Y., June 18, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to inform you that Colonels Ward’s (Thirty-eighth) and Matheson’s (Thirty-second) Regiments New York State Volunteers will leave New York for the seat of war on the 19th {p.277} instant; C. E. Pratt’s (Thirty-first) on the 20th; Lansing’s (Seventeenth) on the 21st, and McCunn’s (Thirty-seventh) on the 22d instant. Colonel Christian’s (Twenty-sixth) will leave Elmira on the 21st.

The Governor, when in Washington, understood it was the wish of the Secretary of War that the regiments should all be sent to General Patterson’s command, but after his return to Albany a telegram asked that the several regiments at Elmira should be sent to Washington via Harrisburg. Being not then ready because not mustered, and because ammunition was not furnished in season by the United States, regiments were ordered from New York City instead. Thinking it probable that Colonel Franklin, U. S. Army, in New York, is in possession of the Secretary of War’s views as to the destination of these regiments, I have directed the brigadier-general in command of the New York depot to confer with him on the subject before dispatching the regiments to the seat of war.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MEREDITH READ, JR., Adjutant-General.

–––

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, June 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Herewith I have the honor to inclose for your information a transcript of a dispatch from our minister resident in Belgium, Mr. Sanford, of the 21st [25th] of May. His suggestions are commended to your consideration.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, Brussels, May 25, 1861.

SIR: In view of the manifest want of arms in the United States to meet the present emergency, I have made inquiries here and at other points as to the means of supply, and have come to the conclusion that no considerable amount of arms of modern pattern can be procured in Europe at first hands. All the great centers of manufacture of which I have any knowledge are without any stock on hand of importance, and are far-behind their orders. All Europe is arming in view of the probabilities of war, and this fact and the change of the old musket for the modern rifled gun have caused an extraordinary activity in this branch of manufacture, and the demand seems to be far in advance of the supply, and this has led to speculation and enhanced prices. The principal workshops in this country are in and about Liege, and their productive capacity-which is, however, rapidly increasing-is now about 10,000 per week. They are mostly employed by foreign Governments, Piedmont being a large customer, and the English Government having contracted there for 180,000-the cost being there less than in England, say from 35 to 40 francs, according to completeness and finish. I learn also on inquiry that the markets at Saint Etienne, in France, are all overburdened with orders, and that the prices have advanced from 42 francs (the Government regulation price) to 78 for the Minie, Government pattern. The capacity of supply of the two principal centers for the manufacture of arms in England is about the same as at Liege, but a large trade is carried on in Birmingham in guns bought here and in Germany.

{p.278}

There is a large cannon foundry in Liege, where the Government manufactures rifled cannon, and has sold them to various Governments. In answer to my application the Minister of War informs me that they will sell no more, having determined to employ their works to their full capacity for the change in that arm which the Government is about to make in its service, and that they will thus be employed for two years. I presume that any desired amount of cannon of old pattern (smoothbore) could be purchased of different Governments, and it strikes me that the most expeditious method of supplying ourselves with rifled cannon would be to procure these and have them rifled in our own workshops. I have little doubt that some rifled cannon, but not in large quantities, can be procured in Prussia and Sweden. They furnished many for the war in Piedmont. The iron guns of the latter are esteemed the best of that material in Europe. The steel cannon made in Prussia surpass anything of the kind yet known. I have already informed you of the rule of the French Government respecting parting with rifled cannon; it will part with none. I think that we might procure from it as a great favor 25,000 or 30,000 Minie rifles. Such was the impression drawn from my conversation with M. Thouvenel on the subject.

It seems to me highly important that an agent acquainted with the language and authorities should be employed to go immediately to Northern Europe, to see what could be procured of the various German Governments or that of Sweden and at the private manufactories. Speculation will soon be excited in view of this new demand from the United States, and the prices will be greatly augmented. As an instance in point, I will mention that an order was given but last week in Birmingham for 20,000 muskets for one of our States at £5 apiece, the price of which the day previous was £2 lOs., and it is to be presumed that these merchants will make speculative purchases over Europe to meet the new demand from-our side of the Atlantic.

There is one other subject in this connection which I deem not inappropriate to bring to your notice. I observe that the President is about to increase very largely the number of men in the standing or Regular Army. It has occurred to me that in view of the preference likely to be given to the volunteer service, and the consequent difficulty of procuring a sufficient number of army recruits through the ordinary channels at home, it might be advisable to seek them elsewhere. The German Legion of 10,000 men for the Crimean war was recruited by England in Hamburg, and were excellent soldiers. I have no doubt the same number of able-bodied men who have been in the army could be obtained there now in a few weeks for the bounty of steerage passage to the United States. I have many applications, as I doubt not have all our legations and consulates in Northern Europe, from men desirous of serving in our Army-among these quite a large proportion of officers and If am certain there would be no difficulty in procuring, if desired, large numbers of soldiers who have seen active service in the army.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

H. S. SANFORD.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

SIR: Recent liberal issues of muskets have reduced our stock below what it ought to be to meet prospective demands. There should be {p.279} an additional supply of 100,000 at least of the latest pattern, as made at the Springfield Armory, and they should be obtained with the least delay possible. The U. S. Armory cannot be relied on now for more than 3,000 muskets per month, and it will be necessary to resort to contracts. In this connection I would respectfully refer to the notes on the subject of contracting for small-arms which were recently prepared here, were commended to your acceptance and firm adherence by Lieutenant-General Scott, and were approved by you. The following extract from those notes indicates the material points to be observed, viz:

It is in my opinion decidedly objectionable to enter into contracts for any other arms than those of the regular U. S. patterns. The best and only proper course to be pursued in this matter is, in my opinion, to make no contract now (with any one person) for more than 25,000 arms, with a stringent condition in regard to the time of delivery-I should say an entire forfeiture of the contract. In this way the ability of each contractor to meet his engagements, both as regards time and the quality of his work, will be ascertained, when additional contracts may be given to those who prove themselves worthy of receiving them.

If four contracts for the above number of muskets, to be made exactly according to the latest Springfield pattern so as to interchange in all their parts with arms of that pattern and with each other, can be made and executed in nine months, or as much sooner as possible, it will be advisable to do so. As regards the price, I consider the time of the delivery of the arms as more important than their cost. They can be made for $12 each, including appendages, but a liberal profit on the cost should be allowed. The present cost at the U. S. Armory is $13.93.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 19, 1861.

His Excellency O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana:

SIR: By order of the President this Department will, with your consent, accept any number, not exceeding four, additional regiments from your State to serve during the war, and to be selected by you. It is, however, the desire of the President that these regiments shall be made up and taken from the First, Second, and Third Congressional districts of the State, and this order is given with that expectation.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 19, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa:

SIR: This Department, with your approval, will accept, in addition to the two regiments already mustered, four regiments to serve during the war, to wit: One regiment of cavalry, commanded by Colonel Warren, and three regiments of infantry, commanded respectively by Colonels Dodge, Worthington, and McDowell; the cavalry regiment and the infantry regiments commanded by Colonels Worthington and McDowell to be mustered into service at Burlington, and that commanded by Colonel Dodge at Council Bluffs.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.280}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 19, 1861-3.20 p.m.

Governor ANDREW, Boston:

With your approval the Department will accept Colonel Webster’s regiment, and have it immediately mustered and ordered on to Washington.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WHEELING, VA., June 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

DEAR SIR: We have, under order received in reply to my dispatch to you and Mr. Chase, a regiment about full, at Clarksburg, with two companies of cavalry. Arms and equipments for both foot and horse companies are wanted. May I beg you to forward them at once, as delay in getting them tends to discourage enlistments, while the men armed and well equipped and drilled have the opposite effect. From present indications our section is to be made the Flanders of the war, and I want as many of our people as possible in the service. I hope it may be in your power to send us the same gun as the 2,000 you gave Mr. Applegate, of Wellsburg, and with which Colonel Kelley’s regiment and the troops on the island, mustered in by Major Oakes, are armed, with at least 50 or 100 rounds of cartridges to each. Send cartridge-boxes, &c. The guns, &c., can be sent to me, care J. B. Ford, agent, Wheeling, Va. I will see they get to Clarksburg.

Sincerely hoping your health is entirely restored, I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

JNO. S. CARLILE.

P. S.-May I beg the favor of an early reply.

J. S. C.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 19. 1861-4 p.m.

Governor A. W. RANDALL, Madison, Wis.:

This Department accepts the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Regiments to serve during the war, if ready to be at once mustered, and this will authorize in that event the U. S. mustering officer to muster them into service.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

EXECUTIVE MANSION, June 20, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: Since you spoke to me yesterday about General J. H. Lane, of Kansas, I have been reflecting upon the subject, and have concluded that we need the services of such a man out there at once; that we better appoint him a brigadier-general of volunteers to-day, and send him off with such authority to raise a force (I think two regiments better than three, but as to this I am not particular) as you think {p.281} will get him into actual work quickest. Tell him when he starts to put it through. Not be writing or telegraphing back here, but put it through.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

[Indorsement.]

General Lane has been authorized to raise two additional regiments of volunteers.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 20, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: I am directed to say to you that when instructions were sent from this office not to discharge three-months’ men from your Ohio regiments reorganized for three years, contrary to their own wishes, it was not designed to encourage them to remain, or that you should take back men already discharged or sent home on furlough, but, on the contrary, that they should be encouraged to quit the service so far as this might be done without compromising the good faith of the Government.

If they persist in remaining for the full time they have engaged to serve, they must be permitted to do so, but in such case it is suggested that you had better form them into a detachment or detachments separate from the three-years’ men.

In relation to the authority of the Governor of Ohio over your troops, I am directed to remind you that as soon as the men are sworn into the service of the United States your command over them becomes absolute and exclusive.

I am also directed to inform you that the generals of three-months’ militia have no different relation to three-years’ volunteers from that which they hold to the regular forces.

I am, general, &c.,

A. BAIRD, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Hartford, Conn., June 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: In consequence of delay in receiving officers of the Army to take charge of the battalion which Colonel Colt proposed to arm with rifles the soldiers have become disaffected, and now decline going into the Regular Army of the United States. As they had not been sworn into the service of the Government I had no power to hold them. I have therefore been under the necessity of appointing their officers and organizing them into a regiment of volunteers for three years. I much regret this, but under the circumstances this course was unavoidable.

I am, dear sir, yours, with high regard,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

{p.282}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 20, 1861.

Governor YATES, Springfield, Ill.:

Will accept your ten companies of cavalry, if ready immediately to be mustered into service.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON CITY, June 20, 1861.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN, President:

SIR: I tender and ask the acceptance for service for three years or during the war the following regiments of troops from Kansas in addition to the three regiments from that State heretofore accepted, viz:

One regiment of infantry, including two companies cavalry and two companies artillery, Col. James Montgomery. One regiment of infantry, including two companies cavalry and two companies artillery, Col. William Weer. General Cameron concurs with me in the existing necessity for two additional regiments, and will cheerfully make the order on your suggestion.

Respectfully,

J. H. LANE.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 20, 1861.

General JAMES H. LANE:

DEAR SIR: This Department will accept two regiments for three years or during the war in addition to the three regiments the Department has already agreed to accept from the Governor of Kansas, to be raised and organized by you in Kansas. Orders will be given to muster the same into service immediately on being ready to be so mustered, and on being mustered the requisite arms, &c., will be furnished on the requisition of the mustering officer, who is hereby authorized to make the same.

By order of the President:

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

BOSTON, MASS., June 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have just received a telegram from Hiram Walbridge stating that the President authorizes him to announce to me that ten additional regiments will be immediately called from Massachusetts. This is most gratifying intelligence. Please telegraph me at once official requisition, so as to justify my making contracts immediately for outfits.

JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor.

–––

WASHINGTON, June 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: His Excellency Governor Austin Blair, of Michigan, in a letter to me under date of the 15th instant, in expressing an earnest {p.283} desire to have the State of Michigan allowed an opportunity of increasing her active forces in the service of the United States, states:

Now what I want is to be allowed to furnish four more regiments just as soon as the Government please if they will furnish the arms, and if they cannot, then as soon as I can get them, which I imagine can be done in a reasonable time.

Should you believe the public interest promoted by the acceptance of the regiments to which the Governor refers, I am confident they would be inferior to no troops in the field, and it would be regarded with pleasure by him and the worthy and gallant people he represents.

Yours, truly,

H. WALBRIDGE.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 20, 1861-11.20 a.m.

Governor BLAIR, Lansing, Mich.:

Send on your Fourth Regiment by Elmira and Harrisburg. They can be furnished with arms, &c., here or, if necessary, at Harrisburg.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

PORTSMOUTH, N. H., June 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Second Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers left Portsmouth for Washington at 8.30 this morning.

GILMAN MARSTON.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 20, 1861.

Col. JOHN W. GEARY, Philadelphia, Pa.:

Whenever your regiment, either at Philadelphia or any other place, is fully ready to be mustered an order will be issued to do it.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

DEAR SIR: In accordance with your request, made to me orally on the morning of the 6th of June, I have examined the apparatus and witnessed the balloon experiments of Mr. Lowe, and have come to the following conclusions:

First. The balloon prepared by Mr. Lowe, inflated with ordinary street gas, will retain its charge for several days.

Second. In an inflated condition it can be towed by a few men along an ordinary road or over fields in ordinarily calm weather from the places where it is filled to another twenty or more miles distant.

Third. It can be let up into the air by means of a rope in a calm day to a height sufficient to observe the country for twenty miles around and more, according to the degree of clearness of the atmosphere. The ascent may also be made at night and the camp lights of the enemy observed.

{p.284}

Fourth. From experiments made here for the first time it is conclusively proved that telegrams can be sent with ease and certainty between the balloon and the quarters of the commanding officer.

Fifth. I feel assured, although I have not witnessed the experiment, that when the surface wind is from the east, as it was for several days last week, an observer in the balloon can be made to float nearly to the enemy’s camp (as it is now situated, to the west of us), or even to float over it, and then return eastward by rising to a higher elevation. This assumption is based on the fact that the upper strata of wind in this latitude is always flowing eastward. Mr. Lowe informs me, and I do not doubt his statement, that he will on any day which is favorable make an excursion of the kind above mentioned.

Sixth. From all the facts I have observed and the information I have gathered I am sure that important information may be obtained in regard to the topography of the country and to the position and movements of an enemy by means of the balloon, and that Mr. Lowe is well qualified to render service in this way by the balloon now in his possession.

Seventh. The balloon which Mr. Lowe now has in Washington can only be inflated in a city where street gas is to be obtained. If an exploration is required at a point too distant for the transportation of the inflated balloon, an additional apparatus for the generation of hydrogen gas will be required. The necessity of generating the gas renders the use of the balloon more expensive, but this, where important results are required, is of comparatively small importance.

For these preliminary experiments, as you may recollect, a sum not to exceed $200 or $250 was to be appropriated, and in accordance with this Mr. Lowe has presented me with the inclosed statement of items,* which I think are reasonable, since nothing is charged for labor and time of the aeronaut.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH HENRY, Secretary Smithsonian Institution.

* Omitted.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 21, 1861.

Governor ISRAEL WASHBURN, Jr., Augusta, Me.:

Oblige me with a statement of the number of regiments organized by you in your State and mustered into service for the war, and the number accepted by this Department not yet mustered, if any, and when these will be ready to muster.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Sent also to the Governors of the following-named States: Goodwin, Governor of New Hampshire; Fairbanks, Governor of Vermont; Buckingham, Governor of Connecticut; Andrew, Governor of Massachusetts; Morgan, Governor of New York; Olden, Governor of New Jersey; Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania; Dennison, Governor of Ohio; Blair, Governor of Michigan; Randall, Governor of Wisconsin; Kirkwood, Governor of Iowa; Ramsey, Governor of Minnesota; Morton, Governor of Indiana; Yates, Governor of Illinois.)

{p.285}

–––

NORWICH, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

Only one regiment from this State accepted and mustered for the war. No other accepted. Can give you one in ten days and another in about thirty. Will you accept them?

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM, Governor of Connecticut.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Norwich, Conn., June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your telegram was received to-day, inquiring the number of regiments organized by this State and mustered into the service for the war and the number accepted by the War Department not mustered, if any, and when they will be ready..

I replied by telegraph, and repeat the answer, that I have received from your Department a call for only one regiment for three years, and that has been mustered into the service, and is now in the field. I can probably have another regiment organized, uniformed, and armed (but not drilled and disciplined) in ten days, and another in less than thirty days, and two others soon after. How many will you receive? Advise me, and your requisition shall have my prompt and earnest attention. Address me at Hartford.

Yours, with high regard,

WM. A. BUCKINGHAM.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 21, 1861.

Hon. R. YATES, Springfield, Ill.:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th instant. Immediately upon its receipt I telegraphed you that your regiment of cavalry would be accepted as soon as it was ready to be mustered in, and further answer by mail is therefore unnecessary.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

Ten regiments have been mustered for three years. Two more will be mustered by the 24th. The regiments for three months at Cairo ready to be mustered. I desire to tender you ten more regiments, full. They can be mustered as soon as mustering officers able to do it. Do accept them. Our arms are the old altered muskets, unfit for service, and more than one-third in hands of troops are not nippled. Send us at least 10,000 stand of best arms. Please answer immediately.

RICHD. YATES.

–––

DAVENPORT, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

There have been mustered into service in this State one regiment for three months and two regiments for the war. Telegram from G. M.

{p.286}

Dodge from Washington on yesterday says you have accepted three additional infantry regiments and one of cavalry from this State. Is it correct? Think I can have them at rendezvous in two weeks from to-day.

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

AUGUSTA, ME., June 21, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON:

Six regiments organized, four of which are in Washington. The fifth is accepted and marches next Wednesday. The sixth is accepted and will march seven or ten days later. No others organized, but intend to raise another or more if desired.

I. WASHBURN, JR., Governor of Maine.

–––

BOSTON, MASS., June 21, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON:

Six regiments were called for and have been mustered in, of which one has marched and five remain awaiting camp equipage, nearly ready. Will have ten more ready to march in forty days.

JNO. A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Agreeably to your request I have begun operations to secure you ten new regiments. We have the material for six of the ten already organized into companies, which we will proceed to organize at once into regiments. One regiment under Col. Fletcher Webster, already fully organized, will be the first of the ten made ready. Enough other companies are now organized to make another, or sixth, regiment, and four more will be started. The contracts for tents, horses, wagons, overcoats, and other equipage are already on foot, and will be fully ready in the forty days, and the men will be tendered for mustering in to your mustering officer in due season at the proper points in Massachusetts.

I am glad the United States Government intends to pursue the war with such vigor and force, and I firmly believe that the preparation of an ample army, properly equipped in season for operations on a grand scale, aggressive and peremptory in character and majestic in proportions, to sweep the field in the autumn, will command the enthusiastic welcome and support of the country. We shall not falter a moment in our preparation of equipments, so as to present our regiments (as nearly as circumstances will permit) prepared according to the standard of the Army, at all events equipped so that they may pitch their tents on any field you may assign to them, where they will fight whatever foe appears, and I doubt not will eat their allowance too, unless your commissariat should fail, or a miracle be wrought.

I am, yours, obediently and respectfully,

JOHN A. ANDREW.

{p.287}

–––

DETROIT, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

Four regiments infantry are organized in this State and mustered into service for the war. The First, Second, and Third are at or near Washington. The Fourth will leave on Monday next. Three additional regiments have been organized by the Governor, the officers and non-commissioned officers of which are in a camp of instruction at Fort Wayne. They are not uniformed or equipped, but can be on short notice.

AUSTIN BLAIR, Governor of Michigan.

Per W. J. GIBSON, Military Secretary.

–––

SAINT PAUL, MINN., June 21, 1861.

General S. CAMERON:

One regiment (Colonel Gorman) is mustered into service for the war. A second is accepted, and will be ready to muster in some eight days.

S. P. JENNISON, Private Secretary.

–––

CONCORD, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

One regiment has been mustered by this State for three months and one for three years-Colonel Tappan’s and Colonel Marston’s Both are now at the seat of war. No others ordered by your Department have been accepted. The State tenders further regiments.

N. S. BERRY, Governor.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Trenton, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: There are three regiments organized by me in this State, each containing the maximum of men, band, and officers prescribed by General Orders, No. 15, and which have been mustered into the U. S. service to serve during the war. The First Regiment, Col. W. R. Montgomery; the Second Regiment, Col. G. W. McLean, and the Third Regiment, Col. George W. Taylor, all of whom have served as officers in the U. S. Army. These regiments are encamped here under command of Colonel Montgomery, and are being fully uniformed and equipped with camp and garrison equipage, under contract with the U. S. Quartermaster-General. They are already armed, and will be equipped and ready to move by the 27th instant. Should anything occur to prevent their being ready by that date I will report to you by telegraph. These troops are unprovided with baggage train and ambulances, which I mention that the deficit may be supplied at their point of destination by the proper department. No other regiments or companies have as yet been accepted by the Department of War from this State. I shall await your orders as to when, how, and where the three regiments are to move.

Your obedient servant,

CHS. S. OLDEN.

{p.288}

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Albany, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In reply to your telegram of the 21st instant to the Governor, I have the honor to make the following statement:

Thirty-eight regiments of volunteers have been enrolled and accepted by the War Department. Thirty-three of them have been mustered for two years. Five of them are yet to be mustered, being those whose muster was arrested by the refusal of the mustering officer to muster except for three years, and to whom orders were subsequently given (June 12) through Colonel Franklin. They will be mustered by the 24th instant. In addition to the above there are four regiments of New York State militia, viz, Second, Ninth, Fourteenth, and Seventy-ninth for three years or during the war; also the Garibaldi Guards (Colonel D’Utassy), raised for the occasion. These last five regiments are those accepted from the Union Defense Committee by the Federal Government.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. SCHRIVER. (For the Adjutant-General.)

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Columbus Ohio, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Your telegram to Governor Dennison is placed in my hands. The status of Ohio troops is as follows, twenty-six regiments the total:

First. Eleven regiments under first call at Camp Dennison until the 20th of June, when three marched for Virginia; three not mustered in; will be on Tuesday next. The change from the three-months’ to the three-years’ enlistment caused vacancies, to which companies have been assigned for immediate duty. The eleven regiments are for the war.

Second. At Camp Chase, near Columbus, are four regiments-two mustered in; other two will be mustered in by Tuesday next; all for the war. There is a deficiency of arms, however, except for the purposes of drill, having only the altered musket.

Third. Two regiments, now near Washington, have not fully declared their purpose as to an extended enlistment. The Governor has proposed to extend the time, lest the active canvass of the question should demoralize the present command.

Fourth. Nine regiments, organized as State regiments, have, under the critical circumstances, been placed at the disposal of General McClellan, and advanced into Virginia. Of this force (8,800 men) a majority offer for three years, and yet they have been so distributed in the various detail of duty devolved upon them as to render impossible the immediate reorganization of the regiments. The commanding general deemed it hazardous to open up the matter. The delay originated solely in their sudden transfer to the border and the overruling necessity of their advance into Western Virginia.

While, therefore, twenty-six regiments are really available for present purposes, four in Virginia and two near Washington are not reorganized so as to count in the quota of twenty-one regiments of three-years’ troops.

{p.289}

If a larger portion of the Ohio force be needed eastward, there are two complete regiments in Cincinnati which could be mustered in forty-eight hours and two more in four days thereafter. This, however, would increase the Ohio quota beyond the designated number, conceding to the two Eastern regiments further time.

The Governor deems that good faith to the Government forbids any unnecessary delay in mustering the three-years’ troops and of such as have acquired military training as far as possible, while he appreciates the circumstances that have prevented some of the three-months’ troops from immediate decision as to the longer term of service.

In the meantime State troops have so performed military duty that an equivalent force has been put into the field, and it is hoped that the general cause has not suffered.

Very truly, your obedient servant,

H. B. CARRINGTON, Adjutant-General.

–––

SAINT JOHNSBURY, VT., June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have two regiments mustered into service for the war, accepted by your Department, one of which is ordered forward and will leave Burlington for Washington on Monday next. The other is mustered at Saint Johnsbury and can be equipped ready to march in two weeks if inspected and supplied with muskets. Can immediately afterward organize another regiment if desired.

E. FAIRBANKS, Governor of Vermont.

–––

MADISON, June 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

In accordance with dispatch reaching us on the 10th, accepting six regiments in all if ready in three weeks, our First and Second have left for the East. Captain McIntyre is now mustering the Third. The Fourth is in camp ready to be mustered in. The Fifth and Sixth will be in camp as soon as he is ready to muster them. All will be ready to move on the limited time or in a very few days thereafter.

ALEX. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

[JUNE 21, 1861.-For Governor Peirpoint’s application for the protection of Virginia by U. S. troops against invasion and domestic violence, see Series I, Vol. II, p. 713.]

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 22, 1861.

Col. H. K. CRAIG, Chief of Ordnance:

The Colonel of Ordnance will take measures to procure 300 wrought-iron field pieces, 6 pounder caliber, from the Phoenix Iron Company, {p.290} price to be determined by the Ordnance Department and to be less than that of bronze pieces of the same caliber; a portion (two-thirds) of these guns to be rifled. The Ordnance Department will also report immediately which of the rifled projectiles heretofore submitted to the Government, including that now experimenting upon at the Washington Navy-Yard by Captain Dahlgren, is best adapted to this caliber, and will advise the War Department upon the best mode of procuring a supply of rifled ammunition to meet the exigencies of the present war. Dispatch is more important than even the selection of the very best model in this case.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., June 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The six regiments of three-months’ men first mustered into the service are now in Virginia. Four regiments have been mustered in for three years in addition, making in all ten. Those four are fully armed, uniformed, and equipped, ready for the field, and are in very fine condition. The call bearing date June 11 for six more regiments can be filled and the men ready for the field in twenty days from this time. The contracts for accouterments, clothing, and equipments of every kind will be let on Monday, to be filled in fifteen days. I am embarrassed by the appointment by the President of colonels for three regiments. It has a bad effect, and is regarded as the work of politicians at Washington and as an indignity to the Executive of the State, who has all the responsibility of raising the regiments. These colonels had no regiments when they were appointed and asked me to furnish camps, clothing, and equipments for them. Is there a new call for four more regiments? If so, I can furnish them all ready in twenty days. Please answer at once. I will have two companies of cavalry ready on Monday. Answer.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, June 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

The engagement I made with you on Wednesday week, namely, that commencing on third day after my return I would forward to Washington equivalent to one regiment volunteers daily for twenty-two days, is thus far kept. First week ends to-night, and Fourteenth, Eighteenth, Twenty-first, Twenty-sixth, Twenty-ninth, and Thirty-eighth, in all seven regiments, have certainly been forwarded, and perhaps Thirty-seventh left New York City this evening. Apparently nothing will prevent the carrying out of my promise for next week and until the whole number has been moved, except want of arms, and I trust even in this respect the War Department is not to be disappointed.

L. D. MORGAN.

{p.291}

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., June 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Col. J. A. Wright, of my staff, will proceed to Washington on Monday noon to give answer to your dispatch of yesterday and to settle with you definitely all questions in regard to it.

A. G. CURTIN.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. IRVIN MCDOWELL, Comdg. Department of Northeastern Virginia, Arlington House:

GENERAL: You are authorized to receive and muster into the service of the United States such citizens of the State of Virginia as may offer their services as cavalry soldiers. You will muster them in by companies or individuals, to be afterward formed into companies at your discretion.

Very respectfully, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 23, 1861.

Governor OLIVER P. MORTON, Indianapolis:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 22d instant, and to inform you that, in addition to the six regiments accepted on the 11th instant, four more were accepted on the 19th instant.

I have also the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter addressed to the President by the hands of Hon. R. D. Owen,* and to inform you that the regiment of cavalry tendered is accepted, conditioned, however, that it shall be one, or take the place of one, of infantry already accepted. In other words, this regiment shall come in under the acceptance of either the 11th or 19th instant. I regret to learn that the acceptances of the 11th and 19th by the President, in which certain colonels are named, have embarrassed you, and I assure you nothing could have been further from the intention of the President or of this Department than the thought of doing so.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See June 17, p. 275.

–––

ALBANY, N. Y., June 23, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The Seventeenth Regiment New York Volunteers was omitted from copy of my telegram to you last night in giving names of regiments dispatched by me during the past week.

E. D. MORGAN.

{p.292}

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 36.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 24, 1861.

I. The organization of volunteer regiments mustered into the service of the United States for a longer period than three months must conform strictly to that prescribed in General Orders, No. 15, from this office, dated May 4, 1861.

All persons in excess of that organization will be immediately discharged, but will receive pay and allowances to the time of their discharge. The rate of such pay and allowances will be that authorized by section 1 of the act of Congress approved March 19, 1836.

II. The duty of buying horses for the light artillery service is retransferred from the Ordnance Department to the Quartermaster’s Department.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The present organization of the Ordnance Department was intended, and is only suitable, for an army on a peace establishment. Its strength is now entirely inadequate to the proper discharge of the many duties pertaining to it-duties which cannot be omitted or neglected without serious injury to the public interests, and without jeopardizing the national honor and safety. The fortifications defending the approaches to all the principal cities and harbors must have their armaments placed as soon as possible in a state to resist the ingress of hostile vessels of war. Each of the districts, say of the Chesapeake and its tributaries, of the Delaware, New York and Boston Harbors, and other points on our entire seacoast, should have an ordnance officer assigned to the special care of attending to the armament of the fortifications of that district. There should be an ordnance officer also with each column in the field. The duties at the arsenals have been so much increased as to tax to the utmost the energies of the limited number of officers now available for duty at them, and it may be truly and confidently asserted that not one of the larger and more important arsenals is adequately provided with officers; nor will the present strength of the Ordnance Corps admit of it. The least admissible increase to meet the necessities of the public service is an organization like that of the Quartermaster’s Department as regards the senior officers, and an addition of six second lieutenants. This will add to the Ordnance Corps only nine officers, an increase very moderate under the present military organization, and absolutely necessary for the proper discharge of the duties pertaining to the armament and equipment of the armies and fortifications of the nation.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

{p.293}

–––

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, June 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your information the copy of a dispatch of the 7th instant from the minister of the United States at London relative to certain purchases of arms and ammunition made by Colonel Frémont in England and France for the use of the United States.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Inclosure.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES, London, June 7, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: After mature reflection I have decided, in conjunction with Mr. Dayton, to assume the responsibility of drawing upon the Government of the United States for a considerable sum of money, to be applied in payment of certain purchases of arms and ammunition made by Colonel Frémont, both here and in France, for the use of the United States.

Aware of the degree in which I exceed my authority by taking such a step, nothing but a conviction of the need in which the country stands of such assistance and the joint opinion of all the diplomatic agents of the United States at the moment in Paris has induced me to overcome my scruples. Having, likewise, great confidence in the capacity and the energy of Colonel Frémont, who goes out to offer his services in the cause, I am not unwilling to promote his desire to bring with him the materials for effectively and promptly organizing a portion of the contemplated additional force. The mode and extent of this operation are limited in the following manner: Contracts have been entered into by Colonel Frémont for the manufacture of cannon and shells in this country, as specified in the papers which he will take with him, to the amount of $75,000. Messrs. Peabody & Co. have agreed to advance the money on the joint draft of Mr. Dayton and myself upon the Hon. Simon Cameron, the Secretary of War, at thirty days after sight. Mr. Morse, the consul, has been fixed upon to audit the accounts in a regular manner.

A further purchase has been made of rifles by Colonel Frémont in France, for which he desires us likewise to provide funds in advance. To this Mr. Dayton also consents within certain limits, which he defines in his letter to me dated yesterday. I have therefore agreed to raise the funds in the same way for the security of 10,000 rifles to the amount of about $125,000. If, however, the Government should be disinclined to take these latter and accept the bills, Mr. Dayton requests that Mr. Stevens, president of the Bank of Commerce, in New York, may be notified, as from communication with him previous to his departure he has reason to believe that he would at once take the arms as security for the acceptance of the bills.

I am constantly receiving offers of service and of all sorts of military implements, but excepting in the preceding instance my uniform reply is that I have no authority to make contracts, neither do I desire to receive any.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

CHARLES FRANCIS ADAMS.

{p.294}

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Omaha, Nebr. Ter., June 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I desire to call the attention of your Department to a few facts disclosed by a letter just received at our executive office from one of the most respected and reliable citizens of this Territory. I make the following quotations from the letter:

Our Wisconsin friends opposite this portion of the Territory are quite excited and very anxious that the Nebraska regiment may be stationed in the southern part of the Territory near the Missouri border, In Holt and Andrew Counties, Mo., Union men are badly treated, and while they may be in the majority, having no arms they are overawed to a great extent.

I have just learned this morning that “something is up” among the Otoe Indians. The Choctaws have been up among the Kaws, Sacs and Foxes, Otoes and Pawnees, and delegations have gone from all to the Choctaw Nation to hold a conference about something. The Otoes are sullen, and not at all disposed to he communicative. However, I think if the General Government can in any way hasten the back payments due to them we can manage the Otoes. I have believed for months past that we shall have difficulty with the Indians, and time only confirms me in that opinion.

I desire to state, in addition to the above, that in one county at least in the extreme southern part of this Territory there is believed to be an actual majority of secessionists.

I am also reliably informed that the Mormon emigrants, who are now crossing the Missouri River in great numbers at a point six miles above this city en route to Salt Lake, sympathize warmly with the secessionists. This emigration is much larger this year than usual, and comes mainly from England. I am satisfied, from what I have myself seen and heard, that, as a class, these people have little or no respect for our Government and institutions. They exercise a great influence over the Indian tribes located in this and the adjoining Territories, many of whom are at the present time dissatisfied with the Government. If they were disposed to make common cause with the secessionists in our own Territory and Missouri, the Indians also becoming their allies, they could easily exterminate the whole loyal population between the Missouri River and the Rocky Mountains before relief could be obtained from the Government.

In view of these facts, I would respectfully request that one or two regiments of troops, in addition to our own, now nearly full, may be so disposed in this Territory as to prevent the secessionists in Missouri and Southern Nebraska and the Mormons and Indians on our western borders from uniting for our destruction.

We have been obliged to put forth every energy to raise the regiment called from our Territory by the President; it will be a serious drain upon our sparse and limited population to furnish it. However. I am confident that it will be ready for service in ten days.

In addition to this regiment called into the three-years’ service, the citizens of every settled precinct are organizing companies for home protection. In this connection I beg leave to state that the quotas of arms heretofore received by this Territory have been most shamefully squandered; so much so, in fact, that at the present time we have not a single stand of arms wherewith to arm our volunteer companies. We should have immediately 1,000 stand of arms to distribute among the companies already organized for home protection. This year’s quota has not yet been received. Can it not be sent forward immediately? Will you advise me when and how I can draw for them?

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. PADDOCK, Secretary and Acting Governor.

{p.295}

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., June 25, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Recurring to our conversation of this afternoon I beg to recommend that measures be at once taken to prepare carriages, caissons, ammunition wagons, battery wagons, and harness for the iron 6-pounder guns, rifled and smooth, which you inform me you have ordered.

The Ordnance Department must have some supply in store, but to supply these guns to replace those which will be broken, lost, or destroyed in service a full supply for all the new guns ordered would not be too many to procure.

As the arsenals are already taxed it would be well to send to some of the great railroad car-shops, now idle, artillery carriages as models from which they can quickly manufacture all that are needed. They have the machinery and the stock, the workmen skilled in precisely this sort of work, and should have been long since employed in furnishing this most effective material of war.

With new troops, such as must be employed in this contest, a full supply of field artillery is of even greater importance than with veterans.

There are many foundries in the country which could manufacture the projectiles needed for these rifled guns. They should be set to work.

Harness should also be procured by contract.

I submit herewith a sketch* of a projectile which I do not think is embarrassed with any patent claim, and which, I have no doubt, would be cheap and effective so long as the caliber is not over six pounds.

M. C. MEIGS, Brigadier-General and Quartermaster-General.

* Omitted.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, June 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In compliance with your instructions of the 22d instant I shall order from the Phoenix Iron Company 300 wrought-iron field pieces-200 rifled and 100 smooth bore. Before giving the order it will be necessary to furnish the company with a drawing to work by. That drawing is now in preparation by the Ordnance Board. Permit me to suggest and recommend that all these guns be rifled. This is essential to uniformity of ammunition and will secure efficiency for all the guns instead of only two-thirds of them. The diameter of the bore cannot exceed 3.35 without making the projectile (suitable for a rifle cannon) too heavy for convenient transportation in the field. This bore will give such projectiles about ten pounds weight. I propose to fix the price at $250 per gun, which will be about 25 cents per pound of wrought iron, as I estimate the finished gun’s weight to be not more than 1,000 pounds; under this weight, rather than above. This is a liberal price even for the first guns of this kind, and allows a fair margin for profit. Of the rifled projectiles heretofore submitted to the {p.296} Government, that proposed by Captain Dyer, and tried in common with many others proposed by different persons, is best adapted to the wrought-iron field guns. This projectile is an expanding elongated one, with a cup of soft metal cast on the rear end. It differs but slightly from the rifle projectile known as Dimick’s and is almost identical with that experimented on at the Washington Navy-Yard by Captain Dahlgren, judging from the little that is known, except by that officer, of the latter projectile. The best way of procuring a supply of rifle-cannon ammunition to meet present exigencies is to obtain the cast-iron shot and shells by purchase and to prepare the ammunition at the arsenals. Although Captain Dyer has no pecuniary interest whatever in the projectiles, which he proposed solely as the result of his studies on the subject and for the benefit of the public service, I do not deem it proper to recommend the adoption of his projectiles because he is an officer of the Army and because projectiles of nearly the same description can be obtained from Mr. Dimick. I recommend that projectiles of both kinds (Dyer’s and Dimick’s) be procured and put in use for a trial in the field of their relative merits.

Respectfully,

JAMES W. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel of Ordnance.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, June 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: A complication exists here growing out of the acceptance of three additional infantry regiments from this State. When I received from G. M. Dodge information that these additional infantry regiments had been accepted, I had not any knowledge of the independent regiment ordered by Major Lauman except from rumor, and immediately proceeded to make up the three regiments from companies pressing me for service. To-day Major Lanman calls on me, expecting his independent regiment to be one of the three; but the three are already made up, and the companies so far notified that it is impossible for me to do anything else than receive them as made up. This throws Major Lanman’s independent regiment out, which is to me a matter of great regret, as the companies will make a splendid regiment.

If the public service will require a still additional regiment from this State, and you will request or accept it, I will recognize Major Lanman’s regiment, and place it in quarters and in uniform as soon as the means at my command will permit.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., June 25, 1861-4.20 p.m.

Governor CHARLES S. OLDEN, Trenton, N. J.:

Your telegram to the Secretary of War is referred to me.* Please send the three New Jersey regiments to Washington by rail on Friday.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

* See letter of June 21, p. 287.

{p.297}

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Albany, June 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I believe eight regiments left our State for Washington last week. I feel confident as many will leave the present week and during the next week or about the time of the assembling of Congress. I hope to have all that have been accepted by the General Government in the field.

I am, very truly, yours,

E. D. MORGAN.

–––

HARRISBURG, PA., June 25, 1861.

Col. J. A. WRIGHT, Washington:

Dispatches received.* Call on the President, in accordance with the suggestion of the Secretary of War made last week, and ask His Excellency if he will take a major-general and two brigadiers named by me, either by giving them commissions in the U. S. Army, or otherwise, with the fifteen regiments; explain to him how this corps has been raised; call his attention to the act of Assembly and to the assignments therein contained for these officers and the direction to appoint them.

A. G. CURTIN.

* Not found.

–––

WASHINGTON, June 25, 1861.

[Governor A. G. CURTIN:]

DEAR SIR: I send you, herewith, report of an interview with General Cameron, which is decisive, and on which you will have to act. General Cameron thinks he has taken responsibility enough and will await action of Congress. He thinks if three-months’ [men] go home, they will in a short time, when another call is made, be the more anxious to re-enlist. As to taking your major-general and brigadiers, says he would not do it if General Jackson was the major-general. As to this point he seems absolutely positive on the ground of having no authority to do so, though at same time speaks favorably of McCall and Biddle. This leaves you in position of twenty-five regiments disbanded at end of three-months’ service and fifteen regiments on your hands, refused by Secretary of War, unless on the condition stated, and no representation in the Army of the United States. However, General Cameron intends recommending a large increase in the Army and under it, if ordered by Congress, we will, of course, have a representation. This may be or not before the disbandment of our present forces. My impression is, the Departments here have scarcely any defined plan for the future and cannot have until the action of Congress. The refusal to take your major and brigadier generals is not peculiar to Pennsylvania, but the necessity has been forced on then on account of the pressure from nearly all the States to force all kinds of men on the Government. I sent you copy of inclosed letter yesterday by telegraph, General Cameron desiring immediate answer, saying he is holding back from accepting regiments until this matter is definitely settled with you. You had better telegraph General Cameron as soon as you receive this, deciding at once what you will do.

{p.298}

To make a résumé: The case stands, if you accept the offer, the major and brigadier generals are left on your hands and the twenty-five regiments disbanded at end of three-months’ service, and you have fifteen regiments in service.

If you refuse the offer, you have the fifteen regiments on hand, well officered, and twenty-five regiments disbanded, unless as they may be affected by action of Congress.

I read my official letter to you of this date to General Cameron and he approves it. I will await your answer. Telegraph me at same time you answer Cameron. In this state of things there is of course no use talking about clothing, tents, or wagons. But if the fifteen regiments go into U. S. service, the United States will provide wagons and you are desired to procure tents and necessary camp equipage.

Yours, &c.,

JOHN A. WRIGHT.

[Inclosure.]

WASHINGTON, June 25, 1861.

His Excellency A. G. CURTIN, Governor of Pennsylvania:

SIR: I had an interview with General S. Cameron, Secretary of War, this morning. He declines taking any action in the matter of mustering in three-months’ men into the three-years’ service to fill up requisitions on you for ten or thirteen regiments, preferring to await the action of Congress, which meets on the 4th of July next. He would accept at once the fifteen regiments of your Reserve Corps if made up to the maximum in accordance with General Orders, No. 15, but positively declines from want of authority to accept any officer higher than colonel, as indicated in that order. He does not desire you to prepare, but recommends your procuring tents and necessary camp equipage. General Cameron desires an immediate answer whether your fifteen regiments of Reserve Volunteer Corps will be offered on condition specified.

I am, sir, yours, respectfully,

JOHN A. WRIGHT, Aide.

–––

[JUNE 25, 1861.-For Cameron to Peirpoint, relative to affairs in Virginia, &c., see Series I, Vol. II, p. 723.]

–––

[JUNE 25, 1861.-For Cameron to Carlile, in reference to organization of forces in Western Virginia, see Series I, Vol. II, p. 723.]

–––

HARRISBURG, June 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Washington:

I have received the official report of my aide, Colonel Wright, of an interview had with you relative to the re-enlistment of our Pennsylvania troops now in the field, and of your having declined to act in the {p.299} matter until the meeting of Congress, as also of your offer to take the fifteen regiments now in camps in course of organization, known as the Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, provided they were brought up to the number indicated in General Orders, No. 15. While I am gratified that you should be willing to accept the fifteen regiments indicated, it would be in my opinion greatly unjust to the men already in the field and who have suffered so many inconveniences and privations by reason of their promptness, to supplant them entirely, as possibly might be the case if the fifteen regiments alone were accepted and these men thrown out at the end of their enlistment. I therefore beg to inquire whether the Department, if so authorized by Congress, will retain in the field such regiments from Pennsylvania now in service as may be willing to re-enlist, and if facilities will be offered said regiments to recruit to the proper standard. Several have already proffered their services and have been indicated by me to Colonel Porter, of the U. S. Army, who until recently had charge of this matter at this place.

A. G. CURTIN.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., June 27, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM B. FRANKLIN, Brevoort House, New York:

If the five regiments organized by Mr. Sickles are ready let them be mustered into service. If they are not ready within three days they cannot be received.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 38.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 27, 1861.

...

II. The existing regulations upon the subject of the appointment of sutlers in the Army are hereby rescinded, and henceforth these appointments will be made by the Secretary of War.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant. General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 27, 1861.

[General SCOTT:]

It being the fixed purpose of the Government to protect all loyal citizens in their constitutional rights, and to defend the States against domestic violence, invasion, insurrection, or rebellion, you are hereby directed to send an officer to Tennessee, to muster into the service of the United States 10,000 men, to receive pay when called into active service by this Department. Each regiment formed therefrom will be commanded by field and company officers of their own selection.

The Ordnance Bureau will forward to Cincinnati, Ohio, 10,000 stand of arms and accouterments and ample supplies of ammunition, to be {p.300} carried thence through Kentucky into East Tennessee by the officer designated by you for mustering the men into service, for distribution among the men so mustered into service. You will also direct an officer to muster into service at the same time in Southeast Kentucky four regiments, to be commanded and officered in the same manner as is herein provided for the Tennessee regiments. All the regiments aforesaid will be raised for service in East Tennessee and adjacent counties and in East Kentucky; and in addition thereto there shall be received and mustered one regiment, to be raised in Western Tennessee.

You will send an officer with a sufficient command on the Kentucky trace to stop all supplies passing over the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad.

You will authorize the officers designated by you for mustering into service as aforesaid to receive into the service of the United States such additional loyal citizens (to furnish their own arms) as may offer their services on the terms aforesaid.

The State of Tennessee is added to the Military District of Kentucky, under General Anderson’s command.

By order of the President:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

[Indorsement.]

JUNE 29, 1861.

Approved.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

[JUNE 28, 1861.-For Peirpoint to Cameron in regard to organization of three regiments in Western Virginia, see Series I, Vol. II, p. 730.]

–––

SPRINGFIELD, June 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

A communication from you to Capt. T. W. Ferree, of Joliet: “The Governor of Illinois has been notified that the Department will accept of several additional regiments.” Your dispatch to me said ten companies of cavalry. How many regiments of infantry will you accept? I have tendered ten.

RICHARD YATES, Governor of Illinois.

–––

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Boston, Mass., June 29, 1861.

Adjt. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by His Excellency Governor Andrew to request that you will inform him what measures are to be adopted for mustering out of the U. S. service such of the Massachusetts three-months’ {p.301} militia as may be desirous of returning home at the expiration of the term for which they were enlisted.

Probably two-thirds of the men will be anxious to re-enlist, but it may be necessary to have the regiments return home for reorganization. Will the United States arrange for transportation to this State of such regiments; or is it desired that this State should make the necessary arrangements? Are they to be mustered out of the U. S. service abroad, or after their return home? Any information upon this subject which you can communicate will be most acceptable, as the commanders of regiments are constantly addressing inquiries to His Excellency.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

HARRISON RITCHIE, Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

–––

Consolidated abstract from returns of the U. S. Army on or about June 30, 1861.

Command.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Date of return.
Officers.Men.
Department of Annapolis (Banks)No returns.
Department of the East (Wool)16394457510June 30, 1861.
Department of Florida (Brown)651,5941,9892,088June 30, 1861.
Department of Kentucky (Anderson)No returns.
Department of New Mexico (Canby)541,4641,9412,466June 30, 1861.
Department of Northeastern Virginia (McDowell)76413,66615,36816,611June 26, 1861.
Department of the Ohio* (McClellan)1,40921,88437,76754,313July 2, 1861.
Department of the Pacific (Sumner)1142,0642,8053,361June 30, 1861.
Department of Pennsylvania (Patterson)74715,86516,69417,188June 30, 1861.
Department of Utah (Cooke)17445561604June 30, 1861.
Department of Virginia (Butler)3977,7949,4859,929June 30, 1861.
Department of Washington (Mansfield)1,69336,60841,16043,363June 30, 1861.
Department of the West (Lyon)581,3881,7171,921June 26, 1861.
Total**5,334103,106129,894152,354

* Only a partial return on file.

** The consolidated abstracts published at intervals of six months in Series III and IV do not represent the full strength of either the Union or Confederate forces. Such classes as unattached officers and men, recruits in rendezvous, and organizations in process of formation are omitted. Only the numbers shown by army and department returns are given.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 1, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this Department:

The accompanying statements of the Adjutant-General will show the number, description, and distribution of the troops which are now in service.*

It forms no part of the duty of this Department to enter upon a discussion of the preliminary circumstances which have contributed to the {p.302} present condition of public affairs. The secession ordinance of South Carolina was passed on the 20th of December last, and from that period until the majesty of the Government was made manifest, immediately after you had assumed the Chief Magistracy, the conspirators against its Constitution and laws have left nothing undone to perpetuate the memory of their infamy. Revenue steamers have been deliberately betrayed by their commanders, or, where treason could not be brought to consummate the defection, have been overpowered by rebel troops at the command of disloyal Governors. The Government arsenals at Little Rock, Baton Rouge, Mount Vernon, Apalachicola, Augusta, Charleston, and Fayetteville, the ordnance depot at San Antonio and all the other Government works in Texas, which served as the depots of immense stores of arms and ammunition, have been surrendered by the commanders or seized by disloyal hands. Forts Macon, Caswell, Johnston, Clinch, Pulaski, Jackson, Marion, Barrancas, McRee, Morgan, Gaines, Pike, Macomb, Saint Philip, Livingston, Smith, and three at Charleston; Oglethorpe Barracks, Barrancas Barracks, New Orleans Barracks, Fort Jackson on the Mississippi; the battery at Bienvenue, Dupré, and the works at Ship Island, have been successively stolen from the Government or betrayed by their commanding officers. The custom-houses at New Orleans, Mobile, Savannah, Charleston, and other important points, containing vast amounts of Government funds, have been treacherously appropriated to sustain the cause of rebellion. In like manner the branch mints at New Orleans, at Charlotte, and at Dahlonega, have been illegally seized, in defiance of every principle of common honesty and of honor. The violent seizure of the U. S. Marine Hospital at New Orleans was only wanting to complete the catalogue of crime. The inmates, who had been disabled by devotion to their country’s service, and who there had been secured a grateful asylum, were cruelly ordered to be removed, without the slightest provision being made for their support or comfort. In Texas the large forces detailed upon the frontier for the protection of the inhabitants against the attacks of marauding Indians were ignominiously deserted by their commander, Brigadier-General Twiggs. To the infamy of treason to his flag was added the crowning crime of deliberately handing over to the armed enemies of his Government all the public property intrusted to his charge, thus even depriving the loyal men under his command of all means of transportation out of the State.

A striking and honorable contrast with the recreant conduct of Brigadier-General Twiggs and other traitorous officers has been presented in the heroic and truly self-sacrificing course pursued by Maj. Robert Anderson and the small and gallant band of officers and men under his command at Fort Sumter, and also by Lieut. Adam J. Slemmer, his officers and men, at Fort Pickens. In referring with strongest commendation to the conduct of these brave soldiers under the trying circumstances which surrounded them, I only echo the unanimous voice of the American people. In this connection it is a pleasurable duty to refer to the very gallant action of Lieut. Roger Jones, at Harper’s Ferry, and the handsome and successful manner in which he executed the orders of the Government at that important post.

The determination of the Government to use its utmost power to subdue the rebellion has been sustained by the unqualified approval of the whole people. Heretofore the leaders of this conspiracy have professed to regard the people of this country as incapable of making a forcible resistance to rebellion. The error of this conclusion is now being made manifest. History will record that men who in ordinary {p.303} times were devoted solely to the arts of peace were yet ready on the instant to rush to arms in defense of their rights when assailed. At the present moment the Government presents the striking anomaly of being embarrassed by the generous outpouring of volunteers to sustain its action. Instead of laboring under the difficulty of monarchical governments, the want of men to fill its armies (which in other countries has compelled a resort to forced conscriptions), one of its main difficulties is to keep down the proportions of the Army and to prevent it from swelling beyond the actual force required.

The commanding officers of the regiments in the volunteer service, both for the three-months’ service and for the war, have in many instances not yet furnished the Department with the muster-rolls of their regiments. For the want of these returns it is impossible to present as accurate an enumeration of the volunteer force accepted and in the field as could be desired.

Under the proclamation issued by you on the 15th of April last the Governors of different States were called upon to detach from the militia under their command a certain quota to serve as infantry or riflemen for the period of three months, unless sooner discharged. The call so made amounted in the aggregate to ninety-four regiments, making 73,391 officers and men. Of the States called upon, the Governors of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Kentucky, and Missouri peremptorily refused to comply with the requirements made by the Department. All the other States promptly furnished the number required of them, except Maryland, whose Governor, though manifesting entire readiness to comply, was prevented from so doing by the outbreak at Baltimore.

In the States of Virginia, Delaware, and Missouri, notwithstanding the positive refusal of their executive officers to co-operate with the Government, patriotic citizens voluntarily united together and organized regiments for the Government service. Delaware and Virginia furnished each a regiment, both of which are on duty in the field. In a similar patriotic spirit the loyal people of Missouri raised a force of 11,445 officers and men, making in round numbers twelve organized regiments to sustain the Government and to put down rebellion in that State; and so also the citizens of the District of Columbia, emulating these honorable examples, furnished no less than 2,823 officers and men, making in all four full regiments, all of which are yet in the field doing active and efficient service. Thus, notwithstanding the refusal of disloyal Governors to respond, the Government, instead of having been furnished with only the number of troops called for under your proclamation of the 15th of April last, has received and has now in service under that call, in round numbers, at least 80,000.**

Under your second proclamation of the 4th [3d] of May last, calling for volunteers to serve during the war, there have been accepted up to this date 208 regiments. A number of other regiments have been accepted, but on condition of being ready to be mustered into the service within a specified time, the limitation of which has in some instances not expired. It is not possible to state how many of these may be ready before the meeting of Congress. Of the regiments accepted, all are infantry and riflemen, with the exception of two battalions of artillery and four regiments of cavalry. A number of regiments mustered as infantry have, however, attached to them one or more artillery companies, and there are also some regiments partly made up of companies of cavalry. Of the 208 regiments accepted for {p.304} three years, there are now 153 in active service, and the remaining 55 are mostly ready, and all of them will be in the field within the next twenty days.

The total force now in the field may be computed as follows:

Regulars and volunteers for three months and for the war235,000
Add to this fifty-five regiments of volunteers for the war, accepted and not yet in service50,000
Add new regiments of Regular Army25 000
75,000
Total force now at command of Government310,000
Deduct the three-months’ volunteers80,000
Force for service after the withdrawal of the three-months’ men230,000

It will thus be perceived that after the discharge of the three-months’ troops there will be still an available force of volunteers amounting to 188,000, which, added to the Regular Army, will constitute a total force of 230,000, officers and men. It will be for Congress to determine whether this army shall at this time be increased by the addition of a still larger volunteer force. The extraordinary exigencies which have called this great army into being have rendered necessary also a very considerable augmentation of the regular arm of the service.

The demoralization of the Regular Army caused by the treasonable conduct of many of its commanding officers, the distant posts at which the greater part of the troops were stationed, and the unexampled rapidity of the spread of the rebellion, convinced those high in command in the service, as well as this Department, that an increase of the Regular Army was indispensable. The subject was accordingly brought to your attention, and after a careful examination an increase was authorized by your proclamation issued on the 4th [3d] of May last.

This increase consists of one regiment of cavalry, of twelve companies, numbering in the maximum aggregate 1,189 officers and men; one regiment of artillery, of twelve batteries, of six pieces each, numbering in the maximum aggregate 1,909 officers and men; nine regiments of infantry, each regiment containing three battalions of eight companies each, numbering in the maximum aggregate 2,452 officers and men, making a maximum increase of infantry of 22,068 officers and men.

In the enlistment of men to fill the additional regiments of the Regular Army I would recommend that the term of enlistment be made three years, to correspond with the call of May 4 [3] for volunteers, and to all who shall receive an honorable discharge at the close of their term of service a bounty of $100 shall be given.

The mounted troops of the old Army consist of five regiments, with a maximum aggregate of 4,460 men. Not more than one-fourth of these troops are available for service at the seat of war. At least two regiments of artillery are unavailable, being stationed on the Western coast and in the Florida forts.

The increase of infantry is comparatively large, but this arm of the service is that which the General-in-Chief recommended as being most efficient.

The organization of the increased force, it will be noticed, is different from that of the old Army. This question was fully considered by officers of the Army connected with this Department, and after much deliberation it was concluded to adopt the French regimental system of three battalions to a regiment. Each battalion is commanded by a major, with a colonel and lieutenant-colonel for the general command of the regiment.

{p.305}

This, it is believed, is the best organization now existing. The number of field officers is less than under the old plan, and therefore much less expensive. Whether this organization may not advantageously be extended to the old Army, after the passage of a law providing for a retired list, is a question which may properly engage the attention of Congress. In making the selection of officers for the new regiments two courses only seemed to be open, viz, to make the appointments from the regular service by seniority or by selection. The first appeared liable to the objection that old, and in some instances inefficient, men would be promoted to places which ought to be filled by younger and more vigorous officers. The second was liable to the grave objection that favoritism might prejudice the claims of worthy officers.

After the fullest consideration it was determined, under the advice of the General-in-Chief, to appoint one-half of them from the Regular Army and the other half from civil life. Of the civilians appointed as regimental commanders, all except one are either graduates of West Point or have before served with distinction in the field, and of the lieutenant-colonels, majors, captains, and first lieutenants, a large proportion have been taken from the Regular Army and the volunteers now in service, while the second lieutenants have been mainly created by the promotion of meritorious sergeants from the regular service.

In view of the urgent necessity of the case, these preliminary steps to the augmentation of the regular service have been taken, and it now remains for Congress, should it sanction what has been commenced, to complete the work by such legislation as the subject may require.

A similar increase of the Army under like circumstances was made in 1812. At the close of the war, the force in the service being found too large and too costly for a peace establishment, a reduction was ordered to be made under the supervision of a board of officers specially organized for that purpose. At the close of the present struggle the reduction of the present force may be accomplished in like manner, if found then to be larger than the public necessities require. In making any such reduction, however, a just regard to the public interests would imperatively require that a force amply sufficient to protect all the public property, wherever it may be found, should be retained.

I cannot forbear to speak favorably of the volunteer system as a substitute for a cumbrous and dangerous standing army. It has heretofore by many been deemed unreliable and inefficient in a sudden emergency, but actual facts have proved the contrary. If it be urged that the enemies of order have gained some slight advantages at remote points by reason of the absence of a sufficient regular force, the unexampled rapidity of concentration of volunteers already witnessed is an ample refutation of the argument. A Government whose every citizen stands ready to march to its defense can never be overthrown, for none is so strong as that whose foundations rest immovably in the hearts of the people. The spectacle of more than a quarter of a million of citizens rushing to the field in defense of the Constitution must ever take rank among the most extraordinary facts of history. Its interest is vastly heightened by the lavish outpouring of States and individuals of voluntary contributions of money, reaching an aggregate thus far of more than ten millions of dollars.

But a few weeks since the men composing this great army were pursuing the avocations of peace. They gathered from the farm, from the workshop, from the factory, from the mine. The minister came from his pulpit, the merchant from his counting-room, the professor and student from the college, the teacher and pupil from the common schools.

{p.306}

Young men of fortune left luxurious homes for the tent and the camp. Native and foreign born alike came forward with a kindred enthusiasm. That a well-disciplined, homogeneous, and efficient force should be formed out of such a seemingly heterogeneous mass appears almost incredible. But what is the actual fact? Experienced men, who have had ample opportunity to familiarize themselves with the condition of European armies, concede that in point of personnel this patriot army is fully equal to the finest regular troops of the Old World. A more intelligent body of men, or one actuated by purer motives, was never before marshaled in the field.

The calling forth of this large and admirable force in vindication of the Constitution and the laws is in strict accordance with a wise prudence and economy, and at the same time in perfect harmony with the uniform practice of the Government. But three years ago, when the authority of the nation was contemptuously defied by the Mormons in Utah, the only safe policy consistent with the dignity of the Government was the prompt employment of such an overwhelming force for the suppression of the rebellion as removed all possibility of failure. It will hardly be credited, however, that the following language in relation to that period was penned by John B. Floyd, then Secretary of War, and now leading the rebel forces, who have even less to justify their action than the Mormons:

When a small force was first sent to Utah, the Mormons attacked and destroyed their trains and made ready for a general attack upon the column. When a sufficient power was put on foot to put success beyond all doubt their bluster and bravado sank into whispers of terror and submission. This movement upon that Territory was demanded by the moral sentiment of the country, was due to a vindication of its laws and Constitution, and was essential to demonstrate the power of the Federal Government to chastise insubordination and quell rebellion, however formidable from numbers or position it might seem to be. Adequate preparations and a prompt advance of the Army was an act of mercy and humanity to those deluded people, for it prevented the effusion of blood.

I recommend the same vigorous and merciful policy now.

The reports of the chiefs of the different bureaus of this Department, which are herewith submitted, present the estimates of the probable amount of appropriations required in addition to those already made for the year ending June 30, 1860, for the force now in the field or which has been accepted and will be in service within the next twenty days, as follows:

Quartermaster’s Department$70,289,200.21
Subsistence Department27,278,781.50
Adjutant-General’s Department408,000.00
Ordnance Department7,468,172.00
Pay Department67,845,402.48
Engineer Department685,000.00
Topographical Engineer Department50,000.00
Surgeon-General’s Department1,271,841.00
Due States which have made advances for troops10,000,000.00
Total185,296,397.19

The resistance to the passage of troops through the city of Baltimore, hastening to the relief of the Federal capital, and the destruction of bridges of the Wilmington and Baltimore and the Northern Central Railroads, together with the refusal of the Baltimore and Ohio Company to transport the Government forces and supplies, involved the necessity at an early stage of the present troubles on the part of this Department to take possession of so much of the railway lines as was required to form a connection with the States from which troops and {p.307} supplies were expected. A military route was accordingly opened from Perryville, on the Chesapeake, by steamers to Annapolis, and thence by railroad to Washington.

In view of the necessities of the crisis Congress, it is not doubted, will justify the steps taken. As the movements of the U. S. forces are continued, the supervision of railroad and telegraph lines will remain a necessity, to be met by the Department. I would therefore recommend the propriety of an appropriation to be made by Congress to be applied, when the public exigencies demand, to the reconstruction and equipment of railroads and for the expense of maintenance and operating them, and also for the construction of additional telegraph lines and their appurtenances. I would also recommend a special appropriation for the reconstruction of the Long Bridge across the Potomac, which is now a military necessity.

The importance of enforcing the strictest discipline where active army operations are carried on in the rebellious States cannot be too strongly urged. Public confidence is for the time being destroyed, and the nice moral distinctions which obtain among men in well-ordered communities are apt to be lost sight of. The Federal courts being suspended, grave offenses may be committed over which our military courts as now organized have no authorized jurisdiction. It would seem only consistent with a just regard to the interests of the Government and the people that some properly organized military tribunal should be empowered to take cognizance of criminal offenses and to punish the offenders when found guilty. Such a tribunal should not have any jurisdiction when the functions of the Federal courts are uninterrupted. I therefore recommend that the subject be referred to the consideration of Congress.

The subsistence of troops now in service is a matter of the highest importance. Rations proper in quantity and quality are quite as essential to the efficiency of an army as valor or discipline. It is desirable, therefore, that the quality of rations distributed to the troops should, as far as possible, be adapted to their previous dietary habits. While it cannot be expected that the luxuries to which many have been accustomed should be provided by the commissariat, a just regard to health imposes upon the Government the duty of furnishing sound, healthful, and palatable food. A larger proportion of vegetables and of fresh meats, when they can be procured, than can now be furnished under the Army Regulations would undoubtedly diminish the danger of epidemics among troops.

I therefore submit the question whether it would not be expedient for Congress to enlarge the powers of the commissariat so as to enable it the better to carry into practice the views here suggested. As all requisitions for camp equipage, for the means of its transportation, and for supplies are made upon the Quartermaster-General’s Department, it is highly essential that every facility should be afforded its chief for meeting all such requisitions with promptness. At present the power of that bureau is limited. For instance, it seems very desirable that the troops in field should be supplied with waterproof capes and blankets, to serve as a protection against the effects of the climate. As the Army Regulations do not recognize such an item of clothing, and as no discretion has been lodged with the Department to act in the matter, many of the troops, for the lack of this essential outfit, have suffered much inconvenience. Some of the States of New England have sent their quotas forward equipped most admirably in this respect. I would recommend that this subject be commended to Congress for its favorable consideration.

{p.308}

The sudden large increase of the Army in May last induced the Acting Surgeon-General to call the attention of this Department to the necessity of some modification of the system of organization connected with the supervision of the hygiene and the comfort of the troops. A commission of inquiry and advice was accordingly instituted with the object of acting in co-operation with the Medical Bureau. The following gentlemen have consented to serve without compensation upon this commission: Henry W. Bellows, D. D.; Prof, A. D. Bache, LL. D.; Prof. Jeffries Wyman; Prof. Wolcott Gibbs, M. D.; W. H. Van Buren, M. D.; Samuel G. Howe, M. D.; R. C. Wood, surgeon, U. S. Army; George W. Cullum, U. S. Army, and Alexander E. Shiras, U. S. Army. They are now directing special inquiries in regard to the careful inspection of recruits and enlisted men, the best means of guarding and restoring their health and of securing the general comfort and efficiency of the troops, the proper provisions of hospitals, nurses, cooks, &c. The high character and well-known attainments of these distinguished gentlemen afford every assurance that they will bring to bear upon the subjects of their investigation the ripest teachings of sanitary science in its application to the details of military life.

The organization of military hospitals and the method of obtaining and regulating whatever appertains to the cure, relief, or care of the disabled, as also the regulations and routine through which the services of patriotic women are rendered available as nurses, was at an early period of the present struggle intrusted to the charge of Miss D. L. Dix, who volunteered her services, and is now, without remuneration, devoting her whole time to this important subject.

The arms and ordnance supplied from our national armories under the able superintendence of the Ordnance Bureau compare most favorably with the very best manufactured for foreign Governments. The celebrated Enfield rifle, so called, is a simple copy of the regular arm manufactured for many years at the Springfield Armory.

Previous to the early part of last year the Government had a supply of arms and munitions of war sufficient for any emergency. Through the bad faith of those intrusted with their guardianship they were taken from their proper depositories and distributed through portions of the country expected to take part in the contemplated rebellion. In consequence of the serious loss thus sustained there was available at the commencement of the outbreak a much less supply than usual of all kinds, but through zeal and activity of the Ordnance Bureau the embarrassment thus created has been in a great measure overcome. As the capacity of the Government armories was not equal to the supply needed, even after having doubled the force at the Springfield Armory, the Department found it absolutely necessary to procure arms to some extent from private manufacturers. It is believed that from these sources they can be obtained equal in quality and not much higher in cost than those made in the national workshops. It would, therefore, appear a wise policy on the part of the Government to encourage domestic industry by supplying our troops in part from private factories of our own country instead of making purchases from abroad. As rifled cannon are in point of effectiveness far superior to smooth-bored, arrangements have been made to rifle a large portion of the guns on hand, and the work is still in progress.

Some patriotic American citizens resident in Europe, fearing that the country might not have a sufficient supply, purchased on their own responsibility, through co-operation with the U. S. ministers to England and France, a number of improved cannon and muskets, and at your instance this Department accepted the drafts drawn to defray {p.309} the outlay thus assumed. A perfect battery of six Whitworth 12-pounder rifled cannon, with 3,000 rounds of ammunition, the munificent donation of sympathizing friends in Europe, has also been received from England.

It will be necessary for Congress, either at its approaching special or at its next annual session, to adopt measures for the reorganization, upon a uniform basis, of the militia of the country. I know of no better source of information on this subject than the able report of General Henry Knox, the first Secretary of War, who by his wise forecast and eminent appreciation of the future wants of the country showed the entire safety of an implicit reliance upon the popular will for the support of the Government in the most trying emergency, abundant confirmation of which fact is found in the present great rally of the people to the defense of the Constitution and laws.

I have already adverted to the superior manner in which some of the New England regiments now in service are equipped. This is to be attributed to the efficient home organization of the militia in some of those States. Their example is an excellent one, and cannot fail to have a beneficial effect upon such States as have not already adopted a like desirable organization. I think it important, also, to recommend a further distribution of improved arms among the militia of the States and Territories. As the returns of the militia are frequently inaccurate, this distribution should be made proportionate to the last census returns of free white male inhabitants capable of bearing arms.

The large disaffection at the present crisis of U. S. Army officers has excited the most profound astonishment, and naturally provokes inquiry as to its cause. But for this startling defection the rebellion never could have assumed formidable proportions. The mere accident of birth in a particular section or the influence of belief in particular political theories furnishes no satisfactory explanation of this remarkable fact. The majority of these officers solicited and obtained a military education at the hands of the Government-a mark of special favor conferred by the laws of Congress to only one in 70,000 inhabitants. At the National Military Academy they were received and treated as the adopted children of the Republic. By the peculiar relations thus established they virtually became bound by more than ordinary obligations of honor to remain faithful to their flag.

The question may be asked, in view of the extraordinary treachery displayed, whether its promoting cause may not be traced to a radical defect in the system of education itself. As a step preliminary to the consideration of this question, I would direct attention to the report, herewith submitted, of the Board of Visitors to the West Point Academy.*** The supplemental report makes special reference to the system of discipline, which it appears from facts obtained upon investigation ignores practically the essential distinction between acts wrong in themselves and acts wrong because prohibited by special regulations.

The report states that no difference is made in the penalties affixed as punishments for either class of offenses. It is argued with reason that such a system is directly calculated to confound in the mind of the pupil the distinctions between right and wrong, and to substitute, in the decision of grave and moral questions, habit for conscience. I earnestly trust that Congress will early address itself to a thorough examination of the system of education and discipline adopted in this important school, and if defects are found to exist, that it will provide a remedy with the least possible delay. The present exigencies of the public {p.310} service have necessarily imposed upon this Department a vast increase of responsibility and labor. To facilitate its proper administration, I would recommend the passage of a law by Congress authorizing the appointment of an Assistant Secretary of War, and the requisite additional appropriation for the employment of an increased clerical force. In concluding this report, I deem it proper to express my deep indebtedness to the veteran General-in-Chief of the Army for the constant and self-sacrificing devotion to the public service exhibited by him in this grave crisis, and also to the chiefs of the different bureaus of this Department for the able and efficient manner in which they have at all times aided me in the discharge of my official duties.

I have the honor to be, with high regard, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Omitted; but see abstract, next, ante. No returns were forwarded by the Adjutant-General for the Departments of Annapolis, Kentucky, and the Ohio.

** The number of three-months’ troops actually furnished was 91,816.

*** Omitted.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 39.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 1, 1861.

I. No volunteer will be discharged upon surgeon’s certificate of disability until the certificate shall have been submitted to the Medical Director, and shall have been approved and countersigned by him.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

–––

Military regulation concerning passports.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, July 1, 1861.

The General-in-Chief, by permission of the Executive, announces to all concerned that hereafter no passport, by whomsoever signed or countersigned, will entitle any person to pass the lines of the U. S. Army unless the same be also countersigned by himself or the commander of a military geographical department. This regulation will continue in force until further notice.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 2, 1861.

Governor YATES,

Ferree was referred to you for opportunity of getting into one of the ten regiments accepted. If more than ten companies of cavalry are now ready, accept and have them mustered in-not otherwise.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 2, 1861.

His Excellency Governor JOHN A. ANDREW, Boston, Mass.:

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 29th ultimo, requesting information from the Adjutant-General as to the place and manner of mustering {p.311} out of service the three-months’ Massachusetts Volunteers, I am directed to state that the Adjutant-General is not yet informed as to whether measures have been adopted for this purpose. It is the desire and advice of the Adjutant-General that the regiments in question be returned to their homes at the expense of the United States, and be there mustered out of the service.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. D. RUGGLES, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, July 2, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington City, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I would much prefer that in the future all troops needed from this State for the service of the United States be called for by regular requisition upon the Executive of the State, unless such troops shall be uniformed and equipped by the United States or by themselves. I will endeavor to furnish promptly all troops that may be regularly required from this State, and I am satisfied it will save much complication and unpleasant feeling here to have all further troops furnished upon formal requisition.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

–––

[JULY 3, 1861.-For Cameron to Peirpoint, in regard to organization of troops in Western Virginia, &c., see Series I, Vol. II, p. 736.]

–––

FELLOW-CITIZENS OF THE SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES:

Having been convened on an extraordinary occasion, as authorized by the Constitution, your attention is not called to any ordinary subject of legislation.

At the beginning of the present Presidential term, four months ago, the functions of the Federal Government were found to be generally suspended within the several States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida, excepting only those of the Post-Office Department.

Within these States all the forts, arsenals, dock-yards, custom-houses, and the like, including the movable and stationary property in and about them, had been seized, and were held in open hostility to this Government, excepting only Forts Pickens, Taylor, and Jefferson, on and near the Florida coast, and Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, S. C. The forts thus seized had been put in improved condition; new ones had been built, and armed forces had been organized, and were organizing, all avowedly with the same hostile purpose.

The forts remaining in the possession of the Federal Government in and near these States were either besieged or menaced by warlike preparations, and especially Fort Sumter was nearly surrounded by well-protected hostile batteries, with guns equal in quality to the best of its own and outnumbering the latter as perhaps ten to one. A disproportionate share of the Federal muskets and rifles had somehow {p.312} found their way into these States and had been seized to be used against the Government. Accumulations of the public revenue lying within them had been seized for the same object. The Navy was scattered in distant seas, leaving but a very small part of it within the immediate reach of the Government. Officers of the Federal Army and Navy had resigned in great numbers, and of those resigning a large proportion had taken up arms against the Government. Simultaneously, and in connection with all this, the purpose to sever the Federal Union was openly avowed. In accordance with this purpose an ordinance had been adopted in each of these States declaring the States, respectively, to be separated from the National Union. A formula for instituting a combined government of these States had been promulgated, and this illegal organization, in the character of Confederate States, was already invoking recognition, aid, and intervention from foreign powers.

Finding this condition of things and believing it to be an imperative duty upon the incoming Executive to prevent, if possible, the consummation of such attempt to destroy the Federal Union, a choice of means to that end became indispensable. This choice was made and was declared in the inaugural address. The policy chosen looked to the exhaustion of all peaceful measures before a resort to any stronger ones. It sought only to hold the public places and property not already wrested from the Government and to collect the revenue, relying for the rest on time, discussion, and the ballot-box. It promised a continuance of the mails, at Government expense, to the very people who were resisting the Government, and it gave repeated pledges against any disturbance to any of the people or any of their rights. Of all that which a President might constitutionally and justifiably do in such a case, everything was forborne without which it was believed possible to keep the Government on foot.

On the 5th of March (the present incumbent’s first full day in office), a letter of Major Anderson, commanding at Fort Sumter, written on the 28th of February, and received at the War Department on the 4th of March, was, by that Department, placed in his hands. This letter expressed the professional opinion of the writer that re-enforcements could not be thrown into that fort, within the time for his relief rendered necessary by the limited supply of provisions and with a view of holding possession of the same, with a force of less than 20,000 good and well-disciplined men. This opinion was concurred in by all the officers of his command, and their memoranda on the subject were made inclosures of Major Anderson’s letter. The whole was immediately laid before Lieutenant-General Scott, who at once concurred with Major Anderson in opinion. On reflection, however, he took full time, consulting with other officers, both of the Army and the Navy, and at the end of four days came reluctantly, but decidedly, to the same conclusion as before. He also stated at the same time that no such sufficient force was then at the control of the Government or could be raised and brought to the ground within the time when the provisions in the fort would be exhausted. In a purely military point of view this reduced the duty of the Administration in the case to the mere matter of getting the garrison safely out of the fort.

It was believed, however, that to so abandon that position, under the circumstances, would be utterly ruinous; that the necessity under which it was to be done would not be fully understood; that by many it would be construed as a part of a voluntary policy; that at home it would discourage the friends of the Union, embolden its adversaries, and go far to insure to the latter a recognition abroad; that, in fact, it {p.313} would be our national destruction consummated. This could not be allowed. Starvation was not yet upon the garrison, and ere it would be reached Fort Pickens might be reinforced. This last would be a clear indication of policy and would better enable the country to accept the evacuation of Fort Sumter as a military necessity. An order was at once directed to be sent for the landing of the troops from the steamship Brooklyn into Fort Pickens. This order could not go by land but must take the longer and slower route by sea. The first return news from the order was received just one week before the fall of Fort Sumter. The news itself was that the officer commanding the Sabine, to which vessel the troops had been transferred from the Brooklyn, acting upon some quasi armistice of the late Administration (and of the existence of which the present Administration, up to the time the order was dispatched, had only too vague and uncertain rumors to fix attention), had refused to land the troops. To now reinforce Fort Pickens before a crisis would be reached at Fort Sumter was impossible-rendered so by the near exhaustion of provisions in the latter-named fort. In precaution against such a conjuncture, the Government had a few days before commenced preparing an expedition, as well adapted as might be, to relieve Fort Sumter, which expedition was intended to be ultimately used or not, according to circumstances. The strongest anticipated case for using it was now presented, and it was resolved to send it forward. As had been intended, in this contingency, it was also resolved to notify the Governor of South Carolina that he might expect an attempt would be made to provision the fort, and that if the attempt should not be resisted there would be no effort to throw in men, arms, or ammunition, without further notice, or in case of an attack upon the fort. This notice was accordingly given, whereupon the fort was attacked and bombarded to its fall without even awaiting the arrival of the provisioning expedition.

It is thus seen that the assault upon and reduction of Fort Sumter was in no sense a matter of self-defense on the part of the assailants. They well knew that the garrison in the fort could by no possibility commit aggression upon them. They knew-they were expressly notified-that the giving of bread to the few brave and hungry men of the garrison was all which would on that occasion be attempted unless themselves, by resisting so much, should provoke more. They knew that this Government desired to keep the garrison in the fort, not to assail them, but merely to maintain visible possession, and thus to preserve the Union from actual and immediate dissolution, trusting, as hereinbefore stated, to time, discussion, and the ballot-box for final adjustment; and they assailed and reduced the fort for precisely the reverse object-to drive out the visible authority of the Federal Union and thus force it to immediate dissolution. That this was their object the Executive well understood, and having said to them in the inaugural address, “You can have no conflict without being yourselves the aggressors,” he took pains not only to keep this declaration good, but also to keep the case so free from the power of ingenious sophistry as that the world should not be able to misunderstand it. By the affair at Fort Sumter, with its surrounding circumstances, that point was reached. Then and thereby the assailants of the Government began the conflict of arms, without a gun in sight or in expectancy to return their fire, save only the few in the fort sent to that harbor years before for their own protection and still ready to give that protection in whatever was lawful. In this act, discarding all else, they have forced upon the country the distinct issue, “Immediate dissolution or blood.”

{p.314}

And this issue embraces more than the fate of these United States. It presents to the whole family of man the question whether a constitutional republic or democracy-a Government of the people, by the same people-can or cannot maintain its territorial integrity against its own domestic foes. It presents the question whether discontented individuals, too few in numbers to control administration, according to organic law, in any case, can always, upon the pretenses made in this case, or on any other pretenses, or arbitrarily without any pretense, break up their Government and thus practically put an end to free government upon the earth. It forces us to ask: “Is there, in all republics, this inherent and fatal weakness?” “Must a government, of necessity, be too strong for the liberties of its own people, or too weak to maintain its own existence ?”

So viewing the issue, no choice was left but to call out the war power of the Government; and so to resist force employed for its destruction by force for its preservation.

The call was made, and the response of the country was most gratifying, surpassing in unanimity and spirit the most sanguine expectation. Yet none of the States commonly called slave States, except Delaware, gave a regiment through regular State organization. A few regiments have been organized within some others of those States by individual enterprise and received into the Government service. Of course the seceded States, so called (and to which Texas had been joined about the time of the inauguration), gave no troops to the cause of the Union. The border States, so called, were not uniform in their action, some of them being almost for the Union, while in others-as Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas-the Union sentiment was nearly repressed and silenced. The course taken in Virginia was the most remarkable, perhaps the most important. A convention elected by the people of that State to consider this very question of disrupting the Federal Union was in session at the capital of Virginia when Fort Sumter fell. To this body the people had chosen a large majority of professed Union men. Almost immediately after the fall of Sumter many members of that majority went over to the original disunion minority and with them adopted an ordinance for withdrawing the State from the Union. Whether this change was wrought by their great approval of the assault upon Sumter or their great resentment at the Government’s resistance to that assault is not definitely known. Although they submitted the ordinance for ratification to a vote of the people to be taken on a day then somewhat more than a month distant, the convention and the Legislature (which was also in session at the same time and place), with leading men of the State not members of either, immediately commenced acting as if the State were already out of the Union. They pushed military preparations vigorously forward all over the State. They seized the U. S. Armory at Harper’s Ferry and the navy-yard at Gosport, near Norfolk. They received-perhaps invited-into their State large bodies of troops with their warlike appointments from the so-called seceded States. They formally entered into a treaty of temporary alliance and co-operation with the so-called “Confederate States,” and sent members to their Congress at Montgomery. And finally, they permitted the insurrectionary Government to be transferred to their capital at Richmond.

The people of Virginia have thus allowed this giant insurrection to make its nest within her borders, and this Government has no choice left but to deal with it where it finds it. And it has the less regret, as the loyal citizens have in due form claimed its protection. Those loyal {p.315} citizens this Government is bound to recognize and protect as being Virginia.

In the border States, so called-in fact, the middle States-there are those who favor a policy which they call “armed neutrality;” that is, an arming of those States to prevent the Union forces passing one way or the disunion the other over their soil. This would be disunion completed. Figuratively speaking, it would be the building of an impassable wall along the line of separation-and yet, not quite an impassable one, for under the guise of neutrality it would tie the hands of the Union men, and freely pass supplies from among them to the insurrectionists, which it could not do as an open enemy. At a stroke it would take all the trouble off the hands of secession, except only what proceeds from the external blockade. It would do for the disunionists that which of all things they most desire-feed them well and give them disunion without a struggle of their own. It recognizes no fidelity to the Constitution, no obligation to maintain the Union, and while very many who have favored it are doubtless loyal citizens it is nevertheless very injurious in effect.

Recurring to the action of the Government, it may be stated that at first a call was made for 75,000 militia, and rapidly following this a proclamation was issued for closing the ports of the insurrectionary districts by proceedings in the nature of blockade. So far all was believed to be strictly legal. At this point the insurrectionists announced their purpose to enter upon the practice of privateering.

Other calls were made for volunteers to serve for three years, unless sooner discharged, and also for large additions to the Regular Army and Navy. These measures, whether strictly legal or not, were ventured upon under what appeared to be a popular demand and a public necessity, trusting then, as now, that Congress would readily ratify them. It is believed that nothing has been done beyond the constitutional competency of Congress.

Soon after the first call for militia it was considered a duty to authorize the commanding general in proper cases, according to his discretion, to suspend the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, or in other words to arrest and detain, without resort to the ordinary processes and forms of law, such individuals as he might deem dangerous to the public safety. This authority has purposely been exercised but very sparingly. Nevertheless the legality and propriety of what has been done under it are questioned and the attention of the country has been called to the proposition that one who is sworn to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed” should not himself violate them. Of course some consideration was given to the questions of power and propriety before this matter was acted upon. The whole of the laws which were required to be faithfully executed were being resisted and failing of execution in nearly one-third of the States. Must they be allowed to finally fail of execution, even had it been perfectly clear that by the use of the means necessary to their execution some single law, made in such extreme tenderness of the citizen’s liberty that practically it relieves more of the guilty than of the innocent, should to a very limited extent be violated? To state the question more directly, are all the laws but one to go unexecuted and the Government itself go to pieces lest that one be violated? Even in such a case would not the official oath be broken if the Government should be overthrown, when it was believed that disregarding the single law would tend to preserve it? But it was not believed that this question was presented. It was not believed that any law was violated. The {p.316} provision of the Constitution that “the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may require it,” is equivalent to a provision-is a provision-that such privilege may be suspended when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety does require it. It was decided that we have a case of rebellion, and that the public safety does require the qualified suspension of the privilege of the writ which was authorized to be made. Now, it is insisted that Congress and not the Executive is vested with this power. But the Constitution itself is silent as to which, or who, is to exercise the power; and as the provision was plainly made for a dangerous emergency, it cannot be believed the framers of the instrument intended that in every case the danger should run its course until Congress could be called together, the very assembling of which might be prevented, as was intended in this case, by the rebellion.

No more extended argument is now offered, as an opinion at some length will probably be presented by the Attorney-General. Whether there shall be any legislation upon the subject, and if any, what, is submitted entirely to the better judgment of Congress.

The forbearance of this Government had been so extraordinary and so long continued as to lead some foreign nations to shape their action as if they supposed the early destruction of our national Union was probable. While this, on discovery, gave the Executive some concern, he is now happy to say that the sovereignty and rights of the United States are now everywhere practically respected by foreign powers, and a general sympathy with the country is manifested throughout the world.

The reports of the Secretaries of the Treasury, War, and the Navy will give the information in detail deemed necessary and convenient for your deliberation and action, while the Executive and all the Departments will stand ready to supply omissions or to communicate new facts considered important for you to know.

It is now recommended that you give the legal means for making this contest a short and a decisive one; that you place at the control of the Government for the work at least 400,000 men and $400,000,000. That number of men is about one-tenth of those of proper ages within the regions where apparently all are willing to engage, and the sum is less than a twenty-third part of the money value owned by the men who seem ready to devote the whole. A debt of $600,000,000 now is a less sum per head than was the debt of our Revolution when we came out of that struggle, and the money value in the country now bears even a greater proportion to what it was then than does the population. Surely each man has as strong a motive now to preserve our liberties as each had then to establish them.

A right result at this time will be worth more to the world than ten times the men and ten times the money. The evidence reaching us from the country leaves no doubt that the material for the work is abundant, and that it needs only the hand of legislation to give it legal sanction and the hand of the Executive to give it practical shape and efficiency. One of the greatest perplexities of the Government is to avoid receiving troops faster than it can provide for them. In a word, the people will save their Government if the Government itself will do its part only indifferently well.

It might seem at first thought to be of little difference whether the present movement at the South be called “secession” or “rebellion.” The movers, however, well understand the difference. At the beginning they knew they could never raise their treason to any respectable {p.317} magnitude by any name which implies violation of law. They knew their people possessed as much of moral sense, as much of devotion to law and order, and as much pride in and reverence for the history and Government of their common country as any other civilized and patriotic people. They knew they could make no advancement directly in the teeth of these strong and noble sentiments. Accordingly they commenced by an insidious debauching of the public mind. They invented an ingenious sophism, which, if conceded, was followed by perfectly logical steps through all the incidents to the complete destruction of the Union. The sophism itself is, that any State of the Union may, consistently with the national Constitution, and therefore lawfully and peacefully, withdraw from the Union without the consent of the Union or of any other State. The little disguise that the supposed right is to be exercised only for just cause, themselves to be the sole judge of its justice, is too thin to merit any notice.

With rebellion thus sugar coated, they have been drugging the public mind of their section for more than thirty years, and until at length they have brought many good men to a willingness to take up arms against the Government the day after some assemblage of men have enacted the farcical pretense of taking their State out of the Union, who could have been brought to no such thing the day before.

This sophism derives much, perhaps the whole, of its currency from the assumption that there is some omnipotent and sacred supremacy pertaining to a State-to each State of our Federal Union. Our States have neither more nor less power than that reserved to them in the Union by the Constitution-no one of them ever having been a State out of the Union. The original ones passed into the Union even before they cast off their British colonial dependence, and the new ones each came into the Union directly from a condition of dependence, excepting Texas; and even Texas in its temporary independence was never designated a State. The new ones only took the designation of States on coming into the Union, while that name was first adopted for the old ones in and by the Declaration of Independence. Therein the “United Colonies” were declared to be “free and independent States;” but even then the object plainly was not to declare their independence of one another or of the Union, but directly the contrary, as their mutual pledge and their mutual action before, at the time, and afterward, abundantly show. The express plighting of faith by each and all of the original thirteen in the Articles of Confederation, two years later, that the Union shall be perpetual is most conclusive. Hawing never been States, either in substance or in name, outside of the Union, whence this magical omnipotence of “State rights,” asserting a claim of power to lawfully destroy the Union itself? Much is said about the “sovereignty” of the States, but the word even is not in the national Constitution, nor, as is believed, in any of the State constitutions. What is a “sovereignty” in the political sense of the term? Would it be far wrong to define it “a political community without a political superior?” Tested by this, no one of our States, except Texas, ever was a sovereignty; and even Texas gave up the character on coming into the Union, by which act she acknowledged the Constitution of the United States and the laws and treaties of the United States made in pursuance of the Constitution to be for her the supreme law of the land. The States have their status in the Union, and they have no other legal status. If they break from this they can only do so against law and by revolution. The Union, and not themselves separately, procured their independence and their liberty. By conquest or purchase the Union gave each of them whatever of independence and liberty it has.

{p.318}

The Union is older than any of the States, and in fact it created them as States. Originally some dependent colonies made the Union, and in turn the Union threw off their old dependence for them and made them States, such as they are. Not one of them ever had a State constitution independent of the Union. Of course it is not forgotten that all the new States framed their constitutions before they entered the Union, nevertheless dependent upon and preparatory to coming into the Union.

Unquestionably the States have the powers and rights reserved to them in and by the national Constitution; but among these, surely, are not included all conceivable powers, however mischievous or destructive; but, at most, such only as were known in the world, at the time, as governmental powers; and certainly a power to destroy the Government itself had never been known as a governmental-as a merely administrative power. This relative matter of national power and State rights, as a principle, is no other than the principle of generality and locality. Whatever concerns the whole should be confided to the whole-to the General Government; while whatever concerns only the State should be left exclusively to the State. This is all there is of original principle about it. Whether the national Constitution, in defining boundaries between the two, has applied the principle with exact accuracy is not to be questioned. We are all bound by that defining, without question.

What is now combatted is the position that secession is consistent with the Constitution-is lawful and peaceful. It is not contended that there is any express law for it; and nothing should ever be implied as law which leads to unjust or absurd consequences. The nation purchased, with money, the countries out of which several of these States were formed. Is it just that they shall go off without leave and without refunding? The nation paid very large sums (in the aggregate, I believe, nearly a hundred millions) to relieve Florida of the aboriginal tribes. Is it just that she shall now be off without consent, or without making any return? The nation is now in debt for money applied to the benefit of these so-called seceding States, in common with the rest. Is it just either that creditors shall go unpaid, or the remaining States pay the whole? A part of the present national debt was contracted to pay the old debts of Texas. Is it just that she shall leave and pay no part of this herself? Again, if one State may secede, so may another; and when all shall have seceded none is left to pay the debts. Is this quite just to creditors? Did we notify them of this sage view of ours when we borrowed their money? If we now recognize this doctrine by allowing the seceders to go in peace, it is difficult to see what we can do if others choose to go, or to extort terms upon which they will promise to remain.

The seceders insist that our Constitution admits of secession. They have assumed to make a national constitution of their own, in which, of necessity, they have either discarded or retained the right of secession, as, they insist, it exists in ours. If they have discarded it, they thereby admit that on principle it ought not to be in ours. If they have retained it by their own construction of ours, they show that to be consistent they must secede from one another whenever they shall find it the easiest way of settling their debts or effecting any other selfish or unjust object. The principle itself is one of disintegration and upon which no Government can possibly endure.

If all the States save one should assert the power to drive that one out of the Union, it is presumed the whole class of seceder politicians {p.319} would at once deny the power and denounce the act as the greatest outrage upon State rights. But suppose that precisely the same act, instead of being called “driving the one out,” should be called “the seceding of the others from that one,” it would be exactly what the seceders claim to do; unless, indeed, they make the point that the one, because it is a minority, may rightfully do what the others, because they are a majority, may not rightfully do. These politicians are subtle and profound on the rights of minorities. They are not partial to that power which made the Constitution, and speaks from the preamble, calling itself” We, the people.”

It may well be questioned whether there is to-day a majority of the legally qualified voters of any State, except, perhaps, South Carolina, in favor of disunion. There is much reason to believe that the Union men are the majority in many, if not in every other one, of the so-called seceded States. The contrary has not been demonstrated in any one of them. It is ventured to affirm this, even of Virginia and Tennessee; for the result of an election, held in military camps, where the bayonets are all on one side of the question voted upon, can scarcely be considered as demonstrating popular sentiment. At such an election all that large class who are, at once, for the Union and against coercion would be coerced to vote against the Union.

It may be affirmed, without extravagance, that the free institutions we enjoy have developed the powers and improved the condition of our whole people beyond any example in the world. Of this we now have a striking and an impressive illustration. So large an army as the Government has now on foot was never before known without a soldier in it but who had taken his place there of his own free choice. But more than this; there are many single regiments whose members, one and another, possess full practical knowledge of all the arts, sciences, professions, and whatever else, whether useful or elegant, is known in the world; and there is scarcely one from which there could not be selected a President, a Cabinet, a Congress, and perhaps a court abundantly competent to administer the Government itself. Nor do I say this is not true, also in the army of our late friends, now adversaries, in this contest; but if it is, so much better the reason why the Government which has conferred such benefits on them and us should not be broken up. Whoever, in any section, proposes to abandon such a Government would do well to consider in deference to what principle it is that he does it-what better he is likely to get in its stead-whether the substitute will give, or be intended to give, so much of good to the people. There are some foreshadowings on this subject. Our adversaries have adopted some declarations of independence, in which, unlike the good old one, penned by Jefferson, they omit the words “all men are created equal.” Why? They have adopted a temporary national constitution, in the preamble of which, unlike our good old one, signed by Washington, they omit “We, the people,” and substitute “We, the deputies of the sovereign and independent States.” Why? Why this deliberate pressing out of view the rights of men and the authority of the people?

This is essentially a people’s contest. On the side of the Union it is a struggle for maintaining in the world that form and substance of government whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men-to lift artificial weights from all shoulders; to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all; to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance in the race of life. Yielding to partial and temporary departures, from necessity, this is the leading object of the Government for whose existence we contend.

{p.320}

I am most happy to believe that the plain people understand and appreciate this. It is worthy of note that while in this, the Government’s hour of trial, large numbers of those in the Army and Navy who have been favored with the offices have resigned and proved false to the hand which had pampered them, not one common soldier or common sailor is known to have deserted his flag.

Great honor is due to those officers who remained true, despite the example of their treacherous associates; but the greatest honor, and most important fact of all, is the unanimous firmness of the common soldiers and common sailors. To the last man, so far as known, they have successfully resisted the traitorous efforts of those whose commands but an hour before they obeyed as absolute law. This is the patriotic instinct of plain people. They understand, without an argument, that the destroying the Government which was made by Washington means no good to them.

Our popular Government has often been called an experiment. Two points in it our people have already settled-the successful establishing and the successful administering of it. One still remains-its successful maintenance against a formidable internal attempt to overthrow it. It is now for them to demonstrate to the world that those who can fairly carry an election can also suppress a rebellion; that ballots are the rightful and peaceful successors of bullets; and that when ballots have fairly and constitutionally decided there can be no successful appeal back to bullets; that there can be no successful appeal except to ballots themselves, at succeeding elections. Such will be a great lesson of peace; teaching men that what they cannot take by an election, neither can they take it by a war; teaching all the folly of being the beginners of a war.

Lest there might be some uneasiness in the minds of candid men as to what is to be the course of the Government toward the Southern States after the rebellion shall have been suppressed, the Executive deems it proper to say, it will be his purpose then, as ever, to be guided by the Constitution and the laws; and that he probably will have no different understanding of the powers and duties of the Federal Government relatively to the rights of the States and the people, under the Constitution, than that expressed in the inaugural address.

He desires to preserve the Government, that it may be administered for all, as it was administered by the men who made it. Loyal citizens everywhere have the right to claim this of their Government; and the Government has no right to withhold or neglect it. It is not perceived that, in giving it, there is any coercion, any conquest, or any subjugation, in any just sense of those terms.

The Constitution provides, and all the States have accepted the provision, that “The United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a republican form of government.” But if a State may lawfully go out of the Union, having done so, it may also discard the republican form of government; so that to prevent its going out is an indispensable means to the end of maintaining the guaranty mentioned; and when an end is lawful and obligatory the indispensable means to it are also lawful and obligatory.

It was with the deepest regret that the Executive found the duty of employing the war power, in defense of the Government, forced upon him. He could but perform this duty or surrender the existence of the Government. No compromise by public servants could, in this case, be a cure; not that compromises are not often proper, but that no popular Government can long survive a marked precedent, that those {p.321} who carry an election can only save the Government from immediate destruction by giving up the main point upon which the people gave the election. The people themselves, and not their servants, can safely reverse their own deliberate decisions.

As a private citizen the Executive could not have consented that these institutions shall perish; much less could he in betrayal of so vast and so sacred a trust as these free people had confided to him. He felt that he had no moral right to shrink, nor even to count the chances of his own life, in what might follow. In full view of his great responsibility he has, so far, done what he has deemed his duty. You will now, according to your own judgment, perform yours. He sincerely hopes that your views and your action may so accord with his as to assure all faithful citizens who have been disturbed in their rights of a certain and speedy restoration to them, under the Constitution and the laws.

And having thus chosen our course, without guile and with pure purpose, let us renew our trust in God, and go forward without fear and with manly hearts.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

JULY 4, 1861.

–––

ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 4, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following statement in relation to the transfer of arms to the Southern States by order of John B. Floyd, Secretary of War, dated December 29, 1859:

A statement of the arms on hand in November, 1859, was furnished on the 12th of that month by direction of the Secretary of War.

That statement showed that there were then:

States.Muskets.Rifles.
Maine24,313
Massachusetts261,08212,855
New York48,82017,995
Pennsylvania27,6291,622
Michigan446
California48,4704,574
Washington Territory3,763126
Total in free States414,52337,172
Virginia14,3774,317
North Carolina7,6781,685
South Carolina2,413814
Alabama2,36432
Louisiana11,6721,488
Texas1,391260
Arkansas34954
Missouri33,015719
Maryland51
District of Columbia73,6572,319
Total in slave States146,88711,690

Mr. Floyd returned the statement to this office with orders, dated December 29, 1859, to Colonel Craig to transfer to the arsenals in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana 105,000 muskets from Springfield Armory, Mass., and 10,000 rifles from Watertown Arsenal, N. Y., and Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y. The orders for {p.322} the transfers were accordingly given January 30, 1860, and were executed in February of that year.

The transfer made the following changes in the previous statement, viz:

States.Muskets.Rifles.
Massachusetts156,0826,855
New York48,82011,995
North Carolina32,6783,685
South Carolina17,4132,814
Georgia20,0002,000
Alabama17,3642,032
Louisiana41,6723,488
left in the free States309,52327,172
Left in the slave States251,87721,690

It will be seen that after the transfer the six seceding States-South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas-had 97,750 muskets and 10,594 rifles; the other slave States, 154,127 muskets and 11,096 rifles; the free States, 309,523 muskets and 27,172 rifles.

The six States before mentioned had therefore between one-fifth and one-sixth of all the muskets and between one-fourth and one-fifth of all the rifles in the country.

Very respectfully,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Brevet Brigadier-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 5, 1861.

M. G. DUPUIS AND OTHERS, Geneva, Switzerland:

SIRS: I very much regret that the Government could not accept the generous offer which you made through the U. S. consul at Geneva. We have already an army composed of more than 300,000 men, a number greater than we need for the actual crisis.

Expressing sincerely my appreciation of the honor conferred by your devotion to the cause of the liberty and sovereignty of our great Republic, I have the honor to be, sirs, your devoted servant,

SIMON CAMERON.

–––

MADISON, Wis., July 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Our Third Regiment of 1,000 men leaves next Tuesday for Washington; the Fourth Regiment two or three days later. Will their arms be ready at Harrisburg?

A. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin.

–––

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, Iowa City, July 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed find statement of nine captains of the First Regiment Iowa Volunteers, on behalf of themselves and companies, {p.323} expressing their readiness to continue in service under a different regimental organization after the expiration of their present term.* Now, therefore, I, Samuel J. Kirkwood, Governor of the State of Iowa, hereby tender to the War Department these nine companies (with such other as will make an entire regiment) for three years or during the war from date of the day following the expiration of their present term of service.

Respectfully, yours,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

P. S.-Please answer at once.

* Inclosure omitted

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 8, 1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL STATE OF NEW YORK, Albany, N. Y.:

SIR: I am directed to inquire how many regiments of volunteers from the State of New York have been mustered into the service of the United States for two years, and how many of these two-years’ regiments are or were three-months’ regiments?

I am, sir,

GEO. D. RUGGLES, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 8, 1861.

Hon. A. W. RANDALL, Governor of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.:

By arrangement of General Rufus King, Third Regiment will be armed at Harrisburg, Fourth Regiment at Washington, and Fifth and Sixth at Milwaukee.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

–––

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, July 8, 1861.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN:

MY DEAR SIR: If the Union is to be maintained the loyal people of the border slave States must be sustained.

By great exertions we have got up a spirit of enlistment in the volunteer service of the United States. Our men who have enlisted have been lying out without even a blanket, destitute of tents and camp equipage, destitute of arms and ammunition, for weeks and weeks.

Complaint is made out of the State that we are not defending ourselves. How can we, without arms or anything of defense in our hands? I have written again and again to the Secretary of War. I have endeavored to see him, but cannot find him with a moment’s leisure. We must have immediately forthwith 5,000 arms, with 100 rounds of cartridges for each, for infantry, and 1,000 carbines for cavalry, with camp equipage, uniforms, &c., for both, or we shall have to give up the contest.

{p.324}