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 Research US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. II, Vol. 4–Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

{p.1}

SERIES II.-VOLUME IV.
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC.,
RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE
FROM JUNE 13, 1862, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1862.

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UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.

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HALLECK’S HEADQUARTERS, June 13, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

There are at Nashville about 1,500 prisoners of war released on parole by General Beauregard. They are without officers, in no discipline and greatly demoralized. They will be of very little service and I respectfully recommend that they be mustered out of service.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington. June 13, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your telegram received. I will send an officer immediately to Nashville to pay off the discharged prisoners and muster them out of service.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 133.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 13, 1862.

...

III. Capt. H. M. Lazelle, Eighth Infantry, will report for such duty as he can perform to Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, at New York City.

...

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, June 13, 1862.

Hon. G. A. GROW, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SIR: In compliance with a resolution of the House of May 28, 1862, I have the honor herewith to inclose to you the report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, with accompanying papers, seven [six] in number, and marked respectively A, B, C, D, E and F.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. USHER, Acting Secretary.

{p.2}

[Inclosure.]

OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, June 5, 1862.

Hon. C. B. SMITH, Secretary, of the Interior.

SIR: I return herewith a resolution adopted by the House of Representatives in the following words:

On motion of Mr. Richardson, Resolved, That the Secretary of the Interior be and is hereby directed to inform this House how many Indians who have been driven into Kansas by the rebels have been or are now being fed and clothed there by the Government, at what expense per day and through whom, and whether by contract, and if so with whom.

calling for information from you relative to the southern refugee Indians who are now in Kansas, which resolution was on the 29th ultimo referred by you to this office for the information sought. I cannot perhaps better give the information desired than by reporting the action of this office more or less in detail.

On the 9th day of January last I received information that the disloyal Indians in the Territory west of Arkansas aided by a considerable force of white troops from Texas and Arkansas had attacked the Union or loyal Indians of that Territory. The Union Indians as nearly as I could ascertain were composed of three-fourths of the Creeks, one-half or two-thirds of the Seminoles and members from all other tribes in said Territory except perhaps the Choctaws and Chickasaws, of whom very few if any adhered to the Government.

Notwithstanding the abandonment of all the forts of the Territory by the U. S. troops and the treachery of the superintendent and agents first appointed by the present Administration these Indians stood firmly to their treaty obligations with the United States, and under the renowned Hopoeithleyohola met their opponents upon the battlefield. Twice they succeeded in repulsing the combined forces of whites and Indians arrayed against them, but in the third battle which took place early in January last they were defeated and compelled to flee from the country with their families, leaving everything in the way of property that would impede their flight. They reached Kansas about the middle of that month.

When in December last and previous to any knowledge of their defeat I learned of the noble struggle then being made by Hopoeithleyohola and the Creeks, Seminoles and other Indians under him I renewed through you my application to the War Department for troops for their relief, which resulted in authority being given to General Hunter to organize and arm 4,000 loyal Indians to accompany the expedition then proposed to be sent into the Indian country under General Lane. On the 3d day of January last I received your communication (copy herewith marked A) authorizing me to assist General Hunter in the organization of these Indians. After advising with the President and yourself I proceeded to Fort Leavenworth, in Kansas, which point I reached late in January last. On my arrival I was informed by General Hunter that Hopoeithleyohola had been defeated and was with 5,000 or 6,000 of his people in Southern Kansas in a most deplorable condition-men, women and children naked, starving and without shelter. Numbers of them had been wounded in battle and very many being barefooted and otherwise exposed were badly frozen. The sick and feeble, the dead and dying were scattered along their route for 100 miles or more. I had no information until I reached Kansas of these disasters.

On the 6th day of February I received a communication from General {p.3} Hunter with accompanying documents (copies herewith marked B, C, D) advising me that he could only supply these people with provisions temporarily; that the provisions made by the officers under his command for their support would be exhausted by the 15th day of February, and that from that time I would be expected to make provision for them. I could but feel that the responsibility was great. The numbers had been accumulating until it was estimated that they amounted to 8,000 to be provided for, and these lying upon the ground which was covered with snow and ice and the weather intensely cold. General Hunter advised me that he had no authority to furnish them clothing, but that Superintendent Coffin acting under his advice had purchased some $10,000 worth of blankets and other necessaries. It will be seen that this purchase amounted to no more than $1.25 to $1.50 for each person and left them about as destitute as before. They were therefore not only to be fed but also clothed. I had no funds applicable to the purpose, and was powerless to relieve them except by purchases made on the faith of an appropriation to be made at the discretion of Congress. The superintendent was in Southern Kansas so that I could not consult or reach him with instructions as to the immediate wants of the Indians. I therefore appointed Dr. William Kile, of Illinois, who being commissioned by the President to act upon General Lane’s staff was then in Kansas and had been detailed by that officer as brigade quartermaster, as a special agent to act temporarily in supplying the necessities of these wards of the Government. (See copy of instructions herewith marked B.) On the same day I telegraphed you as follows:

C. B. SMITH, Secretary of the Interior:

Six thousand Indians driven out of Indian Territory naked and starving. General Hunter will only feed them until 15th. Shall I take care of them on the faith of an appropriation? No funds now applicable.

To which I received the following reply:

Go on and supply the destitute Indians. Congress will supply the means. War Department will not organize them.

I was also advised by you that difficulties had arisen in the way of organizing Indians into the Army; that General Lane’s expedition had been countermanded, but that it was not expected that it would be abandoned but would go forward under command of General Hunter, with whom I arranged verbally for the protection of the Indians to their homes whenever it should proceed.

On my return to Washington I advised you fully as to the condition of these people, and then learned that Congress had authorized the application of their annuities to their relief. Still being anxious that they should immediately return to their homes in order to plant crops in season for their support during the coming year I again with your hearty concurrence urged upon the War Department the propriety of arming a home guard of Indians, who with sufficient escort of white troops should return with these people to their homes and protect them there while raising a crop. This resulted in an order from the War Department to General Halleck directing him to detail two regiments of white troops to accompany 2,000 Indians to be armed for the purpose above stated. I also obtained an order upon the commandant at Fort Leavenworth for 2,000 rifles and suitable ammunition to arm the 2,000 Indian home guards. That there might be no delay in the {p.4} execution of these orders Judge Steele was appointed a special messenger to bear them to their destination. What action was taken by General Halleck under the order delivered to him I am unable to say.

The order for the rifles and ammunition was honored at Leavenworth and on the 16th of April they were delivered to the superintendent in Southern Kansas. For some time but little was heard of the expedition, but on the 16th day of May I received a communication from Colonel Furnas, of the First Indian Regiment, inclosing an order issued by General Sturgis for the arrest of all officers and others engaged in executing the order of the War Department relating to Indian home guards. I mention these particulars to show that I had reason to consider these people as only temporarily in Kansas and to expect from week to week that they would be on their way home.

After the order to arrest the officers engaged in organizing the Indian home guards the changes in the command of the Kansas Military Department were so rapid that I have been unable to keep pace with the proceedings, but from the best information I have I believe the expedition if not already started will soon be en route for its destination.

Superintendent Coffin estimates the per diem expense of subsisting these Indians at 15 cents each. An estimate furnished to me by Captain Turner, chief of the commissary department at Fort Leavenworth, was the basis of my instructions to Agent Kile and Superintendent Coffin. In this connection see paper marked D. Learning that Mr. Collamore was in this city and had recently visited these Indians and made careful investigation as to their numbers and condition, and believing that information derived from him would be reliable, as at the commencement of the rebellion he was selected as State agent and quartermaster to provide subsistence and forage for the Kansas troops, I have procured from him a report of the numbers and the various tribes comprising these refugees, and his estimate of the cost of clothing and subsistence necessary for a given time, a copy of which is herewith marked F.

I have no means other than these estimates to even approximate the daily expense of feeding and clothing these Indians. Some $25,000 of accounts for purchases have been forwarded here, examined and paid. From $50,000 to $55,000 have been forwarded to Superintendent Coffin, but no account of his disbursements has yet reached me, though I learn by telegraph that his accounts for the past quarter are on the way. I have as instructed by you ordered the accounts for the present quarter forwarded to this office for examination before payment.

Special Agent Kile is still employed under his original instructions, as I have seen no reason to change them and do not know what day the removal of the Indians will enable me to dispense with his services.

For your information I will state the mode of distributing the articles purchased, whether of clothing or provisions. Agent Kile makes no disbursements but turns over to Superintendent Coffin all purchases, taking his receipt therefor. No claim or account is allowed except such as are certified by Agent Kile and Superintendent Coffin. Mr. Cutler, of Kansas, agent for the Creeks; Mr. Coleman, of Indiana, agent for the Choctaws and Chickasaws; Mr. Chatterton, of Illinois, agent for the Cherokees; Mr. Snow, of Indiana, agent for the Seminoles, and Mr. Carruth, of Kansas, agent for the Wichitas, are upon the ground acting as commissaries for their respective tribes, and to them the goods are delivered for distribution by Superintendent Coffin, he taking their receipts for the same. When funds are in the hands of {p.5} Superintendent Coffin he may pay accounts, otherwise they are forwarded to this office for adjustment; and in this connection it is proper to state that all expenses incident to the support and relief of these Indians are paid from their annuities under authority of the act of Congress above mentioned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner.

[Sub-inclosure A.]

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, January 3, 1862.

WILLIAM P. DOLE, Esq., Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

SIR: The Secretary of War in a letter dated the 2d instant informs this Department that it is desired to receive into the U. S. service 4,000 Indians from the borders of Kansas and Missouri; that it is proposed to give them each a blanket, army subsistence and such arms as may be necessary to supply deficiencies, and the Secretary requests such instructions from this Department to its officers as will enable Major-General Hunter to organize them.

You are therefore directed to take such action in the matter as may be necessary to effect the object contemplated by the War Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CALEB B. SMITH, Secretary.

[Sub-inclosure B.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 6, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Topeka, Kans.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that Capt. J. W. Turner, chief commissary of subsistence of this department, has just returned from the encampments of the loyal Indians on the Verdigris River and in its vicinity, having made arrangements for subsisting these unfortunate refugees until the 15th day of the present month.

In the neighborhood of Belmont and Fort Roe there were at the time Captain Turner left about 4,500 Indians, chiefly Creeks and Seminoles, but this number was being constantly augmented by the arrival of fresh camps, tribes and families.

Their condition is pictured as most wretched-destitute of clothing, shelter, fuel, horses, cooking utensils and food. This last-named article was supplied by Captain Turner in quantities sufficient to last until the 15th instant, after which time I doubt not you will have made further arrangements for their continued subsistence.

In taking the responsibility of supplying their wants until the Indian Department could make provision for their necessities I but fulfilled a duty due to our common humanity and the cause in which the Indians are suffering. I now trust and have every confidence that under your energetic and judicious arrangements these poor people may be supplied with all they need after the 15th instant, on which day the supplies furnished by Captain Turner will be exhausted.

I make no doubt that provision should be made for feeding, clothing and sheltering not less than 6,000 Indians and possibly as high as 10,000. On this point, however, you are doubtless better prepared to {p.6} judge than myself. I only wish to urge upon you the necessity of prompt measures of relief.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General.

P. S.-Copies of the requests made by Captain Turner and Brigade Surgeon Campbell will be furnished you by to-morrow’s post. In view of the urgency of this case and the fact that these Indians cannot be supplied any further than has been done from the supplies of the army I send one copy of this letter to Topeka and the other to Leavenworth City. Fearful suffering must ensue amongst the Indians unless the steps necessary be promptly taken.

[Sub-inclosure C.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 5, 1862.

JOSEPH K. BARNES, Surgeon, U. S. Army, Medical Director, Dept. of Kansas.

MAJOR: In compliance with instructions from Major-General Hunter contained in your order of 22d ultimo I left this place on the 22d and proceeded to Burlington, where I learned that the principal part of the friendly Indians were congregated and encamped on the Verdigris River near a place called Fort Roe, from twelve to fifteen miles south of the town of Belmont. I proceeded there without delay. By a census of the tribes taken a few days before my arrival there was found to be of the Creeks, 3,168; slaves of the Creeks, 53; free negroes, members of the tribe, 38; Seminoles, 777; Quapaws, 136; Cherokees, 50; Chickasaws,31; some few Kickapoos and other tribes-about 4,500 in all. But the number was being constantly augmented by the daily arrival of other camps and families. I met assembled together Kamtamechks, Talwamechks, Meichkootks and Teslamakimaktla, all chiefs of the Creeks; Poskooak (first) and Gotza (second), chiefs of the Seminoles; Tecumpta, a Chickasaw. From them I learned that a number greater than were assembled were scattered over the country at distances varying from 25 to 150 miles, and unable for want of food and ponies to come in. They were chiefly collected on the Cottonwood, Fall and Walnut Rivers.

These friendly Indians had had two fights with the Indians disposed to join the rebels and had been victorious. Their enemies had received re-enforcements from the Texas Rangers and had come upon them when they were celebrating a festival and in this third contest were defeated, compelled to fly with little or nothing to support life or protect themselves from the severity of the weather, and those now endeavoring to exterminate all who are loyal to the Government.

It is impossible for me to depict the wretchedness of their condition. Their only protection from the snow upon which they lie is prairie grass and from the wind and weather scraps and rags stretched upon switches. Some of them had some personal clothing; most had but shreds and rags which did not conceal their nakedness, and I saw seven varying in age from three to fifteen years without one thread upon their bodies. Hogobofohyah, the second chief of the Creeks, was sick with a fever. It is time he had received from Mr. Fuller blankets enough to keep him warm, but his tent (to give it that name) was no larger than a small blanket stretched over a switch ridge pole two feet from the ground and did not reach it by a foot on either side of him.

{p.7}

One or two of the lodges were better, all the rest worse than his. The boxes from the Chicago commission contained thirty-five comfortables or quilts, many of them only two feet and two feet six inches wide, forty pairs of socks, three pairs of pantaloons, seven undershirts and four pairs of drawers, a few shirts, pillows and pillow-cases. I unpacked the things and piled them up in the wagon in parcels of the same kind of articles. I had the wagon driven around the margin of the woods. I walked through the woods and selected the nakedest of the naked to whom I doled out the few articles I had, and when all was gone I found myself surrounded by hundreds of anxious faces, disappointed to find that nothing remained for them. The pillow-cases were the most essential articles next to food for they were the only means that families had to receive their portion of the meal or flour furnished them.

They are extremely destitute of cooking utensils and axes or hatchets. Many can with difficulty get wood to make fires either to warm themselves or to cook with, which together with the want of cooking utensils compels many of them to eat their provisions raw. They greatly need medical assistance. Many have their toes frozen off; others have feet wounded by sharp ice or branches of trees lying on the snow. But few have shoes or moccasins. They suffer with inflammatory diseases of the chest, throat and eyes. Those who come in last get sick as soon as they eat. Means should be taken at once to have the horses which lie dead in every direction through the camp and on the side of the river removed and burned, lest the first few warm days breed a pestilence amongst them. Why the officers of the Indian Department are not doing something for them I cannot understand. Common humanity demands that more should be done and done at once to save them from total destruction.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. B. CAMPBELL, Surgeon, U. S. Army.

[Sub-inclosure D.]

OFFICE CHIEF COMMISSARY OF DEPT. OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 5, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

SIR: In compliance with your request that I would submit such suggestions as occurred to me in my recent visit to the loyal and destitute Indians now within the southern border of this State-in regard to their numbers, the best locality for them, their requirements and arrangements for supplying them-I have the honor briefly to offer the following:

At the time I was among them it was impossible to get definitely their total numbers. They were scattered over a great extent of country but were daily coming in at the point I visited them. At that time they numbered nearly 5,000. I calculated their numbers would swell to at least 8,000 and probably 10,000-men, women, children and negroes.

The place they concentrated at was on the Verdigris River at a point called Fort Roe, about thirty-five or forty miles from Le Roy and Burlington, on the Neosho.

The locality presented itself to me as a desirable one for their sojourn till at least definite arrangements should be made for their permanent abiding place. It is on Indian land and sufficiently removed from settlers to obviate the difficulties and disputes which would certainly arise if brought in close contact. There are a few settlers in the vicinity on the Verdigris, but as they have no right on Indian lands they can raise no objection to these Indians being here or the free use of the timber.

{p.8}

The only other favorable locality for them is that afforded by the valley of the Neosho, a wooded bottom land. This has the advantage of being nearer your source of supplies and lessening your cost of transportation somewhat, a desideratum, but is open to the very grave objection that the country is mostly owned and occupied by settlers, compelling you to bring these Indians on to settlers’ lands and in daily contact with them.

Ten thousand Indians would stretch along the river bank for several miles in their encampments. No farmers would look with complacency or quietude upon such a crowd of destitute people brought around them and I apprehend serious difficulties would arise. Moreover every farmer has necessarily in this thinly wooded country to husband the little timber which the river bottom affords him. He is rightly choice of his young growth of timber and jealously guards it.

The Indians never regard these things and they would necessarily commit great damages, the cost of which I think would in the end greatly overbalance the little addition you will have to pay to get your supplies from the Neosho to the Verdigris.

Of course the Indians are now in want of every necessary of life. When last attacked by the rebel whites and Indians they were dispersed in every direction. In their flight they had barely time to snatch such few utensils and wearing apparel as were at hand. Much of this in their long journey made by many on foot has necessarily been abandoned or worn out. A strong pair of pants, a pair of shoes, a flannel shirt and a blanket would be a sufficient issue of clothing to each Indian.

Cheap unbleached sheeting could be worked up by the women into various garments for themselves and children and is much needed. The smaller children, for whom shoes could not be obtained, the women could easily make moccasins out of blankets for them, which would answer till they supplied themselves again with skins. Stockings might be sent down at first to supply the pressing wants of the most needy or for the women and children. Once supplied with shoes or moccasins they do not need them. Of cooking utensils they are totally destitute. The ordinary soldier’s camp-kettle and mess-pan, or whatever nearest approached it, would best answer the purpose. About one camp-kettle and three mess-pans would be ample for a family of six. Axes are very scarce with them. Two hundred ought to be sent immediately. Equally important with these requirements is shelter, protection against the inclemency of the weather, and which will present more difficulties as well as greater cost than any other to fill.

Perhaps as speedy a method of supplying it would be to give them material for making shelter-tents-the same kind of stuff of which army tents are made. This would serve the best purpose if it can be obtained, though costly. It might be shipped in bolts and issued to them in length just sufficient to make a low shelter for a family. Afterwards they could by the addition of beef hides which must be now fast accumulating, and other skins, complete a more commodious lodge.

In regard to their subsistence beef and corn-meal will probably be their chief articles of food; they are the principal staples in this section of country and therefore cheaper.

At present it would probably be found more convenient to contract for the delivery of beef weekly-a week’s supply at a delivery-on the foot; the Indians will do the butchering. After grass is up sufficient to afford good feed this would not be so important.

I think the flour mills at Burlington and Le Roy would be able to furnish all the corn-meal that will be required and from corn obtained in {p.9} the valley of the Neosho. They arc custom mills though, and their capacity limited. The importance of a continuous supply being placed beyond doubt is readily seen. Flour might be issued in proportion of one-sixth or one-eighth. Sugar and coffee are not absolutely needed, but tend much to their comfort, particularly for the sick; it might be kept on hand expressly for the latter. Salt is necessary and will have to be sent from here. There is none in the immediate country.

It will be necessary considering the extent of their encampment and the number of Indians to have three or four log-houses erected at suitable points within its limits for issuing depots, with a person in charge of one or two. Each tribe or part of tribe would then have a certain place for drawing their provisions. An enrollment of all the Indians can easily be obtained, and each issuing clerk have a list of all the heads of families of the tribes to which he issues with the number in each.

The issues may be made for two, four or six days as most convenient, the head of a family drawing for his own family. A chief and interpreter may be present to prevent any imposition being practiced. In this way the distribution would be more equal and give greater satisfaction than the method now pursued of turning over the allotment of a tribe to a chief for distribution.

A company or two of soldiers whose presence will be necessary any way would soon put up the buildings.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. W. TURNER, Captain and Commissary of Subsistence.

[Sub-inclosure E.]

LEAVENWORTH, February 10, 1862.

Doctor KILE.

SIR: It has been determined that in consequence of the destitute condition of the Indians in Southern Kansas who have been driven from their homes in the Indian Territory to provide for them temporarily at the expense of the Government of the United States with such articles of clothing and food as their positive necessities require.

You have therefore been appointed special agent for the purpose of purchasing and delivering to William G. Coffin, superintendent of Indian affairs for the southern district, such quantities of clothing and provisions as in your judgment may be required to prevent suffering amongst said Indians.

You will consult with Mr. Coffin at your earliest convenience and receive instructions from him as to the place or places of delivery of the articles you may purchase. I would also advise that you consult with Mr. Coffin as to the articles of clothing to be purchased (if any) after the first purchase, which I think proper should be made at once, and before such conference can be had General Hunter, commandant of the Department of Kansas, will turn over to you a considerable quantity of bacon belonging to the army stores at Fort Leavenworth which will reduce very much the amount of meat needed.

Whatever further supplies of meat you may find necessary you will purchase in beef-cattle, to be delivered, as before stated, either 011 foot or the net beef as will in your judgment be the most economical and beneficial.

For bread I would advise that you furnish corn-meal instead of flour as being sufficiently good and much cheaper; some flour for the feeble {p.10} and sick will be allowed. You may find it necessary to furnish these Indians with a small quantity of cooking utensils and with axes to procure fuel, as I understand they were driven from their homes in such haste as to lose nearly or quite all their property of every description.

The most difficult part of the duties assigned you will no doubt result from the necessity you will be under to make these purchases on the faith of the Congress of the United States making the appropriation to meet any indebtedness you may create, there being now no funds belonging to the Indian Department applicable to that purpose.

You can, however, assure those having for sale the articles that you need that there can be little if any doubt that Congress will so soon as the condition of these people is made known to them hasten to provide for their wants, especially so when it is considered that these very necessities are the result of a failure on the part of the United States to meet her treaty stipulations with these people.

I would again remind you that much more care and labor will be necessary in purchasing these supplies than would probably be necessary had you funds in hand to make prompt payment. You will therefore be careful to seek out if possible such parties from whom to make these purchases as are willing to sell to the Government without extortion.

Superintendent Coffin has been instructed to receive of you the articles herein authorized to be delivered to him and provide storage to keep on hand at least one week’s provision in advance. I do not think it advisable that your purchases should exceed at any time an amount necessary for a supply of thirty days, as it is hoped that our Government will return them to their homes early in the spring and protect them there where they can provide for themselves.

I am advised by the officers of the commissary department at Fort Leavenworth that one pound of meal and one pound of beef per day for each will in all probability be sufficient for these people.

Your compensation will be at the rate of $6 per day from the date hereof until you return to your place of residence, and your actual expenses, for which you should in all cases where practicable take vouchers to accompany your account which must be certified on honor to the Indian Office. When you find it impracticable to take vouchers a memorandum of items of expenditure should be kept and reported with your account, also certified on honor.

A suitable sum of money will be placed in your hands to enable you to pay all incidental expenses so soon as your bond with security to be approved at this office is received, conditioned that you will faithfully account for the disbursements of the same in accordance with the duties hereby prescribed and hereafter to be prescribed under this appointment, a form of which bond is herewith inclosed.*

You will from time to time inform the Indian Department of your progress in supplying the wants of these Indians, and in all cases where there is no positive necessity for acting promptly in any matter under this commission you will advise with this Department before acting at all.

Your obedient servant,

W. P. DOLE, Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

* Not found.

{p.11}

[Sub-inclosure F.]

WASHINGTON, D. C., April 21, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE, Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

DEAR SIR: Agreeably to your request I furnish herewith an account of my recent visit to the loyal Indians who were obliged to flee from their pursuers (the rebel Indians and Texans) in the dead of winter and who are now encamped on the Neosho River, in the southern part of Kansas.

Having heard of their great destitution and suffering in company with the Rev. Evan Jones, who has been for the last forty years a missionary among the Cherokees and who was driven from his station by the rebels in August last, I visited their encampment the latter part of March last for the purpose of observation and giving information as to their actual condition and wants.

It is no doubt well known to you but not generally so what the position of these people has been in the great struggle in which the whole country is involved and with what resolute firmness and endurance they have resisted all the appeals and temptations held out to them by the rebel leaders to abandon the Government which has always protected them. While apparently the attitude of the various tribes was for a season equivocal and the disposition seemed to incline to aid and comfort the enemy, or at the best to “neutrality,” yet the evidence is ample and clear that a large portion of the Cherokee Nation were determined to stand firm in their loyalty to the Union, as is sufficiently evinced in the correspondence herewith inclosed* between John Ross, the principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, and General Benjamin McCulloch and David Hubbard, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the rebel States. And the same may be observed of the other tribes. But the strongest testimony consists in the troops they have furnished and the battles they have fought, and it is the fortune of these battles that has brought them into their present miserable condition on the bare prairies of Kansas. Large numbers of these driven from their comfortable homes, leaving their farms and their herds, many of them it may be said having lived in affluence, joined the armies of the Union. Their houses were fired by the enemy and their horses and cattle driven off. The battles in which they participated and which eventuated in their expulsion from their own country and forced them to seek shelter in Kansas forms a part of the history of this war. The battle of December last was particularly unfortunate to these people and the disasters of the defeat left them in the helpless condition I found them.

They are now located near Le Roy, in Coffey County, Kans., a distance of not less than 175 miles intervening between them and their former homes. Their march was undertaken with a scanty supply of clothing, subsistence and cooking utensils and entirety without tents, and during their progress they were reduced to such extremity as to be obliged to feed upon their ponies and their dogs, while their scanty clothing was reduced to threads and in some cases absolute nakedness was their condition. Let it be remembered that this retreat was in the midst of a winter of unusual severity for that country, with snow upon the prairie. Many of their ponies died from starvation. The women and children suffered severely from frozen limbs, as did also the men. Women gave birth to their offspring upon the naked snow without {p.12} shelter or covering, and in some cases the new-born infants died for want of clothing, and those who survived reached their present location with broken constitutions and utterly dispirited.

Thus I found them encamped upon the Neosho River bottom in the timber, extending a distance of some seven miles. Not a comfortable tent was to be seen. Such coverings as I saw were made in the rudest manner, being composed of pieces of cloth, old quilts, handkerchiefs, aprons, &c., stretched upon sticks, and so limited were many of them in size that they were scarcely sufficient to cover the emaciated and dying forms beneath them. Under such shelter I found in the last stages of consumption the daughter of Hopoeithleyohola, one of the oldest, most influential and wealthy chiefs of the Creek Nation.

In company with Doctor Coffin I visited nearly fifty patients in one afternoon; not a few he pronounced incurable, their diseases being consumption and pneumonia brought on from exposure and privations of the common necessaries of life, Dr. George A. Cutler, agent of the Creeks, informed me that in two months 240 refugees of that nation had died. Those of other tribes suffered in like degree. Doctor Coffin informed me that upward of 100 amputations of frosted limbs had taken place. Among them I saw a little Creek boy, about eight years old, with both feet taken off near the ankle, others lying upon the ground whose frosted limbs rendered them unable to move about. Five persons in a similar situation the physician pronounced past recovery. Sickness among them on account of their exposure and lack of proper food was on the increase.

The following day I visited almost every lodge of several of the largest tribes and found the same destitution and suffering among them. A cold, drenching rain fell on the last day of the visit, and for eight hours I went from lodge to lodge and tribe to tribe, and the suffering of the well to say nothing of the sick is beyond description. Their numbers as ascertained are as follows: Creeks, 5,000; Seminoles, 1,096; Chickasaws, 140; Quapaws, 315; Uchees, 544; Keechies, 83; Delawares, 197; Ionies, 17; Caddoes, 3; Wichitas, 5; Cherokees, 240-making an aggregate of 7,600 persons.

Thus this large number of people have been deprived of shelter for some four months and they have been supplied with clothing wholly inadequate to their actual wants. Some whom I saw had not a single garment on their bodies; nor has their food been sufficient in quantity or proper quality. Neither coffee, sugar, vinegar nor pepper has been allowed them only upon the requisition of the physician for the sick. Only about one pound of flour is given them per week each and a scanty supply of salt.

To all these necessaries of life they have been accustomed. They had been told by the rebel emissaries-as the chiefs informed me-that they would fail to obtain these articles from their Union friends, which having turned out to be the fact has affected them with suspicion and discontent.

Great complaint was made by the chiefs and others as to the quality of the bacon furnished, it being as they expressed it “not fit for a dog to eat;” many of them were made sick by eating it. The unfitness of the food I brought to the attention of their agents who informed me that this bacon had been condemned at Fort Leavenworth; and Major Snow, the agent of the Seminoles, employed the same expression in regard to it as the Indians that it was “not fit for a dog to eat;” and a reliable person who saw the bacon before it was sent to them who is a judge of the article pronounced it suitable only for soap grease.

{p.13}

The unanimous expression of the agents with whom I conversed, including the superintendent of Indian affairs, Colonel Coffin, and the physician, was that they should be provided with all the articles above enumerated as essential to their health and ordinary comfort.

Notwithstanding all their hardships and disappointments these people who have exhibited a courage and endurance beyond any in the United States breathe but one spirit of fidelity to the Union and a desire once more to be restored to their homes and friends and there sustained by the Federal Government to defend the cause they have espoused.

They ardently desire to return to their farms, rebuild their cabins, renew their fences, plant the seed and obtain from the rich soil of their country a subsistence from their own industry; and unless they are afforded an opportunity to return with this object in view they must become discouraged and demoralized and remain upon the hands of the Government a burden from which their natural feeling of pride and independence would save them. Thus the alternative is presented to the Government of restoring them to their homes, enabling them to be self-supporting or sustain them at its own expense for another year at least. In the former case immediate action is necessary for the planting season in that country is already near at hand.

I was assured by Hopoeithleyohola that he and his people were willing on being properly armed to fight their own way back; but more lately learning from reliable information that there were three camps consisting of from 5,000 to 6,000 rebel Indians and Texans to oppose him he would now require assistance from our troops. Should the latter case be adopted it is highly important that a sagacious, humane and prudent officer be intrusted with the command.

Should it be determined to retain them in their present position it is a matter of no difficulty to estimate the expense of so doing. Calling them 8,000 in round numbers, allowing rations for 365 days at 10 cents per day would demand an outlay of $292,000 for subsistence alone; $100,000 would not meet the wants for clothing, to say nothing of tents and other necessary expenses.

We cannot shut our eyes to the demoralizing effect upon them should they remain in their present condition as mere beneficiaries of the Government without employment or incentives to industry.

Your obedient servant,

GEORGE W. COLLAMORE.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 13, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

I respectfully apply to be informed by telegraph to-day if possible whether it be true as has been stated to me that the enemy make only partial exchanges of prisoners, excluding officers, and if so what reasons are assigned for this course. The enemy having proposed to me to negotiate with me for a general exchange of prisoners and the War Department having authorized me to make such exchanges so far as the army under my command and that opposed to me are concerned, it is important before entering into any arrangement on the subject that I should speedily be made acquainted with the information herein sought.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

{p.14}

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, June 13, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: Herewith you will receive a communication* from Col. R. W. Hanson and other prisoners of war on the subject of exchanges. At their special request I transmit it for your consideration. By my correspondence with Major-General Huger you will perceive I not only offered to exchange all prisoners of war, privateersmen as well as those who had been held as hostages, on fair and honorable terms but on the express terms proposed by General Huger according to the cartel made between the United States and Great Britain. The privateersmen when sent to be exchanged or paroled remained at or near City Point I think five days, but received no reply from General Huger. After Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple returned to Fort Monroe with the privateersmen I received a letter from Major-General Huger** just as I was leaving Fort Monroe for Baltimore inclosing a letter (these letters were transmitted to the Secretary of War) from Mr. Randolph condemning the course of General Huger, with an intimation that I had overreached him, which was anything but the truth, for certainly nothing could have been further from my thoughts than circumventing General Huger on the subject. There was no necessity for such a course for there was a perfect understanding between us to be governed by the cartel made between the United States and Great Britain in 1813.

I have complied with the request of Colonel Hanson and others without discovering what more can be done to accomplish the object of exchanging Colonel Corcoran and others. On examination of Major-General Huger’s last letter it will be perceived that he did not receive my letter sent with the privateers. It would seem that it was transmitted to Mr. Randolph.*** Major-General Huger says in his letter that he did not understand the letter of Mr. Randolph.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

** For Huger to Wool, June 5, inclosing Randolph to Huger of June 3, see Vol. III, this Series, p. 650.

*** By reference to Ransom to Randolph, Vol. III, this Series, p. 887, it will be seen that Huger had left Petersburg.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., June 13, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac, &c.

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letter of this date. The officer designated by you is entirely acceptable to me, but the place of meeting (Mr. James Garnett’s house) is included within our line of pickets. I therefore propose that Colonel Key should meet General Cobb at the time you designate (Sunday morning next at 11 o’clock) at the Mechanicsville bridge, which I believe is not occupied by the pickets of either army, the interview between the officers to be alone.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General.

{p.15}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 13, 1862.

Major-General Dix, Commanding, &c., Fort Monroe:

Where is General Pettigrew, taken prisoner by Army of the Potomac, now confined?

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 13, 1862.

Hon. ANDREW JOHNSON, Military Governor of Tennessee, Nashville, Tenn.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that under instructions from the Secretary of War arrangements have been made at Fort Mackinac, Mich., for the reception and safe-keeping of some fifteen political prisoners from Tennessee.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 13, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Philadelphia, Pa.

SIR: In reply to your inquiries* I have respectfully to inform you as follows: State prisoners are under your care to the same extent as prisoners of war. An adjutant and sergeant-major cannot be mustered into service under existing laws for the Sandusky depot. An ordnance sergeant will be ordered there and the Surgeon-General will be requested to detail a hospital steward. The clerks alluded to in your memorandum cannot receive extra pay. Sutlers’ prices should be regulated. A new commander will be assigned to Camp Butler, Springfield. The present commanders of Camps Douglas and Morton may remain, at any rate for the present.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 13, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

SIR: In accordance with your recommendation of May 17 the Secretary of War authorizes you to declare martial law over a space of 100 feet outside and around the limits of the camp where prisoners of war are confined whenever you deem it necessary, and bring to punishment by short confinement or trial by court-martial at the discretion of the commanding officer persons trespassing upon such spaces in violation of orders.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.16}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 98.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 13, 1862.

William M. Clary, late second officer of the U. S. steam transport Saxon, and Stanislaus Roy, of New Orleans, on the night of the 11th of June, instant, having forged a pretended authority of the major-general commanding, being armed, in company with other evil-disposed persons under false names and in a pretended uniform of soldiers of the United States, entered the house of a peaceable citizen, No. 93 Toulouse street, about the hour of 11 o’clock in the nighttime, and then in a pretended search for arms and treasonable correspondence by virtue of such forged authority plundered said house and stole therefrom $1,885 in current bank notes, one gold watch and chain and one bosom pin.

This outrage was reported to the commanding general at 11 o’clock a.m. on the 12th day of June, instant, and by his order Clary and Roy were detected and arrested on the same day and brought before the commanding general at 1 o’clock p.m. of this day, when and where it appeared by incontrovertible evidence that the facts above stated were tine, and all material parts thereof were voluntarily confessed by Clary and Roy. It further appeared that Clary and Roy had before this occasion visited other houses of peaceable citizens in the nighttime and for like purposes and under like false pretenses. Brass knuckles, burglar keys and a portion of the stolen property and other property stolen from other parties were found upon the person of Roy and in his lodgings.

Whereupon, after a full hearing of the defense of Clary and Roy and due consideration of the evidence, it was ordered by the commanding general that William M. Clary and Stanislaus Roy for their offenses be punished by being hanged by the neck until they are dead, and this sentence be executed upon them and each of them between the hours of 8 o’clock a.m. and 12 m. on Monday, the 16th day of June, instant, at or near the parish prison, in the city of New Orleans.

The provost-marshal will cause said sentence to be executed, and for so doing this order will be his sufficient warrant.

By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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POPE’S HEADQUARTERS, June 13, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

General Asboth reports to me from Rienzi that the woods and swamps east of him are swarming with deserters from the enemy. They are making their way homeward. What is to be done with them? Had they not better be suffered to go? It would take reams of blanks to administer oaths to them. I have not hitherto meddled with them as I could not feed them. Thousands have passed on their way home and as many more are coming every day. They endeavor to pass without coming into camp.

JOHN POPE.

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CORINTH, MISS., June 13, 1862.

Col. W. W. LOWE, Commanding Fort Henry:

Muster the mutinous exchanged prisoners out of service and turn them out of your camp.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.17}

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LOUISVILLE, June 13, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The release of prisoners sent from Kentucky to Camp Chase will injure us very much in Kentucky. They return emboldened and to assassinate the men who arrested them. It will endanger us in Kentucky.

J. T. BOYLE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Riley, June 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. G. BLUNT, Commanding Department of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth.

GENERAL: Pursuant to instructions from headquarters Department of Kansas, dated June 10, 1862, received last night, I send to you all the information I can obtain relative to the prisoners in my charge at this post. I have no official information concerning them aside from the paroles, of which I inclose a copy. I can find no papers in the office except a list of their names. I classified them upon the statement of the officers with them. Time of capture, by whom taken and time of parole, by whom paroled, &c., is wholly from them except the paroles referred to.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. S. WHITTENHALL, Captain, Second Regiment Kansas Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

[Inclosure.]

I, J. A. Darby, a first lieutenant of Company I, Colonel Green’s regiment of the Confederate Army, do solemnly swear that I will not bear arms against the Government of the United States, or in any other manner either directly or indirectly serve against the Government unless duly exchanged or otherwise released by proper authority from the obligations of this parole: So help me God.

J. A. DARBY, Company I, Fifth Regiment Texas Mounted Volunteers.

Attest:

A. W. EVANS, Captain, Sixth Cavalry, Provost-Marshal.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND KANSAS VOLUNTEERS, Camp near Council Grove, Kans., June 13, 1862.

Capt. DANIEL S. WHITTENHALL, Commanding Post, Fort Riley.

CAPTAIN: In reply to the communication referred to me by yourself from the Department of Kansas dated June 9 [10] I would state that in my letter to the department on the 5th instant I gave them all the information I was possessed of relative to the prisoners now at Fort Riley. I was not furnished with a copy of the parole, and in fact I have only the word of Lieutenant Johnson that one existed. Major Hayden, of Fort Lamed, informed me that he had conferred fully with General Blunt upon the subject and I had supposed that the necessary information had passed around me. The regiments to which the {p.18} prisoners belonged were Texas regiments and I believe all cavalry. I sent General Blunt copies of all written documents placed in my hands.

Respectfully,

OWEN A. BASSETT, Lieutenant-Colonel Second Kansas Volunteers.

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WASHINGTON, June 14, 1862.

Governor TOD, Columbus:

The question in relation to prisoners is now under consideration. If they are paroled great complaint is made by the friends of our prisoners in the South. No trust can be placed in their parole. I think it is cheaper to keep them where they are than to send them back as recruits, for the rebel Government will release them by law from their parole and force all into the ranks who do not go voluntarily, so that we shall only have to fight and take them again.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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CORINTH, MISS., June 14, 1862.

Major-General BUELL:

The Secretary of War telegraphs that he will send an officer to Nashville to pay off and discharge all paroled prisoners at that place.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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INDIANAPOLIS, June 14, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

Colonel Owen, who has so efficiently commanded at the camp for prisoners, is under orders to take the field with his regiment. I have organized a military force for their place. I desire to place the camp under the supervision of Col. D. G. Rose, U. S. marshal, as commander if it can be done without vacating or interfering with his office as marshal. He is the man for the position. Please arrange this. Advise me by telegraph.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, U. S. Army, Commanding Middle Department, Baltimore, Md.

SIR: It having been stated that General Pettigrew, of South [North] Carolina, taken prisoner in the late battle near Richmond, has arrived in Baltimore and is provided with comfortable rooms at Guy’s Monument House, the Secretary of War directs that he be sent forthwith to Fort Warren and turned over to Colonel Dimick, commanding.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General,

{p.19}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 14, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia, Richmond.

SIR: Lieutenant Fellers, Company G, Thirteenth Regiment of South Carolina Infantry, is now at Fortress Monroe waiting to be exchanged, according to the information I have from the War Department, for Lieutenant Underhill, of the Eleventh Regiment of New York Volunteers, who is said to be a prisoner at Richmond. I am prepared to send Lieutenant Fellers within your lines at City Point upon an intimation from you that Lieutenant Underhill has been released.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

General LEE:

No arrangement of the sort has been made and individual exchanges are declined.

We will exchange generally or according to some principle, but not by arbitrary selections.

G. W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War.

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CORINTH, MISS., June 14, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

I think it will be well to make as many of the enemy give their parole as possible; still it would not be worth while to pursue those who have deserted and are on their way home. I would come and see you but have for several days been confined to my tent with the “evacuation of Corinth.”

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, Miss., June 14, 1862.

General G. J. PILLOW, Oxford, Miss.

GENERAL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of yours of the 9th instant.* While putting no obstacle in the way of any peaceful citizen returning to his home if he comes with proper intentions I have uniformly declined issuing passports or personal safeguards to persons outside of our lines. I cannot make an exception in this case.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

* Reference to Pillow to Halleck, Vol. III, this Series, p. 669.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 103.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 14, 1862.

Theodore Lieb, of New Orleans, George William Craig, late first officer of the ship City of New York, and Frank Newton, late private in the Thirteenth Regiment Connecticut Volunteers, upon their own {p.20} confession and clear proof after a full hearing were convicted of being members of an organized gang of thieves consisting of seven or more, of which William M. Clary and Stanislaus Roy, mentioned in Special Orders, No. 98, and now under sentence of death, were principals, bound together by an oath or obligation, engaged by means of a forged authority and false uniforms in robbing the houses of divers peaceable citizens of their moneys, watches, jewelry and valuables under pretense of searching for arms and articles contraband of war, must suffer the proper penalty. At least eight houses as appears by their confession were plundered by three or more of their gang while others were watching without at various times, and a large amount of property carried off. A large portion has been since recovered. The heinousness of their offense is heightened by the contempt and disgrace brought upon the uniform, authority and flag of the United States by their fraudulent acts in making it cover their nefarious practices, and renders them peculiarly the subject of prompt and condign punishment.

It is therefore ordered that George William Craig and Frank Newton for these offenses as aforesaid be hanged by the neck until they and each of them are dead, and that this sentence be executed upon them at or near the parish prison in the city of New Orleans on Monday, the 16th day of June instant, between the hours of 6 a.m. and 12 m., under the direction of the provost-marshal, and for so doing this shall be his sufficient warrant.

Theodore Lieb being a youth of eighteen years, only in consideration of his tender years has his punishment commuted to confinement at hard labor on the fortifications at Ship Island or the nearest military post during the pleasure of the President of the United States.

By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 134.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 14, 1862.

...

II. Capt. Henry W. Freedley, Third Infantry, will report for such duty as he can perform to Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, at New York.

...

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, June 14, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: May I beg that you will read the inclosed editorial from the Louisville Journal before action is taken in Buckner’s case. Every word of this article is felt to be true by the loyal men of Kentucky, and I earnestly trust and pray that they may be spared the curse and humiliation of having this monster of treachery and crime turned loose to desolate and destroy them. When captured he was under indictment for treason in Kentucky, and it is felt there that the Government should not snatch him from the halter which the criminal court has in store for him.

Very sincerely, yours,

J. HOLT.

{p.21}

[Inclosure.]

The rebel Government demands as a condition of any further exchange of prisoners that General Buckner be exchanged. The demand appears to be put forth as a sine qua non. This is presumptuous and insolent. We hold three brigadier-generals as prisoners of war-Buckner, taken at Fort Donelson, and Pettigrew and another taken in front of Richmond, whilst Prentiss is the only Federal general held by the rebels. The rebels cannot obtain their three generals in our hands by giving for them three officers of equal rank, and if they undertake to insist that they will have a particular one of the three or stop all exchanges, let them stop the exchanges as soon as they like. We can afford it quite as well as they can. We have five times as many prisoners of all grades as they have.

Considering their condition the rebels try to carry things with quite too high a hand. They have at all times acted upon the assumption that they had a right in negotiating exchanges to give up whom they pleased and to keep whom they pleased. No persuasion has ever availed to induce them to exchange Colonel Corcoran. Half a dozen times they have promised and as often they have broken their promises. Their last promise was that they would exchange him if we would let them have the privateers, or semi-pirates, captured by us, but when we sent these to Fortress Monroe to be forwarded to them they violated their engagement as they had so often done before. They presume to decide authoritatively not only what prisoners they won’t give up but what ones we shall give up, letting us understand that they will have their own way in both matters, and that if we dislike it or choose to rebel against their dictation all prisoners must remain prisoners. We shall see whether our Government in this the day of its power and triumph is to be bullied in that fashion.

Kentucky feels it to be her right to ask that General Buckner shall remain a prisoner during the war. She would feel herself deeply aggrieved by his release. Every loyal man and every loyal woman of our Commonwealth would feel it a personal wrong to themselves. All know that Buckner has been the evil spirit, the fiend, the devil of our State, the corrupter of her youth, the ruthless desolator of her homes. He has been no common traitor; he has been the arch-traitor, and she, with her 30,000 loyal sons in the field ready to pour out their blood to undo as far as possible his accursed work, demands that he shall stay in confinement till the end of the war and then take his trial for treason before the judicial tribunals of the land.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 15, 1862.

General JOHN E. WOOL, Baltimore:

It is represented to the Department that Roger W. Hanson and one or more other rebel officers are at large in Baltimore. Please advise the Department immediately whether the statement is true.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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MCCLELLAN’S, June 15, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

... Colonel Key has had an interesting interview with Howell Cobb to-day, the particulars of which I will explain to you by letter.

{p.22}

It proves among other things most conclusively that they will defend Richmond to the last extremity. The interview was arranged for the purpose of bringing about an exchange of prisoners, but in the course of the conversation other matters were introduced and discussed.

...

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN; Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. A. DIX, Commanding Fort Monroe, &c.

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that Lieut. Marcus A. Throneburg, Twenty-eighth North Carolina Volunteers, a prisoner of war sent here from Fort Columbus by Colonel Loomis for release by error instead of to City Point as directed by me, be detained at Fortress Monroe until events before Richmond are further determined. Lieutenant Throneburg is to be exchanged for Lieutenant Perkins, aide-de-camp to General Butterfield, who was taken prisoner at Hanover, and on the application of the general commanding to General Lee released. The error in sending Lieutenant Throneburg here instead of to City Point has resulted in his acquiring information regarding the position of troops, &c., here which renders it unsafe to have him returned to the enemy at present. Lieutenant Throneburg is sent to Fortress Monroe with the bearer of this communication.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Throneburg sent to Rip Raps June 16.

S. W.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, June 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Forces, Corinth, Miss.

GENERAL: Under instructions from my Government recently addressed to General Beauregard it has devolved upon me to inform you that it is understood Asst. Surgs. T. S. Foster* and Newton Vowles, of the Missouri State Guard, were captured (possibly some time since), brought to trial as bridge burners and one at least of them condemned to death under your authority. The authorities of the Confederate States have caused private individuals to be executed for burning bridges, but they deny the right to punish an officer acting under orders and I am directed to say will retaliate on the prisoners in our hands for any execution in violation of the rules of civilized warfare. Further, our authorities will consider themselves at liberty to examine into the regularity of the proceedings under which any citizen of Missouri shall be executed and to retaliate if it should prove a fair trial was not granted.

I must avail myself of the occasion to bring to your notice an act recently committed by an officer of your command without precedent to my knowledge in regular warfare. On the morning of the 30th ultimo a cavalry detachment from your army under command, as I learn, of Colonel Elliott, of the Second Iowa Cavalry, made a descent on Booneville, on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad and a depot for our {p.23} sick, and burned a train of cars and the railroad depot, in so doing burning to death not less than one sick soldier in a car and three in the railroad depot, as well as consuming the bodies of some of our dead.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG, General, Commanding.

* See Vol. I, this Series, p. 389 et seq., for trial of Thomas S. Foster.

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WASHINGTON, June 15, 1862.

Col. D. D. TOMPKINS:

Pierre Souls and Adolphe Mazureau, arrested in New Orleans for political offenses, are expected to arrive in New York by the steamer McClellan. The Secretary of War orders that they be confined in Fort Lafayette and allowed to hold no communication with any person until further orders. Report their arrival and the execution of this order.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

(Same to Lieut. Col. Martin Burke, Fort Hamilton, N. Y.)

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Philadelphia, Pa., June 15, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have visited Fort Delaware and find accommodations there for 2,000 prisoners; 600 are there, of which 300 are to be released on parole by order from General Wool. The island is a very suitable place for the confinement of prisoners of war, and I recommend that Colonel Crosman be directed to have immediately erected sheds for 3,000 more prisoners, making 5,000 in all, and it is possible that even a greater number may be conveniently guarded there.

There are four incomplete companies constituting the guard. These should be filled up to the maximum limit immediately and a fifth company should be added, which would make an ample guard for 5,000 prisoners. Capt. Paul T. Jones’ Independent Battery and two batteries of marine and fortifications artillery under Major Segebarth, well trained companies, might well be relieved to take the field and their places supplied by three companies of infantry. Those companies require eighty-six recruits. One company of artillery, Captain Mlotkowski, would remain to occupy the post.

Capt. A. A. Gibson, of the Fourth Artillery, is commanding, and that his rank may be according to his command I very respectfully suggest that he be appointed and mustered into service as the major or lieutenant-colonel of the four companies of infantry which will form the guard.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[First indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, June 24, 1862.

Respectfully referred to the Quartermaster-General for perusal. Five hundred prisoners have this day been sent from Harrisburg to Fort Delaware.

To be returned.

By order:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.24}

[Second indorsement.]

JULY 3, 1862.

Copy to be made and transmitted to Colonel Crosman to carry out the suggestions of Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, so far as the Quartermaster’s Department is involved.

Return the original to the Adjutant-General.

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Philadelphia, June 15, 1862.

Capt. A. A. GIBSON, Commanding Fort Delaware.

CAPTAIN: By direction of the Secretary of War all officers, prisoners of war, are to be confined at the depot at Sandusky, Ohio, and you will therefore please send to that place under a suitable guard all officers of the rebel army in your charge. If possible arrange it so that they may arrive at Sandusky during the day, as it will be very difficult to cross them to the island at night. Please notify the commanding officer when they will arrive. This order need not be executed till it is decided who are to be released on parole under General Wool’s order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Philadelphia, Pa., June 15, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Comdg. Depot of Prisoners, Johnson’s Island, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: Please say to those prisoners of war who are expecting paroles or release that at present under no circumstances will paroles be granted except in case of extreme illness on the recommendation of the attending surgeon, nor will a release be granted except by exchange. A system of exchange is being negotiated and if satisfactorily arranged probably all will be released by exchange or parole.

If you can find a suitable person for the place of hospital steward let him apply in his own handwriting for the appointment and forward it to the Surgeon-General with your approval and you will receive orders to enlist him for that position. The pay is $30 per month with clothing and a ration and this ought to secure a very competent person.

If the man who is now acting can be recommended for the place he will be discharged from his present service at the same time that he is enlisted as steward.

Say to Captain Read that it will be well to defer the wood contract until it is settled whether prisoners are to be exchanged or released on parole.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.25}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 16, 1862.

BUDD I. WALKER, No. 1218 Hibberd Street, Philadelphia.

SIR: In reply to your application of the 14th instant in behalf of the officers of the transport Union, now held as prisoners by the rebels in North Carolina, and asking for their release the Secretary of War directs me to inform you that recently an arrangement was made for a general exchange of all prisoners of war, but its fulfillment has been delayed by the bad faith of the insurgent authorities. The subject, however, is still engaging the earnest attention of this Department, which will continue its efforts for the release of all our citizens now held as prisoners of war until that end shall be accomplished, but as the release of the great body of these can only be effected by some system for a general exchange-which is more likely to be adopted if special exchanges are not made the Secretary in justice to all is obliged to decline taking any action at present in the case.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., June 16, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I received an order through C. P. Wolcott by telegram last evening, too late however to reply in consequence of the office being closed, requesting me to report whether Roger W. Hanson and one or more rebel officers are at large at Baltimore. I reply Colonel Hanson and several others were sent to me to be forwarded to Richmond for exchange, Hanson for Corcoran, &c. These were refused because the privateersmen were not present to be exchanged and sent back. They were ordered to report to General Dix. As the latter informed me he wrote to you on the subject, when they were permitted to remain in the city on parole, reporting to him daily. On my arrival I thus found them with six others with orders from the War Department to be forwarded to Richmond to be exchanged. The six have been sent by a flag of truce. Colonel Hanson and the two other officers I permitted to remain in the city but not at large, but ordered them to confine themselves at their hotel, I being determined to send them to Fort Warren. They requested a day’s delay in order to write to the Secretary of War, which I granted. The letter which related to exchanges with Corcoran and others I transmitted to the Secretary with my own views on the subject. The next day I visited Annapolis and the next Washington and the day after Harper’s Ferry, all which prevented me from attending to these rebel officers.

There are several other rebel officers that have arrived here since I assumed command, among others General Pettigrew, who is reported {p.26} unable to travel on account of his wounds. I have ordered Surgeon Simpson to have him examined by one or more surgeons in order to ascertain whether he can travel to Fort Warren or otherwise. Shall I send all these officers to Fort Warren?

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

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CORINTH, June 16, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis:

Order referring release of prisoners in Missouri to provost-marshal-general is hereby revoked. In that matter he will act subject to your orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, C. S. ARMY, June 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding, &c.

GENERAL: Permit me to call your attention to the matter of exchanges of our prisoners of war. As you will remember on the 15th and 16th of May General Beauregard sent to you in the aggregate some 174 noncommissioned officers and soldiers of your service, prisoners of war released on their parole, for whom you were pleased to say an equal number of our men in your hands should be duly exchanged. Some thirty days have now elapsed and none of our soldiers have been restored to this army in exchange. I can understand, however, that this has resulted from military conditions, but submit that there should be little longer delay.

You have also been made aware I presume that Col. John H. Morgan, Kentucky cavalry, C. S. Army, captured and released early in May about 270 officers and soldiers of General Mitchel’s division of your forces at Pulaski, Tenn. I have now the honor to send you an official copy* of the parole or list of persons paroled by Colonel Morgan for your information. Subsequently to the affair at Pulaski Colonel Morgan had another combat with some of your forces and some 137 of his command, including Lieut. Col. Robert C. Wood, C. S. Army, were taken prisoners by General Dumont and are now held in close and as I have reason to believe harsh confinement at Columbus, Ohio. It would appear I submit as an act of simple equity that Lieutenant-Colonel Wood and his men should be exchanged and restored to our ranks without longer confinement, and I shall confidently rely on you to give the necessary orders to that end. Of course Lieutenant-Colonel Wood can be exchanged for officers of an inferior grade or for men in accordance with the tariff of exchanges established in General Orders, No. 51, from your headquarters, Saint Louis, Mo., March 3, 1862. Orders have been given to have Captain McMichael, assistant adjutant-general, of your service, released in exchange for Captain Cameron, of this army, who has been sent within our lines.

In connection with exchanges I have to present the names of the following persons whose release is desired whenever any of our officers and soldiers may be restored to our service, to wit: Maj. G. B. Cosby, {p.27} C. S. Army, captured at Fort Donelson; Capt. Isaac [W.] Avery, Georgia cavalry, captured near Booneville, June 1, 1862; Capt. George Soulé, Company A, Crescent Regiment, Louisiana volunteers; Capt. Claiborne Watkins, Company B, Eleventh Regiment Arkansas Volunteers; Lieut. Paul De Clouet and Lieut. F. O. Trépagnier, Orleans Guards; Lieut. R. L. Blair, Twelfth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers; Lieutenant Parker, Alabama volunteers; Lieut. F. Moreno, Louisiana volunteers; Lieut. D. C. Jenkins, Louisiana volunteers; Sergt. A. De Clouet, Orleans Guards; Private M. W. Chapman, Seventh Regiment Louisiana Volunteers; Private Delahoussaye, Louisiana volunteers, all captured at the battle of Shiloh.

I have also to submit the name of Second Lieut. Joseph K. Dixon, Confederate infantry, for early exchange. He was captured at Fort Saint Philip and released on parole. Any officer of equal rank that you may name in our hands will be exchanged for him, or I will direct the immediate release of an officer of his grade if you prefer it.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

[BRAXTON BRAGG, General, Commanding.]

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, June 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Forces, Corinth.

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit herewith for your consideration a copy* of a parole required of and given by Surgeon Benjamin, C. S. Army. As it bears the recent indorsement of your adjutant-general I have sent a copy presuming that he will be able to recognize its authenticity. The paper in question, as you will perceive, stipulates for an exchange of Surgeon Benjamin, C. S. Army, whose rank is but that of major, for Lieutenant-Colonel Morton, Missouri volunteers, of your service-a proposition so untenable that it must have escaped your notice when Surgeon Benjamin was at your headquarters and will not be entertained an instant. By the terms of the parole as extended at your headquarters Surgeon Benjamin must return as a prisoner of war by the - of July within your lines unless exchanged for Lieutenant-Colonel Morton. This requirement or obligation is, I submit, directly at variance with the spirit of recent arrangements touching prisoners of war. As early as 13th of April General Beauregard I find informed General Grant that at an early day he would release on parole all medical officers of the U. S. service in his hands. I can but think it in the clear interest of humanity and of both services that medical officers should not be regarded as other or combatant prisoners of war. I hope you will agree with me and permit Surgeon Benjamin to be absolved from his engagement to return within your lines on the day prescribed; that is, I hope he will be placed on the same footing with other medical officers released by General Beauregard and yourself in May.

I have also to suggest that chaplains should be treated in the same way and released if captured with the least delay practicable. In this connection I have to request the early release of the Rev, A. J. Witherspoon, chaplain Twenty-first Regiment Alabama Volunteers, captured at Shiloh in the discharge of his sacred duties. I learn that we had a {p.28} chaplain of your service, a Mr. Warner, whose immediate release has been directed as well as of any other chaplains held prisoners of war by us.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., June 16, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to report that Alfred Leigh was arrested on the recommendation of a large number of his neighbors, good Union citizens, he having made threats against some of them and having taken property from Union men who had left their farms on the approach of the enemy and refusing afterwards to give any account of it. He was likewise charged with having obtained four Government horses on false pretenses. I would further remark that I hold Leigh, Gunnell and one or two other disloyal citizens of Northeastern Virginia as hostages for the safe return of certain Union citizens of the same region now imprisoned in Richmond.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

[JAMES S. WADSWORTH,] Brigadier-General and Military Governor, District of Columbia.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, New York City, June 16, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, Commanding Fort Columbus, New York Harbor.

COLONEL: By direction of the Secretary of War you will please send to the depot near Sandusky in charge of a suitable guard all the rebel officers, prisoners of war, now in confinement at Fort Columbus. If possible so arrange it that they may arrive at Sandusky during the day as it would be difficult to cross to the island at night, and please inform the commanding officer of the time when they will arrive.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 15.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI, Springfield, June 16, 1862.

The time has arrived when the most stringent measures must be enforced to repress the lawless and atrocious proceedings of the marauders who infest the southwestern portion of the State, practicing murder and robbery on every side. Not only open offenders, but all who in any way aid or abet them must be brought to punishment, and such regulations must be established as will render it impossible for these thieves and assassins to remain undiscovered, and in order to accomplish this object all good citizens are called upon to co-operate with and assist the military authorities in their efforts to punish the {p.29} guilty and cheerfully submit to such regulations and orders that otherwise would be harsh and severe that are necessary and intended only to protect peaceable and law-abiding members of society. It is therefore ordered:

I. That all citizens residing within the limits of the southwest division of the District of Missouri shall at once appear before some properly qualified officer and take the oath of allegiance to the United States of America and to the provisional government of the State of Missouri and receive a certificate thereof unless they have already done so.

II. Every citizen who fails to obey the above order will be deprived of the ordinary privileges of loyal citizenship. He shall neither hold any office nor be permitted to vote; he shall not be allowed to serve as a juror or appear as a witness; he shall not transact any business, either agricultural, mechanical or professional; he shall not be permitted to pass at will upon the public highway, but as a punishment for the apparent aid and countenance which he extends to the marauders who are preying upon the country he is declared to be a prisoner within the limits of his own premises.

III. The troops stationed in this division are instructed to stop and examine all persons whom they find without the limits of their own domiciles and arrest and convey to the nearest military post all such as cannot show a certificate of having taken the oath of allegiance.

IV. When any citizen lives remote from any established military post so that it would inconvenience him to travel to the said post for the purpose he may appear before the nearest commissioned officer of the U. S. Army or the nearest notary public or justice of the peace and take and subscribe to the oath in duplicate, retaining one copy and forwarding the other to the nearest post to be recorded.

V. Nothing in this order will be construed so as to interfere with orders issued from the Department of the Missouri regulating the terms upon which returning rebel soldiers or openly avowed secessionists can make terms of peace with the Government of the United States.

By order of Brig. Gen. E. B. Brown:

JAMES H. STEGER, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, June 17, 1862.

Hon. JOHN A. BINGHAM, House of Representatives.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 13th instant requesting that “any information in this Department or in the Executive Departments of the Government touching the alleged correspondence of Hon. Benjamin Wood with the Confederate rebels be transmitted to the Judiciary Committee.”

In reply I have to state that the following comprised all the information received at this Department in regard to the subject, viz: A communication from the Post-Office Department inclosing two letters addressed to Mr. Wood which had been returned to the Dead-Letter Office and a letter from Mr. A. T. Allen to the Secretary of State. Both of the above it is presumed have already been transmitted to you by the War Department.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD, Acting Secretary.

{p.30}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 17, 1862.

RICHARD BATES, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Your letter of the 14th instant asking if an exchange can be made between J. Stewart Wilson, of Company F, and Thomas Bruce, of Company D, both of the First Maryland Regiment (loyal), captured at Strasburg, Va., and John H. Pleasants and John Morris, jr. (rebels), captured at Fort Donelson, has been received, and in reply the Secretary of War directs me to say that recently an arrangement was made for a general exchange of all prisoners of war, but its fulfillment has been delayed by the bad faith of the insurgent authorities. The subject, however, is still engaging the earnest attention of the Department which will continue its efforts for the release of all our citizens now held as prisoners of war until that end shall be accomplished; but as the release of the great body of these can only be effected by some system for a general exchange which is more likely to be adopted if special exchanges are not made the Secretary in justice to all is obliged to decline taking any action at present in the cases you present.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 67.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 17, 1862.

The supervision of prisoners of war sent by generals commanding in the field to posts or camps prepared for their reception is placed entirely under Col. William Hoffman, Third Infantry, commissary-general of prisoners, who is subject only to the orders of the War Department. All matters in relation to prisoners will pass through him.

He will establish regulations for issuing clothing to prisoners, and will direct the manner in which all funds arising from the saving of rations at prison hospitals or otherwise shall be accounted for and disbursed by the regular disbursing officers of the departments in providing under existing regulations such articles as may be absolutely necessary for the welfare of the prisoners.

He will select positions for camps for prisoners (or prison camps) and will cause plans and estimates for necessary buildings to be prepared and submitted to the Quartermaster-General upon whose approval they will be erected by the officers of the Quartermaster’s Department.

He will if practicable visit the several prison camps once a month.

Loyal citizens who may be found among the prisoners of war confined on false accusations or through mistake may lay their cases before the commissary-general of prisoners, who will submit them to the Adjutant-General.

The commissary-general of prisoners is authorized to grant paroles to prisoners on the recommendation of the medical officer attending the prison in case of extreme illness but under no other circumstances.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.31}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, U. S. Army, Commanding Middle Department, Baltimore, Md.

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 16th instant the Secretary of War desires that General Pettigrew, Colonel Hanson and all the other prisoners of war now in Baltimore on parole be sent without delay to Fort Delaware and there confined.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Lincoln, June 17, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a letter from Colonel Key, one of my aides-de-camp, giving the substance of a conversation with General Howell Cobb. The subject is interesting and I would be glad to have it laid before the President. The letter should be regarded as confidential.

I would be glad to learn the wishes of the Government in regard to a general exchange. I am inclined to think that a satisfactory cartel can be made. You will observe General Cobb’s views on the subject.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Lincoln, before Richmond, Va., June 16, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I am instructed by Major-General McClellan to report to you the substance of an interview held on yesterday by me with the Hon. Howell Cobb, now acting as a brigadier-general in the rebel army at Richmond. I was ordered to proceed with a flag of truce to the bridge crossing the Chickahominy, upon the Mechanicsville road, where I would be met by General Cobb at 11 a.m. for the purpose of a conference in regard to an exchange of prisoners, my instructions being to learn the views of the rebel Government and report them to General McClellan, making arrangements for a second meeting. I also received permission to converse with General Cobb upon the general subject of the existing contest, informing him, however, that all such conversation was purely personal and not in any respect of an official or representative character. I went to the place appointed and there was met upon the bridge by General Cobb. We availed ourselves as suggested by General McClellan of the shelter of a little hut made by our pickets a few feet from the bridge and talked together for several hours, the conversation being carried on chiefly by him.

In regard to the exchange of prisoners he exhibited written authority from General R. E. Lee, the commander of the whole Army of the Confederate States, giving him full power to make any convention on the subject as to any or all prisoners of war wherever captured.

He expressed a readiness to make an agreement embracing all prisoners now held by either side, or one including only those taken by the {p.32} respective armies now confronting each other before Richmond, and to make such agreement applicable either to existing prisoners or also to those hereafter captured. He stated that he would sign any cartel which was based upon principles of entire equality, and he proposed that exchanges should take place according to the date of capture, first, however, exhausting the list of officers. The scale of equivalents to be any one which we might present and which would operate equally; for instance the one exhibited by him to General Wool at a conference between them, and which was taken from a cartel between the United States and Great Britain in 1812, the exchanged persons to be conveyed by the captors (at the captor’s expense) to some point of delivery convenient to the other party, the rule of exchange to operate, uniformly without any right of reservation or exception in any particular case. He professed ignorance of any complaint against his Government in any matter of exchanging prisoners and pledged himself for the removal of any cause of complaint upon representation being made. He suggested the propriety of releasing upon parole any surplus of prisoners remaining after exchanges had exhausted either party. I saw no evidence of any disposition to overreach me in this conference.*

...

Trusting that I may not be considered as having committed any impropriety in the interview or in this communication,

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS M. KEY, Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

* For Colonel Key’s report in full, see Series I, Vol. XI, Part I, p. 1052 et seq.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor of the District of Columbia.

GENERAL: It appears there is an officer of the rebel forces at Willard’s Hotel named William Monaghan, a captain of the Sixth Louisiana Volunteers. It is not known whether he is on parole or not. The Secretary of War desires that he as well as any others who may be at large here under any circumstances be immediately put in confinement as in the case of prisoners of war.

I am, sir, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, N. Mex., June 17, 1862.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I reported in my communication of May 17 that the officer (Captain Lewis, Fifth Infantry) sent by me from Fort Craig for the purpose of effecting an exchange of prisoners had failed in reaching the army in consequence of the high stage of water in the Rio Grande. It was not my intention to have renewed this without further instructions from your office, but Captain Lewis meeting with an opportunity of crossing the river proceeded under his original instructions to Donna {p.33} Ana, from which place his communications were forwarded to General Sibley at Fort Bliss. As the result of the proposition then made the officers and soldiers mentioned in the inclosed order* were exchanged for a like number of Confederate prisoners. Captain Stivers, Seventh Infantry, was included in the proposals for exchange for the reason that his company is serving in this country, and if my recommendation for the transfer of these companies to the East should not have been approved I request that he may be ordered to join his company in New Mexico. At my instance Assistant Surgeons McKee and Alden,paroled at the surrender of Major Lynde’s command, have been released from the obligations of their paroles for a like number of medical officers of the Confederate Army now on duty with their prisoners in this department. I inclose herewith a return* of the prisoners of war taken in this department.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

EDW. R. S. CANBY, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding Department.

JUNE 21, 1862.

NOTE.-This report has been delayed in the hope of making the return of prisoners more complete, but it is still imperfect, as some of the officers in charge of prisoners neglected to note the companies and regiments to which they belonged and the information cannot now be obtained.

* Omitted.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., June 17, 1862.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR.

SIR: In reply to your request for a report in the case of J. C. Gunnell, confined in the Old Capitol Prison, I have the honor to state that he was arrested on the application in writing of thirty-one well-known Union citizens of Fairfax County.

Mr. Gunnell at the outbreak of the rebellion was the acting sheriff of that county, and was perhaps the most active influential secessionist in the county. He was particularly obnoxious to the Union men, and it is charged that he was instrumental in procuring several to be arrested and others to be driven from the county. Having fled on the approach of the Union troops on the evacuation of Manassas he returned a few weeks after and it is charged that since his return he has threatened Union men or at least warned them as to the consequences which might follow their attendance of Union meetings, &c.

I hold Mr. Gunnell under arrest for another reason. The rebel authorities hold in prison at Richmond from thirty to forty citizens of Fairfax County for no offense but their attachment to the Union. Some of these cases are known to me as the most cruel and merciless persecutions on record. I have said to the friends of Mr. Gunnell that if they would procure the release of one of these men I would release him.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

[JAMES S. WADSWORTH,] Brigadier-General.

{p.34}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Saint Louis, June 17, 1862.

Col. JOHN C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Mississippi.

COLONEL: I desire respectfully to ask the attention of the major-general commanding to what seems to me an abuse of the proper office of provost-marshal in this State and in Arkansas. I quote from a letter just received from Major-General Curtis to justify the application of my remark to his district as well as to my own. He says:

The creation of the so-called provost-marshal invented a spurious military officer which has embarrassed the service by including an extra wheel in a well-regulated machine. They have no right to do these things derived from me, but a usage seems to have obtained. Everybody appoints provost-marshals and these officers seem to exercise plenary powers.

These remarks were in answer to a letter which I addressed to General Curtis calling his attention to the fact that many well-known rebels are returning to Missouri from Arkansas bearing certificates from unknown provost-marshals that they have taken the oath and claiming protection, while all experience shows that unless bound by something stronger than their oath their loyalty is apt to be of short duration.

The provost-marshal’s department as it now exists is entirely independent of all commanders except the commander of the department, and hence of necessity pretty much independent of him. The local provost-marshals are appointed by the provost-marshal-general, or by any local commander and approved by the provost-marshal-general. They get all their instructions from him if they get any at all; make all their reports to him if they make any at all, and are responsible only to him and the department commander for the manner in which their duty is discharged. The custody and control of all prisoners not disposed of by orders from department headquarters is given to the provost-marshal-general and through him to his subordinates. Their discretion is to decide all questions as to the release, parole or other disposition of all prisoners. The officer commanding a district who is responsible to the general commanding the department for the condition of his district has nothing whatever to do with the disposition of prisoners captured by his troops, although at the present time in Missouri this is the most important question involving its future peace.

It appears to me that a district commander should have the power to appoint all the provost-marshals in his district; that they should act under his instructions and be responsible to him for the discharge of their duty; that he should also have if he deems it necessary a provost-marshal-general of his district acting under his orders and directly responsible to him, and that he should decide what prisoners taken in his district are to be released and on what terms; what are to be tried by military commission; what turned over to the civil authorities, and what turned over to the provost-marshal of the department to be held as prisoners of war or as convicts under sentence. With this authority a district commander will be able to carry out the general instructions of his commanding general and be properly responsible for those things that are left to his discretion. As it is now he can adopt no policy nor carry out that established by the department commander. He cannot even decide a particular case quite within the jurisdiction of a lieutenant of his command or even of a civilian who happens to be styled provost-marshal.

I have expressed my views thus freely on this subject from the belief that the major-general commanding having much more weighty matters {p.35} to attend to has not given it the attention which he otherwise would have done, and that the provost-marshal’s department in this State is much in need of improvement which I have not the authority to make and which the commanding general of course cannot at present attend to.

Since the above was written a telegram has been received from Major-General Halleck revoking the order in regard to the discharge of prisoners; but as that removes only a part of the difficulties I have mentioned I have decided to forward this communication.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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MEDICAL DIRECTOR’S OFFICE, DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, Fort Monroe, June 17, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: We have in our hospitals several rebel prisoners with amputated limbs. If not incompatible with the views of the Government would it not be as well to let these men go home?

Yours, very truly,

JNO. M. CUYLER, Medical Director, Department of Virginia.

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FORT HAMILTON, N. Y. Harbor, June 17, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: In my letter of yesterday I mentioned about the expected arrival of Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau at Fort Lafayette, and yesterday saw that one casemate was selected to confine them both in conformably to your orders as their being both together would be more convenient so far as room is in the question, and I presumed at the time that was your wish as their confinement together would taking the above circumstances into consideration be quite as safe,if not more so, to prevent any communication from them than to have them separate. However, the matter is respectfully submitted to you. I make this communication in anticipation of their speedy arrival.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, New York, June 17, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Pursuant to instructions heretofore received I have ordered that the rebel officers, prisoners of war at Fort Delaware and Fort Columbus, be sent to the depot at Sandusky, the movement to take place the latter part of the week unless an announcement of a general exchange of prisoners is made in the meantime when it would be unnecessary.

{p.36}

Governor’s Island is better adapted for the reception of prisoners than any place in the interior and I would respectfully suggest that sheds for the accommodation of 5,000 be erected there immediately. The cost of transportation thence to an inland camp would go far toward covering the expense of the buildings. I would respectfully suggest also that bunks be put in Castle William for the accommodation of prisoners confined there. By this means more can be provided for there and good police and health will be promoted. Of course they would be so arranged as to be easily removed. I leave for Detroit this evening.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 18, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

The Adjutant-General has just submitted to me your telegram addressed to him and dated the 13th instant respecting the exchange of prisoners.

This subject has for several months been under the direction of General Wool who has had several negotiations with Howell Cobb and General Huger. The last arrangement made was broken off by the rebel authorities denying Huger’s authority to make the arrangement for Corcoran’s exchange.

It is believed that their real reason for breaking off was to obtain an arrangement that would secure the release of General Buckner. The President has for some days been considering the question of agreeing to a general exchange but has not yet decided because strong opposition is manifested to the exchange of Buckner.

I have ordered the Adjutant-General to send you immediately by mail a copy of the correspondence between General Wool and General Huger which will enable you fully to understand the question in dispute when General Wool left Fort Monroe.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 18, 1862.

CHAIRMAN COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS, House of Representatives.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 5th instant inclosing the memorial of Capt. H. C. Wood, U. S. Army, asking compensation for property lost by him when the Military Department of Texas was surrendered to the rebels, and requesting to know what has been the course pursued by the United States Government in such cases heretofore and my opinion in the matter.

In reply I have respectfully to state that this is the first instance on record of the traitorous surrender to rebels by a U. S. officer. But there is in my opinion a previous action of the Government which would commend this case to the liberality of Congress. I will cite as a sufficient instance the act of July 14, 1832, page 512, U. S. Statutes at {p.37} Large, Private Laws for 1789 to 1815. This act authorizes the Second Auditor of the Treasury and requires him to ascertain and pay the amount of property lost by each officer and soldier in the conflagration at Fort Delaware, which occurred February 8, 1831. The papers inclosed in your letter are herewith respectfully returned as requested by you.

I have the honor, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 18, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Commanding, &c., Fort Monroe, Va.

SIR: The Secretary of War authorizes you to release any rebel prisoners who are badly wounded and disabled and suffer them to pass through our lines to their homes on their giving their parole not hereafter to serve in any capacity against the United States.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 18, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

Under General Orders, No. 60, medical officers held as prisoners of war are to be released. This applies to Doctor Bailey, whose vase was reported by Surgeon Cuyler yesterday. He may be permitted to return home.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 18, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp on Johnson’s Island, near Sandusky:

A scheme is reported to be on foot in Canada by Southern sympathizers to release the prisoners on the island. Be on your guard. Copy of the plan will be sent by mail.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR, Near Sandusky, Ohio, June 18, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I have forwarded to you by express a roll of all our prisoners, also of those who have been sent back to Columbus, also of the privates and citizens here. There has been some deception as to privates and Mr. Wells and the sergeant-major have been very patient and persevering in their endeavor to find them out. There are some {p.38} cases here of fathers and sons and of brothers which it is desirable not to separate, and it happens in cases of very well-disposed prisoners. There are also some here who are sick and also some who are useful. Shall I make any exception in these cases when I have another opportunity to send them away?

There is among the prisoners here a concerted plan for general revolt with a view of taking the island and take their chances for escape. These prisoners have very many desperate men among them and among the higher officers, and they are very influential. So far as I can judge-and I have good means of knowing-this plan of revolt embraces the great body of the prisoners. Our details of guards are so large that with as much care as can be exercised with the sick and absent we get on some every other day. There are a few men short in each company and men are so scarce it is difficult to fill them. We are using the utmost vigilance, and while I do not fear a successful attempt the officers as well as myself would feel better if we had another company. It would be a most unfortunate thing for the Government and our officers who are prisoners if any large body of these should escape, and while we here shall do all we can to prevent it if it should happen and a larger force would have prevented it it would be very unfortunate. I could name a large number of prisoners here who should be in Fort Warren in case no prospect of exchange should result from the present negotiations. Indeed the field officers here generally exert a very bad influence. There is no dissatisfaction with their treatment (and our personal intercourse is pleasant) which creates this disposition, but it is the result of the restless spirit of a set of very bad rebels. I have written in haste and shall not have this letter copied.

Most respectfully,

WM. S. PIERSON.

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NEW YORK, June 18, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

Major Kinsman, aide to General Butler, has surrendered into my custody Pierre Soulé, Adolphe Mazureau and servant. What disposition shall I make of them?

ROBERT MURRAY, U. S. Marshal.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 19, 1862.

ROBERT MURRAY, Esq., U. S. Marshal, New York:

The prisoners surrendered to your custody by Major Kinsman you will deliver into the custody of the commander of Fort Lafayette to be held by him until further order.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 19, 1862.

Col. J. E. BAILEY, Prisoner of War, Fort Warren, Mass.

SIR: In answer to your letter of the 7th instant inquiring whether prisoners on being exchanged will be permitted to carry their families {p.39} with them the Secretary of War directs me to state that no rule has yet been established on this subject, but that when your exchange shall be effected your application will be promptly considered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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MCCLELLAN’S HEADQUARTERS, June 19, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

... I will to-morrow forward to General Lee a copy of the general order directing that surgeons will not be regarded as prisoners of war and do not doubt but that General Lee will at once issue a similar order.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., June 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac, &c.

GENERAL: In compliance with your request I have the honor to transmit herewith a list of the prisoners of war captured by the C. S. forces in the battle of the 31st ultimo on the Chickahominy, and also of those taken on several occasions subsequent to that date.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 19, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Military Forces, Richmond, Va.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a list of prisoners from this army taken by the force under your command. I thank you for responding thus promptly to my proposition on this subject and for relieving the minds of the prisoners’ friends.

I shall continue to send you from time to time lists of prisoners taken by us and am sure that you will return similar lists.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., June 19, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army.

GENERAL: I have just received your communication of the 16th instant asking for information in regard to the subject-matter of the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 28th April concerning Judge Edward P. Pitts, of Northampton County, Va.

In reply I have the honor to state that when I ceased to be the commanding general of the Middle Department, in which Accomac and Northampton Counties, Va., are comprised, Judge Pitts was in office but not with my consent or approbation. When I first saw the memorial of Judge Pitts to the Legislature of Virginia I was entering on my {p.40} duties as one of the commissioners appointed by the Secretary of War in regard to state prisoners. These counties constituted a part of the State of Western Virginia, and Governor Peirpoint had ratified the appointment of Judge Pitts. It was suggested to me by one of the Senators and one of the members of the government of Western Virginia with whom I conferred on the subject that it should be left for the action of the Governor, to whom the memorial of Judge Pitts had been transmitted and with whom they engaged to communicate personally. After completing my duties as commissioner in regard to state prisoners, finding Judge Pitts still in the exercise of his judicial authority, I wrote to the Governor of Western Virginia urging his removal and the appointment of a loyal citizen in his place. I deemed this course the most proper for two reasons:

1. Martial law had not been declared in the counties of Accomac and Northampton. The authority of the government of Western Virginia had been extended over them. No part of the Union had been more quiet or submissive to the laws. They had elected loyal men to the Legislature and to Congress and all persons in office within them had taken the oath of allegiance to the United States.

2. I did not deem it advisable to displace Judge Pitts by military force and thus supersede the remedial action of the loyal Governor of Western Virginia by a measure which might have been misconstrued into censure or distrust until his wishes were made known to me. Besides I did not think it right on general principles to overthrow by military power the exercise of the judicial authority in a loyal State governed by a loyal chief magistrate unless it should become indispensable for want of the necessary authority in him under the State constitution. Having expressed my strong disapprobation of the conduct of Judge Pitts, having communicated to him through a State senator my condemnation of his disloyal course and having appealed to the Governor for his dismissal, I deemed it incumbent on me to defer the exercise of the military power vested in me until advised by the authority to which I had appealed that there was no other remedy.

In the case of Judge Carmichael whom I arrested on a recent occasion I not only had the authority of the Government but I also consulted with the Governor of Maryland, who left the whole matter to be disposed of by me in the exercise of a sound discretion.

I will only add that I had an appointment with Governor Peirpoint at Baltimore on the day I was relieved from the command of the Middle Department, and that my departure for Fort Monroe on a notice of a few hours prevented me from keeping it. Had we met it is not improbable that there would have been some action between us on the subject.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., June 19, 1862.

...

III. In accordance with instructions from War Department the following-named prisoners of war will be sent to Fort Delaware at 2 p.m. to-day via Ericsson line of steamers, viz: Brigadier-General Pettigrew, Confederate Army; Col. Roger W. Hanson, Second Kentucky Volunteers, Confederate Army; Col. William E. Baldwin, Fourteenth Mississippi Volunteers, Confederate Army; Lieut. Col. James Jackson, {p.41} Twenty-seventh Alabama Volunteers, Confederate Army; First Lieut. J. B. Washington, aide-de-camp, Confederate Army; First Lieut. J. Murray, aide-de-camp, Confederate Army.

Maj. Henry Z. Hayner, aide-de-camp, U. S. Army, will take charge of the prisoners to Fort Delaware, turn them over to the commanding officer of that station, take a receipt for them and return to these headquarters. The prisoners will be put on their verbal parole to make no attempt at escape on their way, declining to give which a guard will be sent with them, for which Major Hayner will make application. Maj. James Belger, quartermaster, U. S. Army, will provide the transportation.

...

By command of Major-General Wool:

WM. D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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U. S. MARSHAL’S OFFICE, New York, June 19, 1862.

Col. MARTIN BURKE, Commandant, Port Lafayette.

COLONEL: Deputy De Voe will deliver into your custody Messrs. Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau, of New Orleans, sent here by Major-General Butler. They are committed to your care in obedience to a telegram of the following tenor, viz:

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 19, 1862.

ROBERT MURRAY, Esq., U. S. Marshal, New York:

The prisoners surrendered to your custody by Major Kinsman you will deliver into the custody of the commander of Fort Lafayette to be held by him until further order.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

The original telegram will be produced for your satisfaction, and after having read it will you have the kindness to return the same by bearer?

I am, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. MURRAY, U. S. Marshal.

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U. S. MARSHAL’S OFFICE, New York, June 19, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: In obedience to the order contained in your telegraphic dispatch of to-day’s date I have removed Messrs. Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau (the two prisoners sent to this port by Major-General Butler, New Orleans) to the custody of the commandant at Fort Lafayette, subject to your further orders.

I have the honor to remain, sir, your most obedient servant,

ROBT. MURRAY, U. S. Marshal.

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WASHINGTON, June 19, 1862.

Col. MARTIN BURKE, Port Hamilton:

The Secretary of War directs that you receive Soulé, Mazureau, servant and any prisoners sent North by General Butler, now in the {p.42} custody of Marshal Murray, and safely keep them without allowing them to hold communication with any other person until further orders. Acknowledge by telegraph.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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FORT HAMILTON, June 19, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS:

Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau have arrived and are now confined at Fort Lafayette.

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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DETROIT, June 19, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Telegram this moment received from Maj. W. S. Pierson, commanding Johnson’s Island, Sandusky, says a large scheme is on foot for revolt of prisoners with aid from Canada. Will you come here immediately as Colonel Hoffman has not yet arrived here. I advise you.

G. W. HOFFMAN

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DEPOT PRISONERS OF WAR, Near Sandusky, Ohio, June 19, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN.

DEAR SIR: I wrote you hastily yesterday and on account of further developments I sent dispatch to-day, and hearing from your br[other] I write a word as I have only time before the last boat. I learn in substance that the prisoners have a military organization; that they have a general and adjutant and other officers; that they are to obey orders; that they are to revolt and that the leaders assure them that they will have abundance of transportation from Canada, with aid from the water; that our guards will be driven back and they will rush out; that arrangements are made to this effect, &c. Of course how far this is true I can only judge from what I learn in confidence from the prisoner who betrays, coupled with many corroborating circumstances.

I received dispatch from General Thomas last evening putting me on my guard, stating that “a scheme is reported to be on foot in Canada by Southern sympathizers to release the prisoners on the island. Be on your guard.” It is consistent with what I am informed from within the prison. I have replied to his dispatch and asked if the U. S. steamer Michigan could not be sent here. I do not see any good she does in Buffalo or Erie, and our boat here would be nowhere in case they come with such preparation as is threatened. I have invoice of another mountain howitzer, but it has not arrived. As your br[other] telegraphed you were not at Detroit I write this, as it may be in Detroit as soon as you are so you can understand to what I refer in my dispatch.

Yours, most respectfully,

WM. S. PIERSON.

{p.43}

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FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL, New York, June 19, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I have received an order to report to you “for such duty as I can perform.” I understood that you were in New York, and in my application for duty I applied for orders to report to you here. Should I not be otherwise directed I will proceed to join you at your headquarters at Detroit on Monday next, the 23d instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

... In regard to a contemplated execution of Captains Spriggs and Triplett the Government has no information whatever, but will inquire and advise you.

A. LINCOLN.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Your dispatch in relation to Captains Spriggs and Triplett has been received. This Department has no information of any proceedings against them, but will take immediate measures to ascertain the facts and inform you of them.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, June 20, 1862.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

The President directs that if you have in your custody the rebel Captains Spriggs and Triplett who are reported to be under sentence of death as guerrillas you shall suspend proceedings against them and make report to this Department of the facts in their cases. Please answer immediately.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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STRASBURG, June 20, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

Dispatch just received. I have not yet received any report in cases of rebel Captains Spriggs and Triplett. Have probably been tried by military commission under General Kelley. I will immediately inquire and report.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.44}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Brigadier-General KELLEY, Cumberland:

Suspend proceedings against Captains Triplett and Spriggs and report by telegraph to this Department the facts in their cases.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

A telegram is just received from General Kelley as follows:

CUMBERLAND. MD., June 20, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Captains Triplett and Spriggs were captured by Colonel Crook’s troops in Greenbrier County and I think are in Camp Chase. They have not been tried by court-martial or military commission. Major Darr, provost-marshal at Wheeling, can give all information in regard to them.

B. F. KELLEY, Brigadier-General.

It appears from the foregoing that Captains Spriggs and Triplett are held as other prisoners of war. This Department has no other information on the subject.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Hon. PRESTON KING, U. S. Senate.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your note of yesterday with inclosure relative to procuring the exchange of Surg. G. C. Marshall and to inform you in reply that this Department has by a general order released all surgeons captured from the rebels and that information has just been received from Richmond that all our surgeons now held as prisoners of war by the rebels will be unconditionally released. Hereafter surgeons are to be treated by both sides as non-combatants.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Lincoln, Va., June 20, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to transmit copies of two communications received by me under date of the 17th and 19th instant from General R. E. Lee, commanding the military forces at Richmond, together with copies of my replies to the same.

The list of prisoners alluded to in one of my letters will be forwarded by to-morrow’s mail. I am having a copy taken for use here.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.45}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., June 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: Your proposition* to regard medical officers in care of the sick and wounded as non-combatants is concurred in by me, and such officers are so regarded in the operations of the armies of Northern and Eastern Virginia. I take the occasion to thank you for the unconditional release of Doctor Taylor, of the C. S. Army, who was left in attendance upon a sick man at Williamsburg.

R. E. LEE, General.

* See McClellan to General Commanding Army of Northern Virginia, third paragraph, Vol. III, this Series, p. 670.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 19, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Military Forces, Richmond Va.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of to-day concurring in my proposition “to consider medical officers in care of the sick and wounded as non-combatants.” Such officers will accordingly be so regarded in the army under my command. I inclose to you an order of the War Department on this subject which goes even further than the proposition I made to you. I trust that you will receive a corresponding order.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Sub-inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 60.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 6, 1862.

...

IV. The principle being recognized that medical officers should not be held as prisoners of war it is hereby directed that all medical officers so held by the United States shall be immediately and unconditionally discharged.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., June 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I am directed by the Secretary of War to state that having been informed of the capture of Captains Spriggs and Triplett, of the Ranger service of the State of Virginia, and of their intended execution by order of the United States Government, he has caused lots to be drawn from among the U. S. officers detained as prisoners of war for the purpose of selecting subjects for retaliation, and that the lots have fallen upon Capt. George Austin, Company B, Second Kentucky Regiment of Infantry, and Capt. Timothy O’Meara, Tammany Regiment, New York volunteers.

{p.46}

It is the desire of the Confederate Government to conduct this war in conformity to the usages of Christian and civilized nations, but should he have been correctly informed and should Captains Spriggs and Triplett be executed retaliation will be made on Captains Austin and O’Meara. This course will be demanded by a due regard for the citizens of the Confederate States and will be unhesitatingly though reluctantly pursued.

Not being certain of the correctness of the report no change has been made in the treatment of the hostages, and I shall be very happy to learn that the report is without foundation.*

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General.

* Omitted here; see this letter and the other correspondence in Vol. III, this Series, in its chronological order.

[Inclosure No. 4.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 19, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Military Forces, Richmond, Va.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of to-day relative to a reported intention on the part of the United States Government to order the execution of two prisoners, Captains Spriggs and Triplett, of the Virginia Ranger service.

I know nothing of any such persons. If they were taken by this army the report is without foundation. I have telegraphed upon the subject to the Secretary of War and I will communicate the facts to you as soon as I learn them. I shall much regret any commencement of retaliatory executions.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp Lincoln, Va., June 20, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Military Forces, Richmond, Va.

GENERAL: As I was on the point of dispatching my aide with my reply to your letter of the 19th instant respecting Captains Spriggs and Triplett I received a dispatch from the Secretary of War in relation to those officers, a copy of which is herewith respectfully furnished for your information.

I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 20, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac, near Richmond, Va.

GENERAL: By direction of the Secretary of War I have the honor to inclose herewith for your information a copy of a letter* of the 6th

Substance of this letter telegraphed by McClellan to Stanton June 19 and asking for information about Spriggs and Triplett. {p.47} instant from Major-General Wool to the Secretary of War, forwarding correspondence on the subject of exchange of prisoners of war with the rebel authorities, and fifteen inclosures.*

I have the honor, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* Omitted here; see this letter and the other correspondence in Vol. III, this Series, in its chronological order.

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MCCLELLAN’S, June 20, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. A. DIX:

General McClellan desires that you hold the citizen prisoners who have lately been sent to Fort Monroe and particularly those taken by Colonel Averell until you receive orders from him. He desires to hold them as hostages.

A. V. COLBURN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH, Hilton Head, S. C., June 20, 1862.

Lieut. Col. LOUIS BELL, Commanding Post, Saint Augustine, Fla.

SIR: In reply to your letter dated June 1 relative to the case of William Keys and three other men who have taken the oath of allegiance, and who nevertheless were guilty of harboring a sergeant of the Confederate Army and supplying him with information, I am instructed by the major-general commanding to advise you that the prisoners in question are to be heavily ironed and sent to these headquarters with a statement in writing and as full as possible of their offense. Your action in the case of Mr. Standenmayer, the Episcopal clergyman, is approved.

In reference to your letter dated May 29 relative to the hanging and persecution of loyal citizens by roving bands of Confederate guerrillas the major-general commanding desires that you shall take the most rigorous and prompt measures for the suppression of such practices. All guerrillas caught you will iron heavily and send to these headquarters with written charges accompanying them. You will also threaten to arm and if necessary arm all negroes and Indians who may be willing to enter the service. You should also at once drive out of your lines all persons without reference to sex who have not taken and shall refuse to take the oath of allegiance.

The general commanding reposing much confidence in your judgment gives you a large and liberal discretion in reference to all acts that may be necessary for the vindication of the laws within your district and guarantees you a frank support in any acts within the limits of a reasonable discretion. It is not his wish, however, that the death penalty should be inflicted on prisoners captured without express orders from these headquarters. The better way will be to iron all malefactors and send them here for disposition under the necessary guard. You will report frequently and fully all action taken by you under the terms of these instructions.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.48}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 21, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN.

GENERAL: Your letter with the accompanying letter of Colonel Key respecting his conference with Howell Cobb, acting as a brigadier-general in the rebel army, has been received and laid before the President according to your request. The President’s instructions respecting any further effort at exchange will be speedily communicated to you. I will only remark now that it is not deemed proper for officers bearing flags of truce in respect to the exchange of prisoners to hold any conference with the rebel officers upon the general subject of the existing contest or upon any other subject than what relates to the exchange of prisoners.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 21, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. Dix, Commanding Fort Monroe:

Did you ever make any report of the circumstances connected with the arrest of Judge Carmichael? If you did it has been mislaid and you will please send a copy. If you have not made any report please do so now.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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FORT MONROE, June 21, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The papers in Judge Carmichael’s case were left in Baltimore. I will procure them and report without delay. Governor Peirpoint, of Western Virginia, has appointed commissioners to superintend the municipal election at Norfolk on Tuesday next and called on General Viele for a military force to sustain them. Shall it be furnished, and is Governor P. to be recognized as Governor of this portion of Virginia? I have had no instructions on this point.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 21, 1862.

Col. RICHARD OWEN, Commanding Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind.

SIR: Your letter of the 17th instant to Capt. J. A. Ekin, U. S. Army, reporting the fact that many prisoners now under your charge at Camp Morton would prefer remaining in prison rather than to be released and sent within the rebel lines, has been submitted to this Department, and in reply the Secretary of War directs me to state that when a system of general exchanges shall be established none of the prisoners of war who will take the oath of allegiance and as to whose future loyalty there is no question will be forced within the rebel lines.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

{p.49}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 71.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 21, 1862.

In every case of prisoners taken in arms against the United States who may be tried and sentenced to death the record of the tribunal before which the trial was had will be forwarded for the action of the President of the United States, without whose orders no such sentence in such cases will be executed.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 21, 1862.

Col. D. D. TOMPKINS, Asst. Quartermaster-General, No. 6 State street, New York.

SIR: A telegram was sent you on the 15th instant informing you of the expected arrival in New York of Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau, political prisoners from New Orleans, and conveying orders from the Secretary of War that they should be confined in Fort Lafayette and allowed to hold no communication with any person until further orders. On the 18th instant you:-telegram was received in these words:

The prisoners Pierre Soulé and Adolphe Mazureau have arrived here from New Orleans by the steamer Ocean Queen and have been sent to Fort Lafayette as directed.

Lieutenant-Colonel Burke reports their arrival the next day, June 19, and their confinement at Fort Lafayette. The Secretary of War is informed that instead of being allowed no communication with any person and being taken from the ship direct to Fort Lafayette these prisoners on landing went to a hotel in New York City and were taken in charge by the U. S. marshal and were not delivered at Fort Lafayette until one or two days after they arrived in New York. He directs that you report without delay the facts and circumstances of the case.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 21, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding General.

GENERAL: I am informed by the Secretary of War that Captains Triplett and Spriggs were captured in Greenbrier County and are supposed to be in Camp Chase, in Ohio. They have not been tried either by court-martial or military commission and are held as other prisoners.

In the treatment of prisoners the United States Government is controlled by principles of humanity and civilization, and I respectfully suggest to you the very great danger of violating those principles whenever retaliatory measures are based upon rumor or even upon newspaper report.

I beg leave to express my appreciation of your own views and sentiments, and am,

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

{p.50}

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., June 21, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I am advised by a letter from Brig. Gen. John H. Winder dated at Richmond, Va., the 17th instant that the Rev. David Lee is released from his parole and to be considered exchanged when informed that the Rev. Townsend McVeigh, now on parole at Richmond, is released from his parole and declared to be exchanged. I have the honor to state that I have given the necessary notice to General Winder, so that the exchange is completed and the reverend gentlemen referred to are respectively released from their paroles.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., June 21, 1862.

Capt. S. P. REMINGTON, Scott’s Cavalry.

SIR: You will proceed with your command to the north part of Fairfax County and Loudoun County, and having carefully ascertained the names and residences of the leading secessionists you will seize their horses and mules to the number of 100. You will not take the horse of any Union man, and when you are in doubt as to the loyalty of a citizen you will not disturb his property. You will avoid taking the property of families in reduced circumstances, and unless in the case of a disloyal citizen of ample means you will not take all the horses belonging to one family.

You will arrest any of the justices who recently met with General Asa Rogers to hold a county court whom you may meet with. You will procure your subsistence from disloyal citizens. You will keep a careful record of your proceedings and report to these headquarters on your return.

JAMES S. WADSWORTH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 21, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

SIR: Pursuant to paragraph 4, General Orders, No. 60, of the 6th instant from the War Department, all medical officers held as prisoners of war at Camp Douglas will be immediately and unconditionally discharged.

If necessary employ a private physician to attend the sick and report immediately all the facts to this office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN.

(Similar letters sent to commanding officers of all military prisons.)

{p.51}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 21, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Johnson’s Island, Sandusky, Ohio.

SIR: The following-named officers, prisoners of war at the depot on Johnson’s Island, will be immediately transferred to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, under a suitable guard, viz:

Col. D. M. Anvil, One hundred and thirty-ninth Virginia Militia; Col. Joel A. Battle, Twentieth Tennessee; Col. J. M. Clark, Forty-sixth Tennessee; Col. William C. Mitchell, Fourteenth Arkansas; Col. W. A. Quarles, Forty-second Tennessee; Col. J. M. Simonton, First Mississippi; Col. J. M. Smith, Eleventh Arkansas; Lieut. Col. W. T. Avery, First Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi; Lieut. Col. J. W. Johnson, Forty-sixth Tennessee; Lieut. Col. W. A. Jones, Fifty-fifth Tennessee; Lieut. Col. M. S. Miller, Eleventh Arkansas; Lieut. Col. R. C. Wood, Adams’ [Mississippi] Cavalry.

Send a complete roll with them, and under the head of remarks give the date of their joining the depot and where from and the date of their transfer to Fort Warren. There are possibly among the prisoners some who are disposed to create disturbances, and if so you may select three or four of those most conspicuous in this way and transfer them to Fort Warren with the above-named.

My letter of the 22d May required all enlisted men with certain exceptions to be sent to Camp Chase. This embraces all who are not commissioned officers, among them sergeant-majors, quartermaster’s sergeants, &c. By the first opportunity you will send all those now at the depot to Camp Chase, furnishing a complete roll with them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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NEW YORK, June 21, 1862.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD.

DEAR SIR: Mr. George F. Thompson was editor of the New York Daily News prior to January, 1860, during which time Fernando Wood and W. Drake Parsons were owners, since which time I think he has had nothing to do with that (the News) concern. Perhaps Mr. Gideon J. Tucker, of this city, may give you more information regarding Ben. Wood than any one else, as he was editor under the ownership of that paper by Ben. Wood, who bought out Fernando Wood’s interest on the 14th of May, 1860.

Perhaps Mr. Parsons would be able to give you some information, although this is entirely conjecture on my part. I do not sign this as I do not wish to be drawn into any matter in which Ben. Wood is concerned.

P. S.-The accompanying notice is cut from the New York Express of this day.

[Inclosure.]

THE CASE OF HON. BENJAMIN WOOD.

JUNE 21.-By order of the Secretary of War George F. Thompson, of this city, was sent to Washington last night in charge of a marshal’s {p.52} officer to give testimony in relation to the alleged treason of Benjamin Wood. Mr. Thompson was formerly clerk of Fernando Wood during the mayoralty of the latter, and prior to that time was one of the chief editors of the Daily News.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 22, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Military Forces, Richmond, Va.

GENERAL: Capt. Mathew Donovan and Lieut. F. P. H. Rogers, Sixteenth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, have been missing since the skirmish on the 18th instant near White Oak Swamp and are supposed to have fallen into the hands of your troops on that occasion. I respectfully solicit information respecting them in order that I may be enabled to relieve the anxiety of their friends touching their fate.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

Capt. M. Donovan is at present confined in this prison, but no such person as F. P. H. Rogers, lieutenant, Sixteenth Massachusetts, has ever been received here.

TH. P. TURNER, Lieutenant, Commanding [Libby Prison].

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CAMP NEAR FLORENCE, June 22, 1862.

General HALLECK:

The paroled prisoners at Nashville are mutinous and disorderly and there is not sufficient force there to control them. If discharged there it is to be apprehended that they would cause much disturbance before they could be got off. Do you approve of my sending them to some point on the Ohio and having them mustered out there?

D. G. BUELL, Major-General.

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MADISON, WIS., June 22, 1862.

Lieut. Col. W. HOFFMAN, Eighth Infantry, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to transmit a petition* from Prisoner C. A. Stanton, calling himself captain, &c. I also forwarded lately a copy of the proceedings of a court of inquiry relating to the shooting of one of the prisoners.

I sent off about two weeks ago a detachment of convalescents of about forty prisoners and to-morrow will send off about fifty more, leaving only about twelve or fifteen in the hospital. On the 30th I will muster the prisoners remaining and will send the muster-roll to you, which will show the condition of all that were left here on the 1st of June and the alterations since that date. The day before yesterday (the 20th) two of the hospital attendants escaped. It is due entirely to the idiotic inefficiency of the guard. They are said to have gone off in the midday train, but the fact was not reported to me for twenty-four hours. The {p.53} officer commanding the guard (fifty men), Lieutenant Kingsbury, of the Nineteenth, took no steps whatever to pursue or recover them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. SMITH, Major Twelfth Infantry.

* Omitted.

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WHEELING, June 22, 1862.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Spriggs and Triplett are at Camp Chase to await trial.

JOS. DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal.

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Resolution adopted by the U. S. Senate June 23, 1862.

Resolved, That the Secretary of War be directed to communicate to the Senate any information he may have in regard to the exchange of prisoners or of negotiations therefor if not incompatible with the public interests.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 23, 1862.

Hon. GALUSHA A. GROW, Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SIR: A resolution of the House of Representatives bearing date of 08th of April last was received by this Department calling for information as to-

Whether the prisoners taken on the sloop Velma were released by the U. S. commissioner at Baltimore with the knowledge and consent of the military authorities of the Department of Maryland. Also by what authority Colonel Gunther, of Virginia, who refused to take the oath of allegiance was released on a conditional parole which bound him only not to take arms against the Government while the Eastern Shore counties of Virginia remained under U. S. authority. Also by what authority the said Gunther was allowed to visit the camp of the Sixth Maryland Regiment at Lafayette Square, Baltimore, to search for runaway negroes.

I have the honor to inform you in reply that the Department having no information in its possession upon the subject of your inquiry the resolution was referred to Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, then commanding the Middle Department of the volunteer army.

The report of General Dix has just been received, a copy of which is herewith transmitted.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., June 18, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 13th instant asking me for information to enable you to answer the resolution of the House of Representatives of the 28th of April last. The resolution embraces three points of inquiry to which I will reply in their order:

1. Whether the prisoners taken on the sloop Velma were released by the U. S. commissioner at Baltimore with the knowledge and consent of the military authorities of the Department of Maryland.

I was at that time in command of the Middle Department embracing the State of Maryland. The prisoners referred to were released with {p.54} my knowledge but not with my consent. On the contrary the moment I was advised of their release by the U. S. commissioner I arrested them by virtue of the military authority vested in me by the President of the United States and sent them to Fort McHenry where they were still in confinement on the 1st of June when the command of the department passed into the hands of my successor.

2. By what authority Colonel Gunther, of Virginia, who refused to take the oath of allegiance was released en a conditional parole which bound him only not to take up arms against the Government while the Eastern Shore counties of Virginia remained under the U. S. authority.

Colonel Gunther was not released on any such condition as that assumed by the resolution. He was paroled by order of the commissioners appointed by the Secretary of War for the examination and disposal of state prisoners. Their order embraces other prisoners. So much as related to Colonel Gunther together with a memorandum of the execution of it is subjoined:

COMMISSION IN REGARD TO STATE PRISONERS, New York, April 8, 1862.

Col. W. W. MORRIS, Commanding Fort McHenry.

COLONEL: You will discharge from custody the following state prisoners on the conditions herein specified, viz: 1. Col. Benjamin T. Gunther, on his parole of honor to render no aid or comfort to enemies in hostility to the United States and to hold no correspondence with any person in the insurgent States except in portions occupied by the U. S. forces.

...

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General. EDWARDS PIERREPONT, Commissioners.

We the undersigned have made ourselves acquainted with the contents of the above communication and give our paroles of honor to observe the conditions therein contained.

BENJ. T. GUNTHER.

Witness:

A. J. S. MOLINARD, First Lieutenant, Second Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

It only remains to add on this point of inquiry that Colonel Gunther commanded a regiment of militia in Accomac County and immediately disbanded it on receiving my proclamation* to the inhabitants of that county and Northampton. He was released on a personal examination of his ease.

3. By what authority the said Gunther was allowed to visit the camp of the Sixth Maryland Regiment at Lafayette Square, Baltimore, to search for runaway negroes.

After Colonel Gunther’s release he came to me and asked permission to go to the barracks of the Purnell Legion, in Lafayette Square, to search for a negro belonging I think to his niece and supposed to have been brought from the Eastern Shore of Virginia by some of the men. I declined to give him the desired permission on the ground that I had no authority to surrender fugitives from labor or service and that he must have recourse to the civil authorities for redress. I understood afterwards that he procured a warrant from a magistrate and that he was admitted to the encampment with the officer to identify the supposed fugitive who was not found.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

* See Vol. II, this Series, p. 139, for this proclamation.

{p.55}

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STRASBURG, June 23, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The guerrilla Captains Spriggs and Triplett are at Camp Chase to await trial.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 23, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: ... I will send Colonel Putnam* North so that he may be a witness in any proceedings against Soulé and Mazureau. I have a very decided opinion as to the course to be pursued toward those who have been the cause of burning this property and if I had possessed the proof which I now inclose I should not have sent Soulé and Mazureau North but should have tried them here. If the War Department will send them back and so direct I will now bring them before a military commission for this atrocious treason and arson.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

* For the arrest of Putnam and the burning of cotton in New Orleans, see Series I, Vol. XV, p. 495, where this letter with its inclosures will be found in full.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 23, 1862.

Hon. REVERDY JOHNSON, Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York:

Colonel Burke, at Fort Lafayette, has been directed to permit you to be with Mr. Soulé, and also his colored servant Jules.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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[JUNE 23, 1862.-See Series I, Vol. XIII, p. 106 et seq., for Col. G. N. Fitch, U. S. Army, to the inhabitants of Monroe County, Ark., and the ensuing correspondence between Hindman and Fitch respecting threatened retaliation.]

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, June 23, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. M. SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis, Mo.

GENERAL: I am really very much concerned as to the means of getting rid of the large number of prisoners already held in this division, which number is daily and hourly being most alarmingly increased. Generally speaking the officers are required for active field service, and in the majority of cases they are illiterate and wholly unacquainted with the duties of military commissions. On an average I think I may safely assert that not one out of a dozen is capable of writing out intelligibly the proceedings of a commission and hardly one in any regiment well enough acquainted with the proceedings of commissions {p.56} to conduct the same and have the record made up according to proper form. All the charges have to be made out anew and remodeled before they can be put into the hands of any officer I may appoint as judge-advocate, and this you must know is a most laborious work and would take an officer acquainted with the work and a good clerk continually employed to attend to the business properly. Such an officer should be skilled in the military and civil law and have nothing else to attend to but to prepare the charges and review the proceedings when they come in and have them published. Is there any way in which you can furnish me with such an officer and a good clerk to assist him? Without such assistance I am fearful I shall be swamped and I call upon you most earnestly to help me.

I spoke to Governor Gamble upon this subject, hoping that he would be able upon consultation with you to aid me in my tribulations, but I have not yet been informed of any steps being taken in the matter. At this very moment there are no less than three commissions ordered, and either one of hem will have possibly as high as thirty cases for trial. Other commissions should be ordered but I cannot spare the officers, and beside all this I have the proceedings of two before me under review of something like twenty-five or thirty cases each.

I pray you will think of all this and help me if you can. Would it not be well to have all the prisoners who are taken without arms returning from Price’s army either sent to Alton or would it be better to require them to take the oath of allegiance and give bonds at the posts where taken at once? They are to all intents and purposes spies when found within our lines in citizen’s dress, but the expense of trial and the detriment to the service by removing officers from their active field duties is greater probably than the good resulting, and I have not yet been able to get a military commission to commit them as spies and there is accordingly great doubt attending the matter.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 23, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Depot of Prisoners, Johnson’s Island, near Sandusky, Ohio.

SIR: The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war who have been or may now be held at the depot commanded by you. You will therefore in addition to the list already called for from this office furnish me a complete list of all such prisoners, showing in the column of remarks what has become of those who are not now present. Blank rolls for this purpose will be sent you by express. Separate rolls of citizens will be furnished when the person does not belong to a regiment, and under that head give the State he comes from. The above rolls will take the place of those called for in General Orders, No. 54, of May 17, from Adjutant-General’s Office, and if other rolls have been required by provost-marshals they need not be furnished until you have further instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eighth Infty., Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Similar letters sent to the commandants of all military prisons.)

{p.57}

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., June 23, 1862.

Lieut. Col. B. G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General, Department of the Mississippi.

COLONEL: In accordance with verbal instructions from you to that effect I carefully examined the Gratiot Street Prison and the condition of the prisoners therein and respectfully report:

1. That among the prisoners therein are several who are under sentence of death and others who are to be confined until the suppression of the rebellion.

2. That prisoners of war and civil prisoners are confined together.

3. The culinary and sanitary arrangements of the prison are in most admirable condition. The method adopted whereby a thorough police of the prison is secured is perfect.

4. There is but one place whereat prisoners can possibly escape. This is an unoccupied room on the top of the building, the window whereof looks on the roof of the religious institution adjoining the same. I respectfully suggest that iron bars be placed on the window. I am satisfied that escape from the prison is impossible provided the guard discharges its duty.

5. I ascertained that the officer who commands the prison guard is at the same time commander of the guard at Schofield Barracks. His constant attention to the prison guard is therefore impracticable. The guard whilst not on post are allowed to go beyond the lines of the prison. In case of an outbreak therefore among the prisoners there would be no force to suppress the same. Citizens are permitted to converse with the guard and the sentinels are allowed to sit on post. This should not be tolerated.

I respectfully suggest:

1. That the prisoners of war be kept separate from other prisoners and that the rule prohibiting the officers from communicating with the privates be more rigidly enforced.

2. The severe sentences of those prisoners condemned to death and to imprisonment until the suppression of the rebellion necessarily makes them reckless and bold. Their constant separation from other prisoners and their removal to Alton if practicable is respectfully suggested.

3. One officer should be detailed daily as the commandant of the prison guard who should be required to remain constantly at the prison. He should be directed to allow none of his guard to go beyond the lines. He should inspect each relief every time it was on post at least once. This precaution together with his constant presence and that of his command at the prison would more effectually, it is respectfully submitted, preclude the possibility of escapes and outbreaks.

In this connection allow me to suggest that as among the prisoners there are a number of professors of religion it would be beneficial to them and in nowise detrimental to discipline were clergymen allowed to visit the prisoners once a week in an official capacity. In conclusion I have to state that any escape from the prison has been because of the negligence of the guard. Mr. Bishop has in my opinion adopted every precaution whereby such accidents can be prevented.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. L. MCCONNEL, Acting Assistant Provost-Marshal-General, Dept. of the Mississippi.

{p.58}

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HEADQUARTERS, Alton, Ill., June 23, 1862.

Lieut. Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to your order of June 21, 1862, all medical officers held as prisoners of war at this prison have been this day unconditionally discharged. Being destitute of means they were by my order furnished with transportation to department headquarters. Their names are as follows: Dr. James P. Evans, taken at Pea Ridge; Dr. John S. Frost, taken at Pea Ridge; Dr. William D. Horton, taken at Fort Donelson. A contract has been made with citizen Dr. I. E. Hardy, of this place, for medical attendance on the prisoners (now numbering 467) at $100 per month.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. WASHINGTON, Captain, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, June 24, 1862.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Middletown:

The President directs that you suspend all death sentences in your department until further orders and that the proceedings be submitted to him.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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GENERAL WOOL’S HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, Md., June 24, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Major Cosby and Captain Sheliha, of the rebel army, have just returned from Richmond. Mr. Randolph in a letter to Cosby informed him that under the rule adopted by his Department no more individual exchanges would be made and he accordingly declined to exchange these officers. He further said the system had been found so unjust and arbitrary that the rebel Government had determined to acquiesce in it no longer. He further says that-

As you informed me, however, that General Wool expresses his readiness to agree to a cartel for a general exchange you are authorized to inform him that I will send an officer to confer with him on the subject at any time that he may appoint, and that I will authorize such officer to execute in our behalf a cartel of exchange.

I send this to you for what it is worth. When I sent the privateersmen to be paroled or exchanged to prevent any delay or difficulty I sent the cartel with Lieutenant-Colonel Whipple, as agreed upon between Cobb and myself as to exchanges, which was in accordance with the cartel agreed upon between the United States and Great Britain in the war of 1812-1815, and I authorized Colonel Whipple if they would not assent to have the prisoners paroled that he could make exchanges according to that instrument. No reply was received and the privateersmen returned.

Cosby asks to be sent to Fort Warren, where he left his baggage. Captain Sheliha says his parole has not expired by thirty days. Shall I send these officers to Fort Delaware or will you allow Cosby to go to Fort Warren and Sheliha to remain on parole?

{p.59}

In conclusion I would remark even if it would be proper to notice Randolph’s proposition, which under the circumstances I very much doubt, would it be wise at this moment to make a general exchange of prisoners of war when we have so many more of theirs than they have of ours, especially as Jefferson Davis has not always regarded paroles of honor?

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 24, 1862.

Major-General WOOL, Baltimore:

Send Major Cosby to Fort Delaware and also Captain Sheliha. I understand his parole was for the special purpose of effecting an exchange, and that failing by the act of those whom he recognizes as his superiors his claim to benefit of parole is inadmissible.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 118.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Memphis, Tenn., June 24, 1862.

...

XI. It having been reported to the general commanding that a Major Polk, of the Confederate Army, is on parole and is permitted to roam at large in the city the provost-marshal of the city of Memphis will immediately arrest and confine said Polk and report to these headquarters by whom he has been paroled and by whose authority he is permitted to have the liberty of the city.

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JOHN A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, June 24, 1862.

Colonel BOYD, Rolla, Mo.:

Tell Major Tompkins I shall hold him strictly responsible for any shooting not authorized by my orders. He is not authorized to shoot men not in arms.

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT, Saint Louis, Mo., June 24, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN, Commanding Central Division of Missouri, Jefferson City.

GENERAL: I have just received your letter of yesterday regarding prisoners. I think it useless to attempt to try all the prisoners captured and who are technically guilty of violation of the laws of war. As you remark the number is far too great to admit of it and very few of them will receive at the hands of a commission any more severe punishment than imprisonment during the war. This can be done se well and as properly in most cases without a trial as with. I do not think it worth while to bring before a commission any cases except {p.60} those which are clearly capital and in which the evidence can be obtained with certainty so as to make conviction sure.

The cases as fast as they arise should be examined by the local commanders or provost-marshals and reported to division headquarters.

Those who may properly be released on oath and bond should be released at once and all others except the few to be held for trial should be sent at once to the prison depots.

It would be well if a suitable building could be obtained to establish a prison in Jefferson City large enough to hold all the prisoners of your division. If this cannot be done they will have to be sent to Saint Louis and Alton.

My policy has been to release on taking the oath and giving bond all who surrender voluntarily or who have not recently been in the rebel service and give satisfactory evidence of their determination to remain loyal hereafter. But much caution is required to prevent the escape of bad men in this manner. As to those who do not give themselves up immediately on their return or who are lying about in the brush the least that can be done with them is to send them at once to prison, there to remain until they can be released without injury to the State. And considering the great number of such cases this seems the only course.

I will try before long to send you an officer capable of performing properly the duties of judge-advocate, though I find it extremely difficult to obtain the services of any such officer.

I intend to publish an order soon regarding these matters, but it is difficult to lay down any general rules to be applied to such matters. Very much must be left to the discretion of subordinate officers, and these unfortunately are generally innocent of any such quality as discretion. But we cannot bother ourselves with the trial of prisoners. Convict and punish a few extreme cases as examples and put the others where they will be harmless is the only rule practically open to us.

I am anxious to have my General Orders, No. 3, carried out in a few cases as soon as possible. I hope it will prove an effective remedy for the evils existing in some of the counties of your division.

I am in doubt about the propriety of adopting the proposition to attempt to disarm all disloyal persons. It requires no additional orders to disarm all persons who are known to be actively disloyal. This is done as a matter of course if the arms can be found, which is the difficulty. General Halleck gave such an order last winter, but it resulted only in disarming innocent persons and leaving them at the mercy of every villain that happened to come along. It also gives rise to much abuse on the part of soldiers while searching houses for arms.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. SEVENTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Cumberland Gap, June 24, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Citizens of Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee come in by the dozen to take the oath of allegiance to the United States. A moment ago thirteen Virginians came in, and when I welcomed them back to the old flag every eye was dimmed with tears.

GEORGE W. MORGAN, Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

{p.61}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 24, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Comdg. Depot of Prisoners, Johnson’s Island, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: I this morning telegraphed you to suspend the transfer of prisoners to Fort Warren, and the movement will only be made at a future day on reliable evidence of its urgent necessity and then singling out the leading spirits. Don’t mention this. For individual cases of turbulence you have a remedy at hand in your prison.

I referred Mr. Johnson to you in relation to the washing for the hospital and prisoners. Establish rates by the month for the hospital and by the piece for the prisoners who are able to pay for their own washing. For those who are destitute of money make some arrangements for them to wash for themselves at the bay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Lieut. Col. Eight Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HDQRS. DETACH, 13TH REGT. CAV., MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Camp at Rolla, June 24, 1862.

Colonel BOYD.

COLONEL: I have the honor to make the following report of trip to Texas County: Arrested Colonel Best, from Livingston County, Mo. (in citizen’s dress), with package of letters from Confederate Army. I herewith send package. They tell us of officers and men who have come back in different parts of State. Colonel Chiles’ letter intimates, besides I get from Colonel Best, that most of the Missouri troops were coming to Mississippi River with Texas and Arkansas troops. The colonel has passes as William Morris, but before I found his name in letters found men that knew him. Passes inclosed. Found Confederate money on him, here inclosed.

I arrested also Moses Bradford, the noted guerrilla. He has caused us much trouble to run after him. He will cause us no more. I have James W. Tinsley, fed Coleman’s men; I have John M. Richardson, fed Coleman’s men; I have J. S. Halbert, Southern Army; knew of Coleman’s men; did not give information. I shall keep these three for information and may yet fasten enough on them to shoot them. I will not trouble you with the real ones.

I arrested a minister and congregation at the place where the Reverend Wood, who was shot by Kansas Fifth, was to have preached, and preached first to the minister then to the congregation. A more attentive audience never listened to man. I told them that they had to prove by acts that they loved our Government and we would protect them and their property. I drew more tears than the minister. Left my men (eighty) at Crow’s Station to bring in all who have made threats about Reverend Wood’s death. Will read orders to them to-night. Will go to Hartville, Wright County, and read orders. There is a rebel force there. They have shot two Union men there. I make the rebels I shoot tell me all. I came in with letters and for more provisions and comparing information. Will shoot Best after get all from him.

I have the honor to be, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. TOMPKINS, Major, Comdg. Detachment 13th Regt. Cav., Missouri State Militia.

{p.62}

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully considered and forwarded to Brigadier-General Schofield, with many letters, &c.

S. H. BOYD, Colonel, Commanding.

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128 BROADWAY [NEW YORK CITY], June 24, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

MY DEAR SIR: On yesterday Jules, the colored servant of Mr. Soulé, now confined at Fort Lafayette, called upon me complaining that he could not have access to his master and desiring me to aid him in that behalf. I therefore addressed a note to Mr. Soulé stating that I would see him whenever the authorities gave permission, my object being to explain to him my views that the Government was right in refusing to permit him to hold levees in Fort Lafayette. On the same day Mr. Henry Harrise, a Frenchman who has a desk in my office and who is as I am informed a personal friend of Mr. Soulé, obtained from Reverdy Johnson a dispatch for Mr. Stanton, of the War Office, stating that Soulé was sick and desiring that Jules and himself might have permission to be with him. The servant Jules at the same time stated to me that he had then just returned from Fort Lafayette with the information that Soulé was well.

I think it will be found that there will continue to be a regular correspondence between Soulé and his friends in this city and New Orleans so long as any parties excepting only the officers of the Government shall be permitted to have access to him. Some of his relations are now here on their way to Europe. His son, Nelvil Soulé, formerly a colonel in the Confederate Army and like his father present at Bull Run, is expected here from New Orleans in a few days. If correspondence between Pierre Soulé and his Southern friends continue to be carried out either through Harrise or others the Government will have only itself to blame. It will not be possible to stop such correspondence so long as the servant and others shall be permitted to run to and fro between here and the fort.

Yours, respectfully and confidentially,

JOHN LIVINGSTON.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 25, 1862.

Governor TOD, Columbus, Ohio:

I beg leave to call your attention to the following telegram just received:

HEADQUARTERS, Columbia, June 24, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

There has lately arrived in this vicinity a large number of escaped prisoners from Camps Douglas and Chase by bribing the guards at Camp Douglas. A young man by the name of Smith who lives in Chicago furnishes assistance. The sutler in the camp knowingly sells them clothing to disguise themselves. What disposition shall I make of these prisoners should I arrest them again?

JAS. S. NEGLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

I would request that you make an immediate investigation and report upon the facts above stated and take measures if in your power to prevent the mischief.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

{p.63}

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HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT, Middletown, June 25, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

Walter Cool, Matthew Corbitt, Frederick Chewning and Harrison C. Rollins were recently sentenced to death by military commission at Clarksburg. The last named called himself Captain Spriggs but I am informed is not the man. The sentence is not yet approved. Have you any orders in these cases?

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., June 25, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: In October last I was authorized* by the Secretary of State to arrest Judge R. B. Carmichael, of the Eastern Shore of Maryland, if I should deem it expedient, and if necessary in his own court. In the communication by which this authority was conferred was inclosed a printed memorial addressed to the Legislature of Maryland, signed by him and expressing the most disloyal sentiments. I did not on full consideration deem it advisable to make the arrest at that time.

Soon afterwards a military arrest was made on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in a county in Judge Carmichael’s district by an officer of the Second-Regiment of Delaware Volunteers. At the next term of the court the judge charged the grand jury that it was their duty to present all persons concerned in such arrest and all persons who had given information on which such arrest had been made. His charges in other counties as well as this were of a most disloyal and offensive character, and it was represented to me by Governor Hicks and the most respectable citizens of the Eastern Shore that the hostile feeling to the Government prevailing there was kept up by himself and a few associates. Under the charge referred to the Hon. Henry H. Goldsborough, president of the Senate of Maryland, and several officers of the Second Delaware Regiment were presented by the grand jury and I was informed that bills of indictment had been found against them. The trial of the honorable Mr. Goldsborough was expected to take place in the month of May last and four officers of the Delaware regiment were summoned as witnesses in his behalf. They came to me and expressed a great unwillingness to obey the summons as they had been presented by the grand jury and apprehended that they would be arrested if they made their appearance in the county.

It was under these circumstances and after the repeated and earnest solicitations of the principal Union men in Judge Carmichael’s judicial district that I dispatched Mr. McPhail, deputy provost-marshal of the Baltimore military police, with four policemen to Easton, in Talbot County, where the court was in session, to accompany the four officers who were summoned as witnesses, with instructions to arrest Judge Carmichael if on consultation with the honorable Mr. Goldsborough it should be thought expedient. He bore a letter from me to Mr. Goldsborough I requesting him (Mr. G.) to advise as to the propriety of making the arrest.

{p.64}

It was on full consideration deemed expedient that the arrest should be made in court in order that the proceeding might be the more marked. The bold, open and defiant hostility of the judge to the Government from the very commencement of the rebellion and his known efforts to place Maryland on the side of the insurgent States; to embarrass the officers of the Government in the measures they deemed necessary for the maintenance of its authority and to keep alive a spirit of disaffection in his judicial district were alone deemed sufficient to warrant his arrest as a measure of public security. The prostitution of his judicial authority to the prosecution of loyal men and of public officers who had only performed their duty is considered as fully justifying the manner in which it was decided to make the arrest.

When Mr. McPhail accompanied by two of the policemen ascended the bench and respectfully announced to the judge the order to take him into custody by the authority of the United States he denied the authority of the Government and made a violent attack upon one of the policemen. Mr. McPhail was thus compelled to use force to secure him, and he unluckily received a superficial wound on the head before he ceased to resist. It is worthy of consideration that although the court-room was crowded and although the judge appealed to the officers of the court to aid him not one of them or of those who sympathized with him came forward in his defense, a fact which would seem to indicate that the act of the Government after so long and patient an endurance of his treasonable conduct was considered neither arbitrary nor unjust by his own neighbors.

To guard against the contingency of an armed opposition to the police officers I sent two companies of infantry to Talbot County, but they did not reach Easton until an hour after the arrest was made and their services were not put into requisition.

It is proper to add that I addressed a letter** to the Governor of Maryland some weeks before the arrest stating that I was strongly disposed to make it and that my wish was to send the judge beyond the limits of the State. The Governor gave me no advice, but preferred to leave the matter where it was, trusting to my discretion to make a prudent use of the power which had been intrusted to me by the Government.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

* See Seward to Dix, October 3, 1861, Vol. II, this Series, p. 85. See Vol. III, this Series, p. 576.

** Omitted here; Dix to Bradford, February 10, 1862, Vol. II, this Series, p. 213.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., June 25, 1862.

I. By direction of the Secretary of War Maj. G. B. Cosby and Capt. V. Sheliha, Confederate Army, will be sent to Fort Delaware. Maj. H. Z. Hayner, aide-de-camp, U. S. Army, will accompany these prisoners thither to-day, turn them over to the commanding officer of that post, take a receipt for them and return to these headquarters.

...

By command of Major-General Wool:

WM. D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.65}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 25, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Military Prison, Alton, Ill.

SIR: Will you please furnish me for the War Department with a list of all prisoners of war who have been or are now in confinement at the Alton Prison and please furnish a duplicate of the same for this office. Citizens and soldiers should not be entered on the same list. I will send you blank rolls for this purpose by express and also blank monthly returns of prisoners, with the request you will furnish a return monthly to this office. The roll called for above will take the place of those required in General Orders, No. 54, of May 17, from War Department, and if other rolls have been called for you need not furnish them till you have further instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Same sent to other commandants of military prisons.)

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FORT HAMILTON, N. Y. Harbor, June 25, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Your telegraphic dispatch allowing Mr. Soulé, prisoner at Fort Lafayette, to keep his servant was received. The servant was sent to Fort Lafayette and Lieutenant Wood, my officer commanding that post, received the proper orders on the subject. The inclosed note from him states that Mr. Soulé did not wish his servant to remain with him.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

[Inclosure.]

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y. Harbor, June 25, 1862.

COLONEL: Jules saw his master in my presence and he told him to go back to New Orleans. Nothing passed between them more than above.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. O. WOOD, First Lieutenant, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Hamilton, N. Y. Harbor, June 25, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that owing to a spirit of insubordination on the part of the privateer prisoners now confined at Fort Lafayette in refusing to police their quarters and the space in front of their quarters unless their officers were made to do the same and by crying out in favor of Jeff. Davis and numerous other evidences of insubordination they have been put in irons. The work required of them was that a detail of ten men should turn out each day for the space of about a quarter of an hour to do the necessary policing which {p.66} would bring it upon each man about once in twelve days. I desire that this may be submitted to the honorable Secretary of War.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Hamilton, N. Y. Harbor, June 25, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington.

GENERAL: Lieutenant Wood, commanding at Fort Lafayette, has just reported that Miss Wells (who has a permanent pass from Assistant Secretary of War P. H. Watson to visit John Harleston, prisoner of war) while on a visit to John Harleston, prisoner of war, was detected in handing the prisoner the inclosed letter (to which I respectfully call the attention of the honorable Secretary of War) and $20. Miss Wells had already (this day) given the prisoner $20, which was turned over to Lieutenant Wood in the usual way. I have annulled the pass of Miss Wells until I receive further orders from the War Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

[Inclosure.]

E. L. C. sends you what you ask for through Colonel Burke, but fears you want more, so I hand you inclosed. Do let us know if you want for anything. I have seen a letter from a Confederate officer, dated Richmond, May 20. He is full of hope. We have heard quite lately from New Orleans; the same spirit there, In Baltimore they are quietly waiting for the good time to come. The Republicans look not quite so top-heavy, and Heaven grant that you may defeat them before Richmond, and then England and France will acknowledge you without any more delay. Private accounts from McClellan’s army are fearful, but still do not let the South think he is weak. They say Halleck has re-enforced Mac and that he loses in that Chickahominy Swamp two regiments a week. Now that the Seventh is again ordered off and to Fortress Monroe a great change has taken place. Fathers look pale and begin to think it is a very anxious time. It is horrid to wish for the death of people, but I feel sure if twelve of that regiment could die it would have a most beneficial effect. In New Orleans without the assistance of Yellow Jack the mortality is fearful. Five in one hearse is nothing unusual in one day. With what pleasure they must look on these funerals. We are anxiously expecting news from Charleston, but we will have to wait long. I see no Huger mentioned, but suppose Capt. H. C. King is Margaret’s brother. Mr. Henry Grinnell’s son (in the Confederate Army) was wounded and taken prisoner at Front Royal. He is now in Washington. His mother went to see him. He says that before the South is subjugated every man will have to be killed; then every woman and every child. He had his two fingers shot off and part of his hand. He is crazy to be exchanged and fight again. We do not speak of this out in New York, for it might place the family in a disagreeable position. What I would give to have a long talk with you. I have so much to say. I wish you could read the letter of that officer. The spirit is magnificent. He says the women {p.67} deny themselves everything and devote all their time to the wants of the army, from city belles to factory girls. He adds:

The Southern people have, or rather had, their faults, which have disappeared, and in their place a crop of the most magnificent virtues has sprung up. They are prepared for reverses, and even if defeated before Richmond will retreat and fight elsewhere.

People here are fearfully disappointed about New Orleans. They thought they would have cotton in abundance, but none comes, and the Republicans are obliged to send gold at 7 3/4 or buy exchange at 118 1/2 in place of filling ships with cotton as they expected. Your eyes must be weary, so adieu.

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DETROIT, MICH., June 25, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: In compliance with your order dated Washington, June 12, 1862, requiring me to visit the permanent camps at Albany, Utica, Rochester and Elmira, N. Y., and also the U. S. barracks at Buffalo to ascertain their capacity for quartering troops and to make you a written report thereon accompanied by a general plan of each camp, I have the honor to submit the result of my examination of the camps so specified at Elmira as their condition when visited by me on or near the 19th instant.

First, Camp Rathbun:* This camp is located about one mile to the west of the town on a fine road and is easily accessible at all seasons. Its situation is quite as high as the surrounding country on firm, hard, gravelly soil covered with greensward which does not during the most violent storms become soft, as it gently slopes toward a stream on the south side and is partially drained. There is not in its vicinity either marsh or standing water nor dense forest or shrubbery which could generate malaria or disease, and the whole country about Elmira is exceedingly healthful and no forms of low fever prevail. The camp is abundantly supplied with fine, pure limestone water from two large wells on the ground. Fuel is plentiful in the vicinity and can be furnished on the ground at $2.50 per cord for hard wood and $2 per cord for soft. The ground is shut in on three sides by a low fence of about 4 1/2 feet in height built by nailing slat boards at intervals of about 15 inches to posts set in the ground 10 feet apart. The fourth side is bounded by a running stream of soft water about 25 feet wide used for bathing purposes. Lumber can be purchased suitable for building a high strong fence at 6 1/2 cents per foot and posts 8 feet out of the ground at 16 cents each. The buildings were all built by the Government and both they and the grounds are exclusively under its control, and at present are in the charge of Col. E. F. Shepard, of the New York volunteers, whose headquarters are at Elmira. He has at present about fifty men, volunteer troops, in their occupancy. The ground is about 500 by 300 yards and although limited in extent is admirably adapted to military purposes. The buildings are all new, wooden, one story in height, with pitched roofs, and have firm floors of plank free from dampness. They are covered with boards placed with the edges together both on the sides and roofs of the buildings, and the joints or seams so formed are again covered by an outer board, making a nearly water-proof covering. They are all well ventilated by square windows {p.68} placed sufficiently near each other. The quarters of the men consist of 20 buildings 88 by 18 feet each, containing two small rooms, one of 24 by 7 and the other 8 by 5, and a remaining room extending throughout the interior not thus inclosed. Each building is designed for the accommodation of 100 men, the smallest room being for the noncommissioned officers and the next larger for the commissioned officers of that number of men. The barracks are all furnished with wooden bunks placed end to end on each of the long sides of the buildings. They are arranged in 2 tiers, 12 sets of 2 double bunks, one above the other, thus giving each side 48 men and leaving a passage of about 8 feet wide through the building. It is evident that should necessity require it a different arrangement of bunks would readily give accommodations for 50 men more to each building, as the ridge pole of each is about 15 feet high and the roof or eaves on the inside about 8 feet. The two guard-houses are each 48 by 16 feet, with a prison room in each (without cells) of 20 by 8 feet.

In front of the men’s barracks are two long buildings of 120 by 16 feet each. One contains 5 equal rooms and is used for the quarters of the field and staff, the other, containing 3 rooms, is used by the sutler. In front of these buildings and under one roof are two mess halls of 144 by 41, separated by a kitchen 64 by 41. Against the kitchen is built a shed 13 feet wide. Each hall is complete with tables and benches and will seat 1,000 men each. The kitchen is complete with cooking facilities and apparatus, contains a steam-engine, large ranges, furnaces, boilers, &c., sufficient to cook for 2,000 men at once. In the shed of the building (or kitchen) the wells are situated, provided with pumps, and there the food is prepared. There is no bake-house. The rations are furnished, cooked and placed on the tables for the men by contractors, who find all the table furniture and cooking utensils used both by the men and themselves, at 30 cents each ration. The sinks are insufficient, incomplete and filthy. The whole camp, with this exception and the absence of straw ticks for the bunks, is fitted for the accommodation of 2,000 men, and with some changes of their interior the quarters of the men will admit very readily of 3,000. Accompanying this description is a general plan to which I respectfully call your attention.

Camp No. 2, at Elmira: This camp is known as the Arnot Barracks** and is in charge of Col. E. F. Shepard, of the volunteers. It contains no troops. It is located about one mile to the north of the town. Its situation is quite as high as the surrounding country, on firm, hard, gravelly soil, covered with greensward, which does not become soft even during very wet periods, though the drainage is not good. The form of the ground is nearly a square, whose side is about 300 yards. There is not in its vicinity either marsh, standing water, or dense forest, or any locus of malaria or disease. The camp is abundantly supplied by two wells of pure, never-failing limestone water on the ground. Fuel is plentiful and can be supplied at the same rates as at Camp Rathbun. The ground is shut in on three sides by a slat board fence of about 4 1/2 feet in height formed by nailing three horizontal slats to posts placed 10 feet apart. The fourth side is bounded by the road. A stream of pure, fresh water runs on the south side of the camp at about 200 yards distance, which could be used for bathing and washing purposes. The buildings were all built by the Government and both they and the grounds are exclusively under its control. They are all new, of wood, one story in height, with pitched roofs and have firm floors of planks {p.69} {p.70} free from dampness. They are covered with rough boards both on the sides and roofs. These are placed with the edges together and the joints are again covered by an outer board, making a shelter nearly waterproof. The height of the buildings on the inside is about 8 feet to the eaves and 15 feet to the ridge pole. They are quite well ventilated by means of windows and doors. The quarters of the men comprise ten buildings of the same dimensions and interior divisions and arrangements of bunks as at Camp Rathbun and are designed for 100 men each, though 150 can readily be accommodated and comfortably. The guard-house is 34 by 17 feet, of but one room, no prison room or cells.

To the right and in rear of the barracks are two buildings, one 100 by 18 feet, of 10 rooms, for the use of officers as quarters, and the other 88 by 18 feet, of 6 rooms, for the accommodation of the field and staff for the same purpose. In rear of the left of the barracks is the mess hall and kitchen under one roof. The former is 150 feet long and the latter 50 feet. The hail is completely furnished with tables and benches and will seat 1,000 men, while the kitchen is abundantly supplied with everything necessary to cook for that number. There is no bake-house and precisely the same arrangement is made for the furnishing of food, cooking utensils and materials and table furniture as at Camp Rathbun. The sinks are wretchedly deficient and in bad order. This camp like Camp Rathbun has no straw ticks, and with this and other exceptions mentioned it is now ready for the reception of 1,000 men, and with some trifling change already referred to might be made to comfortably receive 1,500. Accompanying this description is a ground plan.

Camp No. 3, at Elmira: This camp is known as the Post Barracks*** and like the others is in charge of Col. E. F. Shepard, of the volunteers. It contains no troops at present. It is located about one mile to the west of the town, on a plot of ground quite level, not easily drained and considerably lower than the surrounding country. In consequence of this the ground, though commonly hard and firm and composed of gravelly earth covered generally with grass, becomes at wet seasons quite soft and muddy. The area is rectangular, measuring about 400 by 200 yards. There is not in its vicinity either marsh, standing water or dense forest or any special locus of malaria or disease, yet from the situation it would not be regarded as healthful a location as the camps previously mentioned. The water from the wells on the ground and from the junction canal south of it is unfit for use and must be hauled to supply the full garrison at an expense of $2.50 per day. On the northern and on the western sides are low fences composed of slat boards and posts on one side; on the other is a common rail fence. The southern and eastern sides have no fences and their limits are defined by the public roads to the town. On the southern side and south of the carriage road is a coal railroad terminus which is used for freighting the boats of the junction canal immediately south of it. The grounds are easily accessible from town over a good road. The water of the canal is fit for bathing and washing purposes. The buildings were all built by the Government, and both they and the grounds are exclusively under its control. They are all new, of one story, of wooden frames, with rough board covering, both for the sides and roofs, similar to those already described. The height of the pitched roofs at the ridge pole is about 15 feet and at the eaves about 8 feet. They have firm floors of plank {p.71} {p.72} free from dampness and are well ventilated. The quarters of the men comprise twenty buildings of the same interior divisions, number of rooms and dimensions as those barracks described as being at Camp Rathbun. They are designed for 100 men each, though with additional bunks for 50 men in each and a different arrangement of them from the present they will readily accommodate 150 men each. The quarters are all provided with bunks for 100 men each, but have no ticks for straw. There are two guard-houses, 34 by 17 feet each, and of one room each, with no cells or prison room. To the left and rear of the men’s quarters is a building 100 by 20 feet, of 6 rooms, used as quarters for the field and staff. In their rear is the building containing the mess hall and kitchen under one roof. The mess hail is 130 by 40 feet and is well provided with benches and tables. It will seat 1,000 men by placing them closely. The kitchen is 50 by 40 feet and is amply furnished with all the materials and steam-boilers and furnaces, ranges, &c., for cooking for 1,000 men at a time and if necessary by increasing the furniture for 2,000. There is no bake-house and the same arrangement is made for supplying the food by contract as at Camp Rathbun and at the same price, the food being placed on the table cooked and the table furniture supplied. The sinks are quite insufficient, filthy and in bad order. This camp will accommodate by a different arrangement of its quarters and additional bunks, as suggested for Camp Rathbun, 3,000 men, though designed for the reception of 2,000. Accompanying this description is a ground plan of the buildings with reference marks.

Camp No. 4, at Elmira: This camp is known as Camp Robinson Barracks**** and with the others at this point is in charge of Col. E. F. Shepard,of the volunteers. It is easily accessible from the town, being located near a fine road, about one mile and a half from it in a southwest direction on a plot of ground quite level, of a rectangular shape, of about 400 by 360 yards. The soil is firm and hard at all times; is composed of gravel covered with sward. It contains no troops at present. The situation is quite as high as the surrounding country and there is not in its vicinity either marsh, standing water or forest, or any locus of malaria or disease. The camp is abundantly supplied with fine, pure water from never-failing wells on the ground. On the west side is a low fence 4 1/2 feet in height, built of board slats nailed to posts, the slats placed horizontally. On the other three sides the public road limits the boundaries of the camp. The buildings were all built by the Government and both they and the grounds are exclusively under its control. They are all new, of one story, of wooden frames, with rough board coverings both for the sides and roofs, similarly arranged to those described at the other camps. The roofs are pitched and at the ridge pole are about 15 feet in height and at the eaves 8 feet. They all have firm floors of planks and are well ventilated. The quarters of the men comprise twenty buildings of the same interior divisions, number of rooms and dimensions as the barracks described as being at Camp Rathbun. They are designed for 100 men each, though with additional bunks for 50 men in each and a different arrangement of them from the present they will readily accommodate 150 men each. The quarters are all provided with bunks for 100 men each but have no ticks for straw. There are two guard-houses, 40 by 20 feet each, one of 3 equal rooms and the other of 1 large room and 3 cells of 6 feet square each. To the left and rear of the men’s quarters is a building 100 by 20 feet, of 6 rooms, used as the quarters of the field and staff. In their rear {p.73} {p.74} is the building containing the mess halls and kitchen under one roof. The two mess halls occupy the two ends of the building and the kitchens the middle portion. The former are 144 by 41 feet each and are provided with tables and benches for the accommodation of 1,000 men each, who can easily be seated in them. The kitchen is 64 by 41 feet and is amply supplied with boilers, furnaces, ranges and steam apparatus, and the materials requisite to cook for 2,000 men at the same time. There is no bake-house and the same arrangement is made for supplying the food by contract and at the same price as at the Rathbun barracks, the food being cooked and placed on the tables and table furniture provided. The sinks are insufficient, filthy and in bad order. Wood is delivered on the ground at $2.50 for hard and $2 for soft. The camp is designed for 2,000 men, but with additional bunks and a different arrangement of them 3,000 can readily be received, while the grounds are quite large enough, except for military exercises.

Accompanying this description is a plan of the camp and buildings with reference marks. Note: There is on a line with the guard-house a sutler’s store 30 by 18 feet. Elmira is connected by railroad with Harrisburg, Pa., and the distance by this route to Baltimore is 202 miles less than by way of Albany and New York City.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army.

* See p. 69.

** See p. 71.

*** See p. 73.

**** See p. 75.

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DETROIT, MICH., June 25, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In compliance with your order dated Washington, June 12, 1862, requiring me to visit the permanent camps at Albany, Utica, Rochester and Elmira and the U. S. barracks at Buffalo to ascertain their capacity for quartering troops and to make to you a written report thereon accompanied by a general plan of each camp, I have the honor to submit the result of my examination of the camp so specified at Rochester, N. Y., as its condition when visited by me on or near the 22d instant.

This camp is known as the Camp of the State Fair Grounds.* The grounds were rented by the Government at $100 per month for the first three months occupied; after that period at $50 per month. It erected on them quarters for 1,000 men, mess hall, kitchen, guard-house, stables, officers’ quarters, sinks, &c., and for a considerable period occupied them with volunteer troops. Within a few months, however, the buildings so erected and the furnishings contained in them have been sold, and they together with the grounds are now in possession of the authorities of the State Fair who contemplate holding there a fair in September next.

The barracks, mess halls and kitchens are now being removed of their furniture for that purpose. It occupies a fine situation, being located on an excellent road about two miles southeast from town on a plot of ground gently sloping, of a rectangular shape, being 400 by 800 yards. The soil is firm and hard at all times-is composed of gravel covered with sward. The camp at present contains no troops. The ground is quite as high as the surrounding country and there is not in its vicinity either marsh, standing water or forest or any locus of malaria or disease. {p.75} {p.76} The camp is abundantly supplied with pure limestone water from never-failing wells on the ground. The Genesee Canal passes within a few hundred yards of the west side of the camp and the New York Central Railroad lies very near it. It is surrounded by a high, close, board fence of about 8 feet.

The buildings were all, with the exception of that formerly used as a hospital, erected by the Government. They are all new, of one story, of wooden frames, with rough board coverings both on the sides and roofs. These boards are matched and the seams again covered with outer boards. The roofs are pitched and are, at the ridge poles of the buildings used as the men’s quarters, mess halls and kitchens, about 20 feet high and at the eaves 10 feet. The buildings used as officers’ quarters, hospital and guard-house are about 15 and 8 respectively. They all have firm floors of planks and are well ventilated. In two long buildings built closely together and parallel with each other, each 280 by 40 feet, are the quarters for the men and mess halls. At the south end of these two buildings and abutting against them is the kitchen, whose extreme length is, together with a small shed at one end, just equal to the united width of the two larger buildings plus the interval between them, viz, 90 feet. The kitchen is 30 feet wide and contains but little of ordinary cooking apparatus, most of it having been removed. In one of the large buildings above mentioned is a mess hall 130 by 40 feet and in the other another hall 70 by 40. They will comfortably seat 1,000 men, but most of the tables and benches have been removed to the outside since the sale of the buildings.

There are two sets of quarters, one in each of the large buildings, each 40 feet wide and 150 and 210 feet long respectively. In each the bunks are placed end to end and are arranged in 5 rows of double bunks, the outer rows of 3 tiers and the 3 inner ones of 4 tiers each. By this arrangement the larger set of quarters will readily accommodate 600 men and the smaller 400, 1,000 men being the original adaptation of the buildings. There are sufficient bunks for the reception of this number but no ticks for straw. The hospital is 60 by 30 feet with an L of 20 by 10 feet. The guard-house is 20 by 15 feet with an addition for cells and prison rooms of 30 by 10 and is not sufficient but for temporary occupancy of the camp. There are 4 small buildings of 15 by 10 feet each, of 1 room each, used for officers’ quarters. There is no bake-house but the rations are furnished, cooked and placed on the tables, and furniture supplied for the tables, at 22 cents each, the contractor furnishing his own cooking apparatus. The sinks are filthy and out of repair. There is a good bath-house at the northwest end of the ground 70 by 15 feet. On the south side are stabling sheds for 100 horses, and on the north side of the grounds stabling sheds for 50 horses.

Hard wood is delivered at the camp for $4 per cord and soft at $3; coal at $5 and $6 per ton. Lumber can be purchased at $9 and $10 per 1,000 feet. I was informed by General John Williams, of Rochester, under whose care these grounds formerly were, that at Le Roy, a point thirty miles west from Rochester, is a large stone building formerly used as a car depot, completely fitted with furniture and ready for the reception of 1,000 men; that the Government formerly hired and placed in this building its furnishings but that it has now sold them, but that they can be had complete at present if desired as they are not in use, and have not since being occupied for military purposes been disturbed.

I am, colonel, with the highest respect, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

* See p. 77.

{p.77} {p.78}

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DETROIT, MICH., June 25, 1862.

Lieut. Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Eighth Infty., U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: In compliance with your order dated June 12, 1862, requiring me to visit the permanent camps at Albany, Utica, Rochester and Elmira and the U. S. barracks at Buffalo to ascertain their capacity for quartering troops and to make to you a written report thereon, accompanied by a general plan of each camp, I have the honor to submit the result of my examination of the camp so specified at Albany, N. Y., as to its condition when visited by me on or near the 21st instant.

This camp is known as the Albany Industrial School Barracks* and is at present partially occupied, one of the long wooden temporary barracks, 500 by 20 feet, being in use as a hospital for wounded soldiers, containing at present nearly 200, and the permanent brick building being partly occupied as offices and store-rooms of the quartermaster-general’s department of the State of New York and partly as a recruiting depot. The party, however, is very small and does not require but a small room. The camp is under the charge of General C. Van Vechten, quartermaster-general of the State.

It is easily accessible from the town, being located on a fine road about one mile from it in a southwest direction, on an elevated and dry situation. It is irregular in shape. The longest side, however, is about 500 yards and the greatest width about 350 yards. The soil is firm, hard and gravelly, covered with grass and there is not in the vicinity either marsh, standing water or forest, or any locus of malaria or disease. The camp is abundantly supplied with fine pure water from the city reservoir, and with fuel; hard wood at $8 and soft wood at $5 per cord.

There are two camp-grounds separated from each other by a high close board fence. The one containing the Industrial School building has on three sides a high close board fence of 8 feet; the fourth a picket fence 5 feet high. The other ground is inclosed on three sides by a high close board fence of 8 feet; the fourth side is partly bounded by a low fence of horizontal slats and posts, but has a short interval with none.

With the exception of the Industrial School building the buildings were all built by the Government and are now, together with the school building and all the grounds, exclusively under its control. This latter building was formerly occupied as an industrial school and was built by the city of Albany. It is 293 feet long and at the wings and middle portions 50 feet in width. The wings are connected with the central building by two halls, each 77 by 31 feet. It is of brick, the central part three stories in height, and the wings and connecting halls two stories. The ceilings are about 12 feet in height and all parts of the building admit of the most complete ventilation.

The basement is occupied as mess halls kitchens and storerooms. The mess halls are completely supplied with tables and benches and will seat 700 men. There are two kitchens, 31 by 48 feet each. One is completely furnished with cooking apparatus for cooking at one time for 1,000 men. The other kitchen is not in any use. The first floor is occupied as barracks and offices. Its barrack accommodations consist of two halls 66 by 31 feet and two of 48 by 31 feet. They will accommodate 500 men in all, and 500 more can be placed on the floor above, which is also used as barracks and offices, and has the same number of {p.79} {p.80} rooms of the same dimensions as the first floor. One of the halls, 48 by 31 feet, is, however, used as a prison room and has 36 cells arranged in 2 tiers, one tier above the other, and 18 inches each. The third story of the central building is occupied or has been as officers’ quarters and will accommodate 12. By a proper disposition of the rooms and offices in the first and second stories 1,000 men can readily be accommodated, and by a use of all the rooms in the basement the same number can be seated at once and 2,000 cooked for at once. There are sinks and bath-houses to the rear of the building and two sheds 50 by 20 feet used for washing rooms and store-rooms, one small store-house 30 feet square and a sutler’s store 40 by 30 feet, and a small dwelling house 50 by 30 feet, stable sheds for horses 50 feet by 10, and other low sheds 100 feet by 8 feet.

The ground is completely surrounded by a high close board fence except one side which has a picket fence.

With the exception of the school brick building the buildings are all of one story in height, of wooden frames, new and covered with rough boards matched, and the seam again covered by an outer board. The roofs are covered in the same manner. They have pitched roofs at the ridge about 15 feet in height and at the eaves about 8 feet. The floors are firm, of plank, and the buildings are all well ventilated. On the adjacent ground and separated from them by a close board fence 8 feet in height are two long barrack buildings, each 500 by 20 feet, with sinks, bath-houses and guard-house. These buildings are all new, of wooden frames, with pitched roofs of about the same height and covered in the same manner as those already described. They are well ventilated and have good floors. One has a piazza 10 feet wide running the entire length of the building. Each is divided into five divisions of 100 feet each designed to accommodate 100 men each, which they will readily do, or even 150. The middle division of the building with the piazza has four small divisions of 25 feet each and is used as a dispensary and cook room for the sick and wounded recently arrived (within a week) there.

There are at this camp about 1,700 wooden bunks in all and 3,000 linen ticks for straw. There are no kitchens on this ground, all the cooking being done in the basement of the Industrial School building. The guard-house is an octagonal building 40 feet in diameter and one story in height, at present used as a dispensary. There are bath-houses near each of the barrack buildings well supplied with hydrant water and good cleanly sinks for the men. The guard-house has two rooms of equal dimensions. There is no bake-house, the food being supplied, cooked and placed on the table and the table furniture and kitchen utensils found by contracting parties at 24 1/2 cents each ration. Lumber can be bought at 6 cents per foot.

These barracks are designed for 1,000 men but will accommodate at least one-third more. Accompanying this description is a ground plan of the grounds and all buildings and an additional plan of each story of the Industrial School building, with notes and references, all of which are respectively submitted.

With highest respect, I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

* See pp. 79, 81.

{p.81} {p.82}

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DETROIT, MICH., June 25, 1862.

Lieut. Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Eighth Infty., Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In compliance with your order dated Washington City, June 12, 1862, requiring me to visit the permanent camps at Albany, Utica, Rochester and Elmira and the U. S. barracks at Buffalo to ascertain their capacity for quartering troops and to make to you a written report thereon accompanied by a general plan of each camp, I have the honor to submit the result of my examination of the camp so specified at Buffalo, N.Y., as to its condition when visited by me on or about the 23d of June.

This camp is known as Camp Porter* and is at present entirely unoccupied. It is in the charge of Mr. Samuel Strong, a gentleman employed by the Government to take charge of the public buildings at Fort Porter. It is easily accessible from town, being located on a fine road about one mile and three-quarters from it in a northwest direction and on ground quite as high as the surrounding country and bordering Niagara River. It is nearly in the form of a rectangle, being about 320 by 300 yards. The soil is firm and hard, covered with grass, and there is not in the vicinity either marsh, standing water or forest, or any cause of malaria or disease. The camp is abundantly supplied with fine pure water from the city reservoir and fuel is delivered on the ground at $5, and $3.50 or $4, the first price being that for hard wood, the latter for soft wood.

In the same inclosure are the temporary buildings erected by the Government and the permanent fort with its various buildings. The first are all new, of one story in height and of wooden frames covered with rough boards matched. The seam is again covered by an outer board. The sides and roof are covered in the same manner. They have good plank floors and pitched roofs, those of the barracks and guard-house being about fifteen feet at the ridge and eight at the eaves, those of the mess hall and kitchens somewhat higher. The grounds are inclosed by a low fence of horizontal slats placed at intervals nailed to uprights. The barracks (temporary) number ten buildings placed in two lines at right angles to each other. They are each 60 feet by 18 and have bunks placed in each for the accommodation of 150 men, though they are unfitted for the reception of more than 100 in each. The bunks are double and arranged in three tiers, with the length at right angles with the length of the building. This leaves a passage of six feet wide at the middle of the building. The barracks are wretchedly ventilated and are unprovided with ticks for straw for the bunks. In each is a small room 7 by 5 feet used by the orderly sergeants.

In a large building south of these and dimensions of 236 by 66 feet are the mess halls and kitchen. The latter is 36 feet wide, 56 feet long, occupying the central part of the building, with the mess halls of 100 feet in length each at either end. At one end of the kitchen are three small rooms 10 by 12 feet used as store-rooms and outside of these is a large reservoir of cistern water. The roof of this part of the building is higher by about six feet than that of the mess halls. The latter will seat 600 men in each. One is well supplied with tables and benches and the other has but about one-half of the requisite number. The kitchen is very deficient in cooking apparatus and there is no bake-house.

{p.83} {p.84}

The rations have been furnished, cooked and placed on the tables by contractors who find their cooking utensils and supply the table furniture at 27 cents per ration. The guard-house is entirely too small, being 30 by 18 feet, and contains one small prison room 8 by 12 feet. The sinks are miserable and not sufficient in number. The officers’ quarters consist of a stone building two stories, or rather one and a half stories high of 70 by 70 feet, with an L part 30 by 25 feet occupied by the laundresses. This is also of two stories. A large hall 10 feet wide extends through the building on the first floor. It has here five rooms, four of 25 by 35 and one of 25 by 25. At right angles with the L part is a shed used for washing, 70 by 15 feet, and on the same line with it a stable 30 by 20 feet. These buildings are of hewn stone. The quarters have but one room fit for use in the second story and this is 20 by 30 feet.

North of this camp is a square redoubt 60 by 60 feet with crenated walls for musketry, a ditch, parapet and glacis. It is two stories in height with a shelter, half-tower roof 30 feet square, upon which are traverse circles for four 32-pounders. The ditch basement story consists of a hall 8 feet wide extending through the building, on one side of which are two rooms 20 by 28 feet. On the other side are two rooms 20 by 12 feet each and one of 20 by 24. This latter room has been used as a kitchen and contains a large fireplace but no cooking arrangements. The ceilings on this floor are 12 feet high. The second floor is connected with the terre-plein by a drawbridge. It has a hall extending through it 8 feet in width. On one side of this are two rooms 28 by 20 feet each. Each of these rooms has three casemates 8 feet deep and 8 feet wide. On the other side of the hall are four rooms. Two of these are 12 by 20 feet each and are connected by a small interior door. The third is a magazine room 12 by 20 feet and the fourth, of the same size, has two casemates 8 feet by 4. The tower room has been described. It is accessible from the hall by a staircase and would serve very well for a guard-house for troops quartered in the building. The redoubt is of hewn stone. The ceilings are all 12 feet in height. It contains but about twenty bunks and no linen ticks for straw. Owing to the great thickness of the walls the room is much more limited than it would otherwise be, and for this reason not more than 200 men could be well quartered in this building. Even then the ventilation would be very incomplete. There are two reservoirs in the redoubt and a well in the ditch outside, all provided with pumps, not one of which is of the slightest service. Lumber may be purchased here for 8 and 10 cents per foot.

The grounds and buildings entire at this place are unsuitable for the reception of over 1,200 men. Accompanying this description is a ground plan of the permanent camp and redoubt and a projected plan of each floor of the latter, with the references and dimensions for all, to which I respectfully invite your attention.

With the highest respect, I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

* See p. 83.

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NASHVILLE, June 25, 1862.

Brigadier-General NEGLEY, Columbia, Tenn.:

Lieutenant-Colonel Bennett is on parole and is traveling under the protection which the laws of civilized warfare afford. If he has been guilty of imprudence only it is an exhibition of bad taste for which the {p.85} proper punishment is a dignified rebuke. If he has violated his parole you would be justified in arresting him. Under all other circumstances his person is sacred. Report in detail what Lieutenant-Colonel Bennett has done. What can be sworn to is what I want to know, not what irresponsible parties say.

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WHEELING, June 25, [1862.]

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Chase.

SIR: All prisoners sent from this department to your post will be held until released by Secretary of War or by order of commander of this department. Any application or order from any other civil or military authority for release of prisoners sent from this department will be referred to Maj. R. M. Corwine, department judge-advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, or to myself.

In general all prisoners should be held subject only to the order of the Secretary of War and the commander of the department from which the prisoners are forwarded. In the case of the Kentucky prisoners, General Boyle should direct the transfer to Lexington. Notify me of the release by Secretary of War of prisoners sent from here.*

Papers in case of Stover referred to Secretary of War.

By order of Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont:

JOS. DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

* This order, with an additional paragraph, under date of June 26, will be found at p. 98.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 26, 1862.

Col. MARTIN BURKE, Commanding Port Lafayette, N. Y. Harbor:

Representations are made to this Department that Soulé has been and is now sick. Are these representations true, and if so to what extent is he or has he been ill?

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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FORT HAMILTON, June 26, 1862.

Hon. C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

Mr. Soulé’s health is good.

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

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FORT HAMILTON, N. Y. Harbor, June 26, 1862.

Hon. C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Washington City, D. C.:

In answer to your telegraph dispatch of this day I have the honor to state that Mr. Soulé from all I can understand is in good health, and if at any time he should be indisposed the attending surgeon of this post {p.86} will be promptly sent to him. Inclosed you will receive the report of my officer, Lieutenant Wood, in charge of Fort Lafayette, respecting this matter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

[Inclosure.]

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y. Harbor, June 26, 1862.

Lieut. Col. M. BURKE, Third Artillery, Port Hamilton.

COLONEL: In answer to yours of this date I have the honor to reply that Mr. Soulé has made no complaint of being unwell since he has been confined here and I have seen nothing which would lead me to suppose that he was not in perfect health. I have just made inquiry of him as to the state of his health and he states that it is good.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. O. WOOD, First Lieutenant, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 26, 1862.

Lieut. Col. MARTIN BURKE, Port Hamilton, N. Y.:

The permission for Hon. Reverdy Johnson and for Mr. Soulé’s servant Jules to visit Mr. Soulé is hereby revoked. Permit no one to visit him.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 26, 1862.

Lieut. Col. W. HOFFMAN, Eighth Infantry, Chicago, Ill.:

General Negley reports finding at Columbia, Tenn., a number of escaped rebel prisoners from Camps Chase and Douglas, and that a young man named Smith, living in Chicago, assists them to escape, and the sutler at Camp Douglas sells them clothing for disguises. Ascertain the facts and make prompt report.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, June 26, 1862.

Whereas, a system of warfare has been inaugurated known as bushwhacking in which all the rules governing belligerents among civilized nations are discarded, and whereby rebel fiends lay in wait for their prey to assassinate Union soldiers and citizens; it is therefore ordered and all commanders of troops and detachments in the field are especially directed that whenever any of this class of offenders shall be captured they shall not be treated as prisoners of war but be summarily tried by drum-head court-martial, and if proved guilty be executed (by {p.87} hanging or shooting) on the spot, as no punishment can be too prompt or severe for such unnatural enemies of the human race.

By order of Brig. Gen. J. G. Blunt:

THOS. MOONLIGHT, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., June 26, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a letter received last evening from Maj. W. S. Pierson, commanding the Sandusky Depot, reporting disclosures made to him by two of the medical officers recently discharged pursuant to recent orders from the Adjutant-General’s Office. Being satisfied that there are turbulent and desperate spirits among the prisoners who would be glad to bring about a collision with the guard even without a hope of ultimate escape from the island, reckless of consequences to themselves and others, I thought it advisable to call on Governor Tod for a company from Camp Chase to re-enforce the guard. It is scarcely possible that the majority of the prisoners would be willing to engage in a hopeless attack on the guard, but it might be brought about by the acts of individuals in spite of the better judgment and better feelings of the mass of them. The presence of a stronger guard will overawe the reckless and encourage the well-disposed to insist on submission where resistance could only lead to a useless sacrifice of their own lives.

In anticipation of a large increase of the number of prisoners at the depot I would respectfully suggest that a fourth company be added to this guard to take the place of the one called for from Camp Chase. It may become necessary to employ a detective agent in Canada to watch the movements of those who sympathize with the rebellion and I respectfully ask authority to employ such a person.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 30, 1862.

Referred to Adjutant-General, with instructions to provide a force sufficient in any probable contingency to prevent any rising among the prisoners or any attempt from without to rescue them.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS HOFFMAN’S BATTALION, Depot Prisoners of War, near Sandusky, Ohio, June 23, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

I last evening discharged the medical officers in pursuance of an order from General Thomas. On Saturday forty-eight prisoners arrived from Fort Columbus. They came on parole with two U. S. officers. They delivered me their money, about $1,200.

{p.88}

One of the surgeons after they were notified to leave said he wished to speak to me in private. He said he would be hung if he was known to say what he was going to, and would not without I would agree not to mention his name to any one. I told him I would not. He said he was glad to get away. That the prisoners would soon have a revolt; that I should immediately increase our force. I replied, “Let them try. We are ready.” He said he supposed so, but the prisoners were desperate and would make the attempt, and whether successful or not it would lead to great loss of life to them and outside. I said, “Supposing successful, which I do not fear, how will they get off the island?” He said that if they could not have arrangements carried out for transportation they had determined to take their chance by tearing [down] buildings or fences to make rafts across to the mainland, and there take their chance of getting hold of vessels or walking to Canada, or scattering. I said, “They are not so big fools.” He says, “They are, and nothing will stop them unless you have more force, at least in making the attempt.” “Now,” says he, “act as you please, but never disclose me, and I feel that I have done a duty in saying this to you.”

Just as the officers were going on the boat a man who was one of them, but I had never seen him before even to know him by sight, beckoned me to one side and said, “Major, your Government has done a noble and humane act in discharging the surgeons. I want to say to you that you should increase your guards here without delay. It may save a great calamity to do it. I cannot say any more.” He said this in a low voice and went right on the boat. I do not know which he was. I will add that I have not mentioned these circumstances to any person living and shall keep no copy of this letter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. PIERSON, Major Hoffman’s Battalion, Commanding.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 26, 1862.

Hon. DAVID TOD, Governor of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio.

DEAR SIR: I learned last evening from Major Pierson that when the rebel surgeons were released under recent order from the War Department one of them called him aside and under his promise not to mention his name told him that the prisoners were determined on a revolt at all hazards and even with scarcely a hope of ultimate escape from the island. This statement was confirmed by another surgeon just at the moment of leaving.

Improbable as the story seems I thought it advisable last evening to call on you for a company to re-enforce the guard. I am satisfied there are turbulent and desperate spirits among them who keep up discussions and excitement and who taking advantage of the small guard may by some individual act bring about a collision between the guard and the prisoners in spite of the better judgment and better feeling of the large majority of them. The presence of a stronger guard will overcome the reckless and encourage the well-disposed to insist on submission when resistance would manifestly be only a useless sacrifice of their own lives. I must try and cultivate a little more confidence in the command with less concern about what may be undertaken, but twenty preventions are better than one cure.

{p.89}

If the company is required there permanently as probably it will be I will ask authority to call on you for another company to be added to the battalion.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, June 26, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: The company which will arrive to-day from Camp Chase will remove any possible chance of an attempt at revolt by the prisoners, which even without its presence I looked upon as scarcely within the range of possibility. Though not belonging to the battalion the company must perform the same duty and be subject to the same discipline as the other companies. A thorough system of drill must be carried out. Your guards are already strong enough and need not be increased in consequence of the presence of this company.

Kindness alone will not keep prisoners in subjection, and when you can single out a turbulent character you must resort to severe measures. You have the power and you are responsible that it is well executed.

I hope you have secured the services of a good hospital steward. The situation is a very desirable one and there are doubtless many competent persons who would be glad to get it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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INDIANAPOLIS, June 26, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

An order has been presented signed by order Lieut. Col. Bernard G. Farrar, provost-marshal-general, Saint Louis, to release A. W. Clinard, of Kentucky, a prisoner of war at Camp Morton. Has Colonel Farrar authority to discharge prisoners? Answer.

JAMES A. EKIN, Assistant Quartermaster.

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JOHNSON’S ISLAND, Near Sandusky City, Ohio, June 26, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, General Superintendent of Prisoners.

HONORED SIR: On the date of-February, 1862, 1 was appointed by the medical director (who had the authority) surgeon of the Tenth Tennessee Regiment of Volunteers and was acting in that capacity at my capture at Donelson, and hence my name upon the muster-rolls as captain, placed there by Capt. Leslie Ellis, who with all the command was fully aware of the facts as to my rank and appointment as surgeon and captain. Previous to my appointment I was lieutenant. This is a plain statement of facts and I am to-day de jure and de facto surgeon of the Tenth Tennessee Volunteers and entitled to a discharge as per order releasing surgeons. The enrolling of my name as captain was {p.90} unwittingly done as I was not aware that surgeons were registered, only giving my rank, which was captain.

Hoping that the above presentation of facts will be appreciated and that immediate action will ensue resulting in my release,

I remain, with profound respect, your obedient servant,

J. HANDY, Surgeon Tenth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 27, 1862.

JAMES A. EKIN, Assist ant Quartermaster, Indianapolis:

Colonel Farrar has no authority to release prisoners. You will release no one without order or approval from this Department.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 27, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, Commanding Port Columbus, Governor’s Island, N. Y.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge the receipt of a letter signed by a number of prisoners of war now at Governor’s Island and referred by you to this Department expressing their reluctance to be placed under the control of the rebels, and to state in reply that when a system of general exchanges shall be established none of the prisoners of war who will take the oath of allegiance and as to whose future loyalty there is no question will be forced within the rebel lines.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, Miss., June 27, 1862.

Flag-Officer C. H. DAVIS, Comdg. Western Flotilla, Mississippi River, Memphis, Tenn.

SIR: Your letter of the 18th is received. I have received no official information of the gun-boats in the Arkansas and White Rivers. In operating with troops in Arkansas it is of the utmost importance to know something of the movements of the flotilla there. Corporal Warden will be sent to your command. You can negotiate the exchange of your prisoners through any Confederate officer with whom you can communicate. If you have not in your command the men for exchange General Grant on your requisition will be ordered to furnish them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., June 27, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. VAN ALEN, Commanding at Yorktown, Va.

GENERAL: Please send to Mathews County Court-House and arrest Carter B. Hudgins and send him to this post to be placed in confinement at the Rip Raps, and give public notice at the court-house that {p.91} in case of any further disturbance of the public peace by guerrillas or any further violence done or offered in that county by secessionists to Unionists I shall hold every secessionist there personally responsible therefor.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 27, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: In compliance with your instructions I have the honor to submit herewith copies of all correspondence* on file in this office bearing on the Senate’s resolution of June 23 which calls for information in regard to the exchange of prisoners or the negotiations therefor.

I have the honor, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* Omitted here; see correspondence of Wool and Huger in its chronological order.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Chase, Ohio, June 27, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit.

SIR: Yours dated 21st instant concerning or ordering release of surgeon prisoners confined at this post is received, and I have to reply that on the 19th instant pursuant to orders from Governor David Tod of Ohio, dated June 18, all prisoners known to be surgeons were by Col. G. Moody, then commanding, unconditionally released from confinement at this post. A prisoner physician whose claim to a regular surgeonship is not yet clearly decided has been by order of the Governor paroled on condition that he report himself for duty to the post surgeon as his assistant in discharging his duties to the prisoners.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

CHAS. W. B. ALLISON, Colonel Eighty-fifth Regt. Ohio Vol. Infty., Commanding Post.

Surgeons released as per foregoing: M. M. Johnson, Fifty-third Tennessee Regiment; J. D. Johnson, Forty-eighth Tennessee Regiment; Tomlin Braxton, assistant surgeon (rebel), King William County, Va.; Theophilus Steele, Second Kentucky Regiment; E. W. Harris, Twenty-second Alabama Regiment; O. F. Knox, First Alabama.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, June 27, 1862.

Adjt. Gen. L. THOMAS, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of June 26 addressed to the commanding officer Camp Douglas requiring him to report immediately the number and names of all prisoners who have escaped from Camp Douglas and dates of escape. I succeeded Colonel Cameron in the command of this post on the 19th instant. No prisoners have escaped since that date. I do not find any records on file from which I can furnish immediately the number and names of those who previously escaped. I have instituted a vigorous inquiry, however, and will forward the information required as soon as it can be procured.

{p.92}

Hereafter a minute record of all events regarding prisoners of war at this post will be kept on record.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Regt. Illinois Vol. Infty., Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, June 27, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 21st instant addressed to commanding officer of this post. In accordance with instructions therein the medical officers held as prisoners of war in this camp, nineteen in number, were discharged on the 25th instant. I send a list* of them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infty., Commanding Post.

* Not found.

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COPAYE’S MILL, Texas County, Mo., June 27, 1862.

Colonel BOYD.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report to you the following as the result of my work. I made a hasty report to you on the 24th. I now include facts:

I arrested Moses Bradford, a noted guerrilla and one who has caused us much trouble. He was not in arms and I do not feel it my duty to shoot him, although he acknowledges himself in the brush for four weeks and coming from the army with Coleman, and is identified [as] a train-burner. I arrested Lewis Morris in arms with letters from General Price’s army exciting to guerrilla warfare, who acknowledged himself a rebel (the letters I forwarded to you before in which he was spoken of as Colonel Best), and under Orders, No. 18, from General Schofield and instructions I shot him although it was an unpleasant duty.

I have arrested a number who have willingly fed Coleman’s men in order to know what they knew about the rebels in this vicinity and threats which have been made, in doing which I ascertained the hiding place of about forty rebels, it being two miles south of Joel Stevenson’s in a house built two years ago but not occupied; hence rode to it. Out of rebel sympathizers I made guides, and under cover of a heavy shower last night I surrounded the place, but from evidence they had not been there after the arrest of Moses Bradford. I have the names of all and they are those who have friends living here. They are the ones who are shooting Union men down in this vicinity. A Mr. Light, near the Gasconade, was shot while in his corn-field. These rebels roam the whole country. I arrested a Mr. King, who has been feeding his son, a returned rebel, and one who is identified as a train-burner, and released him on promise that he would deliver his son as prisoner of war at Rolla within one week. In so doing I think we can again find the hiding place of the rest.

I have left the very best of impression among the people. I have succeeded in getting neighbors and brothers together who have not {p.93} spoken for over one year to one another, and I believe they begin to love the Government again and hate the Confederates. When we can get the neighbors to be such it is half of the strength of our Government.

I shall start from here in the morning for Hartville. I hear of parties committing depredations in that vicinity. Not the least depredation has been committed by my men. I enforce the strictest discipline in that respect. But much complaint is made against some of our troops. They would be glad to see us but for this fact. I will send prisoner in with bearer. Will do my duty firmly and judiciously and report often. Send me word if Mr. King delivers his son.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. TOMPKINS, Major, Comdg. Detach. 13th Regt. Cav., Missouri State Militia.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, June 27, 1862.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a complete list* of Confederate prisoners within this department as known at these headquarters paroled and non-paroled. As there is no suitable place in this department where they can be safely kept the general commanding earnestly desires that some provision be made by the War Department so as to relieve him of the responsibility. No general order (if ever issued) has reached these headquarters appointing a commissary-general of prisoners or designating the place where they are to be kept. Your early attention to this matter is respectfully solicited.

The commanding general left to-day for Southern Kansas on business connected with his duties as auditing officer of irregular claims, as appointed by the War Department, hence my addressing you direct.

I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. MOONLIGHT, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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CHICAGO, June 28, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

Over 300 prisoners claim to be British subjects and the acting British consul wishes to visit Camp Douglas to investigate these claims. I object. Shall he have permission?

WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 28, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Camp Douglas, Chicago, ill.:

This Department recognizes no right in the British consul to visit prisoners of war taken in arms with rebels against this Government.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

{p.94}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 72.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 28, 1862.

I. Whenever sick men, paroled prisoners or others, under circumstances entitling them to their descriptive lists and accounts of pay and clothing, &c., are sent away from their regiments or being already separated from their regiments are discharged from any hospital or moved from point to point in a body, they will be put under charge of a trusty officer or non-commissioned officer-to be selected if possible from their own number-who will exercise command over the party and conduct it to its destination. And to this officer or non-commissioned officer will be confided the descriptive lists of all, for the safe-keeping of which until properly turned over with each soldier he will be held strictly accountable. Detailed instructions in writing for his guidance and government during the journey will in every case if possible be furnished to such officer by his last commander. And should he himself be compelled to make any detachments from his party he will in each case observe the same rules.

II. That paragraph of General Orders, No. 65, of June 12, 1862, which authorizes the discharge when requested by them of paroled prisoners is hereby rescinded.

III. No more furloughs will be granted to paroled prisoners. All furloughs heretofore given to them are hereby revoked, and all prisoners now at large on their parole or who may hereafter be paroled by the rebel authorities will immediately repair, if belonging to regiments raised in the New England and Middle States, to the Camp of Instruction established near Annapolis, Md.; if belonging to regiments raised in the States of Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana and Michigan to Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio; if belonging to regiments raised in the States of Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri to the camp near Jefferson Barracks, Mo., and report for such duty compatible with their parole as may be assigned to them by the officers in command of said camps. And all whether officers or soldiers who fail to comply with this order within the space of time necessary for them to do so will be accounted deserters and dealt with accordingly.

The attention of all commanding, mustering and recruiting officers is particularly directed to this order and they are required to use their utmost exertions not only to give it the widest circulation in their neighborhoods, but to see that it is faithfully carried out. And their Excellencies the Governors of the several States are respectfully solicited to lend their efforts to the same end.

IV. The transportation necessary to a compliance with this order can on application be procured from the Governors of the several States or from the U. S. mustering or commanding officers in the various cities within them.

V. The commanders of the different Camps of Instruction to which paroled men are sent will have them organized into companies and battalions, keeping those of the same regiment and of the same State as much together as possible, and will have correct muster-rolls of them made out and forwarded to this office, and on the 15th day of every muster month will furnish a list of them to the company commanders, from whom in return they will procure full and exact descriptive lists of each man and accounts of the pay, clothing, &c., due to or from him to the Government.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.95}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 28, 1862.

COMMANDING GENERAL OF THE CONFEDERATE FORCES, or The COMMANDING OFFICER:

Doctor Swinburne, a volunteer surgeon, with a number of the surgeons, nurses and attendants have been left in charge of the sick and wounded of this army who could not be removed. Their humane occupation commends itself under the laws of nations to the kind consideration of the opposing forces. It is requested that they may be free to return as soon as the discharge of their duties with the sick and wounded shall permit, and that the same consideration shown to the Confederate sick, wounded and medical officers who have been captured by our forces may be extended to theirs. A large amount of clothing, bedding, medical stores, &c., have been left both at Savage Station and Doctor Trent’s house.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

CHAS. S. TRIPLER, Surgeon and Medical Director, Army of the Potomac.

[Indorsement.]

SAVAGE STATION, June 30, 1862.

Neither clothing nor bedding and but very [few] medical stores were found here, they having been destroyed by the enemy.

GEO. WRAY, Major, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, June 28, 1862.

N. H. BRAINARD, Secretary, &c., Iowa City, Iowa.

SIR: Your letter of the 21st is received. General Beauregard refuses to exchange prisoners except on terms which our Government will not admit. It is therefore impossible to reorganize the prisoners at Nashville and exchange them for future service till their officers can be released. Under these circumstances the Secretary of War has sent paymasters to pay them off and discharge them, it is the only thing that can now be done for them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, June 28, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: Yours of the 25th instant duly received. The requirements therein will be immediately complied with. The Gratiot Street Prison, in this city, is the principal place west of the Mississippi where prisoners of war are confined. There are local provost-marshals in nearly every county in this State, some of whom hold a few prisoners for trial. They all, however, report to this office and their returns can be consolidated here. The hospitals in the city are as follows: New House of Refuge, Fifth Street (city general hospital), Fourth Street, Hickory Street, {p.96} Jefferson Barracks and Sisters’. Besides the places mentioned in your list east of the Mississippi there are a few prisoners of war sick at the Keokuk Hospital and the Mound City, Ill., Hospital. There is also according to report a number of sick prisoners left at Camp Randall, Madison, Wis.

Very respectfully,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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ROLLA, MO., [June] 28, 1862.

Colonel BOYD.

COLONEL: By order of General Schofield I am under arrest and in close confinement, charged with the most heinous of crimes-outlaw and a murderer. If I could conceive that it was possible for me to be guilty of those crimes I should feel a remorse more stinging than the loss of confidence in me by the department, which is severe. I was never more astonished than when I read the order of my arrest. Severe and dangerous duties to perform and of the most unpleasant kind and that by positive order, and when I have done that conscientiously I find myself in arrest. It may be that I was injudicious in wording my report. I kept no copy. It was worded in view of facts known to you. I remember this sentence, “They will trouble us no more.” I had been five times after Moses Bradford and I suppose ten trips have been made by others. The trouble is over unless let loose by a commission.

I hope a speedy examination will be made in my case. I am ready to answer to any charge. I feel a consciousness in trying to do my duty to man and my Government. I have no revenge to gratify.

I have the honor to be, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. TOMPKINS, Major, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.

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HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT, Wheeling, June 28, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 25th instant. I inclose general orders on the subject of prisoners and the duties of provost-marshals, issued by Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont, commanding this department. All prisoners are forwarded to Wheeling and from Wheeling to Camp Chase. A few only are kept here. I can report daily to you the arrest and release of prisoners, with charges against them if desired. I am about to visit several posts in the department to insure as far as possible regularity in all matters appertaining to the duties of provost-marshals. I have endeavored to systematize my business as far as practicable and would be pleased to have you visit my office on your inspecting tour. All the evidence against prisoners is on file here. Every case comes under my personal supervision. Duplicate lists of prisoners of war and of citizen prisoners will be promptly forwarded when the rolls by express arrive. I shall be prepared at any moment to give all the information in my possession regarding prisoners that have passed through my hands. Many of the citizen prisoners sent from this department are held for safe-keeping until the civil authority is re-established in Western Virginia and they {p.97} can be indicted for aiding in this rebellion. No prisoner is released without taking the inclosed oath* of allegiance and frequently giving bond besides. I should be pleased to have an interview with you here, at Camp Chase or Detroit, as you may desire.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH DARR, JR., Major, First West Virginia Cavalry, Provost-Marshal-General.

* Not found.

[Inclosures.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 21.}

HDQRS. MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT, Wheeling, April 30, 1862.

All arrests whatsoever by provost-marshals at posts, camps or other localities within this department will be immediately reported to the provost-marshal-general at these headquarters, reports to be accompanied with full descriptions of prisoners taken and statement of charges upon which arrested, together with such other information touching cases presented as may be necessary or useful for department files. Regular returns of all persons in custody or released within the month will be made monthly to the provost-marshal at department headquarters or at such other times as he may specially designate, having in view the interests of the service. Commanders of districts, posts and camps will exercise such supervision as shall insure the faithful carrying out of this order by provost-marshals appointed by them or under their control.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

HENRY THRALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CIRCULAR.]

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT, Wheeling, Va., April 30, 1862.

The following instructions from the general commanding are transmitted for your government in the cases specified:

1. Prisoners will not be surrendered to the U. S. marshal until they are indicted.

2. When the major-general commanding is in the field and it is not convenient to communicate with him on urgent cases they shall be referred to the department judge-advocate, Maj. R. M. Corwine, for his opinion and direction.

3. Persons who are charged with disloyalty and sent to prison by the order of any commanding officer of a division, brigade, regiment or post shall be sent to Camp Chase to await the order of the Secretary of War.

4. Persons arrested who are charged with having served under the rebel Government, whether in the military, judicial, executive or legislative departments, will not be discharged, but will at once be committed to Camp Chase, with a statement embodying a history of their case, there to await the order of the War Department.

5. All persons taken with arms in their hands who shall have been actually engaged as guerrillas at the time of their capture shall be tried by military commission at the headquarters of the nearest brigade commander and the proceedings in each case submitted for final decision to the general commanding the department.

{p.98}

6. The arrest of all persons will be promptly reported to Maj. Joseph Darr, jr., provost-marshal-general, headquarters Wheeling, Va., and particular care will be taken whenever practicable to forward with a descriptive list of the prisoners complete and sworn evidence against them. Prisoners will in no instance be sent out of this department without a report to the provost-marshal-general.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

H. THRALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WHEELING, VA., June 26, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Chase.

SIR: All prisoners sent from this department to your post will be held until released by Secretary of War or by order of commander of this department. Any application or order from any other civil or military authority for release of prisoners sent from this department will be referred to Maj. R. M. Corwine, department judge-advocate, Cincinnati, Ohio, or to myself. In general all prisoners should be held subject only to the order of the Secretary of War and the commander of the department from which the prisoners are forwarded. In the case of the Kentucky prisoners General Boyle should direct the transfer to Lexington. Notify me of the release by Secretary of War of prisoners sent from here. Papers in case of Stover referred to Secretary of War. Prisoners sent from this department to your post will not be permitted to leave it on parole without orders from the Secretary of War or these headquarters, or Maj. R. M. Corwine, Cincinnati, Ohio, and then report will be made to this office*

By order Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont:

JOS. BARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

* See foot-note at p. 85.

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Copy of forms used in Mountain Department, forwarded to office of Commissary-General of Prisoners by Maj. Joseph Darr, jr., provost-marshal-general, June 28, 1862.

Form of descriptive list of prisoners.

No.Name.Residence.Date of arrestBy whom arrested.Remarks.
      

DESCRIPTION.

Complexion.Hair.Height.Eyes.Age.Whiskers.
Feet.Inches.
       
{p.99}

Form of Pass.

No. ___.

HEADQUARTERS MOUNTAIN DEPARTMENT, ___, Va., 186___.

All guards, lines, posts, stations will pass safely ___ ___.

DESCRIPTION.

Complexion.Hair.Height.Eyes.Age.Whiskers.
Feet.Inches.
       

This pass being given with the understanding that if the party receiving it be found hereafter in arms against the Government of the United States or aiding or abetting its enemies the penalty will be death.

Form of release.

HEADQUARTERS ___ ___, ___, 186___.

By virtue of an order received from ___ ___, commanding ___, dated at ___, 186 ___, ___ ___, resident of ___ County and State of ___, prisoner ___ at ___, after having complied with the requirements of and subscribed the papers herewith attached is hereby released from confinement.

By order of ___

___ ___.

HEADQUARTERS OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, ___, 186___.

GUARDS:

Pass ___ ___ to ___.

By order___

___ ___, Provost-Marshal at Headquarters.

Form of bond for release.

Know all men by these presents, that we, ___ ___, principal, and ___ ___, security, are held and firmly bound unto the United States of America in the penal sum of ___, good and lawful money of the United States; for the payment of the same as aforesaid we bind our heirs, executors or administrators firmly by these presents.

Given under our hands and seals this ___ day of ___, 186___.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas the said ___ ___ has been arrested and is now in the custody of the military authority of the United States at the depot of prisoners of war near Sandusky, Ohio, and is desirous of being released from custody upon bail; now if the said ___ ___ shall, keep the peace toward all the citizens of the United States of America and shall not take up arms against the United States of America, or adhere to their enemies, or give them aid or comfort or information injurious to the United {p.100} States or beneficial to their enemies, and shall not advocate or sustain either in private or public the cause of the so-called Confederate States, but shall bear true faith, allegiance and loyalty to the Government of the United States of America, any ordinance, resolution, law of any State convention or Legislature to the contrary notwithstanding, then this obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

___ ___. [SEAL.] ___ ___. [SEAL.]

Signed, sealed and acknowledged before me, the security being first qualified as to his sufficiency.

Date.

[SEAL.]

___ ___, Commissioner.

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PHILADELPHIA, June 28, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: May I be allowed to say a few words to you on a subject which interests me very much. My husband, who is Capt. Francis J. Keffer, had the command of Company H, First California Regiment, under the late Col. E. D. Baker, and was taken prisoner at Ball’s Bluff October 21, now held hostage for a privateer of the Savannah. I think he is confined in the jail with six other officers, or rather speaking, a place where rats inhabit the room, and damp, too, but he does not complain to me, but this I know to be a fact and I expected when Mr. Ely came he would try to do something, and I hope he will use all the means in his power to have every prisoner released. Cannot anything be done to have all the prisoners released at once? Does it acknowledge the Southern Confederacy any more to have a large number released than a small number? Will you let me know if I shall write to the Tombs and ask if there is any one there that they would exchange for my husband, or must I not do it? If I do not interest myself for him who will do it? Sir, can you blame me? He writes to me and says: “If the privateers are hung we will be dealt with in the same way, and if they are cleared we will be the same.” Now of course I am unhappy. I have written twice to Secretary Cameron and to President Lincoln and to Mr. Ely and to Fort Warren, but it does seem that none have answered but the one at Fort Warren, and the commanding officer tells me that the South will not give one up for any other than a privateer, but this does not satisfy a woman. May I write to the mayor of New York on this subject? I will do whatever you think proper. If you can send me a few lines I will be very thankful for it. I also made application for his pay for September and October, but Mr. R. P. Dodge sent me $173.20 for that time, which if I know anything about it was not correct. I then made application for November’s pay in this month and for an explanation of money paid to me and my papers were sent to me to sign for $133, but I have not signed them for I do not quite understand them, and if you think there is any chance of may husband coming home shortly I will try and do without his money and let him get it himself. I have sent him $35 and clothing and some food, and I hope they will let him have all I have sent to make him comfortable. Now, sir, I am afraid I have written too much. You will please excuse me for so doing.

Your humble servant,

MRS. ADALINE KEFFER, No. 613 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia.

{p.101}

Mr. Dodge stated to me that they had paid me as if he was a lieutenant instead of captain. This I do not understand and am afraid to sign my papers and send them back to Washington unless all will be made right if he returns himself

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WAR DEPARTMENT, June 29, 1862.

Brigadier-General MORGAN, Cumberland Gap:

By a general order of this Department the President has ordered that no military execution shall take place unless sanctioned first expressly by him. You will suffer no one to be hung or otherwise maltreated after surrender but send them safely to some depot for prisoners of war, not permitting them to go into the hands of any one who would personally harm them. Where persons come in and take the oath of allegiance you will give them the same protection so long as it is observed that you would other citizens of the United States. I understand from your dispatch that Bales and Ewing come within this rule; if they do you will administer the oath of allegiance and afford them such protection conditional upon their loyalty as may be conveniently within your power and as you would give other citizens, not pledging yourself or the Government to anything beyond that. No protection is to be granted to the persons or property of persons disloyal or hostile to the Government except such as is due to prisoners of war.*

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

* This dispatch is in answer to Morgan to Stanton June 27, Series I, Vol. XVI, Part I, p. 1009.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, June 29, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I hasten to inform you that I have arrested Judge Bartol, judge of the court of appeals. He has been engaged with a Mr. Charbonier in transmitting information to the rebels at Richmond. Charbonier escaped yesterday with a bag and letters from the judge and probably has gone to Richmond. This information is obtained from the most reliable sources. I should like some secret-service money. I understand Major-General Dix has or had $1,000 for that purpose deposited in some bank in this city. The news from the White House is not favorable. It is said that Jackson is between McClellan and the White House. Only four gun-boats to protect our supplies at the landing.

[JOHN E. WOOL,] Major-General.

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CORINTH, June 29, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

The principle recognized by the laws and usages of war and the one on which I have always acted in this department is that medical officers are not to be retained as prisoners of war when their services are not required to take care of their own sick and wounded. Paragraph IV, of General Orders, No. 60, introduces an entirely new principle {p.102} not recognized by the laws of war and which will lead to great inconvenience. It is impossible for our own medical officers after a battle to attend the sick and wounded prisoners, and usually it is impossible for some weeks to hire citizen surgeons for that purpose. In such cases humanity requires that the captured medical officers be retained for that purpose. I respectfully suggest that the paragraph be changed so as to conform to the heretofore established rules as recognized in Europe.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CORINTH, MISS, June 29, 1862.

Governor H. R. GAMBLE, Saint Louis:

The Secretary of War has assumed direction and provided for the disposition of prisoners of war at Nashville.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 123.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Memphis, Tenn., June 29, 1862.

...

IV. Arrests being frequently made on representations of citizens who afterward decline to appear to give evidence or to furnish names of witnesses to substantiate the charges, it is directed that hereafter in all such cases the prisoner be released and the party causing the arrest be confined or banished from the city, as the case may seem to require. The circulation of unfounded rumors through the city, now so prevalent, being calculated to create uneasiness and fear in the minds of the citizens will hereafter be prohibited. The provost-marshal will in such cases arrest the parties guilty of violating this order and place them outside our lines with directions to treat them as spies if ever taken within them thereafter. In all cases where persons are placed outside the lines under this order an accurate description of the person will be recorded in the office of the provost-marshal.

...

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

[JOHN A. RAWLINS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Chicago, June 29, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: I think it proper to report to you instructions in relation to affairs at Camp Douglas heretofore given to your predecessor and which it appears have been lost.

You are held responsible for the security of the prisoners of war under your charge and will make such disposition of the force under your command and such arrangements of the prisoners in companies or divisions in the barracks as will best accomplish this purpose. The presence of the prisoners will be verified by daily roll-calls, and every morning a report will be made in writing of each company showing the number present, the sick discharged, escaped and died, giving the names and particulars under the last three heads.

{p.103}

The fund of the prisoners’ hospital will be kept separate from that of the hospital of the guards and will be disbursed for the sole benefit of the sick prisoners on the recommendation of the surgeon in charge approved by you.

A general fund will be created by withholding such part of the rations as may not be necessary, the surplus to be purchased by the commissary as provided for by existing regulations, and this fund will be disbursed under your directions in the purchase of such articles as may be necessary for the health and comfort of the prisoners and which otherwise would have to be purchased by the Government. Among these articles are all table furniture, cooking utensils, articles for police purposes, bed-ticks and straw and the means of improving or enlarging the barrack accommodations. All such articles will be purchased on the requisition of and through the quartermaster with your approbation.

The extra pay of clerks who have charge of the letters and keep the accounts of the private funds deposited by prisoners may be paid from this fund. The commissary will be responsible for the funds, will keep the necessary accounts and will keep you advised from time to time of the amount on hand. The sutler is entirely under your control, and you will see that [he] furnishes proper articles and at reasonable rates, and you will impose a tax upon him for the privilege according to the amount of his trade. This tax will make part of the fund available for the prisoners’ benefit.

Visitors will not be permitted in the camp except the near relations (loyal people) of prisoners who may be seriously ill. This order will in no case be violated unless with my sanction.

All articles contributed by friends of the prisoners in whatever shape they come if proper to be received will be carefully distributed as the donors may request, such articles as are intended for the sick passing through the hands of the surgeon, who will be responsible for their proper use.

Prisoners will not be permitted to write letters of more than one page of common letter paper, the matter to be strictly of a private nature or the letter must be destroyed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Chicago, June 29, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: Please furnish me immediately with the number of prisoners of war that have been held in Camp Douglas up to this time so far as the records show-the number now present, the number sick, the number discharged, explaining briefly the circumstances, the number escaped and the number died. Report to me the condition in which you found the records of the camp on taking command, the amount of funds turned over to you belonging to prisoners of war and condition of the accounts relative thereto, the amount of the hospital or other funds, if there be any, and all matters relating to the sanitary condition of the camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.104}

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OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, June 29, 1862.

Lieut. Col. C. W. MARSH, Assistant Adjutant-General.

COLONEL: Will you oblige by informing General Schofield that no permits have been granted to U. S. officers to enter the Gratiot Street Prison for the purpose of recruiting among the prisoners. Numerous applications have been made for that purpose but have invariably been refused. I will instruct Lieutenant Bishop hereafter to refuse to all officers admission to the prisoners unless by special permit from General Schofield’s or this office.

I remain, very respectfully,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, June 30, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I have seen a letter from Senator Pearce stating that he is making great efforts to procure the release of Judge Carmichael, confined at Fort McHenry. It appears to me that we ought to adopt more rigid measures in regard to traitors than hitherto. It is therefore that I would recommend that you will be slow to act in the case of the judge.

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 30, 1862.

Major-General WOOL:

Your arrest of Judge Bartol is approved. It is not very likely that Carmichael will get liberated. McClellan has moved his whole force across the Chickahominy and rests on James River, being supported by our gun-boats. The position is favorable and looks more like taking Richmond than any time before. I will send you some [secret-] service money.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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CORINTH, MISS., June 30, 1862.

Major-General BUELL, Huntsville:

Lieutenant-Colonel Bennett, of the rebel army, has arrived at General Thomas’ camp with permission from you to come to my headquarters for the purpose of exchange. The impropriety of sending rebel officers to my headquarters for any purpose whatever must be manifest. You can exchange them or parole them for the purpose of effecting their own exchange if you deem it expedient, but under no circumstances should they be sent through our armies to my headquarters.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, June 30, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I have given no rebel officer knowing him as such permission to go to your headquarters for any purpose. I never to my knowledge saw or heard of Colonel Bennett.

D. C. BUELL.

{p.105}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 150.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 30, 1862.

Mrs. Phillips, wife of Philip Phillips, having been once imprisoned for her traitorous proclivities and acts at Washington and released by the clemency of the Government, and having been found training her children to spit upon officers of the United States, for which act of one of those children both her husband and herself apologized and were again forgiven, is now found on the balcony of her house during the passage of the funeral procession of Lieutenant De Kay laughing and mocking at his remains, and on being inquired of by the commanding general if this fact were so, contemptuously replied, “I was in good spirits that day.”

It is therefore ordered that she be not “regarded and treated as a common woman” of whom no officer or soldier is bound to take notice, but as an uncommon, bad and dangerous woman, stirring up strife and inciting to riot, and that therefore she be confined at Ship Island, in the State of Mississippi, within proper limits there until farther orders, and that she be allowed one female servant and no more if she so choose; that one of the houses for hospital purposes be assigned her as quarters and a soldier’s ration each day served out to her with the means of cooking the same, and that no verbal or written communication be allowed with her except through this office, and that she be kept in close confinement until removed to Ship Island.

By command of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 151.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 30, 1862.

Fidel Keller has been found exhibiting a human skeleton in his bookstore window in a public place in this city, labeled “Chickahominy” in large letters, meaning and intending that the bones should be taken by the populace to be the bones of a Union soldier slain in that battle in order to bring the authority of the United States and our armies into contempt, and for that purpose had stated to the passers-by that the bones were those of a “Yankee soldier,” whereas in truth and fact they were the bones purchased some weeks before of a Mexican consul to whom they were pledged by a medical student.

It is therefore ordered that for this desecration of the dead he be confined at Ship Island for two years at hard labor, and that he be allowed to communicate with no other person on the island except Mrs. Phillips, who has been sent there for a like offense. Any written messages may be sent to him through these headquarters.

Upon the order being read the said Keller requested that so much of it as associated him with “that woman” might be recalled, which request was therefore reduced to writing by him as follows:

NEW ORLEANS, June 30, 1862.

Mr. Keller desires that that part of the sentence which refers to the communication with Mrs. Phillips be stricken out, as he does not wish to have communication with the said Mrs. Phillips.

F. KELLER.

Witness:

D. WATERS.

{p.106}

Said request seeming to the commanding general to be reasonable, so much of said order is revoked, and the remainder will be executed.

By order of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 152.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, June 30, 1862.

John W. Andrews exhibited a cross, the emblem of the suffering of our blessed Savior, fashioned for a personal ornament which he said was made from the bones of a “Yankee soldier,” and having shown this too without rebuke in the Louisiana Club which claims to be composed of chivalric gentlemen, it is therefore ordered that for this desecration of the dead he be confined at hard labor for two years on the fortifications at Ship Island, and that he be allowed no verbal or written communication to or with any one except through these headquarters.

By order of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SHERMAN’S HOTEL, Chicago, June 30, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, U. S. Army.

SIR: I thank you for the privilege extended by your courtesy to visit Camp Douglas, from which I have just returned. If you have yourself been there it is wholly unnecessary for me to say that the place is as desperately circumstanced as any camp ever was, and that nothing but a special providence or some peculiar efficacy of the lake winds can prevent it from becoming a source of pestilence before another month has gone over our heads. The amount of standing water, of unpoliced grounds, of foul sinks, of unventilated and crowded barracks, of general disorder, of soil reeking with miasmatic accretions, of rotten bones and the emptyings of camp-kettles is enough to drive a sanitarian to despair. I hope that no thought will be entertained of mending matters. The absolute abandonment of the spot seems the only judicious course. I do not believe that any amount of drainage would purge that soil loaded with accumulated filth, or those barracks fetid with two stories of vermin and animal exhalations. Nothing but fire can cleanse them. I rejoice that you have come at such an opportune moment, for a week’s delay at this critical season when the hot weather is about setting in with violence might cost many lives. It will be a great relief to hear that the place is abandoned and a true camp established in some gravelly region. I hope that ridge ventilation carried the whole length of the building will be adopted in any new edifices and that a careful system of drainage will be adopted from the start. If in the pressure of your engagements you choose to call on the Sanitary Commission for any plan for the camp of 10,000 men or a proper and economical style of barracks I shall be most happy to send a plan and even an architect at the expense of the Commission to aid your purpose. Excuse the liberty I take in addressing you in this private manner. Having no report to make outside I have thought it my duty to send you these few words just as I am leaving Chicago for the East. I shall be in New York after Wednesday next.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY W. BELLOWS, President of the Sanitary Commission.

{p.107}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Chicago, June 30, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: In consequence of the discharge of the surgeons who were prisoners of war at Camp Douglas you will employ four private physicians at the compensation fixed by the regulations, and four assistants at not over $50 per month, to assist Surgeon McVickar in the care of the sick prisoners. Should you find the services of another physician necessary please let me know. When the hospital fund will admit of it the assistants may be paid out of it; other wise they will be paid by the quartermaster.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS HOFFMAN’S BATTALION, Depot Prisoners of War, Sandusky, June 30, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 23d instant. Your order respecting lists of prisoners will be complied with immediately. You say “separate rolls of citizens will be sent.” We received only the old-style blank for prisoners of war; no separate rolls for citizens. I have the honor to send herewith list* of prisoners received June 21 from Fort Columbus, New York Harbor; also list* of surgeons unconditionally released in accordance with paragraph IV, General Orders, No. 60, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, June 6, 1862; also list* of prisoners from Camp Douglas, Chicago, June 27, 1862.

Your obedient servant,

W. S. PIERSON, Major, Commanding.

Per B. W. WELLS, Second Lieutenant and Post Adjutant.

* Not found.

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CAMP DOUGLAS, Chicago, June 30, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding.

SIR: Allow me to call your attention to the necessity of immediate attention in the matter of drainage, free introduction of water and other sanitary precautions for the health of the camp. The surface of the ground is becoming saturated with the filth and slop from the privies, kitchens and quarters and must produce serious results to health as soon as the hot weather sets in. The number of patients in hospital (326 to-day) and the still larger number requiring attention in the barracks, calls also since the discharge of the rebel surgeons for an immediate force to supply the service left vacant by their release. There were sixteen on duty, and from a careful analysis of the same and personal inspection and from conference with my colleagues I think as expressed in conversation yesterday that it will require five surgeons and four assistants to perform the medical duty of the camp in a {p.108} proper manner. Excuse my again pressing this subject. I do it in the discharge of a duty you have personally imposed upon me.

Very respectfully,

B. MCVICKAR, Post Surgeon.

[Indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to Col. W. Hoffman, Third U. S. Infantry, commissary-general of prisoners, with the earnest request that authority may be given me at once to carry out the views expressed in the within letter from Surgeon McVickar.

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteers.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor District of Columbia.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you grant no more paroles to prisoners confined in the Old Capitol under any circumstances permitting them to leave their place of confinement, and that you recall all those given by you in the last ten days. In the case of Anderson, now at the house of Doctor Miller, in this city, you will please place him again in confinement as soon as he is well enough to be moved. You will please give no permits whatever to visit the prisoners in the Old Capitol, and allow them to send or receive no letters without the previous inspection of Superintendent Wood. You will please relieve all the soldiers acting as nurses to the political prisoners and supply their places by detail from their own number to be made by the superintendent.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 1, 1862.

Lieut. Col. MARTIN BURKE, U. S. Army, Commanding, &c., Fort Hamilton, N. Y.

SIR: In reply to your inquiry of the 21st June I have respectfully to inform you that Mr. Soulé may be allowed the same privileges as other prisoners in regard to receiving the New York daily papers.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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BALTIMORE, July 1, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Mr. C. C. Fulton, confined at Fort McHenry, requests me to communicate the fact to the Secretary of War that the dispatch to New York was purely a private one and confidential and not intended for publication, and that he was astonished to find it in print. The original dispatch he says also contained a proviso which was not published that “the papers publishing his report should give the proper credit to the Baltimore American,” which he says indicated its purely private character.

{p.109}

He further says that the fact that he did not allude to his conference with the President in his own paper should be regarded as evidence of his view of the impropriety of such a fact being made public. If detained in custody he respectfully begs me to ask that his wife and daughters be permitted to visit him.

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

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CORINTH, July 1, 1862.

Major-General THOMAS, Tuscumbia:

General Buell says he never authorized any person to come to these headquarters and never heard of Lieutenant-Colonel Bennett. Send him a copy of the pretended pass and retain Colonel Bennett.

...

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CORINTH, July 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD, Saint Louis, Mo.:

No prisoner of war will be paroled to return to Kentucky, Tennessee or States south of them without an order from these headquarters or from the War Department.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HUNTSVILLE, July 1, 1862.

General HALLECK, Corinth:

I warmly recommend the release on parole of Lieut. William Richardson, Confederate Army, a prisoner of war at Camp Chase. He was wounded at Shiloh but was recently captured while still disabled. He is the nephew of Judge Lane, of this place, who was appointed U. S. judge by Mr. Lincoln and has remained from the first to the last a firm and avowed Union man. He interests himself warmly in the case of Richardson. Please answer.

D. C. BUELL, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 1, 1862.

Col. J. M. GLOVER, Commanding Rolla Division, Rolla, Mo.

COLONEL: The inclosed papers are respectfully referred to you for investigation and report. Please attend to the matter with as little delay as possible. If Major Tompkins is not guilty, as I believed him to be in issuing my order for his arrest, I desire that he be promptly restored to his command and fully exonerated. So far as I am able to judge from his report of June 24 upon which his arrest was based or from that of June 27, which I have received to-day, the shooting of Colonel Best was entirely unjustified by my orders or the customs of war. He does not appear to have been a member of any guerrilla band but a regular soldier of the rebel army on his return home. He may very {p.110} probably have been a spy or been returning for the purpose of raising a guerrilla force, but neither of these would justify his summary execution without trial. No crime whatever would justify his execution without trial after he had been taken prisoner and held for several days, as appears to have been the case. Please give this and other transactions of Major Tompkins such explanation as will enable me to determine whether further proceedings are necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, July 1, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have just returned from Chicago and have the honor to submit the following report:

Camp Douglas is located on low, swampy ground without any possibility of drainage, and even at this time the prisoners and troops are suffering from the mud in the camp. The sinks which have been dug and dug again are overflowing and when the hot weather sets in there must be much sickness. The barracks are too much crowded for health and some changes must be made to bring about a good sanitary state of things. By erecting barracks outside of the camps for one regiment of the guard, leaving one regiment inside, there will [be] quarters enough and greater security for the prisoners will be gained. The two regiments are now in tents which will be worn out by the expiration of their service and it will therefore be cheaper to put them in barracks at once.

The camp is in a very foul condition from want of drainage, and this can only be remedied by construction of a sewer sufficiently below the surface to guard against frost around the sides of the camp and leading into the lake. With this must be connected water pipes to furnish an abundant supply of water for the use of the camp and to float out the filth of all kinds through the sewer.

The sinks should be connected with the sewers so that during the summer the camp and neighborhood would be relieved from the stench which now pollutes the air.

The cost of erecting new barracks and repairing the old ones will be $5,000 to $8,000 and for introducing the system of pipes and drainage about as much more.

If a suitable camp-ground could be found and there was yet time for the work it would perhaps be best to abandon Camp Douglas, but there seems now no alternative but to make the best of what we have. I have ordered a thorough system of police to be put in force at once, but your immediate attention is earnestly called to the matter of the above report.

The hot weather of summer is just upon us and if something is not done speedily there must be much sickness in the camp and neighborhood if not a pestilence.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners

{p.111}

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Warren, July 1, 1862.

Lieut. Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Eighth Infty., Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I herewith inclose a list* of all prisoners of war that have ever been confined at this post to the present date, with all information I have concerning them. Also a monthly return of prisoners.

J. DIMICK, Colonel First Artillery, Commanding Post.

* Omitted.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 1, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: Pursuant to your telegram of the 27th [26] which reached me via Chicago I proceeded to Camp Douglas to make inquiries in relation to the escape of prisoners of war and I have the honor to make the following report:

Colonel Tucker, the commanding officer, has two detectives whom he represents to be very reliable men, employed in the camp under the pretense of being prisoners to find out if possible the aiders in the escape of prisoners from the camp, but thus far he has only been able to learn that it was probably a sutler who was discharged some time ago who sold clothing to prisoners. Nothing has been learned of any person named Smith. I have directed that these inquiries should be persevered in till the trace of the guilty ones can be discovered.

There has been the greatest carelessness and willful neglect in the management of the affairs of the camp, and everything was left by Colonel Mulligan in a shameful state of confusion. It is reported to me that there is scarcely a record of any kind left at the camp and it will be difficult to ascertain what prisoners have been at the camp or what has become of them. Contrary to my instructions Colonel Mulligan’s regiment was first relieved, thus devolving the command on Colonel Cameron who knew nothing of the affairs of the prisoners, who in turn in a few days turned the command over to Colonel Tucker without being able to give him any information in regard to his duties. The police of the camp had been much neglected and was in a most deplorable condition, and from this and other causes much labor and large expenditures will be necessary to make the camp inhabitable. I have required a detailed report on the condition of affairs at the camp and on its receipt will report further.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[First indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 19, 1862.

The Adjutant-General will take such measures as may be needful to remedy the evils set forth in Colonel Hoffman’s letter.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

{p.112}

[Second indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 24, 1862.

The attention of Colonel Hoffman is called to the necessity of instituting immediately all proper measures to prevent the escape of prisoners.

Respectfully,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 1, 1862.

Hon. RICHARD YATES, Governor of Illinois.

GOVERNOR: Permit me to present to you Capt. H. W. Freedley, U. S. Army, my assistant, whom I have ordered to Camp Butler to make an inspection of the condition of the prisoners of war [and] aid the commanding officer with my authority in improving the state of affairs there. I have directed the captain to confer with you on the subject and any suggestions you may please to make will be carefully carried out.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 1, 1862.

Col. BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General, Saint Louis, Mo.

SIR: Your favor of the 25th ultimo is received. I will be obliged to you if you will carry out your suggestion and consolidate for this office the returns and rolls of all the prisoners of war in your charge, including civilians, at the stations west of the Mississippi and Keokuk and Mound City Hospitals. Citizens and soldiers should not be entered on the same rolls, though when they are at the same hospital and the number is small they may be entered on the same sheet, each class being arranged alphabetically by itself. The roll of citizens will embrace only those confined on political charges or for offenses in connection with the rebellion.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, July 1, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Third Infantry, U. S. Army:

You will immediately proceed to Camp Butler, near Springfield, Ill., and make a minute inspection of the condition of the prisoners of war confined there reporting to me by letter in detail. You will inquire how far the instructions contained in the accompanying letter addressed to the commanding officer of the camp have been carried out, and you will hand to the commanding officer the letter of instructions herewith inclosed which I desire may be put in immediate execution.

{p.113}

You will remain at the camp for a few days as my assistant to aid the commanding officer by your authority and advice in carrying out my views. In cases of doubt you will refer to me by letter.

At this time the camp is occupied by one regiment, the guard proper, and a battalion of cavalry organized for the field. I am of the opinion that the presence of temporary troops must be prejudicial to the good order of the camp. Inquire into this matter and report immediately.

I am told that a major is commanding while his senior, a lieutenant-colonel, is present. This anomaly in military affairs is in violation of the Articles of War and should not be permitted.

Please say to Governor Yates that I will be much obliged to him if he will appoint a colonel for the regiment at the camp to take command. The position is a very responsible one and requires a person of intelligence, decision and the highest integrity, and I am sure the State of Illinois will not be at a loss to furnish such a man.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[Inclosure.]

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 1, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill.

SIR: Capt. H. W. Freedley, Third Infantry, my assistant, will hand you a copy of a letter of instructions heretofore addressed to the commanding officer of Camp Butler, and in addition thereto you will please observe the following instructions:

You are held responsible for the security of the prisoners of war under your charge and will make such disposition of the force under your command and such arrangements of the prisoners in companies or divisions in the barracks as will best accomplish this purpose. The presence of the prisoners will be verified by daily roll calls, and every morning a report will be made in writing of each company showing the number present, the sick discharged, escaped and died, giving the names and particulars under the last three heads.

The fund of the prisoners’ hospital will be kept separate from that of the hospital of the guard and will be disbursed for the sole benefit of the sick prisoners on the recommendation of the surgeon in charge, approved by you.

A general fund will be created by withholding such part of the rations as may not be necessary, the surplus to be purchased by the commissary as provided for by existing regulations, and this fund will be disbursed under your directions in the purchase of such as may be necessary for the health and comfort of the prisoners, and which otherwise would have to be purchased by the Government. Among these articles are all table furniture, cooking utensils, articles for police purposes, bed-ticks and straw and the means of improving or enlarging the barrack accommodations. All such articles will be purchased on the requisition of [and] through the quartermaster, with your approbation. The extra pay of clerks who have charge of the letters and keep the accounts of the private funds deposited by prisoners may be paid from this fund. The commissary will be responsible for the funds, will keep the necessary accounts and will keep you advised from time to time of the amount on hand. A report of the state of this fund must be made to me on the last day of each month.

{p.114}

The sutler is entirely under your control and you will see that he furnishes proper articles and at reasonable rates, and you will impose a tax upon him for the privilege according to the amount of his trade. This tax will make part of the fund available for the prisoners’ benefit.

Visitors to the camp out of mere curiosity will in no case be permitted. Persons having business with the commanding officer or quartermaster may with the permission of the commanding officer enter the camp to remain only long enough to transact their business. When prisoners are seriously ill their nearest relatives, parents, brothers or sisters, if they are loyal people, may make them short visits.

All articles contributed by friends of the prisoners in whatever shape they come if proper to be received will be carefully distributed as the donors may request, such articles as are intended for the sick passing through the hands of the surgeon, who will be responsible for their proper use.

Prisoners will not be permitted to write letters of more than one page of common letter paper, the matter to be strictly of a private nature or the letter must be destroyed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Madison, Wis., July 1, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: The State of Wisconsin has on hand 1,073 jackets and 9,013 trousers of heavy gray twilled cottonade of excellent quality, a sample of which I inclose. These were procured for the use of troops mustered into the service of the United States but being of an unsuitable color have not been used. If you can with propriety relieve us of them for the use of prisoners I shall be pleased to sell them or deliver them to you, taking your receipt. The contract price was $4.17 for jacket and trousers.

Yours, respectfully,

W. W. TREDWAY, Quartermaster-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. BEN. LOAN, Commanding, Saint Joseph, Mo.

GENERAL: I am directed by Colonel Farrar, provost-marshal-general of the District of Missouri, to inform you that he has information that in the vicinity of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad and near Chillicothe large quantities of clothing are being made by the people, and that they represent that they are making it by the permission of the provost-marshal-general for the use of the prisoners at Alton. No such permission has been given them. The prisoners are abundantly supplied with the gray clothing on hand at the time the order of the Secretary of War was made requiring blue to be worn. There is no doubt they are making clothing for the rebel army, and I respectfully suggest that they be deprived of all clothing and material not necessary to their own use. Every day new evidences are given of preparations {p.115} on the part of the rebels to renew their war in Missouri and they can only be prevented from doing so by depriving them of the means.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THO. C. FLETCHER, Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.

GENERAL: Your communication of the 1st instant is just received. Soon after I took command of the forces at Norfolk by order of Major-General McClellan early in June I learned that General Viele was giving passes to women to go to Richmond to inquire into the condition of their relatives. I directed him immediately to discontinue the practice and am confident no pass has been given by him since. I will inquire and see that the rule of the department is not violated by any one.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, July 2, 1862.

General THOMAS, Tuscumbia:

The pass granted by Captain Greene to Colonel Bennett to go to General Halleck’s headquarters is not approved and must be revoked.

D. C. BUELL.

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MEMPHIS, July 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Where shall I send prisoners? There are now some thirty of the White River prisoners and others taken by our cavalry.

U. S. GRANT, Major-General.

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HDQRS. U. S. FORCES, HILTON HEAD, COCKSPUR, &C., Fort Pulaski, July 2, 1862.

Lieut. JAMES O. PAXSON, Forty-eighth New York State Volunteers:

You will proceed to-morrow morning by water with a flag of truce to the enemy’s lines taking in charge two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and Ashley M. Shaw, who were captured at the surrender of Fort Pulaski on the 11th day of April last and who are released by order of Major-General Hunter, commanding the Department of the South. You will be provided with a letter to the commanding officer at Fort Jackson and you will deliver it and the prisoners to the officer by whom you shall be received. You will also take charge of a number of letters addressed to persons residing in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, &c., a portion of which are from the prisoners captured at Pulaski; the remainder are from other persons. You will deliver none of these letters unless all are received and received with the understanding that subject to ordinary military inspection they are to be {p.116} forwarded to the persons to whom they are addressed whether they come from prisoners or others. Should it be required you will pay the postage on those letters which are not from the prisoners.

You will proceed in an open and public manner in strict conformity with the laws and usages governing flags of truce. Your party will consist of eight men, over whom you will exercise a careful supervision in order that they may give no information to the enemy. Should you be obliged to leave them you will caution them to hold no conversation with any person relative to military matters. Having accomplished the object of your mission you will return with all possible dispatch to this post.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED H. TERRY, Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES, HILTON HEAD, COCKSPUR, &C., Fort Pulaski, July 2, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fort Jackson, Savannah River:

The bearer of this, Lieut. James O. Paxson, of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York State Volunteers, is instructed to proceed to your lines under a flag of truce and there deliver to you two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and A. M. Shaw, who were captured at Fort Pulaski on the 11th of April last and who are now released by order of Major-General Hunter, commanding Department of the South.

Lieutenant Paxson has also in charge a number of letters addressed to persons residing in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, &c.

As far the larger portion of these letters are from prisoners of war captured at Pulaski-the others are from other persons-Lieutenant Paxson is instructed to deliver none of them unless all shall be received with the understanding that, subject to ordinary military inspection, they are to be forwarded to the persons to whom they are addressed.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED H. TERRY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL OF OHIO, Columbus, July 2, 1862.

WILLIAM H. VASSER, Prisoner of War, Johnson’s Island, Ohio:

Your letter of the 26th ultimo to the Governor has been referred to me. The arms taken from the prisoners at Camp Chase were so taken by order of the Secretary of War. They were lodged with me for safekeeping by order of the Governor. I have had them all carefully overhauled, packed and placed in the State arsenal. The saber you describe is among the number. I understand the Governor has no authority to make any disposition of them except by order of the Secretary of War or Colonel Hoffman. If you will procure an order from Colonel Hoffman (which I doubt not you can do through Major Pierson) I will take pleasure in making such disposition of the valued relics as you may wish.

GEO. B. WRIGHT, Quartermaster-General.

{p.117}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 2, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners, Sandusky City, Ohio.

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 27th ultimo inclosing the petition of Captain Handy. In reply I have to inform you that as he has been reported and is borne upon the rolls of this office as captain it cannot be here regarded that his rank in the rebel service is any other, and that before an application for his release can be considered it will be necessary that the claim to the position of surgeon asserted by him as his legitimate rank be fully established.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 2, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: All the prisoners under your charge are prisoners of war, some military and some civilians. In making up the roll for citizens under the headings, rank, regiment and company enter the town, county and State from which the prisoner comes. Your letter of the 30th ultimo is signed for you by your adjutant which is contrary to regulations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 2, 1862.

Maj. JOSEPH DARR, Jr., Provost-Marshal-General, Wheeling, Va.

MAJOR: Your letters of the 28th and 29th ultimo with their inclosures have been received. I judge from your letter of the 28th that there [are] a number of stations in your department where prisoners are held, civil and military, and I will be obliged to you if you will consolidate in your office the rolls and returns of all these stations. I refer to those south of the Ohio. The civil prisoners should be on separate rolls from the military and I wish the alphabetical list to be as comprehensive as possible, being at the same [time] in convenient shape for reference. The names of all those who come under the head of alterations on the return should accompany the monthly return unless a list of prisoners transferred, &c., has been furnished during the month, in which case a reference to it must be made on the back of the return. I don’t think it will be necessary to furnish lists of small changes except with the return. When you require blanks let me know and they will be furnished. I expect to be in Columbus in a few days and will telegraph to you to meet me there.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.118}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 3, 1862.

GEORGE GILBERT, Justice of the Peace, Watertown, Jefferson County, N. Y.:

Information has reached this Department that you have committed into custody on a charge of false imprisonment Lieut. William R. Parsons, on duty as a military officer in your county. Advise this Department at once of the name of the party alleged to have been falsely imprisoned and of the circumstances which led to such alleged action on the part of Lieutenant Parsons.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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CORINTH, July 3, 1862.

Major-General GRANT, Memphis:

Deliver to enemy’s line all your prisoners (not officers), except those guilty of treating barbarously our men, on parole not to serve until exchanged.

...

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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IN VICINITY OF BATTLE-FIELD OF JULY 1, Near James River, Thursday, July 3, 1862.

Brigadier-General STUART, Commanding, C. S. Army.

SIR: It is proper for me to state to you that while the U. S. Army was retreating during the night of the 1st of July it became known to me that a hospital depot containing over a hundred men too severely wounded to follow the army would be left without any care whatever.

I chose to remain with them to do what I could for them, and the following enlisted men (most of whom had been connected with the hospital department before) volunteered to remain with me and throw themselves upon the magnanimity of the Government of the Confederate States: C. B. McGrath, Company H, Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers; S. O’Grady, Company H, Sixty-seventh New York Volunteers; Charles Thompson, Company B, Twenty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers; George H. Kinsley, Company C, Sixty-seventh New York Volunteers; John C. Perkins, Company G, Sixty-seventh New York; John E. Banford Company B, Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers; George C. Hill, Company F, Ninety-eighth New York Volunteers; Corpl. H. Holliday, Company F, Ninety-eighth New York Volunteers; John Campbell, Company E, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Joshua Kendall, Company D, Nineteenth Massachusetts.

All but the first three of these and the fifth, making four in all, were taken from me yesterday as prisoners of war.

We are without food, and if attendants and food are not sent to us we must starve.

Respectfully, yours,

DAVID PRINCE, Brigade Surgeon, U. S. Volunteers.

{p.119}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 3, 1862.

C. A. ARTHUR, Inspector-General, New York City:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 23d ultimo in which you request information respecting the place of confinement of Surg. or Asst. Surg. Dabney Herndon, a rebel prisoner taken at Island No. 10. In reply I beg to inform you that the complete lists of the medical officers of the rebel army confined as prisoners of war have not been received at this office and I am consequently unable at present to comply with your request. It is probable, however, that the officer above mentioned has been released. Order of the Secretary of War required such disposition of commissioned medical officers.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 3, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.

SIR: The report* of Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, “relative to the accommodation of prisoners at Fort Delaware” referred from your office to the Quartermaster-General on the 24th ultimo, is respectfully returned herewith. Colonel Crosman, deputy quartermaster-general, Philadelphia, has been directed to carry out the suggestions of Colonel Hoffman so far as the Quartermaster’s Department is concerned.

By order:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

* Omitted here; see Hoffman to Stanton, June 15, with indorsements, p. 23.

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JULY 3, 1862.

Col. D. D. TOMPKINS, Assistant Quartermaster-General, New York.

COLONEL: You will please cause the suggestions contained in a letter from Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, to the Secretary of War, referred through the Adjutant-General’s Office to the Quartermaster-General, as embraced in the inclosed extract therefrom, to be carried out.

By order:

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

[Inclosure.]

Extract from a letter of Col. William Hoffman, dated New York City, June 17, 1862, to the Secretary of War:

Governor’s Island is better adapted for the reception of prisoners than any place in the interior and I would respectfully suggest that sheds for the accommodation of 5,000 he erected there immediately. The cost of transportation thence to an {p.120} inland camp would go far toward covering the expense of the buildings. I would respectfully suggest also that bunks be put in Castle William for the accommodation of prisoners confined there. By this means more can be provided for there and good police and health will be promoted. Of course they would be so arranged as to be easily removed.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 3, 1862.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE H. CROSMAN, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

COLONEL: Inclosed is a copy of a report* to the Secretary of War relative to the accommodations of prisoners at Fort Delaware, referred to this office through the Adjutant-General U. S. Army. You will carry out the suggestions of Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, contained in this report, as far as the Quartermaster’s Department is concerned.

By order:

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

* Omitted here; see Hoffman to Stanton, June 15, with indorsements, p. 23.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 3, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: The following is a copy of a telegram this day sent you, viz:

Telegram of this date received. We have more than enough irregular clothing fit only for prisoners.

By order:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Delaware, Del., July 3, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: The necessity for clothing begins to be pressing; therefore I would suggest that the following be furnished for future distribution: 1,000 blouses (or any substitute), 500 blankets, 1,000 shirts, 500 shoes (pairs), 300 caps (or any substitute), 1,000 pants.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. GIBSON, Captain, Second Artillery, Commanding.

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Col. James A. Mulligan’s charges against First Lieut. Patrick Higgins, of the Twenty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteers.

JUDGE-ADVOCATE’S OFFICE, Washington, July 3, 1862.

The fact alleged is agreeing for money to aid two prisoners of war to escape. It is here charged, first, as violation of the fifty-sixth article {p.121} of war, and second, as treasonable conduct and aid and comfort to the enemy. The second is not laid under any article of war. Treason as such of either sort is not cognizable by a court-martial.

The fifty-sixth article of war is:

Whosoever shall relieve the enemy with money, victuals or ammunition, or shall knowingly harbor or protect an enemy, &c.

This act is none of these. Had the accused in fact aided the escape it might according to the circumstances be an act of harboring and protecting an enemy.

The next matter of this kind within the purview of the articles of war is the holding correspondence with or giving intelligence to the enemy. Fifty-seventh article. This conspiring to aid a prisoner’s escape is not that. And the offense is not I think one of the enumerated offenses, but falls as a breach of discipline under the ninety-ninth article and as a disgraceful violation of duty under the eighty-third. I should therefore charge: First, violation of duty to the prejudice of good order and military discipline; specification, in concerting and conspiring to aid the escape of - -, prisoner of war; and second, conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman; specification, in entering into a corrupt and disgraceful plot to aid for money the escape of - -, prisoner of war, at -, on -.

Respectfully submitted.

J. F. LEE, Judge-Advocate.

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PRISON No. 3, MESS No. 1, Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, July 3, 1862.

Hon. HORACE MAYNARD.

DEAR SIR: I am a prisoner at Camp Chase, Ohio, and I feel myself a loyal man, if I could have hope [helped] myself, but I am here and wish to let you know that I was not persuaded into it, but actually driven in, as all the violators of the Confederacy were, or hung, or imprisoned. I as well as many other Union men of East Tennessee joined a company of Union home guard, gotten up by J. S. Lamb, in the Fourth District of Knox County, Tenn. I drilled with them and expressed my honest sentiments for the Union and Constitution, and for Andrew Johnson, Horace Maynard, [William G.] Brownlow and T. A. R. Nelson. I have the pleasure to announce to you that I voted for the Union three times and would have done so again and again had I had the opportunity; but, alas, we have been overrun by a military despotism that prevailed in East Tennessee for over twelve months; but after the August election had done all that I could at the ballot box for the Union,and J. S. Lamb and some others saw it plain by Governor Harris’ and Zollicoffer’s proclamation that we were bound to be oppressed. They gathered all they could and made an effort to cross Cumberland Mountains to Kentucky to join the U. S. Army, but we were defeated by the secesh soldiers and several prisoners taken. I got back home and kept myself hid for some time, and though all was over, I was surrounded and notified that those who were engaged in trying to get to the U. S. Army would be hunted up, and if they refused to go into service would be “sent up”-a phrase to mean shooting, hanging, or imprisonment, for they said that they would join the Union Army. I therefore consented to go into a company of sappers and miners, as I was informed it was to work and not to fight, with the intention if I had any chance to {p.122} escape and get to the Union Army; and four of us boys of the same company had entered into a secret covenant, as soon as we were sure that the Union forces were near enough we would go to them and leave Mr. Secesh. Our names are as follows: J. S. Lamb, Calvin Garrett, William Martin, and myself, Joel B. Crawford. We were taken before we knew they were so near. I send this to you and I wish you as my friend to do the best you can for me. I am willing to take any oath that the War Department may require.

I am, respectfully, yours,

JOEL B. CRAWFORD.

I know most of the above statements to be true, as Crawford is a neighbor of mine.

J. S. LAMB.

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FROM PRISON No. 3, MESS NO. 1, Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, July 3, 1862.

Hon. HORACE MAYNARD, Washington, D. C.:

We, the undersigned, wish to give you as full account of the cause as possible of our being prisoners in Camp Chase, as we were Union men, as J. S. Lamb has already referred to us as his “Union fellow-sufferers in East Tennessee,” by the secesh military despotism that reigned for some time in our country. We know you and our fathers were your warm supporters as well as Union lovers, and so would we have done the same, but William Martin was too young to vote. I did myself, Calvin Garrett. I know you are acquainted with our fathers, Reuben Garrett and Jonathan Martin, that live (Garrett) on the top of Copper Ridge and Martin at the foot of the same, Union County, Tenn., on the road leading from Knoxville to Maynardville, Tenn. We were with Joseph S. Lamb when he started to cross Cumberland Mountains to join the U. S. Army, but as J. S. Lamb has already informed you we were stopped by the secesh army and defeated, but we made the second attempt and again found we could not go through. We got home and were about to be taken. We scouted in the ridges for some time. We were informed that if we would give ourselves up and agree to go into the service we would not be hurt. As we saw no other prospect, by their giving us our choice of company and some time to choose we agreed to it and put off the time as long as we could and finding no possible way to get out of it we concluded to go into a company of sappers and miners, as we were informed that that company was to work and not to light. We had concluded to enter that company, and if any possible chance offered, if the Federal Army got close to us, we would desert and go to the Union Army. Four of us boys had entered into that covenant secretly ourselves. The names are Calvin Garrett, William Martin, Joseph S. Lamb and Joel B. Crawford. We would not wish you to publish this to the world, for if we are safely discharged from here our secesh neighbors would kill us secretly. The prisoners, some of them that are here, have threatened, particularly if an exchange takes place, that J. S. Lamb and Martin are to go up, Martin for conducting the Union boys to camp where Lamb was waiting on the sick when I (Garrett) was taken, and for telling them that there were two horses and some Union boys who would be glad to go with them, and J. S. Lamb for going and getting the powder and giving it to them in order as he said to defeat the secesh pursuit; and none of us four ever wish, as you and the War Department may judge, to be exchanged. {p.123} We wish to be discharged by taking any oath that the Department may require. We send this to you and wish you to read and lay it before the War Department, and if you can do us any good we will be under all obligations to you.

We subscribe ourselves, your obedient friends,

CALVIN GARRETT. WILLIAM MARTIN.

I know a number of the above statements to be true, and have no doubt of any, for such were common in East Tennessee.

J. S. LAMB.

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FORT MONROE, July 4, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Five hundred and thirty-three prisoners have just arrived, among them several colonels and majors. Where shall I send them? We have no room here. They are waiting on board transport.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 4, 1862.

Lieut. C. D. MEHAFFEY, First Infantry, Aide-de-Camp to General Porter, &c.

SIR: Pursuant to instructions received from the War Department dated July 4, 1862, a copy of which is herein inclosed, you will proceed with the prisoners of war and their present guard to Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, delivering the said prisoners to the commanding officer thereof. This done you will return without delay with the guard to the headquarters Army of the Potomac. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation.

By command of Major-General Dix:

D. T. VAN BUREN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

WASHINGTON, July 4, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Send the 533 prisoners to Colonel Loomis, commanding Fort Columbus, New York Harbor.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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FORT HAMILTON, N. Y., July 4, 1862.

The PRESIDENT, Commander-in-Chief of the Army:

On this day the anniversary of the Nation’s Independence I find myself a prisoner under the folds of the flag of the Union, the same flag under which I have passed my life in the service of the country. Last year on this anniversary my face was fanned by the rush of rebel bullets, and the brave troops under my command drove rebellion from ten miles of the length of the Potomac, freeing thousands of loyal citizens from the yoke of that rebellion. I am utterly unconscious of any act, word or design of mine which should make me to-day less eligible to an {p.124} honorable place among the soldiers of the Union than I was on that day, or any other day of my past life, and I deem it my duty to state this now when the country seems to need the services of its every willing soldier.

Very respectfully, I am, Your Excellency’s most obedient servant,

CHAS. P. STONE, Brigadier-General.

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SENATOBIA, MISS., July 4, 1862.

Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT, U. S. Army, Memphis, Tenn.

GENERAL: I send this letter by George Allen, a private of Company B, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, U. S. Army, who was picked up by one of my Missourians near the Mississippi River on Tuesday last. I have paroled him until exchanged and hope you will send some one of our men for him, and believe that even if you pick out the poorest in the lot that I will cheat you in the trade. We have neither whisky nor ice to have a very gay celebration to-day, neither have we powder to waste, but the news from Richmond makes us jovial enough.

Yours, most respectfully,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON, Brigadier-General, Missouri State Guard, on Special Service for Confederate States of America.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 4, 1862.

General W. W. TREADWAY, Quartermaster-General of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.

GENERAL: I have referred your proposition to sell certain cottonade clothing to the United States for the use of prisoners of war to the Quartermaster-General who informs me that the department has now on hand an ample supply of clothing only fit to be issued to prisoners and he declines purchasing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HUNTSVILLE, ALA., July 4, 1862.

Col. J. B. FRY, Chief of Staff.

COLONEL: I inclose herewith two letters received yesterday from Brigadier-General Cox which place me in an embarrassing situation. Their contents will inform you of the manner in which the difficulty occurred. I therefore submit the whole matter to you for advice, requesting only that I may be relieved from duty and permitted to visit the city of Washington to facilitate my exchange. I would thank General Buell very kindly for a letter to the War Department in my behalf. Please do me the favor to consider this matter as early as possible.

Respectfully, yours,

JESSE S. NORTON, Colonel, Commanding Twenty-first Ohio Infantry.

{p.125}

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO, July 4, 1862.

The reply of General Cox to General Wise seems to have broken off the arrangement for the exchange of Colonel Norton, leaving him still a prisoner of war. I have therefore relieved him from duty and now refer the case to such authority as may be proper to dispose of it. He is an officer of merit and is anxious for an exchange, which I hope will be sanctioned.

Respectfully,

D. C. BUELL, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE KANAWHA, Flat Top Mountain, June 25, 1862.

Col. J. S. NORTON, Twenty-first Ohio.

MY DEAR SIR: I yesterday received a letter* from Col. George S. Patton, Twenty-second Virginia Regiment of the rebel army, which to my great surprise claims that your exchange never was perfected. He asserts that in March last he was exchanged for Colonel Lee, Colonel Cogswell or Colonel Wood, of our Army, which of the three he is not certain. The other particulars of his claim in this matter you will find stated in a letter from myself to General Thomas, of which I inclose a copy. I have written to the Adjutant-General in order to have the matter promptly corrected if Colonel Patton is right in his statement, as otherwise it might cause you trouble should the chances of war ever put you in the rebels’ power; and besides this I know your own sense of honor would make you very desirous to leave no possible question on the subject.

Assuring you that I remember our brief acquaintance with great pleasure, and hoping for a renewal of it at some future day,

I remain, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. COX, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* For Patton’s correspondence, see Vol. III, this Series, p. 414.

[Sub-inclosure.]

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE KANAWHA, VIRGINIA, Flat Top Mountain, June 25, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.

GENERAL: A letter received yesterday called my attention to a matter which I have the honor to lay before you as it seems to call for some action to prevent the possibility of injury to a very meritorious officer in our service. On the 17th of July last, in the action at Scary Creek, on Kanawha River, Col. Jesse S. Norton, of the Twenty-first Ohio Volunteers, and Col. George S. Patton, of the rebel army (Twenty-second Virginia Regiment), were both seriously wounded and both made prisoners by reason of their injuries being so severe as to prevent their removal. Colonel Norton was first taken, but the Confederate Army being obliged to abandon the position next day both he and Colonel Patton were left in the neighborhood, where they were found by our troops. At the time I understood that Colonel Norton was paroled with the understanding that the same would be done with Colonel Patton, the arrangement being made between Colonel Norton and General {p.126} Wise. Colonel Norton was soon removed to Ohio, and when Colonel Patton improved sufficiently to allow of his removal he was permitted to pass through the lines to his home in Eastern Virginia. He recovered some time before Colonel Norton did, and General Wise sent me a letter by a flag of truce insisting that Colonel Patton should not be regarded as being under parole, but that a complete exchange was made at the time he had his interview with Colonel Norton. I regarded this as an attempt to avoid the parole and to get Colonel Patton on duty whilst Colonel Norton’s position was still doubtful or unknown to me, and I replied that I had Colonel Patton’s written parole, and had understood that Colonel Norton’s was given in like manner; that under these circumstances I could take no further notice of the thing, leaving both officers to have the exchange made through proper channels, the question of exchanges not having been then settled by the United States Government. Colonel Norton upon his recovery resumed his command, the exchange being completed in due form as I supposed, but as his regiment had been removed from my command to Kentucky I had no means of knowing the particulars in regard to it. I now have a letter from Colonel Patton, which is dated in April, stating that he observed his parole until March, 1862, when he was regularly exchanged for another officer, not Colonel Norton. If this be so it would place Colonel Norton in the embarrassing position of serving while his parole is in force which he most assuredly has not done knowingly. If some other officer has been exchanged for Colonel Patton cannot Colonel Norton be relieved from his position by the release of an officer of equal rank, the mistake being thus corrected? If the chances of war should put Colonel Norton in the power of the enemy his position would be a difficult one, since it is manifest that they now claim that he is not exchanged. I shall send him a copy of this letter to call his attention to the claim set up and hope it may be at once arranged so as to have no contingency in his case.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. COX, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, Camp Morton, July 4, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN.

DEAR SIR: Having succeeded Colonel Owen in the command of this post about two weeks since I deem it proper to inform you that in looking over the affairs of the post I think there are matters which require your presence here. I allude chiefly to the peculiar cases of several prisoners confined here, and also the condition of the prisoners’ fund, of which General Love informs me you know.

Your obedient servant,

D. G. ROSE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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CHICAGO, July 4, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN.

DEAR SIR: Owing to the fact that Captain Wormer refused to pay me my mileage from Saint Paul to Mackinac I have been unable to call upon you at Detroit. I hereby send you copies of requests which {p.127} I made whilst acting in my official capacity at Mackinac. I do so in order that you may compare them to the ex parte statements of Captain Wormer. Since I have been in the service of the United States Government I have not had any difficulty with any officer before now and have on all occasions endeavored to discharge my duties faithfully. On arriving there I found the hired surgeon had to sleep in the hospital, as the surgeon’s quarters were occupied by Lieutenant Sutton. The cook-stove belonging to the hospital had been taken away and was used by the officers, and because I endeavored to discharge my duty as the Army Regulations demand it I have met with their displeasure. I have not been made acquainted with the character of the charges made against me, and if it is not improper for me to request you to do me the honor of writing me in answer to this I shall be under great obligations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. W. LE BOUTILLIER.

Address, C. W. Le Boutillier, Saint Anthony, Minn.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

FORT MACKINAC, June 2, 1862.

General HAMMOND, Surgeon-General U. S. Army:

In compliance with Special Orders, No. 102, I have reported myself for duty to Captain Wormer, commandant of this post. Having made suggestions to him on the subject of the health of the prisoners under his charge and he having declined compliance therewith I would respectfully request to be instructed by the department.

I remain, your obedient servant,

C. W. LE BOUTILLIER, Assistant Surgeon First Minnesota and Post Surgeon.

JUNE 25, 1862.

Explanation.-I came here without instructions; found only three prisoners; treated them as I thought the department wanted me to; found that they had no rations issued to them, not even water.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Captain WORMER, Commandant.

SIR: I consider that prisoner Michael Delaney ought to have a respite of one hour in every four. I informed the officer of the day (Lieutenant Sutton) that I considered it necessary for the health of the prisoner that he should have that time of repose, and he having declined compliance therewith I would respectfully ask you that my suggestion be carried out.

Explanation.-Delaney struck one of his comrades with his fist. He was ordered by the captain to carry twenty-four pound cannon-balls. He did so for three hours when I ascertained that he was exhausted and wet to the skin. (It was raining.) He was released at 3.30 o’clock, having carried them seven hours with only one-half hour respite which I ordered the sergeant of the guard to grant him.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT, Fort Mackinac, June 20, 1862.

Lieutenant SUTTON, Commanding Officer of Post.

SIR: I would request you to remove the guard now stationed on the porch of the hospital as I consider it dangerous to have a sentry with {p.128} loaded piece upon this beat, and also would respectfully inform you that accidents such as breaking the hygrometer and willful mutilation of the hospital by the sentries have occurred. The patients too complain that they cannot sleep at night from the noise created by the marching of the sentry upon his beat.

Answer of Lieutenant Sutton: “The sentry will remain there.”

Explanation-This guard was posted there in front of the hospital on the balcony, and my patients were not allowed to go to the privy without being accompanied or passed by a corporal of the guard, and yet the rear of the building was left unguarded so that any of them could escape at all times if they desired.

[Inclosure No. 4.]

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT, Fort Mackinac, June 25, 1862.

Lieut. E. F. SUTTON.

SIR: Having requested you verbally to give me the countersign, and as you refused to comply, I as surgeon of this post demand it.

C. W. LE BOUTILLIER, Post Surgeon.

Explanation.-I was not permitted to have the countersign because the officer (Lieutenant Sutton) did not see the necessity of a surgeon having it.

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PRISON No. 3, MESS No. 1, Camp Chase, Ohio, July 4, 1862.

Col. C. W. B. ALLISON:

Every man that loves liberty and Washington loves also the Stars and Stripes and the 4th of July. The emblem that is on this note I want to triumphantly again wave over this land of rebellion, and I would be glad to help wave it through the breezes of East Tennessee where I live, and my friends would greet me and hail the happy event. Oh, how welcome is the old flag to a goodly number of the People of my native home, East Tennessee! If it is consistent I would be very glad to enter the service of the United States. I will send you my letter that I received from Mr. Maynard, and as you say that you are personally acquainted with Hon. Horace Maynard of course you know him to be an independent, not disposed to flatter and no warm feelings for rebellion, but can did, always meaning just what he says. You will find that he assures me that he will do all in his power to secure my release, which of course if he had not known me to be a Union man he would not have put himself to any trouble for a rebel. He also informs me in the same that the military operations were very exciting and employs the whole attention, but said in conclusion, “However, I think that arrangements will soon be completed for your discharge.” I feel myself; sir, under many obligations to you for your kind reply of the 2d and information I received from you. In compliance I wrote at large and sent to the War Department through the hands of Mr. Maynard. You will please send me back my letter from Mr. Maynard and do not think me troublesome. If you wish to examine me by cross-questions I am at your service; and also here are the other prisoners who can testify to the most I have written to you. I am ever a friend to you and all Union-loving men.

J. S. LAMB.

An interview with you will satisfy you.

{p.129}

[Inclosure.]

WASHINGTON, May 12, 1862.

Mr. J. S. LAMB.

DEAR SIR: I received your letter and laid the matter before the War Department You may be assured that I will do all in my power to secure your release and enable you to go home. The military operations just now are very exciting and occupy the whole attention of the Department. I think, however, that arrangements will soon be completed for your discharge.

I am, very truly, yours,

HORACE MAYNARD.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 5, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 1st instant relating to proposed improvements at Camp Douglas and your telegram of the 4th calling attention thereto have been received. I cannot approve the expenditure involved in the improvements suggested in your letter. Ten thousand men should certainly be able to keep this camp clean, and the United States has other uses for its money than to build water-works to save them the labor necessary to their health.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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HDQRS. U. S. FORCES, HILTON HEAD, COCKSPUR, &C., Fort Pulaski, July 5, 1862.

Maj. CHARLES G. HALPINE, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the South:

I have the honor to report that in obedience to instructions received from the major-general commanding the Department of the South I this morning sent Lieut. James O. Paxson, of the Forty-eighth Regiment New York Volunteers, with a flag of truce to the enemy’s lines on the Savannah River. Lieutenant Paxson had in charge the two prisoners of war, Antonio Ponce, jr., and Ashley M. Shaw, captured at this place on the 11th of April, whom I was directed to send to Savannah, the letters which I received from you and a large number of letters, most of them written by persons taken at Pulaski and which have been in my possession since the fall of the fort. Lieutenant Paxson was instructed to deliver all of these letters or none. He proceeded up the river until halted by the rebel outpost on the west bank of Saint Augustine Creek; he was there detained until the arrival of a commissioned officer to whom he delivered the persons and the letters. No objection was made to the reception of these letters. Having accomplished the object of the flag he returned to this post.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALFRED H. TERRY, Brigadier-General.

{p.130}

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NASHVILLE, TENN., July 5, 1862.

Col. J. B. FRY:

Your dispatch is received in reference to Lieutenant-Colonel Bennett. I gave him a pass to go and see General Halleck and effect an exchange. He was paroled by General Mitchel and granted the privilege by him of endeavoring to effect an exchange. He was placed on a peculiar parole. He was found lying dangerously ill and delirious at the house of a friend and the written parole left for him to observe when he should have returned to his senses. He observed the parole although of course not binding, and I was desirous he might effect his exchange; but I never intended he should visit General Halleck’s headquarters in the field. At the time he left it was understood that General Halleck’s headquarters were at Memphis.

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 5, 1862.

J. COOPER MCKEE, Assistant Surgeon, Camp Butler, Ill.

SIR: Your communication of the 30th ultimo in which you recommend the release under parole of certain sick prisoners confined at Camp Butler has been received. In reply I am directed by Colonel Hoffman to state that he is authorized to grant the release of sick prisoners upon their application for a pardon, approved by the surgeon in charge, in extreme cases; but that paroles for prisoners in charge of the surgeon will not be entertained by him under any other circumstances and only then in cases when in his judgment it would in every respect be proper to grant them.

With the highest respect, I am, sir, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 5, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I arrived here on the evening of the 3d instant, having been delayed at Toledo for nearly twelve hours, the trains not making connection. I visited Camp Butler on the morning of the 4th instant and found affairs there in some confusion consequent upon the Sixty-eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, the guard of the prisoners, having been relieved from further duty there and ordered to proceed to Virginia. There remained at the camp a portion of the Seventieth Regiment Illinois Infantry and a portion of the Second Regiment of Artillery, two regiments now in process of formation at the camp. These regiments are perfectly inexperienced troops; have not been drilled, and the majority of the men have only been enlisted for a few days. I do not know the exact number of enlisted men in camp for guard duty, but there are about 600, and is constantly being increased by the arrival of recruits.

With regard to the instructions heretofore given to the commanding officer of Camp Butler I find that they have only been partially carried out. The improvements in the hospitals therein referred to have been {p.131} made and a most admirable system of police has been established in them. The loss by death has decreased at least 70 per cent. The general health of the prisoners is good. The police of the camp has been much improved, but the scarcity of wagons and teams has prevented the prisoners from keeping their company parade-grounds and the vicinity of their quarters (barracks) in the condition most to be desired. At least six additional wagons and teams are required for the proper police of the camp. Some necessary articles for cooking and police purposes are still required, but can be procured here by requisition or purchase.

With regard to the saving of surplus rations I find that this has been neglected and there is no fund for the purpose of purchasing necessary articles of comfort or of subsistence of the prisoners not supplied by the Government. It appears that the prisoners have been receiving their rations from the contractors and exchanging with the contractors such portions of the rations as they could dispense with for such other articles not forming part of the Government ration as they most needed. This has been done in many cases without the cognizance of the officers in charge. The commissary has not given his personal attention to this matter. The commissary has not been residing in the camp, but I have requested his presence there to-morrow and this matter will be thoroughly investigated. The result will be in my next.

I have visited the camp every day since my arrival but have been unable to accomplish much on account of the change of the guard. It appears that the guard have been changed so often, and are under the charge of different persons who have somewhat conflicted in authority that the instructions heretofore given have not been so strictly observed as might be desired. Maj. J. G. Fonda has been placed personally in command of the camp and of the guard of the prisoners, and is now using and will use his best endeavors to have your instructions strictly complied with. I have daily consulted and advised with him regarding the manner of conducting the camp.

The presence of temporary troops is prejudicial to the good order of the camp and to the comfort and security of the prisoners. The constant desire of new troops to communicate with the prisoners and their curiosity to see and barter with them contributes much to the relaxation of discipline and to inspiring improper feelings of jealousy and revenge, thus rendering the position of the prisoners and the guard more unpleasant.

A guard should be permanently established here. I shall consult Governor Yates on this subject upon his return.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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U. S. SENATE, Washington, July 6, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to inclose a letter from Governor Kirkwood covering one from J. B. Dorr, quartermaster of the Twelfth Iowa Regiment. I respectfully and earnestly request that the subject may receive the favorable consideration and action of your Department.

Your obedient servant,

JAMES W. GRIMES.

{p.132}

[Indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 17, 1862.

General Orders, No. 72 (copy* inclosed), provides for our soldiers on parole. In regard to the exchange of those in the hands of the enemy it is believed steps have been taken such as the Secretary deems proper.

Respectfully submitted.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* Omitted here; see p. 94.

[Inclosure.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, June 21, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, Washington.

DEAR SIR: Inclosed find copy of letter from J. B. Dorr which explains itself. Governor Kirkwood is disabled from writing, and directs me to inclose this copy to you and ask you to bring all the influence of our delegation in Congress to the relief of these men. Other letters are received of the same import of this, and the Governor does not feel that it is necessary to keep these men in their present uncomfortable position.

He would call especial attention to the fate of our officers still in rebel hands as peculiarly hard and deserving of the most active efforts for their relief. Will you not press this matter upon the authorities at Washington with all the influence in your power?

Respectfully, yours,

N. H. BRAINARD, Military Secretary, &c.

[Sub-inclosure.]

NASHVILLE, TENN., June 11, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor State of Iowa.

DEAR SIR: Lieut. John Elwell, of Company E, Twelfth Iowa, and myself made our escape from prison at Montgomery, Ala., on the 24th ultimo and reached Huntsville on the 28th, from which place to this city we accompanied 1,450 paroled privates, among which were 141 of the Twelfth, 200 of the Fourteenth, 230 of the Eighth and a number of the Third, Sixth, Seventh, Eleventh, Fifteenth and Sixteenth Iowa Regiments, all captured at Shiloh. These men are now detained here in camp, having at present very unhealthy and uncomfortable quarters, waiting for orders from General Halleck. To-day within the hour I have learned that orders have been received from General Buell to put them into another camp and require them to do guard duty and drill. They have received clothing, yet they are very indignant that they are not allowed to go farther west if they are to be retained in camp, or if compelled to perform military duty that they are not allowed to return to their regiments. Exhausted and worn out with two months’ imprisonment upon starving rations they feel that they should be allowed a short respite from the duties of a soldier and that if they are to be kept at any point for the purpose of exchange they should be sent to some point nearer home. With few exceptions all are willing to continue in the service when honorably released from parole forced upon them by the alternative of death by disease or starvation in a Southern prison, but deem it an infraction of their obligation to be required to perform guard duty in this latitude where the only enemies of the {p.133} United States are the adherents of the Southern Confederacy. But whether their feelings are reasonable or unreasonable they earnestly desire you to intercede in their behalf and procure for them removal to some point farther west and a speedy exchange or a prompt discharge from the service.

Some 600 more paroled privates are daily expected here, which will include the balance of the Iowa troops captured at Shiloh, making a total of 300 of the Fourteenth and 340 of the Twelfth, for whom also I trust you will use your influence with the Government. I need not say to you that these men performed their duty as soldiers at Shiloh. The Iowa brigade maintained its position, driving back the enemy, until after 5 p.m., and was ordered to fall back with no enemy in view of its front. Nor did the remainder of the Twelfth and Fourteenth surrender until they found themselves surrounded by 15,000 troops and after every other regiment in that part of the field had retreated or surrendered.

But there is another subject to which I earnestly beg Your Excellency’s attention. Two hundred and fifty commissioned officers taken at Shiloh are now at Selma, Montgomery, Ala., and Macon, Ga. Among them are the company commissioned and non-commissioned officers of the Fourteenth and Twelfth and the regimental officers of the Fourteenth and Eighth, as well as officers of several other regiments, including Major Stone and Colonel Geddes. These men are receiving less than one-fourth rations of a private in the U. S. Army, and are subjected to all the hardships and indignities which venomous traitors can heap upon them. They are without money or clothing, and a large number of them at Montgomery are imprisoned in a foul and vermin-abounding cotton shed. They are desirous for their discharge, and if bravery and cool and determined behavior deserves it none are more deserving of it than these Iowa men.

Will you not interfere with the President and General Halleck in their behalf? I should have written you before, but expecting to leave here every day I intended to report to you in person. Having experienced the tender mercies of the rebels I beg of you that you will exert yourself for these brave and meritorious men.

Were the officers of the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth exchanged (and men) the three regiments could take the field with little delay. Excuse this hasty letter. I am quite unwell and hardly able to even write.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. DORR, Quartermaster Twelfth Iowa.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 6, 1862.

I. The following-named officers of the volunteer force of the United States recently escaped from the military prison at Macon, Ga., will proceed to Washington and report in person to the Adjutant-General: Henry W. Mays, first lieutenant, Ninth Kentucky; N. J. Camp, second lieutenant, Twenty-third Missouri; George W. Brown, second lieutenant, Twenty-third Missouri; George H. Logan, second lieutenant, Company I, Fourteenth Iowa; John S. Agey, first lieutenant, Company D, Fourteenth Iowa; I. N. Rhodes, second sergeant, Company I, Fourteenth Iowa; Milton Rhodes, third sergeant, Company I, Fourteenth {p.134} Iowa, Maj. James Belger, quartermaster, U. S. Army, will furnish the necessary transportation.

...

By command of Major-General Wool:

WM. D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, DABB’S HOUSE, Near Richmond, Va., July 6, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I have been directed by the Secretary of War of the Confederate States to inform you that it is reported in the journals of the United States that Mr. William B. Mumford, of New Orleans, and Col. John L. Owen, of the Missouri State Guard, have been executed by the U. S. authorities-Mr. Mumford for having pulled down the U. S. flag in New Orleans and Colonel Owen upon a charge of bridge burning in Missouri. The former is stated to have been hung, the latter to have been shot.

Mr. Mumford, we are informed, pulled down the flag before the Federal forces had acquired possession of the city. The U. S. vessels were anchored before it and a demand for its surrender had been made but not complied with, the party that hoisted the flag having retired. Under these circumstances if true the execution of Mr. Mumford is considered as a murder of one of our citizens. I inclose the account of his execution from the New Orleans Delta.

Colonel Owen, it appears from the account given in the Missouri papers, as you will perceive from the inclosed slip, was shot without trial. He was a commissioned officer of the Second Division of the Missouri State Guard. Individuals have been put to death by the authority of the Confederate Government for burning bridges within its territory, and persons in military service coming disguised within its lines to destroy railroads have also been executed, but they have had a fair trial. If Colonel Owen entered your lines in disguise we cannot deny your right to try and punish him. But his execution without trial is not considered justifiable, and should he have acted in obedience to orders and not have been in disguise his execution is looked upon as murder.

Supposing then Mr. Mumford to have been executed for an insult to the U. S. flag hoisted in a city not in their possession and Colonel Owen to have been executed without trial the Confederate Government deems it to be its duty to call on the authorities of the United States for a statement of the facts, inasmuch as it is not intended to permit outrages of such a character to be perpetrated without retaliation.

Hoping that no necessity may arise for such a course, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General.

[Inclosures-Newspaper snips.]

THE LINCOLNITES IN MISSOURI MURDER A SECESSIONIST.

The following is from the Hannibal (Mo.) Herald of June 10:

Information was brought into camp at Palmyra on Saturday last that Col. John L. Owen, a notorious rebel who has made himself conspicuous in burning bridges, cars and depots, firing into passenger trains, last summer and fall, was secreted at or near {p.135} his farm in Monroe. A detachment from Company A, Eleventh Regiment Missouri State Militia (Colonel Lipscomb), under command of Lieutenant Donahoo, was immediately sent out from Palmyra to hunt the outlaw. On approaching the farm of Colonel Owen en Sunday about 12 m. the squad discovered a negro running rapidly from the house toward a piece of brush. The lieutenant and his company immediately started for the brush and going into it discovered the game and soon bagged it. At first the colonel showed a determination to resist his capture, but finding such a proceeding useless he yielded. Preparations were made for his execution. He begged the soldiers to take him prisoner. They informed him that “taking prisoners” was played out. They then placed him upon a stump in front of a file of soldiers and at the word of command eight bullets pierced the body of the rebel, killing him instantly.

Thus has ended the career of a notorious bushwhacker and outlaw. He has met the just retribution of his damning crimes.

THE EXECUTION IN NEW ORLEANS.

The miserable hireling Butler is playing the tyrant with a high hand. His savage instincts are far ahead of the most ferocious native of Dahomey or Patagonia. A week or two since as our readers have already been informed he had William B. Mumford executed for tearing down the flag hoisted on the Mint by Commodore Farragut. He died as a patriot should die-with great coolness and self-possession. An instant before he passed into the presence of his Maker he was calm in his demeanor and on his countenance could be found no trace of the ordeal he was passing through.

Commenting upon the execution the black-hearted scribbler in The Delta has the following remarks which we copy because it speaks the sentiment of the Nero Butler and to show the vapid and sickening stuff now in the once eloquent Southern Delta:

“Mumford, the ill-starred youth whose name and fate will be a terror to all who are inclined to trifle with the Government or its sacred emblems in time to come, justly received the reward of his treason and madness in the presence of thousands of spectators as announced in The Delta of last evening. So far as one knowledge extends in the matter it is the first instance upon record of a man being tried, found guilty and executed for laying violent hands upon our national flag, and the lesson it conveys is a solemn and we trust will prove a salutary one. Mumford though standing only as a representative of parties equally guilty at heart as himself had the misfortune to mingle a little more rashness with his treasonable intents than some of his traitor associates and paid the penalty with his worthless life. It is perhaps of very little importance whether this individual so depraved in his nature, so lost to all sense of patriotism and love of country, be dead or alive, and the recompense of forfeiture which he made in the sacrifice of personal existence is in no degree a compensation for the insult which he offered a great and magnanimous people by basely trampling their noble ensign underfoot; and the thousands who witnessed the exit of this miserable person from a life he had disgraced must have learned if they had need of such a lesson that it is most dangerous to set at defiance a Government that from its very nature is self-protecting and will at all hazards and under all circumstances vindicate itself and avenge the insult offered its flag. Deluded men may have flattered themselves that because a rabble or mob sometimes rules within the narrow limits of some important town or corporation that there is no power under the Government sufficiently potent to arrest their mad career when their high-handed wickedness extends to a violation of symbols sacred to a great and powerful nation, but the example of yesterday must disabuse them of any such fallacy.

“The hauling down of the flag on the Mint was a much more cowardly act than entering the ranks in open and armed rebellion, for the perpetrator might well flatter himself that in the absence of those who had either the will or the power to redress the insult at the instant his escape in the middle of a mob-beleaguered city might be relied upon. But in this he misjudged and never did justice overtake a criminal more abandoned or punish a crime more revolting to the senses of every honorable, high-minded person. There could be no reprieve from the execution of a sentence so just; and forever after so long as time shall continue and the good old national flag floats over the Union-as float it will long after the present race of traitors are dead and buried-let him who would violently lay hands upon it to haul it down count well the cost by remembering the fate of Mumford; and lest by your neglect, citizens of New Orleans, some of your children may come to the same bad end teach them that hauling down the American flag is an act of treason and is synonymous with death.”

{p.136}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT No. 2, Tupelo, July 6, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Forces, &c., Corinth, Miss.

GENERAL: On the 15th and 16th of June I had occasion to address you according to the usages and forms of civilized war three several communications, one at least of which, concerning Surgeon Benjamin, C. S. Army, in my judgment called for the easy courtesy of an answer which up to this date has not reached me. You are of course the sufficient judge as to the comity to be observed by you while commanding the Federal Army on my front, but I cannot permit your silence to pass without this record of my own sense of what is due to me from our relative positions and what I expected from a trained soldier. This said I have now to acquaint you with the chief purpose of this letter, to wit:

I have been informed from a number of sources that bands of your soldiery especially along the line of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad in the vicinity of Grand Junction are traversing the country with the avowed object of burning or otherwise destroying the property of those citizens of Mississippi and Tennessee who in obedience to the wishes of their Government, the orders of these headquarters and a substantially unanimous public sentiment have chosen to burn their own cotton; that is, their own property. I have been informed further that the property of more than one of our loyal citizens has been destroyed by these detachments. These acts might not excite surprise if done by men under certain commanders of Federal armies, officers inexperienced in the long-established usages of war or regardless of its amenities and animated by a spirit of fell vindictiveness, but I must be permitted to express my astonishment that such measures should have been resorted to by the army of an educated, experienced commander.

In view therefore of these flagrant violations of well-known rules of war touching the private property of citizens of belligerents on land involved in the causes now brought to your notice I shall instruct all officers under my command to execute any Federal officer of whatsoever rank who shall fall into our hands against whom it may be clearly established that he had commanded or been instrumental in the wanton destruction of any planter’s immovable property. Further any officer or soldier caught in the act shall be summarily put to death. I shall profoundly regret any occasion for the exercise of this severity, and therefore do earnestly invoke your vigorous interference with your subordinates especially in the vicinity of Grand Junction and on the Mississippi River to stop conduct so unlike any ever tolerated by reputable officers in previous wars.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. BRAGG.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Columbus, July 6, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Agreeably to your request I inclose herewith a list* of the last detachment of Pulaski prisoners of war received at this post. I wrote to Colonel Dimick June 26 ultimo requesting to be furnished {p.137} with a list of prisoners of war and political prisoners transferred from this post to Fort Warren in October last. He writes in answer to that: “I have just forwarded to Colonel Hoffman a list of all the prisoners now at this post including the prisoners sent here by you.” It is therefore presumed that a list from me will not be required. He also states that he has not the original list of the Hatteras prisoners which I sent him. I have this day received some 500 prisoners of war among which are some fifty officers. Will you not order these officers sent to Sandusky?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. LOOMIS, Colonel Fifth Infantry, Commanding.

The prisoners of war that have been received to-day are very destitute of clothing and need a supply especially of underclothing for cleanliness. Will you authorize an issue from your stock on hand at this post?

G. LOOMIS, Colonel Fifth Infantry, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS ROLLA DIVISION, Rolla, Mo., July 6, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD, Commanding District of Missouri.

GENERAL: I trust you will pardon the delay of my reply to your letter of 1st instant referring to me for investigation the execution of Best (alias Morris or Morrison) by Major Tompkins, of the Thirteenth Cavalry Regiment, Missouri State Militia. The press of business, the confusion and disorder among a portion of the troops at this post and the attention to be given to the rebel force under Colonels McBride and Coleman constitute my only apology.

After a hurried investigation, general, I would respectfully report the following facts and conclusions collected from various sources and in part from the accompanying documents herewith submitted, marked A, B, C, D, E and F, together with a letter from Major Tompkins to myself, viz: That about 12 o’clock (in.) Sunday, 22d June, Major Tompkins, and with considerable danger to himself, in person and alone arrested a man calling himself Morrison, who said he was returning from Price’s army, passing stealthily through our lines along the by-paths of the worst guerrilla communities, being armed and having upon his person a large package of letters from rebels to their friends at home, inciting them to guerrilla warfare, the said letters being inflammatory and treasonable in the highest, revealing the facts that Morris or Morrison was Best, and that he had before acted in the same capacity, and was to return South again and consequently to communicate all he should learn within our lines, showing that he was not simply a regular soldier of the Confederate Army returning home but that he was at least a spy. That before the letters were read lie was identified as Old Best, of Livingston County, Mo., by one George Irving, private in Company F, First Illinois Cavalry, whose influence had resulted in the death of more Union men than of any one man in that section of the State. Best stated he had no other business than to convey said letters.

I learn that Major Tompkins after the arrest of Best delayed his execution only to satisfy himself clearly what was the character of the man and his own duty under General Schofield’s Orders, No. 18. To do {p.138} this the investigation shows he rode on Monday to Rolla, a distance of at least thirty miles, to consult said order and to confer with Colonel Boyd, commanding post, under whose written instructions the major was acting. After the consultation it was agreed that Best should not be brought in, so on Tuesday night Major T. reached his camp and early Wednesday morning Best was executed. It appears that the time of Best’s imprisonment was consumed by Major T. in ascertaining what was his duty in the premises under his oath of office to obey his superiors, and having determined from the best lights around him he acted promptly.

The foregoing constitutes about all the important facts I have been able to elicit in the hurried investigation I have been compelled to give the subject. Now the character of all those officers and men who have borne testimony I have no means of knowing save by their appearance and bearing while testifying. They seemed candid and sincere and gentlemanly. I have full confidence in the worth of their statements. Of Major Tompkins, comparatively a stranger, having known him only a few days, I take pleasure in saying his conduct and statements as far as known to me personally are those of a high-toned gentleman. Public report says of him that he is a brave, energetic and faithful officer. I am inclined to the opinion that he is not overrated. He seems to have the confidence of his men and the better part of his officers with whom I have conferred. He seems to have none of the elements of wantonness and cruelty in his character. Upon a strict and literal construction of General Orders, No. 18, I am satisfied he has erred, but I am equally satisfied he was aiming to and supposed he was carrying out in good faith said order. This would appear from his own reports where he executed Best because he was taken in arms and stealthily passing our lines, &c.; did not execute a notorious guerrilla because he was captured without arms, &c. Major Tompkins seems to be candid, conscientious and undisguised, resting the whole matter upon his best intentions and the facts in the case, believing the order justified his action.

Relative to other recent transactions of Major Tompkins which you enforce upon me to examine I cannot discover certainly to what they relate. I have only found there is some disaffection toward him on the part of one or two of his co-officers, resulting from the major’s exactions in discipline and morality. If it be consistent with the honor of the service and the commanding general’s sense of duty I would be glad to see Major Tompkins restored to his command immediately, because I have no doubt that he executed Best from an honest sense of duty and because his battalion has suffered demoralization since his arrest from the evil examples and teachings of some of its officers which needs speedy correction, and which no one can do so promptly and effectually as Major Tompkins. I believe his country may expect much at his hands and his country’s enemies have much to fear.

I have the honor to be, general, in great haste, your obedient servant,

J. M. GLOVER, Colonel, Commanding Division.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. DETACH, 13TH REGT. CAV., MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Camp at Rolla, Mo., July 4, 1862.

Colonel GLOVER.

COLONEL: I herewith by request present affidavits of Lieut. F. [M.] Avey, Lieut. William A. Lord, Corporal Gilmore, Bugler Burns, Citizen {p.139} Jacob H. Stuart (who was my guide) in the matter of my execution of Lewis Morris, in Texas County, Mo. The letters show him to be Colonel Best. He denied it. Facts proved are:

First, a rebel. Second, he came stealthily through our lines. Third, armed. Fourth, exciting to guerrilla warfare. Fifth, passing through the worst section we have to contend with, evading our forces. Sixth, I gave him every opportunity to clear himself of the charge. Seventh, he made no plea that he was not guilty as to facts. Eighth, he presented pass from General Price, of rebel army, to pass into Missouri. Ninth, he was guilty not only of passing our lines (which would make him a spy) but of carrying the elements of sedition and insurrection with him in letters from those whom our army had driven out of State.

And when he carries letters for others with their guarded advice, with the risk attending him, it is reasonable to believe he carried more in his heart, as I am well aware that he would have shot me but for my constant vigilance in not giving him an opportunity. I was alone when I captured him, and for one hour and a half before my men came. To be sure I was right I rode to Rolla, thirty-five miles, and was assured by Colonel Boyd that it was my duty to execute him; by General Curtis’ and General Schofield’s orders that I could not do otherwise.

The fact of taking him prisoner and then shooting him afterwards is no abridgement of his rights under these orders, and was for my security of duty and information. Besides if men are taken with arms who did not fire upon me I should feel it my duty to take sufficient time before executing them to take military proof of their character. Should citizens only prove it turn them over to commission. The death penalty is hard to inflict.

In this case my own knowledge was the evidence and the only question was did he come under the order. I endeavored to act with great care by seeing Colonel Boyd in person. I was ordered to go to Hartville, Wright County, and to have moved him was to have endangered his escape for which I would have been held responsible. Some to clear themselves might have given him a chance and thus executed the order. What I cannot do openly under orders I cannot consent to do slyly or by false or created pretext.

I have the honor to be, colonel, yours, obediently,

H. TOMPKINS, Major, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.

[Sub-inclosure A.]

STATE OF MISSOURI, Phelps County, ss:

Lieut. William A. Lord, of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, being duly sworn on his oath deposes and says that he witnessed the execution of Lewis Morrison by Major Tompkins; that Maj. H. Tompkins gave him every opportunity compatible with his situation as a prisoner to establish his innocence, or that he did not come under Orders, No. 18, issued by General Schofield; that said Morris was sullen and uncommunicative after his arrest to any but his fellow-prisoners, and seemed determined to keep all information to himself; that he was identified by one George Irving, of Company F, First Illinois Cavalry, as being as he called him “Old Best.” This was done by said Irving in presence of said Best. He, Irving, stated further that this man and his family and the McDow family, of Livingston County, {p.140} Mo., had done more for the rebellion and had killed more Union men in that county than all others. And further deponent saith not.

W. A. LORD, Lieut., Company H, Thirteenth Regt. Cav., Missouri State Militia.

Subscribed and sworn before me this 4th day of July, A. D. 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

H. A. GALLUP, Major, Missouri State [Militia] Cav., Provost-Marshal Rolla Div.

[Sub-inclosure B.]

STATE OF MISSOURI, Phelps County, ss:

Lieut. F. [M.] Avey, of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, being duly sworn deposes and says on his oath that he was present a few moments after the arrest and at the shooting of Lewis Morrison, in Texas County, by Maj. H. Tompkins; that he saw the revolver and letters taken from the said Lewis Morrison and heard many of the letters read inciting to guerrilla warfare. Admitted he had no other business, and that he had come stealthily through our lines and that he was taken on by-road, avoiding our troops and passing through the worst settlement of guerrillas in this section of State. And further deponent saith not.

F. [M.] AVEY, Lieutenant.

Subscribed and sworn before me the 3d day of July, A. D. 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

H. A. GALLUP, Major, Missouri State [Militia] Cav., Provost-Marshal Rolla Div.

[Sub-inclosure C.]

STATE OF MISSOURI, Phelps County, ss:

Oliver J. Burns, bugler of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, being duly sworn deposes and says on his oath that he was present within a short time after the arrest of Lewis Morrison by Major Tompkins; that he was among the first of Major Tompkins’ men who came to him; that he saw the revolver and letters, and heard many of them read, which were taken from said Morrison; stood guard over him afterwards, and after Major Tompkins had told him what order of prisoners he came under he was sullen and used every strategy to get away. The greatest vigilance was required to keep him. He denied that his name was Best. Admitted he was of the rebel army, and had passed stealthily through our lines. Made no effort to prove himself not liable under Orders, No. 18. And further deponent saith not.

OLIVER J. BURNS.

Subscribed and sworn before me this 3d day of July, A. D. 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

H. A. GALLUP, Major, Missouri State [Militia] Cavalry, Provost-Marshal.

[Sub-inclosure D.]

STATE OF MISSOURI, Phelps County, ss:

Thomas Gilmore, corporal of Company H, Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, being duly sworn on his oath deposeth and {p.141} says that he was present at the shooting of Lewis Morrison by Major Tompkins, in Texas County, Mo.; that the said Lewis Morrison admitted that he was of General Price’s (rebel) army; saw the letters and heard many of them read inciting to guerrilla warfare in this State; admitted he had no other business in going to north part of State; denied that he was of any other name; saw the Confederate money taken from him; also a navy revolver of the latest pattern and largest size, the same taking place on the 23d and 25th of June, A. D. 1862. And further deponent saith not.

THOMAS GILMORE.

Subscribed and sworn before me this 3d day of July, A. D. 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

H. A. GALLUP, Major, Missouri State [Militia] Cavalry, Provost-Marshal.

[Sub-inclosure B.]

STATE OF MISSOURI, Phelps County, ss:

Jacob H. Stuart, of Phelps County, Mo., being duly sworn on his oath deposes and says that he was with Major Tompkins in his hunt for rebels from the 20th of June to the 27th day of June; that he was present within two hours after the arresting of Lewis Morrison; that he was present at his execution; that he saw the revolver and letters taken from him, and heard many of the letters read, which spoke of inciting to guerrilla warfare, in the presence of the said Lewis Morrison; that he admitted he belonged to rebel army; that he had no other object than the letters [sic]; that he admitted he had passed our lines stealthily; that he, said Morrison, was in by-roads traveling and in a section of country where nearly every inhabitant is a rebel sympathizer, and within four miles of where train was burned, and that he, said Morrison, was making inquiries for the by-roads to Waynesville, Pulaski County. And further deponent saith not.

J. H. STUART.

Subscribed and sworn before me this 3d day of July, A. D., 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

H. A. GALLUP, Major, Missouri State Militia Cavalry, Provost-Marshal.

[Sub-inclosure F.]

ROLLA, MO., July 5, 1862.

We, Lieut. William A. Lord, Thirteenth Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry; Lieut. F. M. Avey, Thirteenth Regiment Missouri State Militia Cavalry; Thomas Gilmore and O. J. Burns, privates Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, being duly sworn testify as follows:

That Best (alias Morrison) was captured by Major Tompkins in person and alone about 12 m. on Sunday, 22d June. On Monday Major Tompkins left for Rolla for information and advice at the hands of Colonel Boyd, commanding post, and in relation to General Orders, Nos. 18 and 21, issued by Generals Schofield and Curtis. Returned to camp on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning early Best was executed (25th). The distance to Rolla from place of execution was at least thirty miles. We all regarded Best as a spy and a very bad type of a traitor. The major stated on his return that it was Colonel Boyd’s opinion “Best should not be brought in.” We are all perfectly satisfied {p.142} that Major Tompkins was endeavoring in good faith to execute the orders above alluded to. If he has erred it is an honest error. We all testify that the major used diligently all his time and energy to ascertain whether Best came within the provisions of General Orders, Nos. 18 and 21, and it was only after he satisfied himself perfectly that he did and of his infamous and cruel character that he was executed.

We further state that in our presence one George Irving, private in Company F, First Illinois Cavalry, identified Morrison as Best, of Livingston County, Mo., and as one of the worst and most dangerous men in that county and section of the State, who had done more toward killing Union men than all the men in the county of Livingston.

W. A. LORD, First Lieut. Co. H, Thirteenth Regt. Cav., Missouri State Militia. F. M. AVEY, Second Lieut. Co. H, Thirteenth Regt. Cav., Missouri State Militia. THOMAS GILMORE, Private Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia. OLIVER J. BURNS, Private Thirteenth Regiment Cavalry, Missouri State Militia.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this the 5th day of July, A. D. 1862, at Rolla, Mo.

T. M. WILCOX, Lieutenant and Assistant Provost-Marshal.

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BALTIMORE, July 6, 1862.

Col. E. S. SANFORD: (For W. W. Harding, Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia.)

Arrived here from Fort Monroe this a.m. and gives cheering accounts of McClellan’s army up to Friday p.m. On that day national salute and review by McClellan. Still occupies strong and invincible position. Men anxious to move to Richmond and full of spirits. They heard rumor that movement was called defeat and very indignant as they deem it brilliant success. Richmond papers announce arrival of McCall. I learn that he was wounded slightly in arm during battle and three hours after which in piece of woods captured before he could draw pistol or sword. Richmond papers Friday acknowledge loss 30,000. Reported death Stonewall Jackson denied. He is said to be on left bank Chickahominy. Captain Hazzard, Fourth Artillery, arrived this morning from Fortress badly wounded [in] leg with grape-shot. Spaulding and large ship in tow with sick and wounded left Fortress Saturday evening for New York. Also large steamer for Philadelphia. Steamer Massachusetts arrived at Fortress Friday night with Lieuts. G. W. Brown and N. J. Camp, Twenty-third Missouri; J. S. Agey and G. H. Logan, Fourteenth Iowa; H. W. Mays, Ninth Kentucky, and Sergeants I. N. Rhodes and Milton Rhodes, Fourteenth Iowa, escaped prisoners, on board. All were captured at Shiloh except Mays, who was taken by the guerrilla Morgan. They belonged to General Prentiss’ brigade and they corroborated the statement that the surrender took place in the evening after stubborn struggle. While at Macon, Ga., June 1, Lieutenants Camp, Brown and Mays determined to escape. They passed sentinels and walked through town singing Dixie. Traversing swamp at midnight reached Ocmulgee River and finding small boat, by using tin plate and canteen for paddle, started. Next morning found them twenty-five miles from Macon. Secreted themselves all {p.143} day and at night having cut wooden paddles from tree started. Toward morning came across a boat which they endeavored to avoid by hiding in bushes. To their horror, however, boat came alongside, but-subsequent joy-turned out to be Lieutenants Agey and Logan and two Sergeants Rhodes, who escaped a previous Tuesday in disguise of rebel soldiers and having around waists a bag with flour, dried peaches, &c., and files, salt in boots, and they subsequently escaped in boat. The two boats then kept together safely 600 miles by night with oars muffled with cypress moss. On the 11th reached Hawkinsville, where three small deserted steamers were tied up. Passed by without observation. On trip where persons [were] observed on bank, cheered for Davis and said were messengers from Davis. On the 17th reached Wolf Island, in Altamaha Sound. Next day reached Sapelo Island; found deserted. On the 18th went aboard steamer Wamsutta which next day transferred to steamer Florida at Saint Simon’s Sound. Put aboard steamer Massachusetts, which brought [us] to Fort Monroe. They report Lieutenant Bliss, of Fifty-eighth Illinois [Second Michigan Battery], on May 1, was wantonly murdered by the rebel guard.

J. ROBLEY DUNGLISON.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 7, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

Hundreds of Missouri troops taken prisoners at Shiloh and paroled are now at Cairo in suffering condition. Be good enough to order them here.

H. R. GAMBLE.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 7, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM, Governor of Connecticut.

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 19th ultimo I have respectfully to inform you that the Government is making no exchanges of prisoners at present and that separate cases will not be taken up.

I am, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 7, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, U. S. Army, Fort Columbus, N. Y.:

Send 100 of the prisoners arriving at Fort Columbus to Fort Warren and the rest to Fort Delaware.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, Ira., July 7, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Commanding Fort Monroe.

GENERAL: The general commanding refers to your discretion the inclosed letter from Charles M. Hubbard and others, prisoners confined {p.144} at Fort Wool, and directs that you cause all of those referred to in the letter who can be discharged with safety to the public service to be conveyed to some suitable point whence they may return to their homes. You will cause them to be provided with necessary subsistence during their return.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS M. KEY, Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

[Inclosure.]

FORT WOOL, July 4, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

We propose to present to your consideration the following facts: There are now about 100 citizens of Virginia who have in no way been connected with the present war confined at this place. They were taken from their homes or arrested by bands of armed men, separated from their families, and are here imprisoned and not even informed of the charges if any there be on which they were arrested. They know not on what evidence they were arrested nor have they been confronted with their accusers. They are denied all intercourse with the world and are here confined with the same hard fare alike for the sick and well, good and bad huddled together without respect for their rights or person. When taken from their homes they were assured by the officers who arrested them that they would be detained but a few hours and then would be restored to their homes and families. They were then induced to leave home without a change of clothes and are now [covered with] vermin of this prison house, without a change of clothing. They are without funds with which they can procure the necessaries or comforts with which to promote cleanliness or preserve health. Their families are without any protection, surrounded by slaves and camp followers, from the unprincipled and violent hands of whom every species of wrong may be anticipated. From the rumors that reach us through the citizens who have been most recently sent here many of us believe that our slaves have left us; that our household furniture has been wantonly destroyed; that the provision designed for the use of our families during the present year has been forcibly taken from them, and that our growing crops have been wasted and destroyed, and that our homes except for the presence of loved wives and children are barren deserts.

Much more might with truth and propriety be said, but surely this is enough of the sad picture which has resulted from our effort to remain at our homes and protect those who are dependent on us, when we believed that our property and persons would not be violated by those who were seeking to restore a humane and liberal Government. Our friends advised us that it was best that we should remain at home. Our reason and judgment approved the advice and your proclamation inviting the citizens to remain at home and assuring them protection confirmed us in the propriety of that course. Alas! alas! How vain were our expectations! How we have been disappointed! Why are we here? We know that we are here and can well imagine the sufferings of all who are dear to us. How long shall this continue? We cannot believe that you have caused us to be imprisoned in violation of the assurances of your proclamation. We cannot realize that the Government of the United States thus refuses us our liberty, wastes our property and places our persons on this island of rock that we may by cruelty and oppression be taught to hate the Government under which we were born.

{p.145}

As citizens of Virginia we ask that we may be at once released from this prison.

CHARLES M. HUBBARD, of James City, JOHN P. PIERCE, of New Kent County, A. B. TIMBERLAKE, of Hanover, SAMUEL EDWARDS, of King William, Committee in behalf of the whole.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 7, 1862.

Messrs. LITTLETON, PIERCE and HUBBARD, Prisoners of State, Fort Wool.

GENTLEMEN: I am directed by Major-General Dix to say in reply to your letter* of this date that he will forward any proper communication from you to Richmond by the first flag of truce; that he holds you under orders from General McClellan and does not know for whom you are held as hostages. If you are in want of any articles needful for your personal comfort he will be glad to supply them. A personal interview he cannot at present conveniently grant.

By command of Major-General Dix:

Yours, respectfully,

[WILSON BARSTOW], Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

* Not found, but see petition of Messrs. Hubbard, Pierce, Timberlake and Edwards, July 4, p. 144.

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HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 7, 1862.

Colonel FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

SIR: Certain of the prisoners of war confined in McDowell’s College having escaped in disguise as negroes you will immediately on receipt of this designate some one to call upon Colonel Tuttle and request him to exclude from the prison all negroes. A proper temporary provision will be made for their shelter elsewhere.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON, Brig. Gen. of Vols., U. S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

(Copy to Colonel Tuttle, commanding Saint Louis District.)

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 41.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 7, 1862.

From the report of Col. J. M. Glover of an investigation made by him in pursuance of orders from these headquarters of the circumstances under which one Colonel Best, a rebel spy, was executed by Major Tompkins, Thirteenth Cavalry, Missouri State Militia, and affidavits accompanying said report, it is evident that the said Colonel Best richly deserved his fate and would have received it at the hands of a military commission had he been tried; yet his case does not appear to have been one of that class which requires the summary punishment inflicted upon members of {p.146} guerrilla bands when actually taken in arms engaged in their unlawful warfare. Best was undoubtedly a spy and was engaged in inciting insurrection, but the laws of war do not justify the punishment of even these crimes without trial, nor do they justify such treatment of guerrillas under any circumstances except where the formal process of law has failed to arrest the evil. When it becomes necessary to dispense with the form of trial and execute certain classes of outlaws upon the spot orders directing this course must be construed strictly and literally, and officers charged with the execution of such orders must be held to the most rigid accountability for going beyond the terms of the order. The commanding general is satisfied, however, that while Major Tompkins erred in this case he did so honestly believing that he was discharging with strict fidelity an important and disagreeable duty. The commanding general therefore takes pleasure in honorably acquitting Major Tompkins of all intentional wrong and in restoring him to his command. Major Tompkins will be immediately released from arrest and return to duty with his regiment.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

C. W. MARSH, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 20.}

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISS., Trenton, Tenn., July 7, 1862.

It being proven to the satisfaction of the general commanding that Robert Masley, Samuel Baker, Gilbert Patterson, of Weakley County, Tenn., and Samuel Abbott, Letts and sons, and Doctor Gardner, of Gibson County, Tenn., have aided and abetted the Southern rebellion and encouraged the burning of the road bridge over the Big Obion; also that J. F. Penn, William M. Jones, A. O. Dunnell, A. Brickhouse, Freeman and Tom Johnson have aided the rebellion by subscriptions of money and in various other ways, it is hereby ordered that the above-named persons take the oath of allegiance to the United States and proceed to immediately rebuild the above-named bridge. And any of the above-named persons failing to obey this order in any particular will be arrested and sent to these headquarters. Capt. John Lynch, Company E, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, is charged with the execution of this order.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. M. Dodge:

GEO. M. REEDER, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 21.}

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISS., Trenton, Tenn., July 7, 1862.

The provost-marshal will arrest and hold in confinement any person refusing to take the oath. He will arrest all soldiers and officers returning from the rebel army who do not come forward voluntarily and take the oath. He will ascertain what property if any that can be used by the U. S. forces any persons who are now in the rebel army may own and report the same from time to time to these headquarters.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. M. Dodge:

GEO. M. REEDER, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.147}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 7, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose a requisition for clothing required for prisoners of war at Fort Delaware.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[Inclosure.]

Estimates of clothing to be furnished to the commanding officer of Fort Delaware, Capt. A. A. Gibson, Second Artillery, for prisoners of war:

1,000 blouses (or any substitute), 1,000 pants, 1,000 shirts, 500 blankets, 500 pairs shoes, 500 caps (or any substitute).

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 7, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I forward the inclosed papers, viz: Order* from Secretary of War for unconditional release of William Pinckney Jones, Third Mississippi Regiment, now a prisoner of war at Camp Douglas. Letter from the Hon. Schuyler Colfax to “Friend Spencer,” and letter from J. S. Wigmore to commanding officer Camp Douglas for your instructions in the premises. These papers were received by express from Mr. Wigmore. A doubt is expressed in Mr. Colfax’s letter whether Mr. Jones can accept the release before an exchange is arranged for certain other prisoners of the same regiment. Mr. Jones can throw no light on the matter, and wishes to know clearly the obligations he will assume if set at liberty.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel, Commanding Post.

* Not found.

[Inclosure.]

MIDDLEPORT, ILL., June 25, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Douglas.

DEAR SIR: I send the inclosed to your care as there might be some delay if sent to Mr. Jones, the prisoner whom this release is for, trusting to your kindness to have it handed to him with letter from Hon. S. Colfax regarding his fellow-prisoners’ release. Mr. Colfax’s letter, if you will please read it, says he will have to wait until the rest are discharged. I should like to have him come here until that time, but how he will know what day their release will come if absent here I know not. You will confer a lasting favor on now your unknown friend if you will prompt him in regard to this matter, as he doubtless wishes to return to his wife and children.

With much respect, I am, dear sir,

J. S. WIGMORE.

{p.148}

[Sub-inclosure.]

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, Washington, June 19, 1862.

FRIEND SPENCER:

I received yesterday a letter from your friend Wigmore inclosing one from his Mississippi friend and urging renewed efforts in his favor. I have not received a word of reply from Reuben Davis, of Mississippi, and hence the exchange has not been arranged; but as you take such a deep interest in Mr. Jones I have procured his unconditional release as you will see from the inclosed,* which will open his prison doors and which the Secretary of War granted me as a personal favor. Please have your friend Mr. Wigmore state to Mr. Jones that if he desires to cross our lines into the South he will have to decline it and wait till his comrades are released, when they will be sent to our lines by the Government.

I am arranging irrespective of Mr. Davis’ failure to write for the exchange of the Mississippians, a list of whom you furnished me. That list I sent to Davis and a copy of it to General Wool and hence have no record of it with me. Ask Mr. Jones to make out another list excluding the lieutenants, as in the prisoners returned to us recently on parole they have sent only from sergeants down to privates, and if he chooses include enough more Mississippians to make up seventy-five, place them in the order he desires to have them released,and I will arrange for at least forty-five of them to be discharged on parole and sent across the line within two weeks, I trust; perhaps for the whole. I mean that forty-five shall be released certainly and I hope within two weeks.

The bad faith of the Southerners as to Corcoran blocks the way as to general exchanges, but I will have a special exception made of this case. They will of course have to report to their authorities as exchanges for paroled Indianians.

Perhaps you had better send this letter to Mr. Jones through Mr. Wigmore and ask the former to write to me without delay, as the adjournment of Congress is uncertain. You wrote me that Mr. Jones could remain North, but he speaks in his letter* which I inclose of returning South. He cannot get across our lines if unconditionally discharged, so he must decide himself which course to adopt. In great haste, as usual,

Yours, truly,

SCHUYLER COLFAX.

P. S.-As the temper of our people is not in favor of releasing rebels and as I would not have done it but to oblige you make no reference to it in the paper. After the exchange is arranged it will be time enough. My regards to your new partner, with my best wishes for the success of both of you.

S. C.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Butler, July 7, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.:

Yours of the 5th instant asking in what capacity Drs. J. L. H. Sessum, E. R. Crockett, S. E. Winnemore and R. H. Andrews appear on the roll is received. I have examined the rolls and do not find them reported as surgeons. I will state, however, as a matter of justice to those gentlemen that they are practicing physicians and surgeons and that they {p.149} have performed duty as such during their imprisonment here. Doctor Alexander who is also here had been appointed a surgeon prior to his surrender, but if discharged will continue on duty here with the prisoners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Post.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, July 8, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: It has been represented to me that there are among the prisoners of war at Governor’s Island, N. Y., a number of young men of Northern birth who were impressed into the insurgent service and who it is believed would be willing to enlist in the Army of the United States if permitted to do so. If you think it best to cause an inquiry to be made as to the correctness of these representations I would suggest that Robert Murray, esq., U. S. marshal for the southern district of New York, who is a very discreet man, be authorized to visit the prisoners for the purpose indicated.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 8, 1862.

His Excellency H. R. GAMBLE, Governor of Missouri, Saint Louis:

Commanding officer at Cairo has been telegraphed to send paroled men to Jefferson Barracks, Saint Louis, and officer in command there has been ordered to be in readiness to receive them.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 8, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: The Secretary of War instructs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant relative to the order of the provost-marshal-general at Saint Louis for the release of a prisoner of war said to be a British subject, and asking for instructions in the case.

You are respectfully informed in reply that except the authority conferred upon you in the cases of sick prisoners as set forth in General Orders, No. 67,* there is no authority anywhere save in the War Department to parole or discharge either political prisoners or prisoners of war.

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* See p. 30.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, Va., July 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. A. P. HILL, Commanding Division of Confederate Forces.

GENERAL: Understanding that there are sick and wounded men belonging to the army under my command at Carter’s Landing who are {p.150} suffering for want of attendance and provisions and that no objections will be entertained by you for their removal here, I accordingly request permission to send a boat under a flag of truce for them.

I would be glad to receive any other wounded and sick men that may be in your possession that belong to my army, and ask to be informed how many there are and if they be subsisted and receive medical assistance.

I have made these requests in the interests of a large humanity, which would seem to justify the delivery of wounded and sick men who must die if they cannot have due care and sustenance, which I learn you are not in a position to afford them.

I shall be glad to receive a reply to this communication at your earliest convenience.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS LIGHT DIVISION, July 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Forces.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date and to inform you that there are thirty of your wounded and sick soldiers at Carter’s Landing. So far as lay in my power I have had them attended to, and have sent my staff surgeon to them twice and would have had them removed to Richmond did their condition allow it, where they would have been better cared for. You can send a boat for them any time to-morrow and Mr. Hill Carter will deliver them to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. P. HILL, Major-General, Commanding Light Division.

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CORINTH, July 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. H. THOMAS, Tuscumbia:

Any one within our lines who corresponds with the enemy is a spy and should be tried and punished as such. Deserters should be released on taking oath and giving parole. The same with refugee citizens if living within our lines. Prisoners of war who wish to be exchanged will be delivered to the enemy on receipt, they giving parole not to serve until regularly exchanged. Perhaps Winston had better be sent to Alton Prison.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 8, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Cairo, Ill.:

General Orders, No. 72,* just issued, requires paroled prisoners from Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri to be sent to camp {p.151} near Jefferson Barracks, Mo. They must not be furloughed. Send them at once.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* See p. 94.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 8, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you in reply to your communication of the 3d instant that prisoners of war, civil and military, in this department are confined at Forts Delaware and McHenry. There is no provost-marshal in general charge of these prisoners, but Brevet Brigadier-General Morris is in charge of those at Fort McHenry and Capt. A. A. Gibson, Second Artillery, in charge of those at Fort Delaware. The major-general commanding directs me to say that he is about to transfer some eighteen political prisoners from Fort McHenry to Fort Lafayette and that Fort McHenry is nearly full at this time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[WM. D. WHIPPLE, ] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISS., Trenton, Tenn., July 8, 1862.

The commanders of posts and provost-marshals within this command will arrest and hold in confinement any person refusing to take the oath of allegiance to the United States Government. They will arrest all officers and soldiers returning from the rebel army who do not come forward voluntarily, deliver themselves up and take the oath as prescribed. Any person detected in intimidating by threats or otherwise any person from giving in their allegiance to the United States Government or using disloyal language in any way whatever will be arrested and punished to the utmost extent of the law. This division extends from Columbus to Humboldt along the line of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. M. Dodge:

GEO. M. REEDER, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 8, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith copies of regulations which pursuant to authority given me in General Orders No 67, of the 17th ultimo from the War Department I have issued for the government of commanders who have charge of stations where prisoners of war are held. I hope they will meet your approbation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.152}

[Inclosure.]

CIRCULAR.]

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 7, 1862.

The following regulations will be observed at all stations where prisoners of war are held:

1. The commanding officer at each station is held accountable for the discipline and good order of his command and for the security of the prisoners, and will take such measures as will best secure these results. He will divide the prisoners into companies, and will cause written reports to be made to him of their condition every morning showing the changes made during the preceding twenty-four hours, giving the names of the “joined,” “transferred,” “deaths,” &c. At the end of every month commanders will send to the commissary-general of prisoners a return of prisoners, giving names and details to explain alterations. Where rolls of “joined” or “transferred” have been forwarded during the month it will be sufficient to refer to them on the return.

2. On the arrival of prisoners at any station a careful comparison of them with the rolls that accompany them will be made and all errors on the rolls will be corrected. When no roll accompanies the prisoners one will be immediately made out containing all the information required as correct as can be from the statements of the prisoners themselves. When the prisoners are citizens the town, county, and State from which they come will be given on the rolls under the heads, rank, regiment and company. At the same time they will be required to give up all arms and weapons of every description and all moneys which they have in their possession, for which the commanding officer will give receipts.

3. The hospital will be under the immediate charge of the senior surgeon who will be held responsible to the commanding officer for its good order and the condition of the sick. “The fund” of this hospital will be kept separate from the fund of the hospital for the troops and will be disbursed for the sole benefit of the sick prisoners on the requisition of the surgeon approved by the commanding officer. When the fund is sufficiently large there will be bought with it besides the articles usually purchased all articles of table furniture, kitchen utensils, articles for policing, shirts and drawers for the sick, the expense of washing, and all articles that may be indispensably necessary to promote the sanitary condition of the hospital.

4. The commanding officer will cause requisitions to be made by his quartermaster on the nearest depot for such clothing as may be absolutely necessary for the prisoners, which requisition will be approved by him after a careful inquiry as to the necessity and submitted for the approval of the commissary-general of prisoners. The clothing will be issued by the quartermaster to the prisoners with the assistance and under the supervision of an officer detailed for the purpose, whose certificate that the issue has been made in his presence will be the quartermaster’s voucher for the clothing issued. From the 30th of April to the 1st of October neither drawers nor socks will be allowed except to the sick.

5. A general fund for the benefit of the prisoners will be made by withholding from their rations all that can be spared without inconvenience to them, and selling this surplus under existing regulations to the commissary, who will hold the funds in his hands and be accountable for them subject to the commanding officer’s order to cover purchases. The purchases with the fund will be made by or through the {p.153} quartermaster with the approval or order of the commanding officer, the bills being paid by the commissary, who will keep an account book in which will be carefully entered all receipts and payments with the vouchers; and he will keep the commanding officer advised from time to time of the amount of this fund. At the end of the month he will furnish the commanding officer with an account of the fund for the month showing the receipts and disbursements, which account will be forwarded to the commissary-general of prisoners with the remarks of the commanding officer. With this fund will be purchased all such articles as may be necessary for the health and comfort of the prisoners and which would otherwise have to be purchased by the Government. Among these articles are all table furniture and cooking utensils, articles for policing purposes, bedticks and straw, the means of improving or enlarging the barrack accommodations, extra pay to clerks who have charge of the camp post-office, and who keep the accounts of moneys deposited with the commanding officer, &c., &c.

6. The sutler is entirely under the control of the commanding officer who will see that he furnishes proper articles, and at reasonable rates. For his privilege the sutler will be taxed a small amount by the commanding officer according to the amount of his trade, which tax will make a part of the general fund.

7. Prisoners will not be permitted to hold or receive money. All moneys in possession or received will be taken charge of by the commanding officer who will give receipts for it to those to whom it belongs. They will purchase from the sutler such articles as they may wish, which are not prohibited, and on the bill of the articles they will give an order on the commanding officer for the amount, and this will be kept as a voucher with the individual’s account. The commanding officer will keep a book in which the accounts of all those who have money deposited with him will be kept, and this book with the vouchers must be always ready for the inspection of the commissary-general of prisoners.

8. All articles contributed by friends for the prisoners in whatever shape they come if proper to be received will be carefully distributed as the donors may request; such articles as are intended for the sick passing through the hands of the surgeon who will be responsible for their proper use. Contributions must be received by an officer who must be held responsible that they are delivered to the persons for whom they are intended.

9. Visitors to these stations out of mere curiosity will in no case be permitted. Persons having business with the commanding officer or quartermaster may with the permission of the commanding officer enter the camp to remain only long enough to transact their business. When prisoners are seriously ill their nearest relatives, parents, wives, brothers or sisters if they are loyal people may be permitted to make them short visits; but under no other circumstances will visitors be allowed to see them without the approval of the commissary-general of prisoners.

10. Prisoners will not be permitted to write letters of more than one page of common letter paper, the matter to be strictly of a private nature, or the letter must be destroyed.

11. Prisoners will be paroled or released only by the authority of the War Department, or by direction of the commissary-general of prisoners.

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.154}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 8, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: I inclose herewith for your information and guidance a declaration of martial law in and about Camp Douglas which you will publish conspicuously about the camp and in the newspapers of Chicago so that all interested in it may have due notice. Let your camp outside the fence be as closely adjoining it as possible and make the line which bounds the space covered by martial law so clearly that there can be no doubt about it. A line of stakes fifty feet apart and two above the ground will I suppose be sufficient. Determine upon the line and the mode of establishing it before the announcement is made. Should there be any obstacle in the way which I cannot anticipate refer to me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[Inclosure.]

JULY 8, 1862.

By authority of the War Department martial law is hereby declared in and about Camp Douglas, Ill., extending for a space of 100 feet outside and around the chain of sentinels, which space the commanding officer will indicate by a line of stakes, and the area of the ground included within the said line is hereby declared to be under martial law. Any person violating military authority within said line will be subject to punishment by short confinement or trial by court-martial at the discretion of the commanding officer.

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 8, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: Your letter of yesterday with its inclosures just received. The Secretary of War’s orders give you no discretion in the matter and William Pinckney Jones, of the Third Mississippi Regiment, must be immediately and unconditionally released. No obligations are imposed on Mr. Jones by the terms of his release. As an exchanged prisoner he could claim the right to return South. Whether he has the same right under his present release I am not able to say. I return the order for your guidance.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 8, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: By your communication of June 29 I am required to furnish immediately-first, the number of prisoners of war that have been {p.155} held at Camp Douglas up to this time so tar as the records show; second, the number now present; third, the number now sick; fourth, the number now discharged, explaining briefly the circumstances; fifth, the number now escaped; sixth, the number now dead.

I would as a preliminary report say that immediately on receipt of your letter of June 23 specifying lists of prisoners called for by the War Department I directed that the rolls of the different companies and squads of the prisoners which were in the hands of the U. S. corporals detailed to call the daily rolls should be made use of as the proper basis for gaining the proper information. These rolls have been corrected as far as possible by requiring the non-commissioned officers in charge of the prisoners to give from memory or memoranda in their possession the names of all the members of their company or squad who were here but are not now present, and account for them dead, escaped or discharged. This branch of the work is completed and the names are being transcribed in alphabetical order on the rolls sent by you and at the same time also transcribed in a book to be kept here for reference. Thus two persons are writing and one calling off constantly. In advance of the completion of the rolls I can only report on the different heads, as follows: First, cannot at present furnish the information; second, number of prisoners of war present at Camp Douglas as per morning report this day, 7,807; third, number sick per hospital report, 260; fourth, cannot report; fifth, cannot report; sixth, number died per report of post surgeon to July 5, 650. Numbers of the prisoners appear to have enlisted in the Twenty-third and Sixty-fifth Regiments Illinois Volunteers and are probably in their ranks now. The number of sick in quarters are not included in the number 260 who are all in hospital. There must be I fear a large discrepancy between the number as shown by the lists taken as the prisoners came into camp and the numbers now accounted for.

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Regt. Illinois Vols., Comdg. Camp Douglas.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Butler, Ill., July 8, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a requisition* for clothing for the prisoners of war at this camp.

Hoping it may meet your approval, I remain, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Post.

[Indorsement.]

Clothing ordered July 12.

* Not found.

CAIN BUTLER, ILL., July 8, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have made a complete and thorough inspection of the condition of the prisoners of war at this camp and would respectfully call your attention to these facts:

The supply of water to be obtained here is entirely inadequate to the {p.156} demand. Many wells have been dug and water obtained, but they all fail to furnish the required amount. These wells appear mutually to depend upon each other for their supply. Additional wells are now being made and are intended to be carried to a considerable depth. It is to be hoped that they may furnish a sufficient supply of this element. Should they however fail water can be procured from a small river (Sangamon River) about half a mile distant. This water is not suitable for drinking purposes.

The prisoners are sadly in want of clothing and I have directed the commanding officer to make a requisition for the necessary amount, which he will forward to-day for your approval. The amount of the estimate was at my suggestion after having minutely inspected and counted the prisoners.

With regard to the fund to be acquired for the use of the prisoners by selling the unnecessary part of the ration I have endeavored to inform the commanding officer and commissary of the manner of conducting it, as directed in your instructions, so as not only to be a benefit to the prisoners but a saving of expense to the Government. This mode at first seemed to conflict with the terms of the contract made for furnishing supplies for this post. It appears this contract has been given out with a stipulation that the contractors should issue the rations at their own expense upon the requisition of the commanding officer or commissary. They heretofore have issued directly to the prisoners. It also appears that there was a distinct understanding with the contractors that they should have the privilege of repurchasing such part of the ration as might not be required by the prisoner at such prices as they themselves had determined upon, the proceeds to be again invested in articles such as the prisoner might require not prohibited by the commanding officer at such prices as the contractors had fixed. This appears to have been done without the sanction or approval of the present commanding officer of the post or officer in charge of the prisoners. Capt. N. W. Edwards, assistant commissary of subsistence, volunteer service, stationed at Springfield, and purchasing commissary of this district, by whom this contract was drawn up on the part of the United States, objects to purchasing the saving of the rations of prisoners as directed under your orders without definite instructions to that effect. The commissary at this post has no funds under his control and all purchases are made through Captain Edwards. I desire and request that unequivocal instructions may be furnished him. I inclose herewith a copy of the contract for your information.

A number of the hospitals for the prisoners of war are situated on the outside of the inclosure. I have recommended to the commanding officer that the inclosure be extended to include these buildings, together with the commissary and quartermaster’s store-rooms. As they are now situated the physicians, nurses, cooks, attendants and patients are constantly without the line of the sentinels, and are required to have an officer, a guard or a written permission from the commanding officer and surgeon to pass to and from their companies within the lines. Dishonest persons in availing themselves of the privileges of these hospitals may take advantage of their position to escape. By extending the inclosure so as to bring these buildings within the lines of sentinels the above-mentioned persons may pass to and from their quarters and to and from the commissary and quartermaster’s store-rooms without molestation from the sentinels. It will {p.157} also avoid the necessity of written passes, thus adding to the comfort as well as to the security of the prisoners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

[Inclosure.]

Articles of agreement entered into this 16th day of June, 1862, between Ninian W. Edwards, captain and commissary of subsistence in the U. S. volunteer service, on the one part, and Edwin S. Fowler, of the county of Sangamon, State of Illinois, of the other part.

This agreement witnesseth that the said Ninian W. Edwards, for and on behalf of the United States of America, and the said Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors and administrators, have covenanted and agreed with each other as follows, to wit:

1. That the said Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors and administrators shall supply or cause to be supplied and issued at Camp Butler and Springfield, Ill., all of the rations to consist of the articles hereinafter specified that shall be required for the use of the U. S. troops, prisoners of war or others entitled to draw rations from the United States that are or may be at either of said posts, to be delivered and issued in suitable packages without charge on the provision return or in bulk at the option of the Government, commencing on the 21st of June, 1862, and ending on the 31st of December, 1862, or such earlier day as the commissary-general may direct.

2. That the articles comprising the rations and the prices to be paid therefor are as follows, to wit (to 100 rations):

Cents.
75 pounds of baconper pound41/2
Or 125 pounds of fresh beefdo4
137 1/2 pounds of fresh baker’s breaddo23/4
Or 125 pounds of corn-mealper bushel.20
Or 100 pounds of pilot breadper pound3
Or 137 1/2 pounds of flourdo23/4
10 pounds of green coffeedo14
Or 8 pounds of fine-ground coffeedo14
10 pounds of ricedo5
Or 10 pounds of hominydo1
15 pounds of sugardo8
1 gallon of vinegarper gallon6
1 1/4 pounds Star candlesper pound10
2 quarts saltper quart1
8 quarts beansdo2
42 84/100 pounds potatoesper bushel24
Molassesper gallon42
4 pounds of soapper pound41/2

3. When several articles compose the rations the officer making the requisition shall have power to require either article.

4. The said Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors and administrators shall supply, deliver and issue hospital supplies and any other articles that may be required at the lowest wholesale prices, to be delivered by said Edwards, and shall furnish the U. S. officer any of the articles at the rate above specified.

5. All of the articles shall be of the first quality and shall be approved by the commanding officer, the commissary at the post or said Edwards, and payment shall be made as per advertisement for proposals.

6. That in case of failure or deficiency in the quality or quantity of any of the articles to be issued then the said Edwards or the commissary {p.158} in charge shall have power to supply the deficiency by purchase, and the said Edwin S. Fowler will be charged with the difference of cost.

7. Said Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors and administrators shall always, either by themselves or agent, be at said posts ready to receive the requisition of the officer or other persons authorized to receive said supplies which are to be delivered and issued at said place or places, as may be directed by the commanding officer or commissary, and the said Edwin S. Fowler is to furnish the necessary hands for weighing, delivering and issuing at their own expense.

8. No member of Congress shall be admitted to any share herein or any benefit to arise therefrom.

In witness whereof the undersigned have hereunto placed their hands and seals the day and date above written.

E. S. FOWLER. [SEAL.] NINIAN W. EDWARDS,[SEAL.] Captain and Commissary of Subsistence.

Know all men by these presents: That we, Edwin S. Fowler and Edward L. Baker and Samuel H. Melvin, are held and firmly bound to the United States of America in the sum of $15,000 lawful money of the United States, for which payment well and truly to be made we bind ourselves and each of us, our and each of our heirs, executors and administrators for and in the whole, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents.

Sealed with our seal, dated the 16th day of June, A. D. 1862. The nature of this obligation is such that if the above bounden Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors and administrators or any of them shall and do in all things well and truly observe, perform, fulfill, accomplish and keep all and singular the covenants, conditions and agreements whatsoever which on the part of the said Edwin S. Fowler, his heirs, executors or administrators, are or ought to be observed, performed, fulfilled, accomplished and kept, comprised or mentioned in certain articles of agreement or contract bearing date the 16th of June, 1862, between Ninian W. Edwards and the said Edwin S. Fowler, concerning the supply, delivering and issue of rations or other articles, according to the true intent and meaning of the said articles of agreement or contract, then the above obligations to be void; otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

E. S. FOWLER. [SEAL.] E. L. BAKER.[SEAL.] S. H. MELVIN.[SEAL.]

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, July 9, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I herewith inclose a letter unofficially presented to me by the French Minister, M. Henri Mercier, in reference to Pierre Soulé, a prisoner confined in Fort Lafayette, which I respectfully submit for your consideration.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

{p.159}

[Inclosure-Translation.]

[WASHINGTON,] July 1, 1862.

Mr. FREDERICK W. SEWARD.

DEAR SIR: Herewith is the letter of which I spoke to you yesterday and which I take the liberty of commending to the kind attention of your father.

Truly, yours,

HENRI MERCIER.

[Sub-inclosure-Translation.]

NEW YORK, June 28, 1862.

M. HENRI MERCIER, Minister of France, &c., Washington.

Mr. MINISTER: Since my return hither from the short visit I had the honor to make you a few days past I learn that Mr. P. Soulé, of New Orleans, now a prisoner at Fort Lafayette, is ill and that his physical decline as well as mental condition causes some uneasiness.

The Government at Washington no doubt is not informed of his situation, and perhaps you may not think it of disadvantage-you, sir, who have at heart only the welfare of the great Republic-to place this situation before Mr. Seward. It is at all events a question of humanity, perhaps one of policy, for in fact if misfortune befall Mr. Soulé would not the Government fear that it might be accused, as well in Europe as at the South, of having listened only to the whispers of a mean revenge, and would not the hostility of the people that it is attempting to reclaim be increased?

At the long conference with which the Secretary of State was pleased to favor me some days past he seemed to me to be moved by sentiments so conciliatory and the desire to be just that I feel emboldened to make to him through you respectful representations on the matter in question. I hope his heart and high intellect will appreciate them favorably. At all events I leave the whole in your hands, and you will it is needless to say make such use of my communications as you think fit.

I was charmed to make your acquaintance and regret my short stay at Washington prevented me from cultivating it.

Accept, Mr. Minister, the expression of my high consideration.

M. HEINE.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

GENERAL: You will take immediate measures to remove the prisoners of war from Governor’s Island to some place of security and also to guard Fort Columbus and Castle William from any danger by surprise or otherwise from the prisoners there. You will also take measures to remove all the prisoners from the forts in New York Harbor to places of security immediately.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 9, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit Mich.:

Very urgent complaints are made to the Department by some of the best known and worthiest citizens of Columbus, Ohio, as to the misconduct {p.160} of certain rebel prisoners of war who are at large on parole in that city. This grievance seems to have been of long standing and must be abated at once. You will therefore instantly arrest and transport to Johnson’s Island all the rebel prisoners at large on parole in Columbus. Except in cases of extreme illness as specified in General Orders, No. 67, this Department alone has authority to release rebel prisoners on parole. If any of these prisoners are so sick as to come within the authority given you by General Orders, No. 67, to confer paroles you will so soon as their condition will permit their removal cause them to be transferred to the military prison at Johnson’s Island.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WASHINGTON, July 9, 1862.

Colonel BURKE, Fort Hamilton:

It is again represented to the Department that Pierre Soulé is sick. Please state immediately the condition of Soulé in this respect.

C. P. WOLCOTT.

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FORT HAMILTON, July 9, 1862.

Hon. C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

Pierre Soulé, prisoner at Fort Lafayette, is in perfect health.

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor District of Columbia, Washington.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you send immediately and arrest a rebel officer named A. E. Reynolds, staying at the National Hotel, who is on parole and send him to Fort Delaware for confinement.

I am, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 9, 1862.

Maj. BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal. General, Saint Louis, Mo.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs you to report without delay by what authority and for what cause you gave permission to A. E. Reynolds, a prisoner of war, to leave his place of confinement on parole. He further directs that you release no more prisoners of war on parole, but hold all who may come under your control in confinement.

I am, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.161}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: You will proceed to Forts Columbus and Lafayette and such other points as may be necessary to execute the special instructions of the Secretary of War.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, July 9, 1862.

General B. BRAGG, Commanding, &c., Tupelo.

GENERAL: Your letter of the 6th instant is just received. In regard to the case of Doctor Benjamin I have only to remark that his parole was given precisely as he asked it. If he made a mistake in regard to his own rank no one is at fault but himself. He will be expected to carry out his voluntary agreement.

In regard to the accusations and threats contained in your letters, I have no remark to make other than that the accusations are untrue, and the threats unbecoming. Any officer or soldier in my command who violates the laws of war will be duly punished, but I shall not be deterred from the due enforcement of these laws by any threats of a barbarous retaliation either from you or your Government.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 9, 1862.

GENERAL COMMANDING, Department of the Appomattox.

SIR: By command of Major-General McClellan, commanding the Army of the Potomac, I send by flag of truce Lieut. Marcus A. Throneburg, of the Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment, who has been exchanged for Lieutenant Perkins, of General Butterfield’s staff. Several officers of the Army of the United States who were taken prisoners and paroled for the purpose of effecting exchanges return within your lines under the same flag, having failed to accomplish their object.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 9, 1862.

Lieut. JOHN A. DARLING, Second Artillery, Aide-de-Camp:

You will proceed to-morrow with flag of truce up the James River, in charge of certain officers of the Federal Army, prisoners of war, released conditionally for the purpose of attempting to effect a mutual exchange of prisoners of war and who return to fulfill the conditions of their release.

{p.162}

Also one certain officer, prisoner of war (Lieutenant Throneburg, Twenty-eighth North Carolina Regiment), released on exchange for Lieutenant Perkins, U. S. Army, of General Butterfield’s staff.

Also certain (wounded) prisoners of war released on their parole to go to their homes.

Also certain political or state prisoners (citizens) released paroled to go to their homes.

You will land at City Point the above officers of the U. S. Army, also Lieutenant Throneburg, and the wounded prisoners so paroled.

You will then proceed to some point on the east bank of the James River, above City Point and beyond our lines, and there land the citizen prisoners. If not practicable to land them at such place beyond and above our lines you will also land them at City Point.

By command of Major-General Dix:

D. T. VAN BUREN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 23.}

HDQRS. 1ST DIV., DIST. OF JACKSON, TENN., Jackson, July 9, 1862.

All citizens over eighteen years of age residing inside the picket-lines of the U. S. forces at this place are required to appear before the provost-marshal by Saturday, 12th instant, 12 o’clock in, and take the prescribed oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States of America. All who fail to comply with this order by the above prescribed time will be arrested and disposed of as prisoners of war. Prisoners who have heretofore been paroled do not come within the purview of this order.

By command of Brig. Gen. John A. Logan:

J. J. DOLLINS, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 9, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, ill.

COLONEL: The Quartermaster-General does not approve of the system of sewerage and introduction of water-pipes proposed at Camp Douglas which I referred to him, nor has he as yet approved of any change in the condition of the barracks. You will therefore carry out as thoroughly as possible the system of police which I directed. Let the old sinks be as perfectly covered up as possible and have the new ones large and deep, with good shed houses over them. Have a thorough police of all the grounds daily and carry off the refuse trash of all kinds in carts; use lime plentifully everywhere. All of this work must be done by details from the prisoners so far as their own barracks and camp-grounds are concerned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 10, 1862.

ROBERT MURRAY, U. S. Marshal, New York.

SIR: You are authorized to visit and hold communication with the persons now held as prisoners of war at New York for the purpose of {p.163} ascertaining whether any and how many of them are willing to enter into the military service of the United States, and to make a report to this Department.

All officers having charge of such prisoners will regard this as a pass to see the prisoners in their custody.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 10, 1862.

Hon. JAMES L. BATES, Columbus, Ohio.

SIR: Various petitions have been received from citizens of Columbus and its vicinity, in your State, protesting against prisoners of war being allowed to be at large in the city on their mere parole of honor, and among these petitions is one signed by yourself and others.

The Secretary of War directs me to inform you that Colonel Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, was yesterday telegraphed to instantly arrest and transport to Johnson’s Island all the rebel prisoners who were at large on parole in Columbus and its vicinity. He was at the same time informed that except in cases of extreme illness this Department alone possesses and exercises authority to release rebel prisoners on parole, and that if in the event of such extreme illness it should become necessary for him to exercise the limited authority conferred upon him by General Orders, No. 67, he must have such sick prisoners transferred to the military prison at Johnson’s Island as soon as their condition will permit their removal.

A copy of the general order* above referred to is herewith inclosed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* See p. 30.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 10, 1862.

J. S. KEYES, U. S. Marshal, Boston, Mass.

SIR: The Secretary of War instructs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 5th instant informing this Department of the action of the grand jury in the case of James Lyons suspected of being one of the Sumter pirates.

When the examination is finally closed you will please to communicate the fact, so that the Department may immediately act thereon.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 10, 1862.

Hon. JOSHUA R. GIDDINGS, U. S. Consul-General, Montreal, Canada.

SIR: The Secretary of War desires me to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 7th instant covering a note from Mr. John Young, of Montreal, addressed lo you, desiring your assistance in procuring the release on parole of Capt. John Handy, of the Tenth Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, now a prisoner of war in Sandusky, Ohio.

{p.164}

Many applications of a like nature are daily received from classes of prisoners from those who have been pressed into the rebel ranks against their will, as well as from those who are merely willing to promise not again to take up arms against the Government until regularly exchanged, but it has been found necessary, for reasons which need not here be detailed, to meet these applications with a steady refusal. In the meantime the Department has been and still is making every effort to effect a general exchange of prisoners of war, when Captain Handy will of course be released.

However willing the Secretary might be under other circumstances to grant the request of Mr. Young, indorsed as it is by you, he feels it necessary to say that he cannot make this application an exception to the rule, which is daily enforced.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbus, July 10, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Detroit, Mich.

DEAR SIR: Your letter by Captain Lazelle is before me. There are so many matters of moment for consideration connected with Camp Chase prison that I regret your inability to visit the camp. As you cannot, how ever, allow me to present a few of the most prominent to you:

1. A new and more permanent prison is required. With the present prison we are compelled to maintain a guard at least three times as large as would be necessary with a proper structure.

2. The location of the prison should be changed. Prison discipline and camp instruction cannot be maintained together. I have therefore to recommend that you erect a new prison, located on a bluff about half way between this city and Camp Chase, and that you raise a special corps for guard duty. The term of the present guard, three-months’ men, expires on the 10th day of September next.

3. Authority should be given to some one on the spot here to grant discharges and paroles. We have in the prison insane, idiotic and maimed prisoners who should at once be discharged. Common humanity requires the occasional parole of prisoners dying by slow degrees from confinement. There are many confined in the prison, political as well as military prisoners, whose cases should at once be investigated and discharged.

4. When the pressing call for troops for the protection of Washington reached me I at once ordered the Sixty-first Regiment, then on guard duty at Camp Chase, to the field and employed a temporary guard from this city until my call for three-months’ men could be responded to. The expense of this temporary guard is between $500 and $600, which I beg you to see promptly paid. To secure accurate and reliable records of the prison I authorized the commandant to employ a clerk at the rate of $60 per month, and to aid myself in the examination of prisoners’ correspondence I have employed a clerk who works three hours a day at the rate of $30 per month, both of which accounts I beg to have allowed and paid.

In view of these suggestions I have requested Captain Lazelle not to take any definite action until after he shall have seen you. You may rely upon my best endeavors to aid you in the prompt and efficient discharge of your arduous duties.

Very respectfully, yours,

DAVID TOD.

{p.165}

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WASHINGTON, July 10, 1862.

Mr. J. S. LAMB.

DEAR SIR: I have received the letters of yourself, Garrett, Martin and Crawford and have laid them before the War Department with a statement of my own (verbal). I am assured that the matter will be investigated, and will I hope result in your all being released. You must exercise some patience. This great Government has many things to attend to. Kind regards to our friends.

I am, very truly, yours,

HORACE MAYNARD.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 10, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of Virginia.

GENERAL: I have sent a flag of truce to City Point with Lieutenant Throneburg, with two of our own paroled officers whose time expires to-night and who reported to me at the last moment, and some political prisoners whom I have discharged under a stringent parole as authorized by you. I would have ordered Lieutenant Darling, of the Second Artillery, who goes with them to report to you, but I suppose he could not avail himself of the protection of the flag up and down the river if he did not confine himself strictly to the purpose for which it is sent.

...

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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NEW YORK, N. Y., July 10, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The Baltic will be ready this evening and will take from Fort Columbus all the prisoners of war, including one officer, except a few sick, over a thousand , and from Fort Lafayette about 120, leaving there some forty political prisoners. Not a man is now in Castle William. I send a guard of 4 officers and 100 men. I shall visit Fort Delaware on my way back.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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NEW YORK, July 10, 1862.

Commodore PAULDING, Commanding Brooklyn Navy-Yard.

COMMODORE: I am here for the purpose of transferring the prisoners of war from the forts in this harbor to Fort Delaware. They number upward of 1,000 and will be sent in the steamer Baltic. I shall send a guard, but to avoid a rescue I think it proper also to have a convoy round to the Delaware River. Will you under these circumstances send a gun-boat on this service? Please address your answer to me at No. 6. State street.

I have the honor, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.166}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit July 10, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 5th instant. I am glad to be relieved of the responsibility of deciding that Camp Douglas cannot have large expenditures made to improve its sanitary condition. The condition of the camp excited the apprehensions of the officers and of the neighbors, and I felt bound to submit the plans which had been projected for the improvements, though I was doubtful of the necessity of it to the extent suggested. Much of the work inside was to have been done by the prisoners. Before I left I gave directions for a very general and thorough system of police to be carried out immediately, all of which was to be done by the prisoners, and if my orders are attended to as I think they will be the camp will be put in as good and wholesome state of police as it is susceptible of. But there are some improvements which are indispensable. Some of the quarters which were originally put up as stables have board roofs which leak very much, besides being in a falling condition. These should be set up again and covered with waterproof roofs. Some old stables on the lowest ground in the camp might be used for this purpose, and by removing them a part of the fence might be moved in so as to lessen the extent of the camp and at the same time much improve the condition of the fence, which is now no obstacle to the escape of the prisoners. I cannot say what the expenses of these repairs would be, but as much old lumber would be used they cannot amount to much. Wherever the labor of prisoners can be used it will be done and as much economy observed as possible.

I have just received the accompanying note* from Doctor Bellows, president of the Sanitary Commission, which will show you what he thinks of the location and state of the camp. I do not agree with him as to its fearful condition, nor do I think it is past being put in a wholesome condition. When he asked my permission to visit the camp in his official capacity I granted it, with the request that he should make no report on its condition, as I should do that myself. I shall of course release him from any pledge of silence he may be under to me. As the doctor had not seen the camp when he made the promise he could scarcely have been influenced to give it by any impression that he may have taken up that I intended to move the camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* See p. 106.

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CAMP DOUGLAS, Chicago, July 10, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In order to save correspondence please instruct me on the following points:

1. Can prisoners of war whose term of life is evidently short be released upon parole, or on taking the oath of allegiance, or on any terms?

2. Will those who furnish substantial proof that they were forced into the rebel service and desire to take the oath of allegiance and give bonds be released?

{p.167}

3. In case a general exchange of prisoners is arranged will Government insist on exchanging those who do not desire it and compel them to go South again as Confederate soldiers, and if not what will be done with such prisoners?

4. Are the balances which appear on Colonel Mulligan’s ledger to be due prisoners claims on the United States and will they be made good in case Colonel Mulligan does not supply the deficiency reported?

In order to gain time and not compromise the colonel I am only certifying orders to the amount of one-half of prisoners’ balances, said half not to exceed $5, as, if this is only personal indebtedness of his and he should not liquidate it, the loss must fall on all his prisoner creditors alike, and it would not be fair to pay the account in full till the fund is exhausted and let the remainder get nothing. I am much embarrassed about this matter and beg for your advice if you cannot instruct. I hear nothing from Colonel Mulligan yet.

I remain, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[JOSEPH H. TUCKER,] Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Infantry, Commanding Post.

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OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Wheeling, July 10, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SIR: The following are and have been permanent posts in this department: Wheeling, on the Ohio River; Grafton, on Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 100 miles from Wheeling; Cumberland, Md., on Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 200 miles from Wheeling; Clarksburg, Va., on Northwestern Virginia Railroad, twenty-three miles from Grafton; Parkersburg, Va., on Ohio River, ninety-six miles from Wheeling; Gallipolis, Ohio, on Ohio River, four miles from mouth of Kanawha; Charleston, Va., on Kanawha River, sixty miles from mouth; Gauley Bridge, Va., on junction of New River and Kanawha; Raleigh Court-House, Raleigh County, Va.; Guyandotte, Va., on Ohio River; Buckhannon, Upshur County, Va.; Romney, Hampshire County, Va.

The following have been lately added within its limits: Martinsburg, on Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, eighty miles from Cumberland; Winchester, Frederick County, Va. I will do all in my power to procure from the commanding officers at these points the monthly returns required by you. Having had a full conversation with Captain Lazelle I do not refer to the matters discussed between us, knowing you will be duly advised of the same. I leave for the Kanawha District to-morrow afternoon. I shall endeavor to carry out all your instructions as contained in the circular to be printed, of which please send me several copies.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

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OFFICE OF THE QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL OF OHIO, Columbus, July 10, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I inclose to you some letters sent to Governor Tod and handed to me by him. They relate to the security of Johnson’s Island, which the Governor thinks had not a sufficient guard, and informs me that upon his suggestion the Michigan (naval steamer) was sent to {p.168} that vicinity by the Secretary of the Navy, and he further has informed me that he ordered there a company of volunteers as a further temporary security. He believes that with a small guard the danger is imminent of an attempt at rescue by unscrupulous parties on the Canada side, hired for the purpose by wealthy friends of prisoners confined at Johnson’s Island. Of that matter and the necessity for his precautionary measures you will best be able to judge.

With the highest respect, I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

[Inclosure.]

TOLEDO, July 1, 1862.

General CHARLES W. HILL, Columbus.

DEAR SIR: The inclosed has just reached me this morning. You may judge as to the chance of its being correct in information. You will note the closing sentence which says. “I am not deceived.”

Your friend, truly,

RICHARD MOTT.

[Sub-inclosure.]

WINDSOR, June 28, 1862.

RICHARD MOTT.

DEAR FRIEND: I have good reason for believing that an attempt will soon be made to release prisoners on Johnson’s Island. I cannot ascertain facts sufficient, however, to warrant me in saying that certain Canadians, well-known and prominent men, are aiding Kentucky fugitives here and at Malden to carry out their plot. Our Government should at least be put on their guard. I am not deceived.

Yours, truly,

ISAAC N. HATHAWAY.

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OZARK, July 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. E. B. BROWN.

GENERAL: The exchange which you offer cannot be accepted by me.

1. Thompson Pearce, Private J. L. Stevens and Private Lewis J. Davis being at present at Springfield held as prisoners cannot be allowed to take the oath, but must be held by U. S. forces as prisoners of war and exchanged as prisoners of war.

2. John Brettoni and R. G. Lauderdale are not at present prisoners of war from the fact that they are not members of the C. S. Army. If you will have the kindness to send the three prisoners who are members of my battalion to me I will have the ten men for whom I came to exchange released, provided that you will give me credit for the remaining seven. If above conditions cannot be granted our communication will close.

General, I am, very respectfully, your humble and obedient servant,

C. H. CLIFFORD, Major, C. S. Army.

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BERKELEY, VA., July 11, 1862.

The PRESIDENT:

To-day received letter from General R. E. Lee offering to return to me on parole our wounded. I have accepted the offer and will send transports as soon as he designates the place.

...

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

{p.169}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, Va., July 11, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose to you a letter from General R. E. Lee under date of the 9th instant, received to-day, proposing to deliver to us our wounded prisoners in his hands; also a copy of my reply to the same. I commend to your attention the humane spirit evinced by General Lee,and I also beg leave to commend to your consideration a mutual release of all prisoners upon parole, exchanging as far as may be practicable. I am satisfied that any views which you may deem just and equal will be acceded to at once by the other party, and I deem it a duty to our soldiers who are suffering in captivity and whose condition tortures the heart of the nation to meet this subject in the best spirit of civilized warfare, and at once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 9, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the United States.

GENERAL: Notwithstanding such care as we have been able to give the wounded of your army who have fallen into our hands, in addition to that of your own medical officers, I learn with regret that they are dying rapidly. In order to alleviate their sufferings and to facilitate their recovery as far as possible I am willing to release them on parole, provided you can receive them at a point to which we can transport them without adding to their distress.

If it meets with your convenience I will endeavor to transport them to some point on the Pamunkey or James River whence you can take them in your transports.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 11, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 9th in relation to my wounded men in your possession and to express my cordial thanks for the humanity which dictated it.

I will be glad to receive the men in question at such point on the James River as may be most convenient to you. I can receive 1,500 to-day or say 2,300 to-morrow. Should it be proper or practicable I can send ambulances to any hospitals you may designate.

For such as cannot be removed I would be glad to send ice or any other hospital stores and comforts that you may deem advisable or necessary.

Again thanking you for the spirit which pervades your letter, and asking how I can best reciprocate it,

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.170}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 11, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: If agreeable to you I would be glad to forward by the transports which go for the wounded the baggage, &c., of my wounded and unwounded officers in your hands.

I will gladly receive and forward anything intended for your officers in possession of my Government.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, July 11, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to forward herewith a letter* with two newspaper slips inclosed therein received to-day from General R. E. Lee, bearing date the 6th instant, and relating to two persons alleged to have been executed by authorities of the United States as enemies of the Government. I also send a copy of my reply.

The General Orders, No. 71, from the War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, covers every case of prisoners taken in arms against the United States and forbids their execution except by order of the President. I suggest whether this should not be extended to all prisoners charged with hostility to the Government. Crimes against individuals, as murder, rape, arson, &c., may be safely left to subordinate authorities as far as they fall under military jurisdiction, and the exigencies of warfare require that they should be summarily and often capitally punished. The case is different in regard to political offenses.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

* Omitted here; Lee to McClellan, July 6, p. 134.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 11, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt to-day of your communication of the 6th instant respecting the alleged execution of Mr. William B. Mumford at New Orleans and Col. John L. Owen in Missouri by authorities of the United States.

I have forwarded your letter and the two newspaper slips included therein to the Secretary of War. I am wholly ignorant of the cases complained of in your letter. On the receipt of the communication from the Secretary of War in response to your complaint I will at once address you on the subject. I am glad that nothing has occurred among the forces under my command which can in any point of view subject any prisoners taken from them to any retaliatory action under any circumstances.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.171}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, July 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

I request to be furnished at your earliest convenience with a list of the prisoners taken by this army now detained at the various posts at the North, stating the company and regiment of the prisoners and where taken. In the confusion naturally incident to a battle some prisoners have been sent to the rear and found their way North without any register of them by the provost-marshals here. A complete list is indispensable to me and it is important I should be furnished with it at once. It is presumed that Colonel Hoffman can furnish the lists. If not, then the various commanders of the forts of detention at the North can furnish them. The lists should embrace the names of all prisoners taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula.

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 11, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.

SIR: In answer to a telegram received at this office from Col. Lewis Merrill stating that there is no camp near Jefferson Barracks, and inquiring whether the camp of instruction at Benton Barracks is the camp referred to in General Orders, No. 72, I have the honor to reply that the commanding officer of the department may exercise his own discretion as to whether he will establish the camp for paroled prisoners at Jefferson Barracks or at Benton Barracks.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 11, 1862.

Maj. Gen. N. P. BANKS, Commanding Army Corps.

SIR: In order that the major-general commanding this department may comply with an order from the War Department directing him to release on parole the same number of rebel prisoners belonging to Jackson’s army that Jackson released of our men I have the honor to request that you will if it is in your power furnish me with a list of the U. S. soldiers who were released on parole by Jackson.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[WM. D. WHIPPLE,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. W. W. MORRIS, Commanding Fort McHenry.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you in reply to your communication of the 10th instant that the commanding general deems it inexpedient {p.172} to provide political prisoners with stationery at the expense of Government. He can see no reason why it should not be done at their own cost.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[WM. D. WHIPPLE,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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DETROIT, July 11, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

Have just returned from Sandusky. I have given but one parole to a chaplain very ill. The paroles at Columbus are without my knowledge or approbation.

W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 11, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith petitions* with letters from the provost-marshal-general at Wheeling, Va., in favor of Sylvanus Harper, Jacob Phares, Solomon Hedrick, Copeland Thompson, James Bennett, Isaac Hinckle, Laban Teter, Joseph Lantz, John W. Dolly and George Bennett, prisoners of war, at Wheeling, Va. I have heretofore referred other petitions in favor of most of these men to the Department. Major Darr after looking carefully into these cases recommends that they be released on taking the oath of allegiance and giving bonds for good behavior, which recommendation is approved by Governor Peirpoint. From what appears in these papers and in statements made to me by Mr. Abram Hinckle, one of the petitioners, I respectfully recommend that these men be released on the terms suggested by Major Darr.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 11, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I beg leave respectfully to request that you will send me the authority in writing to make the repairs and changes which were suggested and agreed upon when you were here, viz: The purchase of necessary horses and carts or drays for service in camp, also portable saw for sawing wood; necessary repairs of fences and barracks, and the building of a bake-house for the camp. I would respectfully inform you also that I regard it as of vital importance to the health of the camp and safety of the prisoners of war that the sewer spoken of should be constructed and the water taken into camp. The necessity {p.173} for all prisoners of war to resort to the extreme northeast corner of the camp makes that a weak point besides affording an insufficient supply of water, and the water is setting back under the walls of Mrs. Bradley’s house adjoining camp (of which complaint was made to you when here) to the extent that will cause her serious injury. Besides we want the water to pass through the vaults of the sinks to be constructed over the sewer proposed. It is very desirable also that I should be authorized at once to draw in on the south line by taking down the fence on that side and putting it up on the new line, and take down the old stables formerly for cavalry horses and using the lumber for repairs and perhaps a new barrack or two inside the new line. I do not overestimate the importance of these two or three measures stated and the necessity of prompt action.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding Post.

P. S.-Captain Potter, assistant quartermaster, appears to desire to co-operate with me in his department.

J. H. T.

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ON BOARD STEAMER JOHN TUCKER, July 11, 1862.

Major-General DIX.

SIR: I have the honor to report that in pursuance of your order dated July 9, 1862, Headquarters Army Corps, Fort Monroe, Va., directing me “to proceed with steamer John Tucker under flag of truce up York River to White House and then to receive all the sick and wounded who were in the hospital near Cumberland Landing,” I took on board all necessary rations and medical stores and proceeded with all possible expedition to and up the York River, but was met by an officer in charge of a flag of truce at Cumberland Landing, who placed in my hands the inclosed communication requesting me to detain the steamer at that point for reasons which are therein made manifest.

I then proceeded with ambulances and under charge of Lieutenant Clopton, C. S. Army, to the hospital at Talleysville and safely removed to the steamer the inmates, 106 in number (a list* of whose names and regiments you will please find inclosed), together with all personal and Government property in their possession.

This done I returned with them to this point where I have the honor to await your further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILBER LEITCH, Surgeon-in-Chief.

* Omitted.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP NEAR TALLEYSVILLE, VA., July 9, 1862.

The OFFICER IN CHARGE U. S. STEAMER PROCEEDING UNDER FLAG OF TRUCE TO CONVEY PRISONERS RELEASED UNDER PAROLE FROM TALLEYSVILLE.

SIR: I have the honor to request that you will stop your boat at Cumberland Landing, as that was the point to which I authorized Lieutenant Clopton, in charge of flag of truce on yesterday, to consent to your coming.

{p.174}

Doctor Weisel, the surgeon in charge of hospital at Talleysville, would himself prefer Cumberland Landing, as the roads are much better to that point than to the White House Landing.

This communication will be handed to you by William E. Clopton, first lieutenant, acting commissary of subsistence.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

THOMAS F. GOODE, Colonel, Commanding Confederate Forces near Talleysville.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Fort Monroe:

The President directs me to say that he authorizes you to negotiate a general exchange of prisoners with the enemy.

You will take immediate measures for that purpose, observing proper caution against any recognition of the rebel Government and confining the negotiation to the subject of exchange. The cartel between the United States and Great Britain has been considered a proper regulation as to the relative exchange value of prisoners. Your note received this morning is answered by mail.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 12, 1862.

Governor ANDREW JOHNSON, Nashville, Tenn.:

The President authorizes you to appoint a provost-marshal to exercise the jurisdiction and authority of that office under you within the city of Nashville. He has ordered Colonel Campbell to be released from arrest and that Captain Greene without delay turn over his command to the officer next in rank and leave the city of Nashville and report himself in person to General Buell. The President hopes this will be satisfactory to you and that you will use efforts to prevent any disputes or collisions of authority between your subordinates and those of General Buell.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

–––

WASHINGTON, July 12, 1862.

Col. LEWIS D. CAMPBELL, Nashville, Tenn.:

Your immediate release from arrest has been ordered.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 12, 1862.

Captain GREENE, Nashville, Tenn.:

The President having been informed that you have put under arrest Col. Lewis D. Campbell, who was acting under authority of Governor Andrew Johnson as provost-marshal, he directs that Colonel Campbell be immediately discharged from arrest. He also orders that hereafter {p.175} you abstain from interfering with or resisting any order of Governor Johnson or with any officer acting under his authority. The President also directs that without delay you turn over your command to the officer next in rank and leave the city of Nashville and report yourself in person to General Buell.

By order of the President:

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

–––

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 12, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 9th instant covering copy of a letter from the French minister and one from M. Heine relative to the physical and mental condition of Pierre Soulé, a prisoner at Fort Lafayette.

Immediately upon the delivery of your note a telegram was addressed to the commandant at Fort Lafayette inquiring of the condition of Pierre Soulé and a reply (a copy of which is inclosed) was received on the 10th instant, which will enable you to assure the French minister and M. Heine that he was then in perfect health.

This is the third time within as many weeks that it has been represented to the Department that Mr. Soulé was sick, and in each case the statement has turned out to be absolutely without foundation. He has not been ill since his confinement at Fort Lafayette.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

FORT HAMILTON, N. Y. Harbor, July 9, 1862.

Hon. C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Washington City, D. C.

SIR: Inclosed you will please find papers marked Nos. 1 and 2. The first one is an answer to your telegraph dispatch of this day, which was sent by telegraph to you. With regard to paper No. 2 I do not know whether Mr. Soulé would desire me to send a surgeon to examine him without his first expressing a wish to that effect. I would be glad if the Department would give me express instructions on this subject.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

[Sub-inclosure No. 1.]

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y. Harbor, July 9, 1862.

Lieut. Col. M. BURKE, Fort Hamilton.

COLONEL: In obedience to your instructions I have the honor to report that Pierre Soulé, prisoner confined at this post, is in perfect health.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. O. WOOD, First Lieutenant, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Post.

{p.176}

[Sub-inclosure No. 2.]

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y. Harbor, July 9, 1862.

Lieut. Col. M. BURKE, Fort Hamilton.

COLONEL: I would respectfully recommend that the doctor come over and see Mr. Soulé, when he could certify as to the state of his health.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. O. WOOD, First Lieutenant, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Post.

–––

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 12, 1862.

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I have appointed Surg. J. S. D. Cullen, C. S. Army, to superintend the removal of your sick and wounded, who will designate the time and place at which their reception will be most convenient and easy. As they are now dispersed over a large area I fear the process will necessarily be slow but I hope it will be accomplished without injury to them.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 12, 1862.

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: In reply to your letter of yesterday’s date I have the honor to inform you that I have no objection to your sending the baggage of your wounded and unwounded officers in our hands. I would recommend that only the necessary clothing be sent.

I am, with high respect, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of Virginia.

GENERAL: I inclose a copy of a telegraphic dispatch from the Secretary of War. I had hut a few moments with the President while lie was here, but understood him to assent to the suggestion of the Secretary of War.

Will you please communicate to me your wishes on the subject.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A-DIX, Major-General.

{p.177}

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 8, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

General McClellan shortly before the late battles made an arrangement for the exchange of prisoners taken on either side by the forces before Richmond. It is the desire of this Department to carry the arrangement into effect. I wish you would communicate with him. I also with the consent of the President whom you will consult authorize you to negotiate for a general exchange of all prisoners taken and held or paroled on both sides; the exchange to be on the principles of the cartel between the United States and Great Britain in the last war with that power.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of Virginia.

GENERAL: I sent a dispatch from Colonel Campbell this morning, received just as the steamer was leaving. I hear nothing further in regard to crossing troops over the Chickahominy.

The flag of truce referred to by Colonel Campbell was sent by me to Cumberland at the request of the commanding officer at the White House to receive the sick of General Kearny’s hospital who have been paroled by order of General Lee, and who arrived here this morning. They number 106 and are nearly all well and speak in strong terms of the kindness with which they were treated by the insurgent officers.

Captain Gibson’s battery will be sent to you the moment we can get transports. We are much pressed for transportation. It is in readiness to move.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 12, 1862.

Col. T. F. GOODE, Commanding near Talleysville, Va.

COLONEL: I send by Lieutenant Barstow, one of my aides-de-camp, under a flag of truce some sixty civilians who have been a short time in custody for public reasons and whom I have released on parole. They are commended to your courtesy with the hope that there may be no impediment to their speedy restoration to their families and homes. We have provided for their comfort as well as we could while they were with us, and their subsistence will be furnished until they are delivered to you.

I avail myself of the occasion to return you my thanks for your kindness to the sick at General Kearny’s hospital. They are to go up the Chesapeake Bay in the John Tucker, the same steamer which received them, and in order to avoid the necessity of her return to this post they will remain on board until the civilians are delivered to you and then proceed to their destination. The latter would have been sent to you when she went up before but they were not ready.

I am, respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

{p.178}

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 12, 1862.

Capt. WILSON BARSTOW, Aide-de-Camp.

SIR: You will proceed in charge of flag of truce with certain prisoners (citizens) released on parole, landing them at some convenient point beyond our lines on the York or Pamunkey Rivers. Thence returning to Yorktown, at which place the flag of truce will cease. You will there receive the balance of the company of the Eighth New York Militia (a part of which said company is now on duty at Point Lookout) and convey such troops to Point Lookout, there to act as a guard to the hospitals at that place. Thence proceeding with the convalescent paroled officers and men to Annapolis (who will accompany you from Fort Monroe), delivering them to the commanding officer at that post, in accordance with General Orders, No. 72, War Department, June 28, 1862. All which being performed you will return to this place.

By command of Major-General Dix:

D. T. VAN BUREN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 12, 1862.

Col. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Mississippi.

COLONEL: I have the honor to respectfully suggest to the major-general commanding the propriety of modifying General Orders, No. 13,* Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, March 30, 1862. This order requires that sentences of military commissions extending to confiscation of property or imprisonment for a longer period than thirty days be confirmed by the commanding general of the department, while the law requires sentences of general courts-martial to be so confirmed only when they amount to death or dismissal of a commissioned officer.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

* Omitted here; see Vol. I, this Series, p. 177.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 12, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit:

Furnish as soon as possible a complete list of prisoners taken by Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, State company and regiment, place where taken and place where confined.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Dr. HENRY W. BELLOWS, President of the Sanitary Commission, New York.

SIR: I received your favor of the 9th instant* yesterday on my return from Sandusky and I hasten to reply to it. When I requested you to {p.179} make no report in relation to the condition of Camp Douglas it was with no desire that there should be any concealment about it, and if I had seen you at the time I saw Mr. Blatchford I would have told you to make any report on the subject you saw fit. You are now perfectly at liberty to take such steps in the matter as you think proper.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Commanding, Fort Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: I am required to furnish to the War Department a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, the place where captured, when captured and the place where confined. Will you have the kindness to direct that lists corresponding to the above instructions of all prisoners within the range of your command be made out and forwarded to me with as little delay as practicable? I have the honor to inclose General Orders, Nos. 32* and 67,* from the War Department, which you may not have seen. I will forward to the assistant adjutant-general at Fort Monroe blanks for monthly returns of prisoners and blank rolls which I respectfully request may be distributed to those places where prisoners of war are held.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Omitted here; for General Orders, No. 32, see Vol. III, this Series, p. 417, and for General Orders, No. 67, see p. 30, this Vol.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 12, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a report made to me by Col. J. H. Tucker, commanding Camp Douglas, in relation to the records of prisoners and the condition of funds belonging to prisoners at Camp Douglas. By this report it appears that of the moneys received by Colonel Mulligan for prisoners of war there is a deficiency of $1,450.75. There are no papers of any kind left at the post by Colonel Mulligan to show what became of this money and I respectfully ask for instructions how to proceed in this matter. Can the money of which the prisoners have been defrauded be refunded to them in any way?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[First indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 17, 1862.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.180}

[Second indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 19, 1862.

The Adjutant-General will instruct Colonel Mulligan to report promptly and directly to this Department upon the matter herein referred to.

By order:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP DOUGLAS, Chicago, July 9, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In accordance with your directions of June 29 to report to you, first, the condition in which I found the records of the camp on taking command; second, the amount of funds turned over to me belonging to prisoners of war and the condition of accounts relating thereto-third, the amount of hospital and other funds if there be any; fourth, and all matters relating to the sanitary condition of the camp, I would respectfully report: First, that I found no regular files of any description at the post quarters. There were some papers in the pigeon-holes, but they mostly referred to matters prior to Colonel Mulligan’s assuming command. Such as they were they were filed with no system, and on being carefully examined threw but little light on prisoners’ business. Second, I received from Colonel Cameron the sum of $2,663.88 and receipted to him for that amount, specifying the description of funds, $2,628.88 being prisoners’ funds and $35 post funds. The discount for collection of drafts, depreciated money and bills utterly worthless is $61.92, leaving in my hands available funds of prisoners received by Colonels Mulligan and Cameron to the amount of $2,566.96. Against this there is a list of prisoners’ balances drawn off Colonel Mulligan’s ledger (the only book that was kept) by Corpl. W. B. Mulford, of the Twenty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Irish Brigade, amounting to $3,310.25 and a list of moneys received for prisoners by Colonel Cameron made by same party amounting to $707.50; aggregate, $4,017.75, leaving a deficiency of $1,450.79. Third, I am not able to give the amount of hospital funds. It is in the hands of Captain Christopher, U. S. Army, and no report has been received from him in regard to it though one has been called for. Fourth, answer to this will be the subject of another communication.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel, Commanding Post.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 12, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to return herewith papers in relation to Drs. J. L. H. Sessum, E. R. Crockett, S. E. Winnemore and R. H. Andrews, prisoners of war at Camp Butler, together with such further proof as can be offered to establish that they are in the position of medical officers and therefore entitled to their discharge.

{p.181}

There are other cases like the above and there are hospital stewards who have been serving as medical officers. Shall they be considered as having a claim to be discharged under General Orders, No. 60?

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

CAMP BUTLER, near Springfield, Ill., April 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Dr. E. R. Crockett, of the State of Tennessee, begs leave to make the following statement and respectfully requests your consideration of the same.

He states that he was within the Southern lines at Fort Donelson at the time of its surrender to the Federal forces on the 16th of February last; that nevertheless he was in nowise connected with the Southern Army nor was he bearing arms in any capacity against the United States or any of its authorities, nor had he ever done so; that he was at Fort Donelson with no hostile intentions toward the United States; that his presence there was induced solely by the illness of his brother, R. B. Crockett, of the Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment, to whom he was then up on a visit.

Further Dr. E. R. Crockett would state that the Federal authorities upon taking possession of Fort Donelson as aforesaid did not regard him as a prisoner of war nor was he ordered by them into line as such, but that the continued illness of his brother the said R. B. Crockett induced him the said E. R. Crockett to attend him to this place; that his presence here is therefore voluntary upon his part; that now his brother having been for some time recovered lie has been seeking to return home, but that the U. S. military authorities at this place have restrained his so doing and continue still so to do.

He therefore respectfully asks that you pass an order for his release from his present confinement or take such action in the premises as may cause such release, whichever may be consistent with the powers vested in you and in accordance with your kindness of purpose.

Respectfully,

E. R. CROCKETT.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Camp Butler, April 9, 1862.

From all the information I can gather the within statement is correct. Doctor Crockett has been busily employed in his profession attending to the sick prisoners.

P. MORRISON, Colonel Eighth Regiment, Commanding Camp Butler.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, April 12, 1862.

Doctor Crockett will be retained at Camp Butler on his parole to attend the sick prisoners of war.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Third indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 2, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Colonel Hoffman for investigation and report.

By order of the Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.182}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

CAMP BUTLER, ILL., June 23, 1862.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR.

DEAR SIR: I learn that an order has come to this post liberating all Confederate surgeons. I would respectfully submit the following for your consideration:

I joined Company C, First Alabama Regiment, in the capacity as private surgeon to that company. I was never mustered in the Confederate service as a private nor have I received any remuneration from that Government. I was to be paid by the company. A few days after my arriving at Island No. 10 I was appointed by the lieutenant commanding to the position of surgeon of the floating battery. His certificate (a copy) I inclose you. Before I had time to get my commission we were taken prisoners. I was doing the duties of surgeon up to the time I was taken. On my arrival at Camp Butler the certificate which Lieutenant Averett (commanding floating battery in the C. S. Navy) gave me entitled me to the position of surgeon to the sick prisoners, which position I have held and still hold. Dr. J. Cooper McKee, medical superintendent of Confederate prisoners, and Major Fonda, commanding post, will certify that I have been doing the duties of surgeon since I have been here.

Hoping, dear sir, that your decision may be favorable to me, I remain, yours, very respectfully,

S. E. WINNEMORE.

[Sub-inclosure.]

NEW MADRID, MO., April 10, 1862.

This is to certify that Doctor Winnemore has been doing the duty of surgeon on board the floating battery under my command, and was on duty as surgeon at the time of her abandonment.

S. W. AVERETT, Lieutenant Commanding, C. S. Navy.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

CAMP BUTLER, Springfield, Ill., June 23, 1862.

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Drs. J. L. H. Sessum, E. R. Crockett, S. E. Winnemore and R. H. Andrews, prisoners of war, confined at this camp since last spring, have been detailed and acting as medical officers to the prisoners of war up to this date. These gentlemen have not been regularly commissioned, but are desirous of returning home, and would like to know if the late order releasing all medical officers now prisoners of war is applicable to their cases.

JOHN G. FONDA, Major Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Post.

J. COOPER MCKEE, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army, Superintendent Prison Hospitals.

[Inclosure No. 4.]

HEADQUARTERS, Camp Butler, July 7, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit.

COLONEL: Yours of the 5th instant asking in what capacity Drs. J. L. H. Sessum, E. R. Crockett, S. E. Winnemore and R. H. Andrews {p.183} appear on the roll is received. I have examined the rolls and do not find them reported as surgeons. I will state, however, as a matter of justice to those gentlemen that they are practicing physicians and surgeons and that they have performed duty as such during their imprisonment here. Doctor Alexander, who is also here, had been appointed a surgeon prior to his surrender, but if discharged will continue on duty here with the prisoners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. FONDA, Major Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Post.

[Inclosure No. 5.]

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I was acting as assistant surgeon when captured and have been performing such duty up to this time. Would like to be released if the order releasing surgeons is applicable to my case. If released from being a prisoner of war I wish to remain here and continue my professional services as long as necessary.

Yours, respectfully,

J. L. H. SESSUM.

[Indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 7, 1862.

As the plea of being an acting assistant surgeon is open to abuse it should not be entertained as ground of release without other proof than the prisoner’s own statement. Respectfully referred to the commissary-general of prisoners for investigation and report.

By order:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure No. 6.]

STATE OF ILLINOIS, Sangamon County, Camp Butler:

Personally appeased before me, J. G. Fonda, colonel commanding post, the undersigned, who being duly sworn depose as follows:

That Dr. S. E. Winnemore was elected private physician of Company C, First Alabama Regiment; that a few days after arriving at Island No. 10 the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore was appointed by S. W. Averett, lieutenant commanding floating battery, as surgeon of said floating battery, and that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore was performing the duties of surgeon at the time of her abandonment, and that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore being taken prisoner did not have time to get his commission. They further state that the said Dr. S. E. Winnemore has never been in any hostile attitude toward the Government of the United States.

JOHN N. CANTEY, J. A. PRIM, JNO. A. WOOD, W. H. BLACKMAN, C. T. HRABOWSKI, JOHN BURTON, Enlisted men of Company C, First Alabama Regiment, C. S. Army.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of July, A. D. 1862.

JOHN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Camp Butler.

{p.184}

[Inclosure No. 7.]

SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 10, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In reply to your communication of the 3d instant I have the honor to state that I have obtained such additional evidence as would confirm the statements of Doctors Winnemore and Crockett and forward it to you inclosed. Doctors Winnemore and Crockett are on duty as surgeons, each having charge of a hospital of prisoners of war. They have performed their duty faithfully and appear to be gentlemen of honesty and integrity.

S. E. Winnemore appears on the rolls as surgeon Company C, First Alabama Regiment. E. R. Crockett does not appear on the rolls. I will by this evening have completed my inspection of this camp. Will you please send me any additional instructions that may be requisite? The rolls of the prisoners of war do not appear to be well posted up.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

[Sub-inclosure No. 1.]

STATE OF ILLINOIS, Sangamon County, Camp Butler:

Personally appeared before me, J. G. Fonda, colonel commanding post, R. B. Crockett, Company A, Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment, and in due form made oath that Dr. E. R. Crockett was at Fort Donelson on the 16th of February last when the fort was surrendered; that he was there waiting upon myself (R. B. Crockett), at that time sick, and that for the same reason attended me to this place; that he (the said E. R. Crockett) was a private citizen and in nowise connected with the Confederate Southern Army; that he never took up arms against the Government of the United States nor aided its enemies.

R. B. CROCKETT.

Sworn to and subscribed before me on the 9th day of July. 1862.

JOHN G. FONDA, Major, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, Commanding Camp Butler.

[Sub-inclosure No. 2.]

CAMP BUTLER, Springfield, Ill., July 8, 1862.

I certify that Dr. E. R. Crockett, confined at this camp as a prisoner of war, has been on duty as a surgeon since his arrival here and that he has performed his duties faithfully.

J. COOPER MCKEE, Asst. Surg., U. S. Army, Supt. Prisoners’ Hospital.

–––

DETROIT, July 12, 1862.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND:

I have no rolls of prisoners taken by the Army of the Potomac. Will call for them immediately.

W. HOFFMAN.

{p.185}

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I would respectfully inquire if I am at liberty to order supplies of clothing for prisoners of war at the Western camps and by what depots it should be furnished.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Col. J. DIMICK, First U. S. Artillery, Comdg. Fort Warren, Boston Harbor, Mass.

COLONEL: The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me with a list as soon as practicable?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, Fifth Infty., U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Columbus, N. Y. Harbor.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 6th instant with the list of prisoners from Fort Pulaski is received. The clothing which you refer to at the close of your letter is I presume in the hands of your quartermaster and is for issue to the prisoners whenever you think it proper. The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me a list as early as practicable?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

–––

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 11th instant is received. To much of it my letter of last evening is a sufficient reply. In the matter of furnishing horse-carts and other articles for policing purposes I thought it was so well understood when I was at the camp that until now I had felt sure {p.186} they had all been provided and that the work of putting the camp in a wholesome state of police was by this time well in progress if not already completed. Please call upon Captain Potter for as many of these things as may be absolutely necessary. Three carts to belong permanently to the camp, with as many more hired while the necessity for active sanitary measures is so urgent, will perhaps be the best arrangement, but if more could be used to advantage have enough to perform the work promptly. I instructed Captain Potter also to purchase the portable saw-mill, but as it has not yet been done you may let that rest till we see the result of the negotiations for a general exchange of prisoners which the papers this morning announce to be in prospect of satisfactory settlement. If an exchange is agreed upon there will be no occasion for the mill. When I was in Chicago I promised Mrs. Bradley that I would give such orders in relation to the waste of water at the camp as would insure that her house should no longer be injured by the neglect of this matter, and I gave the necessary orders which should have protected her from the nuisance. Will you please see that proper arrangements are made immediately to prevent such a waste of water as has been tolerated to day and to carry what is unavoidably spilt away from Mrs. Bradley’s house? I beg you to have this matter attended to at once, as there is no possible excuse why Mrs. B[radley] should have suffered so seriously and so unnecessarily. Have an estimate made of the cost of laying water pipes to a more convenient point in the camp and I will refer the question to the Quartermaster-General. As I said at the camp I wish an estimate made of the cost of a bake-house before I order its construction. I have referred the matter of moving the fence, repairing the barracks, &c., to the Quartermaster-General. This work too will not be necessary if there is to be a general exchange of prisoners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army, Springfield, Ill.

CAPTAIN: Your report of the 8th is received. I inclose herewith the orders* of the War Department giving me authority to regulate the matter of the saving of rations and the regulations* which I have issued in virtue of this authority. Please furnish Captain Edwards, assistant commissary of subsistence, with a copy of each, and if he refuses to be governed by them desire him to put it in writing and report to me. The contract which you sent me in the first paragraph leaves it at the option of the Government whether to receive the rations on the provision return or in bulk. Private understanding has no force. Please say to the commanding officer, Major Fonda, that I direct the prisoners’ rations to be received in bulk hereafter. The difference between what is drawn and what is due will of course be what the commissary will pay for. The Army Regulations and recent orders provide for the purchase of surplus rations. No further fencing can be erected without authority from the Quartermaster-General. Give me the length of the {p.187} fence you speak of and an estimate of its cost. I wish you to see the regulations which I inclose put in force. Have the returns for June made out immediately and the rolls of all prisoners completed with the least possible delay. Report to me what their condition is at this time. I will write to you again in reply to your letter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* See pp. 30, 152.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Capt. J. A. POTTER, Assistant Quartermaster, Chicago, Ill.

CAPTAIN: Please furnish the clothing required in the accompanying estimates,* giving the inferior clothing you have on hand which is not suitable for issue to our own troops.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

Capt. A. A. GIBSON, Second Artillery, Commanding Fort Delaware, Del.

CAPTAIN: The War Department has called for a list of all prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac since its arrival on the Peninsula, giving the State, rank, regiment and company, when captured and the place where captured. If there are any of these prisoners in your charge will you please furnish me a list as early as practicable? The three political prisoners which you speak of in your letter of the 4th instant will remain at Fort Delaware.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 12, 1862.

J. T. HUBBARD, Lebanon, Mo.

SIR: Your letter of the 3d instant asking that your brother-in-law, T. A. Spencer, may be released from confinement at Camp Douglas has been referred to me, and in reply I have to inform you that Mr. Spencer cannot be released unless you can establish that he was forced into the rebel service against his will. On such proof the matter would be referred to the secretary of War and possibly he would order his release.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.188}

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 12, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: On the 8th instant I inclosed you copies of correspondence with headquarters Department of the Mississippi relative to release of certain prisoners. I am to-day in receipt of the following reply to mine of July 1 (copy of which you have), viz:

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Corinth, July 7, 1862.

General Halleck is empowered by the War Department to release such prisoners as he may deem proper. Colonel Tucker will obey orders.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

May I ask your immediate instructions?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 12, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your letter of 8th instant inclosing declaration of martial law in and about Camp Douglas. I have made an order promulgating the declaration and had it inserted in the Tribune, Post and Times, of Chicago, this day; advertisement to be continued one week. I have ordered 200 posters to be placed about the camp; also caused stakes to be driven in the ground at the proper distances all around the camp, except where houses or fenced lots intervened.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Infantry, Commanding.

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 12, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

Can the furlough of invalid paroled prisoners be extended by military commander on surgeon’s certificate? If not, is that power in the hands of any one short of Washington?

ALBERT B. DOD, Captain, Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, Military Commission.

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OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, July 12, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your order communicated by E. D. Townsend, assistant adjutant-general, dated the 9th instant, requiring a report from me stating for what cause I gave permission to A. E. Reynolds, a prisoner of war, to leave his {p.189} place of confinement on parole. I have the honor to report that A. E. Reynolds has been on parole in this city since the time of his capture. His parole was given by order of Major-General Halleck. I found him here on parole, residing at the house of a notorious secessionist in the city. I did not give him “permission to leave his place of confinement on parole.” He was not in confinement. At the suggestion of the commanding officer of the district in the absence of General Halleck I extended us parole to report to the Secretary of War to endeavor to effect his exchange. By general orders of the general commanding the Department of the Mississippi I had authority to extend his parole. I did so under the impression that there was no impropriety in permitting him to leave Saint Louis, where he was on parole and where I then thought and still believe the good of the cause of the Union required that no prisoners should be suffered to be at large on parole.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General, District of Missouri.

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FORT HAMILTON, N. Y., July 12, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Inclosed you will receive a list of the prisoners remaining in Fort Lafayette. I sent off 138 by your order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN BURKE, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Artillery.

[Inclosure.]

List of prisoners in Fort Lafayette.

Pierre Soulé, Adolphe Mazureau, W. H. Child, W. R. Butt, R. T. Zarvona, E. R. Platt, Thomas Sherman, James Anson, Thomas Potts, S. Hoffman, E. W. Cecil, J. B. Giles, Samuel Barry, John Bouldin, David Bendann, William H. Cowan, Francis Carroll, S. G. Cox, John Corbett, R. B. Carmichael, John B. Fisher, Warner Hobb, William H. Jones, Jacob Klasson, William Nabb, I. C. W. Powell, George W. Porter, H. G. Richard, John M. Tormey, Benjamin Worthington, Brig. Gen. Charles P. Stone.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 13, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have just received official information that the Secretary of War has invested Maj. Gen. John A. Dix with authority “to negotiate for a general exchange of all prisoners taken and held or paroled on both sides, the exchange to be on the principles of the cartel between the United States and Great Britain in the last war with that power.”

If your views on this subject remain as heretofore expressed it is presumed that there will be little difficulty in bringing the negotiation to a satisfactory conclusion.

{p.190}

General Dix is under my command and will meet any representative whom you may appoint at such place in this vicinity not within our lines as you may designate.

It will be necessary for you to give me thirty-six hours’ notice of the time and place, that General Dix may be enabled to meet the-appointment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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FORT MONROE, July 13, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

It seems to me very important that I should have General Wool’s correspondence with Generals Cobb and Huger in regard to exchange of prisoners and that I should have also some instructions from you. General Wool has taken away all papers relating to the subject, so that I have not seen a copy of the cartel between the United States and Great Britain. In the meantime I am advised this evening by General McClellan, to whom I sent a copy of your dispatch in cipher, that line has requested General Lee to appoint a general officer to meet me and given forty-eight hours’ notice. I did not expect such speedy action and must ask your instructions as to the place of exchange, &c., and also General Wool’s correspondence by to-morrow evening’s boat from Baltimore.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, July 13, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: Will you have the kindness to send me a certified copy of the parole* given by Daniel C. Lowber, of New Orleans, who was released from Fort Warren, with instructions how to dispose of him. He now seems to think that he has been sent down here for the purpose of visiting his wife and is quite indignant that I do not send him home to his family.

I have the honor to be very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

* For case of D. C. Lowber, see Vol. II, this Series, p. 578 et seq. This parole will be found at p. 590.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, La., July 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. NEAL DOW, Commanding Forts Jackson and Saint Philip:

I am informed that wines and liquors have been distributed between officers and the prisoners in the forts. I depend on your well-known temperance principles to have a stop put to this most pernicious and criminal practice.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.191}

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ROSECRANS’ HEADQUARTERS, July 13, 1862.

Col. J. C. KELTON:

General Ord has sent some prisoners to me who are described as wishing to be exchanged. If it be the order of the commanding general that an exchange of only these prisoners should-be made I will go to the trouble and exchange, but if not I desire orders to send them up for transportation to Alton.

W. S. ROSECRANS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 13, 1862.

Col. JOHN C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss.:

There are in the military prisons of Saint Louis and Alton several prisoners sent here from portions of the department not in my command, chiefly from Arkansas, Kentucky and Tennessee. They are not prisoners of war. I am in doubt whether I have the same authority to dispose of them as in case of prisoners taken in my own district, or whether they are simply to be held subject to orders from the commanding officer of the district from which they were sent or of the commanding general of the department. I respectfully request instructions on this subject.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[J. M. SCHOFIELD,] Brigadier-General.

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BENTON BARRACKS, near Saint Louis, Mo., July 13, 1862.

General W. S. KETCHUM, Saint Louis, Mo.

MY DEAR GENERAL: With this large lot of paroled men (1,167) just come, without officers and with extraordinary opinions of duties proper for them, is a somewhat unpleasant task. I have inquired what duty is expected of them, as I wish to be certain that my efforts will be supported. As yet I have no reply. It appears strange that on one side of the barracks are men who are to be mustered omit be paroled, while on the other side are men also paroled to be retained for exchange. Am I not to have officers? I think you told me they are being looked for. When found I do hope they may be sent here if these paroled men are to be here permanently. Colonel Marshall with his First Illinois Cavalry is here, and Lieutenant Price told me he would be here last Friday to muster them out. I suppose their pay daily is about $400. I have just received an answer to my asking if recruits can be made from the First Illinois. “Replied that the discharge with the man will show whether he be proper subject for re-enlistment.” The above is about it. Our weather is again getting warmer and warmer.

Yours, truly,

B. L. E. BONNEVILLE.

[First indorsement.]

SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 14, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Lieutenant Price, with a repeated notice that the First Illinois Cavalry are to be mustered out of service “with as little delay as practicable.”

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Brigadier-General and Assistant Inspector-General.

{p.192}

[Second indorsement.]

SAINT LOUIS, July 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General KETCHUM, Assistant Inspector-General, Department of the Mississippi.

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have mustered the field, staff and band; also Companies A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H and I, of the First Illinois Cavalry, out of the service of the United States, all except Companies H and I to date from the 14th instant. The muster-out rolls will be transmitted in a few days. Company L, of this regiment, at its last report to the colonel, June, 1861, was with General McClellan in Virginia as a body guard. Company M, Captain Thielemann, when last heard from was at Paducah, Ky. Has never reported to the commander of the regiment. Company K, Captain Huntley, was at last report at Batesville, Ark., with General Steele, acting as body guard it is thought. My order reads to “muster out the First Illinois Cavalry,” but I presume it is intended to include only the companies already discharged. Permit me to say that so far as my authority and power has extended I executed this as all other orders with the least practicable delay.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. T. PRICE, Lieutenant, Fifth Infantry.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 13, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Third Infantry U. S. Army, Springfield, Ill.

CAPTAIN: My letter of the 11th instant very nearly covered all the points in your reports of the 5th and 8th instant. If they have not already been furnished please call on the quartermaster in Springfield, Capt. W. H. Bailhache, in my name, for as many carts or wagons as may be necessary to have the camp in a good state of police. A couple of carts should belong to the camp and as many more as may be necessary for immediate use, say four, should be hired for a few days till the policing is completed. If a sufficient supply of water cannot be obtained by digging wells it will be necessary to have a water wagon furnished. Cannot the buildings used as hospitals be converted into barracks for some part of the guard and other buildings inside the fence be appropriated for hospitals? I wish you to see that all the orders which I have given in relation to the management of affairs at Camp Butler be put in immediate force. Hurry the completion of the rolls as much as possible and have a return for June with all necessary explanations made out immediately. I will be very glad if Major Fonda can remain in command, but I presume it will depend on the organization of the guard.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 13, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I inclose you three [four] articles of a very offensive nature, cut from the Evening Journal of Chicago. I think it my duty to submit {p.193} them to you. I understand they are written by a local reporter named Field, who was and is indignant because he was excluded from camp. In this connection I would ask if prisoners are allowed to subscribe for and receive by mail loyal newspapers, and if so who pronounces on their loyalty?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

Letter from a rebel prisoner.

CAMP DOUGLAS, ILL., June 25, 1862.

EDITOR OF THE CHICAGO EVENING JOURNAL.

SIR: I noticed in your paper of yesterday a description of the search made at Camp Douglas among the so-called rebel prisoners. Said search was brought about for the purpose of finding concealed arms. It is indeed strange that we could have arms. We were examined while on our way from Donelson by almost every soldier that passed us and when we arrived the same thing had to be rehearsed. I would like to know what Colonel Tucker and Chicago police call arms. The inspectors in their examination took every pocket-knife that was of any value. I guess cutlery can be had at the police office very cheap for cash. Every one should hurry forward and buy themselves rich. (Secesh knives.) We can spare our knives, but how is it? While we are guarded away from our quarters the inspecting gentry enter, ransack our satchels, pillage our knapsacks. They bear off as trophies the ambrotypes of our dead mothers, sisters and friends. Tobacco, cigars and other little trinkets share the same fate. Great God, are we to suffer everything? We have suffered all the insults and indignities that an ignorant and ill-mannered city rabble could heap upon us. We are neither brutes nor heathens that such treatment should be meted out to us. The commanders seem to expect us to stay here. It is not our business to stay; it is their’s to keep us. When we undertake to get out and are betrayed we have to carry planks upon our backs marked “escaped prisoners recaptured.” Where are there such rules in the military code directing that prisoners of war should be treated in this manner? And the others have to be put upon one-third rations. We never have got full rations and when two-thirds are subtracted almost nothing remains.

Chicago papers call us half starved, forlorn-looking wretches. Bring some of your stylishly dressed nobility within the walls of Camp Douglas, take the money that his friends may send him, discount by half, give him the remainder in white and blue pieces of pasteboard upon the sutlers, put him on one-third rations, and the names given to us would be a very appropriate one for him in a very short time. I send this to give you some idea of the manner in which prisoners of war are treated at Chicago. If you feel so disposed you can publish it; if not it is all right. Newspaper correspondents were stopped out of the camp so that they could do anything they pleased and keep it from the eyes of the world. Give them a hint of this and oblige a prisoner of war.

TENNESSEE REBEL.

{p.194}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, July 11, 1862.

The following order is published for the information of all concerned:

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 8, 1863.

By authority of the War Department martial law is hereby declared in and about Camp Douglas, Ill., extending for a space of 100 feet outside and around the chain of sentinels, which space the commanding officer will indicate by a line of stakes, and the area of the ground included within the said line is hereby declared to be under martial law. Any person violating military authority within said line will be subject to punishment by short confinement or trial by court-martial at the discretion of the commanding officer.

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

The area or ground around this camp included in the order and which is hereby declared to be under martial law has been distinctly marked by a line of stakes, Capt. Hiram R. Enoch, Sixty-seventh Regiment Illinois Infantry, has been appointed provost marshal for the district included in this order.

By order of Joseph H. Tucker, colonel commanding:

A. H. VAN BUREN, Post Adjutant.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

ANOTHER “MILITARY NECESSITY.”

Have the people of Chicago and Illinois heard of the last coup d’état? They would not readily guess it. Suppose we should say that martial law had been proclaimed at Camp Douglas, extending 100 feet beyond the line of sentinels outside the camp, including State street, several private residences, hotels, &c.? “Nonsense! Nonsense!” would be the reply on all sides. Perhaps it would; but nevertheless this thing has been done. In a morning paper we find the following :*

Doubtless those citizens who unfortunately reside within the prescribed limits were surprised this morning to find themselves for the first time in their lives living under martial law. Passengers upon State street opposite the camp will remember that they are within military jurisdiction; that any direct or implied violation of the military code will render them liable to arrest and trial by court-martial, in which a few three-months’ officers may defy the power of city, county, State or Federal courts and laugh to scorn the writ of habeas corpus. We admonish them to be cautious and to guard well their liberties. This perhaps can be effectually done by vacating the premises. We asked Muggins this morning the object of this extraordinary movement. He grunted, “Military necessity;” leered mischievously with his game eye and went away.

* Preceding notice of martial law omitted,

[Inclosure No. 4.]

CAMP DOUGLAS.

The Post declares that the rebel prisoners in Camp Douglas are in a state of insubordination; that early Thursday morning an attack was made by them upon the commandant’s headquarters with stones. That there has been a great change in the disposition of the rebel prisoners since Colonel Mulligan commanded Camp Douglas we have long been {p.195} aware. That officer, while he commanded their respect, made himself felt and feared. Under his administration of affairs such a thing as a “showing of teeth” was out of the question. He allowed the prisoners to go the full length of their privileges and promptly and surely punished the slightest infraction or abuse thereof. The present commandant we have every reason to believe is neither respected nor feared by the prisoners. One of his first acts upon assuming command of the camp was a ridiculous search of the prisoners for weapons; a tacit acknowledgment of fear and an implied doubt of his ability to crush a jack-knife rebellion against his authority. We all know how that search resulted, but the public has not been told that even miniatures, lockets, rings, keepsakes and tobacco were confiscated in lieu of murderous weapons. This action embittered the prisoners and aroused their hostility to an intense degree. To add fuel to the flames petty acts were resorted to, such as prohibiting peddlers of vegetables, milk, &c., from the camp. Of this last we do not speak complainingly, provided the prisoners are ruled with an iron hand. We believe too much favor has been shown the fat rascals in view of the horrible and brutal treatment bestowed upon our soldiers in Southern prisons. But we do insist that there is a palpable maladministration of affairs at Camp Douglas if there is any dependence to be placed on the assertions of those who claim to know whereof they speak. Eight thousand resolute and well-fed prisoners, smarting under petty grievances and rendered sullen by long confinement, could not in a state of revolt be held by 1,600 raw recruits, no matter how able a commandant they had over them. It would be no slight thing to find this body of desperate men suddenly let loose upon society. The country through which they bent their way would be devastated by pillage, incendiarism rapine and all the horrors which can be imagined. These are the risks, the imminent risks, which stare us in the face. We may dream on yet awhile longer in fancied or affected nonchalance but we shall be awakened with a start by and by.

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 13, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In compliance with your instructions I have the honor briefly to report the condition in which I found Camp Chase and the result and progress thus far of my endeavor to patiently and faithfully fulfill the most difficult and delicate task which you could have imposed upon me. If the statement demonstrates that I have gone beyond your special orders and the particular authority delegated to me, I believe it will at the same time appear that whenever I have assumed so to act it has been with the sole desire to fully represent your own views and to impress upon those with whom I came officially in contact the imperative necessity of prompt and energetic action in executing carefully important measures admitting of no delay, while it will at the same time be plain that my intercourse has been with parties clothed with both military and civil power, and yet while vain of its exercise possessing the most astonishing ignorance of the most ordinary practical military functions.

At the earliest moment I procured an interview with Major Darr, to whom I fully and carefully detailed your wishes as I conceive them to exist and received from him particular accounts and statements of matters in his department of which I have memoranda and which {p.196} will, together with the official papers left with me by him, be laid before you immediately on my return. I will state here some facts to which in a more general way I shall again refer in reference to what is understood of your position and authority.

Major Darr desired to be informed if you had the entire charge of the prisoners; if the camps were, where used as prison camps, exclusively under your control; if he should release by the orders of brigadier or major-generals, or parole prisoners by the same authority; if those powers could confine prisoners and order their release or parole on their own authority whenever they thought proper; under whose orders he was and whether he could at the camps where prisoners were confined in his (the Mountain) department take the necessary steps to secure their safety, and to furnish them with what was absolutely required. I made the obvious replies to these and many other questions and informed him that in the exercise of his duties as provost-marshal he was the safety officer of his department; but that after he or the authority commanding the department had made and placed in his keeping military or political prisoners from that instant they were exclusively under your control or the War Department, and that all measures relative to them must be executed by one of these two authorities. He is very zealous; perhaps too hasty and arbitrary. I have much to communicate to you of him and of the prisoners sent here by him. I have the official records of a number of prisoners sent here by him, seven of which state that the prisoner is charged with “doing nothing.” One was taken from the almshouse where he had been nine years; another was a lunatic when arrested and is charged with being a lunatic. Many others have been sent here under equally slight charges whose cases I will soon submit to you, at least copies of their official records as transmitted by him to Camp Chase, for I believe that it cannot be your desire that this camp should be filled to overflowing with political prisoners (made by half depopulating a section of country where the inhabitants are often compelled to expressions of apparent sympathy) arrested on frivolous charges, to be supported by the General Government and endure a long confinement. I have not expressed to him, however, a shade of any opinion upon this matter, or under any circumstances to others upon similar matters where there has been the possibility of doubt as to your action.

I had an early interview with Governor Tod and laid before him in detail your communications to me, your views and wishes expressed. He explained to me matters which he desired should be considered by you, most of which are briefly expressed in his letter to you, which is inclosed. Conceiving that whatever your decision might be in regard to moving the camp or any portion of it from its present location (it would be probably delayed in execution for several months or until the warm weather is nearly over) I have with the approval of the Governor taken, regardless of any intention to remove, the steps necessary to improve the camp in its present position so tar as it relates to sanitary or other obviously necessary measures.

The Governor approves of all and each of the articles contained in your circular as applicable to Camp Chase with the exception of the last and the third from the last. These two relate to visitors to the camp and to the prisoners and to the parole and release of prisoners. To use his own language, he declared that the discretionary power exercised by him in permitting visitors to the camp and to see their friends in confinement had been worth to the Government the expenditure of one hundred tons of powder upon the enemy. The result of the {p.197} exercise of this power by the Governor is that at present there are paroled within the limits of this city several prisoners who go where they think proper. They are I believe generally invalids, and that at each of the three prisons there are reception rooms for visitors to converse with and hold interviews with the prisoners, and that an average of about a dozen people with permits from the Governor exercise this privilege daily. Besides this for the benefit of all curious people there is a regular line of omnibuses running daily from the capitol to the camp, past the chain of outer sentinels to the commanding officer’s quarters, and any one who desires to spend twenty cents may visit the camp and go where they please except inside the prisons. The consequence of this is that there are always driving about the camp a great number of hacks, carriages and omnibuses laden with idlers and others who everywhere and at every turning infest the camp, inspect everything, interfere with the duty and very much with effective discipline, and infuse into soldiers and officers, the commanding officer not excepted, the same desire for show and the display of authority and indifference to it as would characterize an entirely undisciplined body of men under the immediate gaze of curious civilians anywhere. The commanding officer is vain of his consequential position and the exhibition of arbitrary authority before citizens; his officers (those few in camp) emulate him, and there follows a general neglect of other duty and a general confusion everywhere. Much of this is due to the presence of visitors in considerable numbers. I represented this to the Governor and to the commanding officer, and yet the prohibition of visitors was violently opposed by both. The object seems to be to make Camp Chase popular. In connection with the matter of your release of prisoners the Governor remarked that authority should be delegated to some one at this point to examine into the cases of and when they thought proper to release prisoners. He said that the commanding officer at the camp should not be a good soldier so much as a lawyer, who should personally examine under oath if necessary the prisoners upon their asserting their innocence. Permit me to say that this has been literally acted upon. Colonel Allison, the present commanding officer, superseding Colonel Moody, is not in any degree a soldier; he is entirely without experience and utterly ignorant of his duties and he is surrounded by the same class of people. But he is a lawyer and a son-in-law of the Lieutenant-Governor.

It was, colonel, in this interview with the Governor that that great difficulty in whose existence I had ever believed but never before seen arose before me in all its colossal proportions, viz, the misunderstanding of the extent of his own authority over the camp and such an exercise of it as would prevent me, without his permission, from establishing-your desires unless I came in conflict with him. I did not deem myself at all justified in even suggesting to him in more than the most general terms the fact that you had the entire control of all matters concerning prisoners. This he seemed to understand and I discussed the subject no further, determining to yield to his points as far as he deemed necessary and leave the sequel to one having more authority to act. I consequently have made no further objection to the nonenforcement of articles 9 and 11 beyond specially desiring that all idle visitors who had no friends in either the guard or prison camps be excluded, and the regulations were officially submitted to the commanding officer, Colonel Allison, with that understanding.

I will now state the condition of the prison and camp, the means taken for their improvement and the difficulties in the way of a rigid {p.198} application of your recent regulations so long as the Governor looks upon the matter from his present point of view and gives orders to the commanding officer conflicting with your regulations and with changes which ought to be immediately made.

Prison No. 3 contains nearly 1,100 prisoners, quite as many as at present the accommodations are prepared to receive. The buildings of boards over light frames are about 20 by 14, and eighteen men could be made comfortable in each. They are generally arranged in clusters of six, the buildings of each cluster about two feet and a half apart and the clusters separated from each other by narrow streets. Had the materials of each cluster been appropriated in erecting a single building, more room, better accommodations and an infinitely better arrangement of the camp as regards health and comfort would have been secured. As it is the air of the camp, and more particularly of the prison, is polluted and the stench is horrible. The prison buildings are without brooms and are extremely filthy and none of them have been whitewashed for months. They are heated to an insufferable extent by the stoves, which in all weathers drive the prisoners to the broiling sun or rain to avoid their heat, and are begrimed with smoke and grease, and the debris of cooking and cooking utensils. The spaces between the clusters of the quarters are heaped with the vilest accumulations of filth which has remained there for mouths, breeding sickness and pestilence. All the refuse of the prisoners’ food, clothing and the general dirt of a camp is gathered here and no care has been taken for its removal. The streets, drains and gutters of the prison are in the same state and are so filled and filthy that they answer as cesspools of standing filth more than the purpose for which they [were] made. The sinks are open excavations with a single rail placed over them lengthwise. The main drain of the prison empties here when it is itself overflown, thus supplying constant moisture, by no means sufficient to drain off but a small part of the natural accumulation, but quite enough to insure rapid decomposition and load the air of the prison with the most nauseating and disgusting stench.

After a violent rain this refuse from more than a thousand men is partially carried without the high fence surrounding the prison and for a long distance lines the large open main gutter passing through Camp Chase. Further comment is unnecessary, in season of the hot weather, of the natural effects of such a cause. Suffice it to say that while it is a matter of constant representation and of the loudest complaint from all the prisoners, all the soldiers and all the doctors, the commanding officer and Governor, not a single step has been taken to remedy this terrible abomination. The ground of the prison is very irregular and soft, and after a rain the mud is very deep and the water and mud stands where formed and deposited until the sun dries it up. All of the quarters not shingled leak in the freest manner both at the roof and sides, and most of those with good roofs leak at the sides from the defects of the boarding and the holes knocked in the sides for ventilation or other purposes by the prisoners. They almost all require repairing. The buildings are set directly on the ground with the floors in very many instances in contact with it. The drainage is so incomplete that water falling accumulates under the buildings and remains there constantly.

Prison No. 2 is much smaller than the one above referred to; it contains about two hundred and fifty prisoners, who have for their accommodation three buildings about 100 by 15. These are divided by cross partitions of eighteen feet in length, each containing bunks for eighteen {p.199} men, with the stove, cooking utensils and provisions for each mess of eighteen. Two of these buildings are well constructed and have good roofs, shingled; they are raised from the ground six or eight inches, and by removing the accumulation of earth and mud and sawing off the side boards which run down below the floors a free circulation of air will be allowed beneath them. The third of these structures is somewhat smaller than the other two and is set flat upon the soft, muddy ground. It has a roof of boards much warped and leaks badly both at the top and sides. Its site is much lower than either of the others, and in fact it is the lowest part of the prison ground, and the floors are in some places quite as low if not lower than the general level surrounding them. In consequence of this it is very damp and unhealthy. In the third prison, or prison No. 1, there are two long buildings constructed in a similar manner and of the same dimensions as those already described. They are quite well raised from the ground, and by removing the accumulations of earth and rubbish from their sides and vicinity and sawing off the boards which are vertical and project below the floors a tolerably good ventilation will be secured beneath them. This prison has about one hundred and fifty inmates besides those contained in the hospital, which is a building of about 20 by 70 inclosed within the board fence. There are about thirty patients cared for daily by a doctor, a prisoner paroled with the limits of the camp. All the sick of each prison are daily attended in the same manner, but the whole is under the general charge of the surgeon of the camp, who has time to visit the sick prisoners, as he himself informed me, but once a week except in cases of great emergency. I will speak of this further on.

In both prisons, Nos. 1 and 2, the same statement precisely may be made relative to the drainage, the sinks and the utter neglect of whitewashing and policing. A terrible stench everywhere prevails, overpowering the nostrils and stomach of those not impermeated with it. I desire to add that in the prisons of the hospital that building by a singular want of judgment or carelessness occupies the lowest ground of the prison, all the refuse water of the camp is collected in its vicinity and it is immediately contiguous to one of the vile sinks. One whole side of this prison is entirely unguarded; there is no sentry’s gallery or sentry except at night. In all the prisons the water with one or two exceptions is extremely bad. Some of the wells are but ten feet in depth, a few are fifteen and none over that. The prisoners in very many of the messes (of eighteen men) have nothing to wash themselves in, not even a basin or tub to wash their clothes.

The wood furnished is said by the commanding officer to be the same allowance as that of the soldier, viz, that of the Army Regulations. The prisoners complain that they do not have enough and there is a fault somewhere. I shall remedy it.

The provisions are very inferior. Beef is only tolerable and necks and shanks are issued. The salt pork is very soft, evidently still-fed. The flour is black and not properly ground-third-class. The bread is sour and dark and heavy. The bacon good. The corn-meal is good. The beans and pease as bad as they can be. The rice is floury and wormy. The sugar is miserable third-class brown sugar. The molasses inferior. The coffee the worst Rio. The candles tallow. The soap seldom resinous and never as good as the worst commonly issued in the Army. The potatoes bad. The salt, rock salt, coarsely ground.

I found many of the prisoners in rags and on my calling the attention of the commanding officer to the fact he said that it was his object to make their friends clothe them. The prisoners have up to the present {p.200} time been allowed to retain in their possession $5, the balance has been placed in the hands of the quartermaster-general of the State. There is a little sutler’s store to each prison and through a small hole he sells all articles usually sold by sutlers, except whisky, being paid in cash by the prisoners or receiving an order for the amount (should the prisoner have the money) on the quartermaster-general. Up to the present time no attempt has been made to regulate the prices of the sutler or to impose upon him a tax for sales to the prisoners more than the payment of a small post-office charge which has amounted to a dollar a day, and he seems to do exactly as he pleases.

Each of the prisons is placed under the sole control of a stout, coarse non-commissioned volunteer, a “three-months’ man,” who alone superintends all of the roll-calls, issues all the provisions, has the entire charge of each prison under the commanding officer and does exactly as he pleases.

The prisoners are generally very quiet and well-behaved and express themselves as gladly willing to do anything to better their condition. Axes have generally been used; some few attempts to secrete them have been made, but upon depriving that prison of the use of axes until the missing one was restored they have been recovered. A few days since several burrows were discovered under the outer quarters next the fence in prison No. 3. These were horizontal holes about two feet in diameter which had been run almost to the fence.

I will now endeavor to state to you the means I have adopted to remedy some of these prominent evils.

I have (by the consent of the Governor) through the commanding officer directed the quartermaster to dig vaults in each prison at least ten feet deep, to line them with planks to keep out surface water and so to slope the ground above that no water can run into the vaults; over these vaults to build substantial privies with air chimneys and bench seats with a strong, firm board placed horizontally and one edge inclined at such an angle as will prevent an improper use of the seats. Each seat is to be provided with a hinge cover which when up strikes against this board and which when the prisoner leaves falls down whether closed or not, thus confining all stench and arranging to shut out water to decompose the filth. Each privy is to accommodate fifteen at one time and is to have a urinating trough which carries all deposit outside the prison walls into the general drain and not into the vault.

There will thus be constructed at prison No. 3 accommodations for thirty men at once and at the other prisons for fifteen each. The present vaults or rather holes from which the filth passes into the main drain, and is extended through the camp are to be covered with earth packed firmly and if necessary it will be planked up to perfectly confine all stench. By this means and the free use of lime at all times in the privies the filth and stench will be confined to a single point and greatly diminished. When these vaults fill they are to be closed up and the privy removed to another prepared in the same manner. The quartermaster is ordered to furnish immediately lime and whitewash brushes in sufficient abundance for rapidly whitewashing all the quarters in all the prisons. Fifty brooms will be immediately supplied to prison No. 3 and twenty-five to the other prisons; twelve to one and thirteen to the other. If necessary they will be purchased. The prisoners will be supplied by purchase elsewhere if they cannot be procured at the commissary department with tubs of the capacity of twenty gallons each. One of these will be given to every twenty men. This will involve the purchase of perhaps twenty tubs. The quartermaster {p.201} will cause to be immediately raised so that the floors will be one foot from the ground all of the buildings in prison No. 3. He will place under them blocks and string pieces to firmly secure them on a foundation of such height. In prisons Nos. 1 and 2 he will have all the side covering of all the buildings removed below the floors by sawing it off, and all earth and rubbish removed from about them so as will allow the free circulation of air under the floors. In order that this measure may be effected in the middle building of prison No. 2 and that the roof and walls may be properly repaired it will be necessary that this building be taken down in sections of one-third at a time and re-constructed on a proper foundation. He will have constructed in front of all the prison quarters in all of the prisons raised platforms over the drains similar to those now placed there but more elevated and more extended. They will be placed as entrances to the quarters. He will cause all rubbish and piles of earth, embankments, &c., around the prison grounds in the vicinity of any of the buildings or between them to be at once removed, the rubbish and offal to be carried without the camp limits, and the earth to be used in the construction of roads and drains.

In all the prison grounds in those portions now used for a roadway there will be constructed a wagon road with a high curved surface and suitable side drains. In all portions now used as walks, walks will in the same manner be constructed with side drains. Drains will be made about each and all of the buildings, to be shallow as well as those of the roads and walks, but the whole so arranged as to be higher than the main drain of the prison leading from the wells, and which will receive all refuse water and carry it outside of the walls at suitable points. All of the ground of each prison will be graded and drained in the most complete manner so that after rains there will be no standing water at any part of the grounds. The digging of vaults, white washing, draining, grading and constructing roads and walks in each camp will be done by prisoners detailed for the purpose and under proper guards, all other labor about the prisons designed to in any manner benefit the prisoners will be performed by prisoners so far as it is practicable. The quartermaster will cause to be erected on that side of prisons Nos. 1 and 2 which is now destitute of the galleries for sentries similar to those on other sides of the same prison. At the entrance to this prison he will cause a proper arrangement to be made of drains and such grading done as will conduct away from the vicinity all standing water or that which now runs toward the prison grounds. If necessary he will construct to this end a drain leading to the main sewer. In the outer guardhouse of this prison he will have constructed eight strong small cells for confining disobedient or violent prisoners. He will procure by purchase if necessary six pairs of handcuffs for a similar purpose. He will have the main sewer leading through Camp Chase properly cleaned out and planked over, commencing at prison No. 3. He will have all the prison wells in each prison opened and cleaned out by the prisoners without delay, and in case any of them are not fifteen feet in depth they will be deepened to that extent. He will have all of the stoves at present in prison No. 3 removed to the outside of the prison, and all shelters of whatever character which are not a part of the regular quarters will be removed at once from prison No. 3. In the other prisons these may for the present remain where they are erected-over the stoves on the outside of the quarters. He will purchase fourteen saws, eight of which will be for the use of prison No. 3 and three in each of the other prisons, and the prisoners will not be {p.202} allowed to chop their wood for the “Farmer’s boilers” or stoves. They must be allowed to split it, however, when necessary, and here axes will be allowed them. The quartermaster will have immediately repaired the roofs of all the quarters in the prisons where necessary. None will be shingled which are not now shingled, but they will be improved with the same materials with which they are now covered so far as possible, and in all cases by the same method by which first covered. He will cause the six “Farmer’s boilers” to be placed in prison No. 3 on the outside and near the line of single quarters next the sutler’s store, one next to each building, and will erect over each of them a shelter of boards eight feet square and will cut a door from this shelter through the wall of the quarters for egress. In each of the prisons Nos. I and 2 the quartermaster will have removed to the outside of the quarters all stoves. They will be placed during the continuance of the warm weather next to the quarters, but no shelter will be constructed over them, the object of a shelter over the “Farmer’s boilers” being to increase the kitchen room, which is small, for the large number of prisoners designed to be accommodated. In the issue of wood the quartermaster will personally see that the proper allowance is daily issued and delivered inside of the prison walls to the prisoners.

The commanding officer is held responsible for the immediate enforcement of these special instructions.

The commanding officer is required to detail daily two officers of police, one to prison No. 3 and the other to prisons Nos. 1 and 2. It shall be the duty of these officers to have the rolls called every morning at 8 o’clock of all the prisoners at each prison. He must be present personally and satisfy himself of the presence of the prisoners and will report immediately to the commanding officer, stating the number and giving the names of absentees if any. These officers will cause the prisons to be carefully and thoroughly policed twice during each day under their personal direction at the hours of 6.30 a.m. and 4.30 p.m. This will be done by the prisoners detailed in the proportion of one in eighteen. The police party will be formed, the rolls called and the tools for police distributed under the direction of the officers. When the policing is completed the party will be formed, the roll again called and the implements with the exception of the brooms placed without the prison walls. In policing the quarters are to be carefully swept and all rubbish, offal and dirt to be removed from within and about them, and all accumulations of whatever nature in the grounds of the prison or in it roads, walks or drains must be removed. The “officer of the day” will make a careful and thorough inspection of all the prisons twice in each day after police hours and will report to the commanding officer their condition as relates to the efficiency of the guards, the general security and discipline of the prisoners and the cleanliness and order in the prisons, together with such other matters as should specially come to the knowledge of the commanding officer. The commanding officer will see by a frequent personal inspection of the provisions furnished by the contractors that the stipulation of their contract requiring provisions of the first quality to be furnished be strictly enforced so far as procuring such provisions as are commonly furnished by the commissary department of the Regular Army, and if there be any doubt in his mind he will apply to the Commissary-General for a proper construction of the contract. If complaint of the quality of the provisions is such as to require a frequent recourse to referees as provided by the terms of the contract to pronounce upon the stores he {p.203} will state the fact to the Secretary of War for his action. The commanding officer will immediately appoint a high-toned and careful officer to act as assistant post commissary to receive the provisions from the hands of the contractors for the prisoners. It shall be his duty to attend personally at every issue by the contractors. He will see that the precise amount called for at each issue is weighed out and delivered to him, and that it be the net and not the gross weight of the provisions that he receives. The quantity of the ration drawn by him and issued to the prisoners will be that allowance prescribed by the board of council and the amount over this allowance will be at each issue not drawn from the store-house, but charged to the contractors, and at the end of the month the commissary who pays the contractors for stores will deduct the price of this amount not issued and turn the sum of money over to the commanding officer of the post, to be disposed of by him as is elsewhere prescribed by the commissary-general of prisoners. The commanding officer will ascertain by daily examination what part of the ration should be thus reserved and how much, while he preserves, however, the amount set down by the “board of council” (a list of which accompanies the instructions to the commanding officer) as a general standard to guide him. Upon receiving the provisions the officer appointed for that purpose as above referred to shall place them in charge of the steward of each prison, who will immediately issue them to the different messes of the prisoners, under his (the commissary officer’s) personal superintendence. The whole duties of the prison stewards shall hereafter be to issue to each mess in proportional amounts the provisions and the fuel and quartermaster’s stores. Fresh beef will hereafter be issued five times a week instead of twice as heretofore, not only to the prisoners but to all troops at the post, and necks and shanks will not be issued as part of the ration as heretofore.

As the prisoners have used milk to secretly correspond, in evasion of prison regulations, the sale of it hereafter or furnishing it to them in any manner is prohibited. Each prisoner until further orders will be allowed as heretofore one plate, cup, knife and fork and such cooking utensils as with the arrangements for cooking the commanding officer deems requisite. The “fund” of the prisoners which will accumulate in the manner above detailed will be kept separate from the fund of the other troops at the post. The same officer detailed as above described to attend to the issues to the prisoners of commissary stores will also personally supervise the drawing from the contractors, weighing and issuing to all troops at the post the rations supplied by the contractors. Such portions of the rations as the commanding officers may find by daily experience may be well spared by the troops will not be drawn, but will be dealt with in the same manner as already directed for the prisoners, thus providing for the accumulation of a post fund for the guard of the prisons.

In order to systematize the records of the post the commanding officer will cause to be kept at the post a reception book, in which will be entered the date of the confinement of prisoners and all data necessary for a complete description of them and of their history as forwarded to the commanding officer, with the exception of the charges against them, which will be kept in a book used solely for the purpose of recording the charges under the immediate care of the commanding officer. A large description report book will be kept of the same form as already described to the commanding officer and a ledger containing the accounts of the prisoners’ funds; also a morning report book of prisoners, the form of which has been already given to the commanding {p.204} officer. Forms of the descriptive report book and morning report books are inclosed to the commissary-general. If necessary these books will be purchased by the quartermaster. Prisoners will not generally at their request be furnished with the charges against them, but whenever the commanding officer is satisfied from an examination of the prisoner that he ought in justice to know the charge against himself because of his desire to return to his allegiance, or of his innocence or ignorance of crime or offense, or of his having been forced into service of the rebels, or for other reasons which in his opinion are sufficient, line will allow the prisoner to be informed if not prejudicial to discipline so to do. For the purpose of Enabling Major Darr, provost-marshal-general of the Mountain Department, to keep a record of all political prisoners arrested and sent to Camp Chase from his department and to retain their full history the commanding officer of Camp Chase will at the request of Major Darr furnish him with a list of all those prisoners who sent from that department have died, been released or transferred, or who have escaped from Camp Chase or who may yet be included under these heads. In all cases where applications for release or parole from the prisoners are forwarded to the commissary-general for his action the commanding officer shall after a personal examination of the prisoner under oath indorse upon the said application his opinion and recommendation. He will cause to be forwarded with the application the statement of the prisoner supported by all the testimony which the prisoner may be able to collect that such statement is truthful and he will permit the prisoner to consult by correspondence those parties from whom he may desire to obtain corroborative testimony.

In the issue of clothing to prisoners, drawers and socks will not be issued from the last of April to the first of October.

The confinement of officers and soldiers in the same quarters will be avoided. The former will be allowed a separate building and as far as possible enlarged accommodations. No Union prisoners will under any circumstances be confined with the rebel prisoners whatever be their offense, as it is always a matter of injustice to either one or the other class of prisoners, and those at present confined in prisons will be immediately confined at the guard-house instead.

In the accounts of all and each of the “funds” which may accumulate at the camp they will be kept separately. The prison hospital fund, the guard hospital fund, the prisoners’ fund of the prisons and the fund of the guard or troops each will stand by itself and a monthly report to the commissary-general be made of each.

No changes will be made in enlarging, increasing or extending the accommodations of the prisoners or alteration in them of a material character of any kind not contemplated by the regulations from the Commissary-General of Prisoners or in these instructions without first having the approval of the Commissary-General of Prisoners.

All immaterial changes in the buildings of the camp or the construction of others must be done by estimates approved by him. All matters of doubt in questions contemplating important changes must be referred to the Commissary-General of Prisoners for his decision. The sutler will be taxed 10 cents per man per month for the privilege of selling to the prisoners and this tax will go to the prison fund. These comprise most of the special instructions given to the commanding officer. I shall, however, aid him in dividing the prisoners’ messes so as to suit the capacity of the “boilers,” six of which are already purchased and set up; instruct him how the rations are to be cooked, post him in the matters of the “funds” and the office books and all other matters which {p.205} will as I believe meet your views. You will, colonel, doubtless be surprised at the detail of these instructions to the commanding officer of so important a position as Camp Chase. But these “instructions” to this point from the middle of the fourteenth page of this report to the present page I have copied just as they are here detailed except that they are to him more clearly stated and given them to him in writing at his own request. He is utterly ignorant of the most common requirements of the Army Regulations, but a “good lawyer” or he is said to be. I found the contractors issuing necks and shanks to the troops and prisoners, and, as I have every reason to believe, the gross instead of the net weight was the standard of issue. The provisions were weighed in the presence of no one representing the parties to whom they were to be issued but dealt out by the contractors alone, pitched into a cart in the coarsest, roughest manner, which was driven off to the prisons or the camps and the contents thrust out to the care or rather questionable honesty of those non-commissioned three-months’ stewards to be delivered to the prisoners under the supervision of no one. The contractors or rather their agents were arbitrary in their behavior and insolent at my interference. Under the present arrangement I am satisfied that the most extensive frauds have been constantly committed in these issues. They even attempted to inform me that necks were always issued in the Regular Army. I will instruct them, however, in their proper duties before I leave you may be assured. The commanding officer is ignorant of any method of remedying this, but resignedly informed mime that he thought it wrong.

These stewards have heretofore made out the requisitions for provisions for the number of prisoners that they thought proper to do. The commanding officer has signed it without inquiry generally I am satisfied, and the steward does the rest.

The commanding officer has no idea of a fund or how it is to accumulate. I shall instruct him. He has no knowledge of the importance of discipline and of the effect upon it of citizens lounging in great numbers about the camp. It is pleasing to him to talk and guide and explain to them all curious points of interest constantly and this tone and disposition prevails among his executive officers. I shall insist upon their exclusion, however, and it will be done; but that I may not raise any question of your authority with the Governor I have first yielded to his as before stated. In order to prepare the prisoners for the considerable labor before them I wrote out and had the commanding officer sign and post up in the prisons the inclosed order. I am satisfied by conversation with the prisoners that the work will be done cheerfully. I shall have the Governor approve of what I do and of all of my instructions. I sincerely trust that whatever you may think of them you will take no means to recall them before I fully explain to you as I cannot well do on paper the necessity for each one of them. I have before stated that my task here was a delicate one. I will now endeavor to explain the difficulties in the way of a rigid application of your instructions so long as the Governor looks upon this camp from his present point of view. He regards this (as I ascertained by conversation) as a camp of instruction of the State of Ohio for its recruits, of which camp he considers that he controls the soldiers and you care for the prisoners together with him; for he desired me to submit to him all orders or instructions given by me. He paroles prisoners within the limits of the town and line gives instructions to Colonel Allison, the commanding officer, relating to their control and discipline. He grants permits to visit them, &c., and he is still jealous I am convinced of {p.206} interference with this exercise of authority. On Friday afternoon, the 11th, he issued orders that seven companies of the troops at the camp should hold themselves in readiness to march to Kentucky, and had they gone but 180 effective men would have been left. As it is all but about 480 have gone.

I had an interview with his authorities (as he was absent thirty miles from town when he issued the order) and represented the inadequacy of the guard which under the first order would remain, and the order was changed leaving the present number. I deemed it unnecessary to telegraph to you the fact without being able to explain the whole matter. Under a recent order Camp Chase is made the place of rendezvous for all furloughed and paroled or disabled soldiers in the State. About these he gives to the commanding officer such orders as he pleases. The hospital is swarmed with them and about 100 lie about the various quarters of the camp, most of them doing no duty. The hospital originally arranged for the close accommodation of fifty patients has in it treble that number. This has been the case for forty days or more. Hence the surgeon has so much labor to perform that he does not visit the prisoners but once a week but leaves them to the stewards and to inefficient rebel amateur practitioners who have a parole of the camp as before stated for the purpose. The first article of the regulations submitted by me to the commanding officer by your orders holds him responsible for the discipline and security of the prisoners. Yet the Governor takes away from him ad libitum the means for that security. The regulations by you require that the commanding officer shall maintain discipline and order in his command. The Governor orders as he thinks proper the troops, furloughed men or others assembled or assembling. The commanding officer of the camp is uncertain and in constant doubt as to whom he should go for instructions, which together with his ignorance of his duties quite overpowers him. I have carefully instructed him that for the present he will consider the character and number of the troops sent to Camp Chase or placed or to be placed there as in the hands of the Governor; that he will immediately report to you, however, whenever he may not have a sufficient guard, that you may take such steps as may be deemed best. I have informed him that the discipline and police of the whole camp is under his (the commanding officer) special direction regulated by you as having general charge of that matter, and that everything relating to it and to estimates for building, the sutler, &c., must be referred to you. But even here it is difficult to see that if this is a camp of instruction and so far under the Governor’s control how the orders for the instruction or discipline of troops can be considered by the Governor or by the commanding officer as not superior to your orders to the commanding officer. At least this is the construction both by the Governor and commanding officer, which I am satisfied exists in the minds of both and in the minds of all surrounding them.

I do not, colonel, refer to this in a questionable or discussive manner, but with the view of pointing out to you the difficulty which much embarrassed me for awhile but which I have avoided by carefully evading any contact with it, and have always submitted all instructions given by me as well as all of your instructions to me to the Governor for his inspection. Thus far he has opposed nothing but that part of your regulations relating to visitors and paroles to which I have already referred. He considered your regulation relating to the establishing of a fund among the soldiers as impracticable for the reason that the troops were continually changing. I will endeavor to {p.207} fully demonstrate in a practical manner that he is mistaken. I have directed the quartermaster to prepare for your approval an estimate for hospital enlargements. The present accommodations are insufficient for the camp even were there not more than 1,500 men present. In his letter to you the Governor recommends the removal of the prison camp to another point on ground nearer the city. Permit me to say that the recommendation should not in my opinion be acted upon under the reasons assigned by him for its removal; as the ground at the bluff as he calls it is of the same character and on the same level as the present camp, and the drainage is no better nor is the soil in any particular better. He objects to the present stench as annoying the instruction camp. This will be completely removed by having the present drain covered throughout the entire camp, as I have directed, and by having the filth from the privies inclosed instead of carried into the main drain of the camp, the above referred to open ditch, and extended through it by this drain which has no running water except when it rains.

I have estimates for enlarging and improving the camp as proposed by you and will at an early moment submit them. I will explain further upon these matters when I see you.

No negroes are confined at the camp. They were several weeks since released. Of the escape of the prisoners I will submit to you soon all data which can be collected. I am assisting the commanding officer in making to you as complete a report as possible of the prisoners who have been confined here. It will be necessarily an incomplete report, however, as the records have been kept in a very irregular and careless manner, without system or order. Oscar F. Knox, prisoner of war, surgeon, was released on the 24th ultimo from Camp Chase. In order that the Governor’s special views might be immediately presented to you line seem after my arrival desired me to return for “fresh instructions,” and since then has so expressed himself that little can be done unless the prison camp is removed. I determined, however, to fully inform myself before I attempted to inform you or submit his ex parte recommendations for your consideration; hence my necessary delay in making this report. From the facts involved I cannot think it advisable for any reason to put the Government to the expense and trouble of removing the camp. All that is required is effective police, good arrangements of the present materials and an energetic and intelligent commanding officer to carry out rigidly proper instructions. This done and in my opinion all of the conditions of a good camp may be fulfilled, both of health and discipline.

There are unquestionably a large number of prisoners amounting perhaps to nearly 200 confined here whose cases I think you would upon examination declare to be those of unjust confinement. From personal interviews with some I am of this opinion, and the Governor has informed me that there are this number, and he is of the same opinion relative to their release and recommends that some one be authorized here to examine into and release upon proper proof being presented to them. There are among the prisoners two idiots, two insane and several so maimed as to be utterly harmless in any community.

I inclose to you in separate package the Governor’s letter, the forms of books which I have ordered; the three others are common blank books. I inclose in separate package a copy of my letter to the Quartermaster General in a matter which was referred to me. The Governor said of it that it was exactly right. In separate package I {p.208} inclose a copy of the order which I had by the commanding officer’s directions at my request posted up in the prisons and which I wrote for that purpose.

Also for your examination a copy of a contract under which the commissary stores are supplied.

I will add that at present there is not nor has there been any commissary whatever at the camp to represent the Government. I have ordered one to be appointed. I inclose a copy of the bill of Messrs. Aiken & Emory; you will see the cost of the stoves from it. For the “Farmer’s boilers” I shall arrange their account to be presented to you. I inclose (separate package) for your consideration some of the charges forwarded by Major Darr of prisoners arrested in his department. I cannot believe the safety of the country endangered by such individuals and inclose them for your consideration.

In conclusion I have to state that I have rigidly attended to the enforcement of your views so far as I understand them, and trust that my conduct will meet with your approval. I have had constantly to contend with ignorance of the grossest character, with listlessness, lack of energy and a want of appreciation of the importance of the requirements made by you and myself, and I indulge the hope that the discretionary exercise by me of authority will be found to have been the proper course pursued, even if in some cases I have erred.*

With the highest respect, I am, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army.

* None of the inclosures mentioned found.

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WASHINGTON, July 14, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Some place convenient to Fortress Monroe, as City Point or such other as you may designate, can be fixed for the exchange of prisoners in the East; Vicksburg or some adjacent point for exchange in the West.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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FORT MONROE, July 14, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

An open letter of which the following is a copy has just been received from General Lee:

HEADQUARTERS, &c., July 6, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, U. S. Army.

GENERAL: The Secretary of War of the Confederate States has been informed that you were empowered by the United States Government to arrange for a general exchange of prisoners between the two Governments and I am authorized to appoint a commissioner to meet you for that purpose. I have therefore appointed Brig. Gen. Howell Cobb, with full authority to agree on the part of the Confederate States to a general exchange of prisoners of war. I shall be pleased if you will designate an early day and place to meet General Cobb for the purpose of making the necessary arrangements.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, Commanding General, C. S. Army.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

{p.209}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 14, 1862.

General DIX:

Your telegram inclosing General Lee’s letter just received. All the correspondence* is ready and will be sent to-day special messenger. When you receive it you can fix the time. The papers will furnish all necessary instructions. If further directions should be desired they can be given by telegraph.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

* Reference to correspondence between Wool and Huger; see Dix to Stanton, July 13, p. 190.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 14, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Commanding, &c., Port Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs me to forward to you in accordance with the request made by your telegram of yesterday the inclosed correspondence between this Department and General Wool and General Wool and the insurgent authorities relative to an exchange of prisoners of war. Part of the papers sent you are the original communications and it is desired that of these you will take special care, and when through with them you will return them to this Department, as also the inclosed copies.*

The correspondence between General Wool and General Huger refers to the “cartel between Great Britain and the United States in 1813.” Diligent search has been made among the State papers and the archives of this Department for a cartel** made in that year, but no trace or record of such can be found. There was, however, discovered on file a cartel** between the two countries dated on the 28th day of November, 1812, which it is believed is the only one ever made, defining the tariff according to which prisoners of war, whether taken on land or on sea, should be exchanged.

This cartel is herewith*** sent to you, and as the inclosed is the only known extant copy you will please cause it to be transcribed at once and return the inclosed to the Department. The Secretary further directs me to say that in arranging for an exchange of prisoners you will make no reference whatever to the cartel, but will simply adopt as one of the provisions of the arrangement the tariff of exchange prescribed by its first clause.

In this regard you will be exceedingly careful, as any reference to the cartel might possibly be misconstrued into some sort of recognition of the insurgents.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* Inclosures not found, but see correspondence between Wool and Huger in preceding volumes.

** The cartel of 1812 was identical with that of 1813, having been agreed upon November 28, 1812, by the commissioners, but not finally approved until a year afterward.

*** Omitted here; to be found at p. 303 of Vol. III.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX:

If there should be any failure or delay to effect a general exchange I would be very glad to have you arrange the exchange of Col. John R. {p.210} Kenly, First Maryland, for Col. C. A. Sugg, Fiftieth Tennessee, if it can possibly be done.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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DETROIT, July 14, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

General Halleck, by his assistant adjutant-general, telegraphs that he is authorized by the War Department to release such prisoners as he may deem proper. Is he?

W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 14, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit:

Prisoners may be released upon the order of General Halleck.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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BERKELEY, VA., July 14, 1862.

A. LINCOLN, President:

Nothing new of interest. Position of enemy’s rear-guard unchanged. Varies from six to eight miles from us. Health of troops improving somewhat. Food, forage and medical supplies abundant. Will get quite a large number of our sick and well from the enemy to-day. Have informed General Lee that we are ready to negotiate a general exchange and asked him to appoint some one to meet General Dix. Everything going on very well. I am very anxious to have my old regiments filled up rather than have new ones formed. What of Burnside?

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant informing me that Maj. Gen. John A. Dix had been invested by your Government with authority to negotiate for a general exchange of all prisoners taken and held or paroled on both sides.

I have the honor to inform you that I have appointed Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill ,* C. S. Army, to meet General Dix and arrange with him the terms of a general exchange. General Hill is clothed with full authority to act for this Government in the premises.

I propose that the meeting be held at Shirley, and General Hill will meet General Dix at that place on Wednesday next, the 16th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* See p. 815 for Lee’s order of July 14.

{p.211}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 92.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, July 14, 1862.

For the information of all in this command the following explanations are given in reference to the rights and duties of citizens of the States in which we may be stationed:

1. All citizens of the States claiming the rights and holding themselves bound to the duties of citizens of the United States are entitled to the same protection of person and property which we claim for ourselves.

2. We hold citizens to the performance of active duties only when they receive protection. If left without protection they are only bound to good will and abstinence from acts of hostility to the Government.

3. Persons denying that they are citizens of the United States, repudiating the duties of citizens by words or actions, are entitled to no rights save those which the laws of war and humanity accord to their characters. If they claim to belong to a hostile Government they have the rights of belligerents and can neither justly claim nor have anything more from this army. If they are found making war without lawful organization or commission they are enemies of mankind and have the rights due to pirates and robbers, which it will be a duty to accord them. It is not our purpose to admit the slaves of loyal masters within our lines or use them without compensation, or prevent their recovery when consistent with the interests of the service. The slaves of our enemies may come or go wherever they please, provided they do not interfere with the rules and orders of camp discipline. They deserve more at our hands than their masters.

By order of General Rosecrans:

W. L. ELLIOTT, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

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MOSCOW, July 14, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Yesterday one of our forage trains, guarded by fifty cavalry, was fired on by a party that immediately fled, having killed 1 man and wounded 3 of ours. The attacking party was composed of horsemen, but their dress was not clearly seen in the ambush. I believe they were citizens hastily called together to fire on the train as it was returning loaded, and have sent a strong party to bring in twenty-five of the most prominent of the vicinity, each with a horse, saddle and bridle, whom I wish to send to La Grange and thence under guard to Columbus by to-morrow’s train. I am satisfied we have no other remedy for this ambush firing than to hold the neighborhood fully responsible, though the punishment may fall on the wrong parties. The scene of the occurrence was seven miles out, south of Wolf River, and two miles and a half from where I have a regiment on picket.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General.

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MOSCOW, July 14, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Colonel McDowell reports from Macon, near Morning Sun, that he will collect the wagons and mules and return to-morrow. I ordered him to look in at Lafayette, not much off his road, to see the regiment stationed there. The cavalry is now out and gathering in the citizens. I am so well satisfied of their complicity that I will hold them prisoners here until they produce the parties who fired on our men, with the {p.212} necessary testimony. I had answered Stanton finally, but I have such respect for your superior judgment that I will telegraph Mr. Ewing, who approved my first, and to whose revision and judgment I submit my last. I wish the letter to be withheld from publication. Hurlbut telegraphs an expedition started by my order to Davis’ Mills, also a flag of truce from Jackson’s cavalry, but has not yet made known the result of either. I have not yet heard of artillery or infantry anywhere in our neighborhood. Travelers from Memphis come through unmolested and yesterday a loaded sutler’s wagon came through safe.

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., July 14, 1862.

General Asa Rogers, of Loudoun County, Va., having been arrested and released from imprisonment in exchange for Turner, a citizen of Fairfax County held in confinement at Richmond, he will not be disturbed in his person or property for any past transactions.

[JAMES S. WADSWORTH,] Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION, Springfield, July 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. M. SCHOFIELD, Commanding District of Missouri, Saint Louis.

GENERAL: I inclose herewith copies of a correspondence with Colonel Tracy, who represents himself as commanding troops in the vicinity of Fayetteville. I suppose it is what is known as Rains’ command and probably Rains is too drunk to be fit for duty, and the gentleman wanted to figure in a correspondence á la Bombastes Furioso.

Hoping the reply will meet your approval, I am, very truly, your very obedient servant,

E. B. BROWN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTHWEST MISSOURI, Camp near Fayetteville, July 10, 1862.

[Brig. Gen. E. B. BROWN.]

GENERAL: This letter will be handed you by Maj. Thomas H. Murray, bearer of flag of truce. It has been represented to me that citizens of Southwest Missouri of Southern opinion are being constantly shot and murdered by soldiers of the United States and by the militia of the Provisional Government of the State of Missouri; that these men are thus inhumanly dealt with because of opinions’ sake. I desire to know of you, general, if such acts are committed at the suggestion or within the knowledge of the U. S. officers or State officers over whom they have control. I have been sent here by my Government together with others for active service in Missouri. Before I enter the State I desire to have some positive understanding as to the manner of carrying on the war. If it is the policy of the United States or the Gamble government of Missouri to murder our friends, burn and destroy our homes and turn our women on the charity of the people for subsistence, I desire to know it, and I shall come, however much my feelings may revolt at the idea, with the black flag, asking no {p.213} quarter and giving none to those who claim protection under the Stars and Stripes, and I will either mark my path with the blood of my followers or of those who have instituted such an inhuman warfare.

Since the inception of this war I have been an officer in the Army of the South. During that time I have had under my charge many prisoners of the U. S. Army, and I assure you, general, it has been a source of great pleasure to me to know that while with me not one ever received even a minor insult. It has been my constant aim as far as I had any authority to carry on this war according to the recognized laws of war throughout the world. I have and do denounce assassins, murderers, robbers and land pirates of the South as well as of the North. Let the armies of the South and North fight this war to its end and those who remain at home who have not been engaged in jayhawking lives and property go unmolested. These have been and are yet my ideas for carrying out a Christian and humane warfare, and it would grieve me much, general, to lay them aside for a service heretofore unknown in the history of this country. Let me hear from you, general, by the return of this flag.

Trusting that peace may soon restore mis to our homes,* I have the honor to be, general, your most obedient servant,

J. C. TRACY, Colonel, Commanding, C. S. Army.

* For General Brown’s answer to this letter see Series I, Vol. XIII, p. 471; also see p. 222, this Vol. for Brown to Schofield, July 15.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

General J. T. BOYLE, Commanding U. S. Forces, Louisville, Ky.

GENERAL: Your letter in relation to R. P. Sharp, Jos. D. Smith and W. S. Alexander, prisoners of war at Camp Chase, addressed to Col. C. W. B. Allison, commanding, has been referred to me. These prisoners cannot be removed from Camp Chase without the authority of the Secretary of War, and if there is anything that can be offered in their behalf I will be glad to forward it. I have the honor herewith to inclose orders* from the War Department in relation to prisoners of war which you may not have seen, and I will send to your adjutant-general by express blank returns and rolls which I respectfully request you will cause to be given to commanders in charge of prisoners of war under your authority with orders that rolls and returns for June may be prepared and forwarded to this office with as little delay as practicable. I inclose also copies of regulations** which I have issued for the guidance of commanders in charge of prisoners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* See General Orders, No. 67, p. 30.

** See p. 152.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

General STRONG, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cairo, Ill.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith General Orders, Nos. 32 and 67, from the War Department, and a circular of regulations {p.214} for the guidance of commanders of camps where prisoners of war are held. Will you please require officers in charge of prisoners under your orders to furnish me immediately with a return for June and a duplicate set of rolls, one for the War Department and one for this office, of all prisoners who have been or are now held, with explanations under the head of remarks showing what disposition has been made of those not now present? There should be a note on the return showing how many are citizens. I sent blank rolls and blank returns to you on the 12th by express.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, Commanding Fort Columbus, New York Harbor.

COLONEL: I have the honor to inclose a circular of regulations* which I have published under the authority given to me in General Orders, No. 67, of the 17th ultimo from the War Department for the guidance of the commanders of camps where prisoners of war are held. In order to conformity please have them observed at Fort Columbus as far as may be practicable.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Same to Dimick, Fort Warren.)

* Omitted here; see p. 152.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

General C. P. BUCKINGHAM, War Department, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: The rolls of prisoners of war required by your letter of the 3d ultimo have been called for from the several camps where prisoners are held, but there has been so much neglect and so much carelessness in furnishing rolls with prisoners sent from the army in the field and in keeping them at the camps that it is now almost impossible to get up rolls that will be at all satisfactory. I will hurry the matter as much as possible. Please call attention to my reports of May 16 and June 15 and 17 in relation to camps for prisoners.

There are now no places prepared for the reception of prisoners, and if we expect to hold what we have and take more the places I have named or others should be prepared to receive them. Camps Chase, Morton, Butler and Douglas are now full to overflowing. I have no authority to decide for myself and in the multiplicity of other important matters my reports are lost sight of. Now that the old camps are to be occupied by the new volunteers it may be necessary to build for the prisoners unless there is a general exchange agreed upon.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.215}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: I am informed that you continue to permit visitors to see prisoners under your charge notwithstanding my explicit and repeated instructions to the contrary. I can scarcely believe that this offense has been repeated, though the report comes to me in such a shape as to leave little room for doubt or the chance of mistake.

I should be less inclined to credit the report if I did not know that ladies had been allowed to have interviews with prisoners and to go inside the prison yard, all of which was in violation of my orders.

Hereafter I must insist on a rigid observance of my orders, and when a visitor is permitted an interview at the request of Governor Johnson, of Tennessee, you will forward their letters to me and please forward immediately any letters on which interviews have heretofore been granted.

Please remember that prisoners’ letters are examined to ascertain that they contain no improper matter, not to gratify idle curiosity.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 14, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: Please say to Mr. Vasser that the arms belonging to officers which are at Columbus are in very safe hands and expect to be returned to the owners whenever they are released. A parole can be granted to Lieutenant Hubbard only on the certificate of Doctor Woodbridge that his health is such as to make it highly necessary that he should be permitted to leave the island for a few days. The application must be approved by you and then I must only consent to his going to Cleveland.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, July 14, 1862.

R. R. Ross, Esq., Clarksville, Tenn.

SIR: Your letter of the 3d ultimo in behalf of the sons of H. P. Carney and G. H. Warfield, prisoners of war at Camp Douglas, has been referred to me, and in reply I have to inform you that paroles can be granted only by the Secretary of War. The young men that you refer to are in the same class with many others, being the sons of loyal parents, and as all must be treated alike-where there is no reason for special consideration, it is not probable paroles will be granted in those cases. Parents are permitted to see their sons in cases of severe illness at the prison.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.216}

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 14, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I have completed the inspection of Camp Butler and that the instructions you have given are now enforced. I would respectfully request you will furnish me with further instructions. The prisoners of war are now separated in different companies and squads and are governed and inspected as you have desired. The orderlies have been chosen from their own members and roll-calls are to take place at reveille and retreat. I have instructed the commanding officer in the manner of making out the morning reports and the proper form of the monthly return. It is advisable that an officer should have the charge of the prisoners to the exclusion of his other duties. Such is the intention of the commanding officer, should he find an officer in the command who is capable of filling with credit such a responsible position. The difficulty has been that the guard has been recently changed and the new officers are not as yet sufficiently well acquainted with their duties to fill such important positions. The regiment (Seventieth Illinois) now forming the guard of the prisoners is a regiment of three-months’ men just forming, and the commanding officer of the camp not belonging to the regiment has not sufficient acquaintance with his officers to make details for such important service. The commanding officer has exerted every endeavor to carry out the instructions given him, and as he is now fully informed regarding his duties and the manner in which you desire the camp should be regulated or governed you may rest assured that your instructions will be enforced.

I have had an interview with Governor Yates and he has in every way signified his willingness to co-operate with you in carrying out the intentions of the Government regarding the prisoners and in aiding the commanding officer of the camp by every means in his power to promote their security and to enforce your instructions. I have reported to him that I considered the presence of temporary troops prejudicial to the good order of the camp and to the security of the prisoners, and he has assured me that orders would be immediately issued to remove the temporary regiments now forming at Camp Butler. The adjutant-general of the State has informed me that the Seventieth Regiment would be filled up and form the permanent guard of the prisoners and that no more temporary troops should be sent there for instruction.

Camp Butler has been heretofore a camp of instruction as well as a general depot for recruits. Maj. J. G. Fonda, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, has been assigned to the command of the camp. I have understood he has been assigned to this command by the Secretary of War but my information is not official. Should the Seventieth Regiment be filled up and the field officers appointed, there will again be some confliction of authority. At present Major Fonda is the superior in rank at the camp. The battery of Second Regiment Illinois Artillery, now forming part of the guard, is under orders to move.

Your instructions regarding visitors I have caused to be rigidly enforced. I found upon my arrival that the friends of prisoners were allowed to have communication with them almost unmolested. This I deemed to be a fruitful cause of their escape. The near vicinity of Kentucky and Tennessee, a large proportion of the prisoners being citizens of the latter State, has facilitated the visits of many of their friends whom I have no doubt in many instances encouraged their escape and perhaps contributed material aid for the express purpose. {p.217} No visitors are now permitted with the exceptions mentioned in your instructions, and persons having business or employment within the inclosures are sworn not to aid or abet their escape.

I have endeavored to impress upon the commanding officer as well as upon the prisoners themselves the vast importance of cleanliness of camp and quarters. Renewed attention has been given to this matter. I found the camp in as good police as could be expected, but after the instructions you have given are fully enforced by the aid of the prisoners’ fund many improvements which have been suggested will be made and contribute materially to the comfort, health and appearance of the camp. Dr. J. Cooper McKee, U. S. Army, medical superintendent of prisoners, has caused renewed attention to be given to personal cleanliness and the prisoners under charge of an officer and suitable guard have been permitted and compelled to bathe occasionally in the Sangamon River, about half a mile distant. This has been the custom in camp for some time. I would respectfully request some instructions regarding it-whether or not you consider it advisable, what number should be permitted to bathe at one time, what relative guard is sufficient, &c. The limited supply of clothing in possession of the prisoners is somewhat opposed to personal cleanliness, but when the new supply is furnished new regulations are to be enforced which will add greatly to their comfort and proportionately decrease the sick list.

With regard to the clothing to be supplied it would be advantageous if outer clothing of a coarse texture and gray color could be furnished. It would be munch better if clothing different from that of the U. S. troops could be supplied, not only so the prisoners could be readily distinguished from the guard, but as a preventive measure against their escape, and should their escape be effected they might be more readily distinguished and apprehended.

With regard to the fence I had recommended to be constructed I have received your dispatch and its construction is suspended. The material for the fence were already at Camp Butler and the labor was performed by the prisoners themselves. It would have been constructed without cost to the United States. I cannot consider the construction of this fence other than an advantageous measure and recommend it to your consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third U. S. Infantry.

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Statement of Joseph S. Lamb, prisoner.

CAMP CHASE, July 14, 1862.

I reside in Knox County, Tenn., ten miles from the city of Knoxville. I am the person to whom the letters of May 12 and July 10, 1862, from Horace Maynard, which are now in my possession, are addressed. I am a Union man and will continue to be as long as I dare speak and have been so all the time. I voted against secession and talked against it as long as I dared. I had a Union flag at home and have yet unless they have gotten in and robbed me of it. About the 1st of June, 1861, I had my likeness taken with the Stars and Stripes across my breast. I was well known at home as a Union man both by Union men and secessionists and can give plenty of references of Union men as to this fact.

{p.218}

After the time of taking my likeness and the election General Zollicoffer, of the rebel army, came to Knoxville and took command and proclaimed that all those of the South should unite with the Confederacy and warning them that they had better never have been born than strike a blow against the South. Afterward, about the 9th of August, I together with Calvin Garrett, William Martin and Joel B. Crawford, now confined in prison with me at Camp Chase, with many others left our homes in Knox and Union Counties and started for Kentucky to unite with the Federal Army, then lying at or near Camp Dick Robinson. After traveling all night and the forenoon of the next day, having arrived at the foot of the Cumberland Mountains and about thirty miles on our journey, our advance was attacked by a squad of secession cavalry under command of Captain Ashby. We were unarmed. Captain Thornburg, of our party, was wounded in the neck and he and nine others taken prisoners. We were informed by the mountain pilots that it would be impossible to cross the Confederate lines, they being too closely guarded, upon which we all returned to our homes, narrowly escaping being taken prisoners upon our return.

In about ten or fifteen days afterward there came into my home upon me some seven armed men and arrested me and informed me that the charge was treason. At this time I had a sign on the front of my house on which I had painted “The Union.” They ordered me to destroy it; to split it up. I told them I could not do that; that it showed my sentiments and I could not split it up. They swore I should do so and drew their pistols, when one of them said, “that was too hard,” and took an ax and split it up and burned it. I was then cussed for a traitor and tory and abused for, as they accused me, supporting such men as Maynard, Brownlow and other Union men; and another charge they had against me at Graveston, Tenn., was that I in presence of some of their volunteers called for three cheers for the U. S. Army and for General Winfield Scott, whom I served under in Mexico, and further that I had called for three groans for secession. I had called for those cheers and those groans as charged. They cursed my wife the same night they arrested me for saying she did not think the Union men were traitors and tories for maintaining their sentiments; that such a charge should rather go upon the other side.

They compelled me then to go along with them to Knoxville. There I was informed that the only way to save myself was to join the Southern Army and support the South against invasion. Being advised by my friends I did so, in hopes that the Federal Army would soon come and rescue us, and with the full determination never to fire a gun against the flag that had protected us. I had a choice as to what company I should join and I joined a company of sappers and miners, as I understood that that was a company for labor and not to fight. When I united with the company of sappers and miners I got of my wife a white handkerchiefs, which I have yet in my possession, remarking to her and intending that if we got in a battle with the Federal soldiers that I would wave that handkerchief as a token. That I knew that would save my life and they would not harm me, for I knew what Federal soldiers were.

I was at Big Creek Gap waiting on and cooking for some sick soldiers about the 21st day of February last, when a squad of Captain Cross’ company, of Second Tennessee (Union) Regiment, came in sight some 200 yards off. I could easily have escaped after I discovered them had I had any disposition to do so. Calvin Garrett was then with me and lie could have easily escaped also. In stead of making my escape I was out of doors and immediately started, meeting them walking slowly. {p.219} Garrett did not start toward them with me but did not attempt to escape. I and Crawford, Martin and Garrett had previously entered into a secret agreement that if ever we came near enough to the Federal lines that we knew we could make our escape we would do so and unite with the Federal Army. We were all of mis taken prisoners the same day by Captain Cross’ company of infantry. Martin and Crawford had been taken before us and Martin piloted Captain Cross’ company to us. We were taken prisoners and have remained prisoners ever since. I understood from members of Captain Cross’ company who took me that Martin said when they took him that if they would give him a gun he would go and shoot Lieutenant McCauley who was in command of the rebel company. They said Martin also told them that if they would come down a mile further they would get a couple of other boys who would be anxious to go with them, alluding to me and Garrett. About the time they were going to leave after arresting myself and Garrett the thought struck me of some powder, two kegs of rifle and one of blasting powder, being laid away there, and I told them of it, saying that to take it away would defeat the pursuit of the rebel forces; and I think it proved to be so, as I understood that they gathered in force to pursue us.

I am willing and anxious to take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government and to enlist and fight in the Federal Army till the last gun is fired if I should live or the rebellion is put down, and to support the government of Governor Andrew Johnson.-I am a warm friend of William G. Brownlow and Horace Maynard and of Governor Andrew Johnson. I am firmly of the opinion that Calvin Garrett, William Martin and Joel B. Crawford have at all times at heart been Union men, are now, and if released will be good citizens of the United States and I believe they would unite with the Federal Army.

JOSEPH S. LAMB, Taken, subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of July, A. D. 1862.

C. W. B. ALLISON, Colonel, Commanding Post, Camp Chase, Ohio.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 15, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Some correspondence between Major-General McClellan and General Lee in relation to the exchange of prisoners was inadvertently omitted to be forwarded to you by the special messenger last night. It will, however, be sent by mail to-night.

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 15, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Commanding, &c., Fort Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs me to transmit to you the within correspondence* between Major-General McClellan and General Lee in relation to the exchange of prisoners, which was inadvertently omitted to be forwarded to you last night by the special messenger.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* Omitted here; see pp. 169, 170.

{p.220}

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WAR DEPT., ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 15, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Department of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss.

SIR: It is reported that arrangements will soon be made for an exchange of prisoners of war. The point in the West at which the prisoners will be assembled will be near Vicksburg. The Secretary of War directs that the arms and ammunition be sent with the prisoners to be put in the hands of those returned to us from the rebels that they may at once be put on duty.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPT., ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 15, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fort Delaware.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you send Colonels Baldwin and Hanson and Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson under a suitable escort back to Fort Warren, they paying their own expenses for transportation.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 15, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding C. S. Forces.

GENERAL: Your communication of the 14th instant advising me of the appointment of Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill, on your part, to arrange within Major-General Dix the terms of a general exchange of prisoners, reached me at 8 o’clock this morning.

General Dix being at Old Point Comfort, it will be impracticable for him to meet General Hill to-morrow; but I will at once order him to repair to this place and he can meet the appointment at 10 o’clock a.m. on Thursday, the 17th instant.

Shirley being some distance within the lines of my pickets, and as in my letter on the subject I especially requested that the meeting might take place outside of our lines, I would respectfully suggest that the conference be held at Haxall’s Landing, understood to be in the immediate vicinity of the outlying pickets of both armies.

It might take place either on shore or on the steamer which takes up General Dix.

Unless therefore I hear from you to the contrary I will direct General Dix to be at Haxall’s on Thursday, the 17th instant, at the hour I have named.

In the sincere hope that this meeting may result in the accomplishment of the very desirable object we both have so much at heart,

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

Maj. Gen. D. H. HILL.

GENERAL: General Lee directs me to say that he agrees to the meeting as proposed in the above letter, therefore you will not have to go down to-morrow. He would like to see you to-morrow.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. P. MASON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.221}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 15, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

List of killed, wounded and missing of the Army of the Potomac in the battles since the battle of Fair Oaks, June 1, 1862: Sumner’s (Second) Corps, 170 killed, 1,068 wounded, 848 missing; total 2,086. Heintzelman’s (Third) Corps, 189 killed, 1,050 wounded, 833 missing; total, 2,073. Keyes’ (Fourth) Corps, 69 killed, 507 wounded, 201 missing; total 777. Porter’s (Fifth Provisional) Corps, including McCall’s Division, 873 killed, 3,700 wounded and 2,779 missing; total 7,352. Franklin’s (Sixth Provisional) Corps, 245 killed, 1,313 wounded and 1,179 missing; total 2,737. Engineers, 2 wounded, 20 missing; aggregate 23. Cavalry, partial report, 19 killed, 60 wounded and 97 missing; aggregate 176. Grand total: 1,565 killed, 7,701 wounded and 5,958 missing. Grand total, killed, wounded and missing, 15,224. Full reports will vary these numbers somewhat, but not more than 100 or so probably. I beg the War Department to observe that many reported missing were probably killed and that fully 3,500 men, the medical officers estimate, have gone North on hospital steamers, whose names were not taken by them. For the first day or two upon my arrival here it was impossible to do more than ship the sick. A register could not be prepared. The actual loss properly distributable to damage from the enemy in the late battles will amount to a little over 11,000.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 15, 1862.

General J. A. DIX:

The commanding general desires that you will come to these headquarters by the boat of to-morrow. Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill, of the Confederate Army, has been appointed to meet you to arrange for a general exchange of prisoners. The meeting will take place on Thursday morning at Haxall’s, a few miles above here on the river.

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, Little Rock, Ark., July 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. S. R. CURTIS, Commanding U. S. Forces.

GENERAL: I send you under flag of truce Surg. A. Krumsick, of Third Missouri Regiment, U. S. Army, who has been in my custody for some time. I deem it proper that surgeons and assistant surgeons should be omitted from the list of prisoners of war, and am informed that your Government recognized the principle in the case of several surgeons lately released at or near Springfield, Mo. I expect therefore to act upon that principle so long as adhered to by your Government. It is proper to state that I dispatched a flag of truce with Surgeon Krumsick some days since, but you then being on the march the truce party was recalled. I respectfully call your attention to the fact that many prisoners, among them Captains Hallowell and Galloway for whom an exchange was effected with you by General Van Dorn immediately after the battle of Elk Horn, are yet detained in custody by the U. S. authorities. Assistant Surgeon Evans, of the First Cherokee {p.222} Regiment, has not returned to his command, and I respectfully ask to be informed whether or not he has been released from custody, and if not that it be done at once.

I deem this a proper opportunity of suggesting to you the entire uselessness of detaining the prisoners whom you and I hold respectively. I would gladly consider any proposition you may have to make for their release. Should you think of no better one I propose that I release all the prisoners of war that I hold; that you do the same; that should there be any excess on either side the opposite party shall in future release a sufficient number to offset such excess. In order to prevent confusion it will be necessary for us to furnish each other with the number and rank of prisoners released at any time. I have here in custody Capt. Joseph Indest, of Company A, Third Missouri Regiment, U. S. Army, whom I wish to exchange for Capt. Joseph Fry, C. S. Army. Should you agree to the exchange, please allow Captain Fry to report to me at once under such restrictions as you may desire until the exchange is consummated, and I will return Captain Indest to you at once.

Very respectfully,

T. C. HINDMAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWEST DIVISION, Springfield, Mo., July 15, 1862.

General JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, Commanding District of Missouri, Saint Louis.

GENERAL: I learn that four prisoners, soldiers of one of the Kansas regiments, were murdered in Coffee’s camp at Fayetteville on the night or evening of the 9th instant. Major Murray (the bearer of the flag of truce whose dispatch I sent you yesterday) gives the following version of the affair:

The four men killed were Kansas soldiers. On Wednesday night a firing was heard in the upper end of Coffee’s camp which created inquiry and it was learned that 4 men had been shot-3 killed dead and 1 wounded badly who made his escape through a fence and went into a house where a woman gave him some help. She was warned not to do so. It was stated in Fayetteville that the shooting was done by Coffee’s order. There was some indignation at the deed in Coffee’s camp which was likely to become general. It was then reported that the shooting was ordered by Coffee’s provost-marshal. This did not, however, prevent one whole company of Coffee’s regiment from leaving and joining Tracy’s (whose camp was eight miles distant) regiment of Confederate troops. Rains heard of the act next morning and cursed bitterly. He sent up a wagon to get the wounded man and three dead ones. Before the wagon came the wounded man was dead. Rains buried the dead. In Tracy’s camp the act was loudly condemned.

This affair may have prompted the dispatch he sent to me charging us with shooting men, women and children.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. B. BROWN, Brigadier-General.

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[JULY 15, 1862.-For letter of Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles, C. S. Army, to Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, U. S. Army, relating to the case of Henry Castle, &c., see Series I, Vol. XV, p. 519.]

{p.223}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 15, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: Frequent inquiries are made by prisoners of war and their friends whether in case of a general exchange all will be compelled to accept of the exchange and go South whether they wish to do so or not. There are many among them who live in Southern States who wish to be released on parole so that they may not again be forced into the ranks. Others wish to remain at the North and enter our service. Can these be singled out and released on taking the oath of allegiance?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 15, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: Rolls of prisoners of war have been called for by the War Department and from your office. I presume that one set is all that will be required and will furnish them with as little delay as possible. There has been much remissness in furnishing rolls with prisoners taken and in preserving them, and it will scarcely be possible to make cut reliable rolls from the meager papers at the prison camp. At Camp Douglas it appears that a number of the prisoners enlisted in Colonel Mulligan’s regiment, the Twenty-third Illinois, and Colonel Cameron’s regiment, the Sixty-fifth Illinois. When the rolls are completed I will be able to give the particulars.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 15, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: Your several letters of the 10th, 12th and 13th have been received. Your action in the case of Chaplain Warren is approved. The parole of T. C. Depeyster will be revoked. Don’t permit the newspaper articles to give you any concern. If you think it worth while you may state that the occurrence which gave rise to the declaration of martial law took place while Colonel Mulligan was in command; that the authority was asked for at that time and that the declaration would have been made if he had remained there.

The rebel letter must have been smuggled out of the camp, as both the matter and length of it are in violation of the rules of prisoners’ correspondence, if it was written by a prisoner, which I doubt very much. Possibly and probably it was made up by the excluded reporter, but I doubt if the publication of it can be made a political offense.

The commanding officer is the proper person to decide what are loyal papers. Newspapers cannot be received by prisoners by mail without {p.224} their being opened and examined and that would cause too much labor to clerks in charge of the post-office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 15, 1862.

Capt. J. HANDY, Prisoner of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

SIR: Your letter of the 7th* is received. It appears by the papers accompanying your letter that you have served as a medical officer by authority of the medical director, but it appears also that you were a captain in the line, and as the medical director is a subordinate your services in his department must be looked on as only temporary and you were liable at any time to be recalled to your appropriate duties. Under this view of the case I do not feel at liberty to class you with medical officers. Other cases similar to yours have been laid before the Secretary of War and if the decision is favorable to you I will inform you. Your order is herewith returned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Omitted.

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FORT WARREN, Boston Harbor, July 15, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 12th asking for a list of prisoners of war taken by the Army of the Potomac on the Peninsula. On the 10th instant I forwarded to you a list of 100 prisoners of war (received at this post on the 9th) with such information as I received with them from Fort Columbus, New York Harbor. I have no official information as to the time or place of their capture. It embraces all that I have not before reported.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. DIMICK, Colonel First Artillery and Brevet Colonel, Commanding Post.

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OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, July 15, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit duplicate copies* of roll of prisoners of war confined in Gratiot Street Prison in this city up to July 10, 1862. A consolidated return of all prisoners of war confined in the various hospitals and stations in this district will be forwarded as soon as the reports are all in.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BERNARD G. FARRAR.

{p.225}

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INDIANAPOLIS, July 15, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

Fifty prisoners escaped last night from Camp Morton. Several have been killed and wounded. A number recaptured. We are scouting the country and hope to overtake others.

JAS. A. EKIN.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 16, 1862.

Major-General WOOL:

The following dispatch has just been received from the operator at Dover:

FORT DELAWARE, July 16, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

Nineteen prisoners escaped last night. Particulars by mail. My men are on guard every other day. It is impossible to prevent escapes without a larger force. I ask for re-enforcements immediately.

A. A. GIBSON, Captain, Commanding.

You will please take immediate measures for the security of the prisoners at Port Delaware and for the recapture of those who have escaped and investigate and report the numbers and circumstances under which the escape has taken place.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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WASHINGTON, July 16, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

You will please procure all the information you can respecting the names and condition of our prisoners held by the rebels and make report to this Department after your interview with General Hill.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. E. WOOL, Baltimore, Md.:

There are at Fort Delaware upward of 3,000 prisoners and it is reported that some escaped last [night]. The Secretary of War directs that additional troops be sent to that post and also that a steam guard-boat be provided.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. E. WOOL, Baltimore, Md.:

Colonel Tompkins at New York has been directed to send a guard-boat to Fort Delaware.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.226}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 16, 1862.

Capt. A. A. GIBSON, Commanding Fort Delaware:

Report immediately whole number of prisoners escaped from Fort Delaware and in what manner they left the island.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 16, 1862.

Capt. A. A. GIBSON, Commanding Fort Delaware:

When at Fort Delaware I did not understand that you regarded additional troops as necessary to prevent the escape of prisoners or I would have taken measures to have sent them. To my question whether a guard-boat was not necessary you replied no; you had perfect control over the island. General Wool has been directed to send an additional force to Fort Delaware and a guard-boat will be sent from New York. You must allow no intercourse whatever with the prisoners and keep citizens from landing on the island except those in the employment of the Government, and these must not have any intercourse with the prisoners. If boats came to the island and took the prisoners off your sentinels could not have done their duty.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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FORT DELAWARE, DEL., July 16, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I sent a telegraph to you this morning announcing the escape of nineteen prisoners of war and asking for additional troops, the guards being now as heavy as physical endurance will permit. Last evening the officer of the day suspected that certain prisoners were plotting to escape and took extra precautions to prevent it. Until midnight the weather was stormy and the darkness unusual. The escape was effected by timbers with which a privy was being constructed on the shore about 400 yards from the quarters by those who made the attempt. The bank at that place is covered with a thick growth of reeds. A partially constructed raft was found this morning which the party undoubtedly were prevented from completing by the patrols. The officers of the post cannot be more vigilant and I hardly think another prisoner will be able to escape. I have exhausted my ingenuity in making the custody of the prisoners complete, but the area to be guarded is too great for the present force.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. GIBSON, Captain, Second Artillery, Commanding.

Since writing the foregoing I have received a telegraph from the Adjutant-General requiring more particulars which have been rendered. By no inquiry can I discover that the sentries were not vigilant. They were posted in the quarters and on the inside and outside of the prisoners’ parade around the building. The ventilators give free opportunity to get out from every tier of bunks.

A. A. G.

{p.227}

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WILMINGTON, DEL., July 16, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Prisoners escaped last night from Fort Delaware and were assisted by men in New Castle. Traitors from New Castle visited the fort a few days since. All may escape if more troops are not sent; it is said 3,500 prisoners and only two [companies] of soldiers. Traitors can carry boats over in five minutes from Delaware City.

A. H. GRIMSHAW.

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BERKELEY, VA., July 16, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President:

...

Generals Dix and Hill are to meet on Thursday at Haxall’s to arrange general exchange of prisoners. I hope to see Burnside to-day and arrange with him. Will telegraph you fully when I have conferred with him.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 16, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to send you herewith a list of prisoners taken by the troops under my command from the 26th ultimo to the 2d instant inclusive. I would respectfully request that you will furnish me as soon as convenient with a corresponding list of the prisoners taken from my command now in your hands.

Its publication would tend to relieve much anxiety on the part of the relatives and friends of the parties.

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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FORT MONROE, July 16, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

General Stevens doubts whether General Hunter will have transportation enough for General Wright’s division unless the Mississippi returns to Port Royal. It will take her a week. The Vanderbilt should go to New York to refit. It will also take her a week. Neither can go up the James River, as they draw too much water. I am summoned to General McClellan’s headquarters to-morrow morning. He has arranged for me to meet General D. H. Hill, of the Confederate Army, on Thursday on the subject of exchanges. I have received the papers by Major Breck and shall wait for the residue to-morrow morning. I suppose the privateersmen are not to be distinguished from other prisoners we have to be exchanged on the principle of the cartel of 1812.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, July 16, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Do with the transports whatever you think best. The privateersmen are to be exchanged as other prisoners of war, no distinction being made.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

{p.228}

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 16, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letters of 14th and 15th. I forward herewith statement respecting five women who have been found among the prisoners. I shall be happy to receive any instructions regarding them which you may see occasion to give. Also a communication regarding John Hayes, a prisoner of war held here. Also copy of letter from Capt. J. Christopher dated June 14, giving statement of various funds accrued in his hands belonging to this camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

JULY 16, 1862.

Particulars respecting the five female prisoners in Camp Douglas:

Rebecca Parish, born in Lee County, Ga.; about twenty-eight years of age; has always lived in Sumter County, Ga., till this last year; has been three years and a half married; her parents live in Barbour County, Ala.; removed with her husband, a soldier in the Confederate service, and two children to Island No. 10 about the 1st of March last. Her husband and two children had died by the middle of April, since which time she has lived under the protection of her brother, and on the 15th of April she was taken prisoner with her brother, a soldier in the Confederate service, at Island No. 10. Having no friends there and no money to take her home, she preferred remaining with her brother, although the medical men in charge at Madison, Wis., would have given her her liberty and sent her back as far as Cairo.

Harriet Redd, born in Wayne County, Miss.; about twenty-four years of age; has lived the greater part of her life in Pike County, Ala.; her parents live in Wayne County, Miss.; two years and a half since she removed with her husband to Pike County, Ala., where she remained till her husband joined the Confederate Army, last January, and was taken prisoner with him at Island No. 10, while an invalid and has so continued and lives with her husband in this camp.

Araminta Palmer, born in Pike County, Ky., is about twenty-two years of age; has mostly lived in Great Bend, [Meigs] County, Ohio; was married about two years since; went to Columbus, Ky., with her husband about a year and a half since, where her husband, an invalid, was sworn to support the Confederacy. Her husband has been dead ten months; was a cook in the Confederate hospital at Island No. 10 when taken prisoner on the 8th of last April. Has no relations within 800 miles of her and has been sickly in camp. Her parents are good Union people.

Amelia Davis, born in East Brandon, Vt.; is about thirty-three years of age; left Vermont at the age of 18; has lived in many parts of the Union; has been married twice. Her present husband is a seafaring man, whom she married in Baltimore two years since. Both husband and wife were respectively employed as cook and stewardess on board the steamer Red Rover when taken by General Buell at Island No. 10 and both sent prisoners to Camp Douglas together with a little boy eight years of age. Does not know that she has any relatives alive.

Bridget Higgins, born in Galway, Ireland; came to America in 1857; was married in Baltimore. Her husband was obliged to join the Confederate {p.229} Army about the 1st of October last and became a member of the Nelson Artillery. Shine has followed the fortunes of her husband since and they were taken prisoners at Island No. 10. Does not know that she has any relatives in this country. Is in delicate health.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

ROCKFORD, July 14, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas.

DEAR SIR: The undersigned citizens of Rockford would respectfully represent that John Hayes, now a prisoner at Camp Douglas, was somewhat more than two years ago a worthy citizen of Rockford, Ill., where he had resided ten years and who was known and respected as an industrious man with a wife and large family of children. About that time he went to Tennessee with others in quest of work, and while employed in constructing the stone-work of a railroad in the vicinity of Memphis was coerced as he declares into the Confederate service on penalty of death. Mr. Hayes during his absence previous to the period of his constraint was mindful of the necessities of his family, and everything so far as we are able to learn justifies the conclusion that he is a loyal man, a good husband and a worthy citizen of the North. Many of us are well acquainted with him and his family, know him to be a good citizen and do not hesitate to unite in an urgent request that he be released and sent home to his family in Rockford, who require his efforts in their support in the absence of his oldest son who has been absent more than a year doing service as a soldier in the Union Army. If such action is consistent with your duties, by granting this request you will confer a favor on the undersigned and relieve the distress of a worthy family.

Yours, very truly,

M. J. UPWRIGHT, Sheriff. BELA SHAW. [And fifteen others.]

[First indorsement.]

ROCKFORD, July 14, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Camp Douglas.

DEAR SIR: I have no personal knowledge of the matters set forth in the foregoing papers, but on inquiry am fully satisfied that Mr. Hayes would not voluntarily of his free choice join the enemies of the country and that he ought to be discharged from imprisonment. If you can aid in procuring his discharge it will be an act of humanity and aid his suffering family.

Very truly, your friend,

CHARLES WILLIAMS, Mayor of Rockford.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, July 16, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Col. W. Hoffman, Third Infantry, commissary-general of prisoners, with the additional remark that from personal examination of the prisoner I am disposed to credit the statements herein made. He also seems an orderly, quiet, well-disposed man.

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.230}

[Inclosure No. 3.]

CHICAGO, July 14, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Sixty-ninth Regt. Illinois Vols., Commanding Camp Douglas.

COLONEL: In reply to your communication of the 11th instant I have the honor to inform you that the following funds accrued at Camp Douglas to be applied to the benefit of prisoners of war and U. S. troops: Post funds of prisoners from June 1 to July 1, $369.48; hospital fund of prisoners of war to 1st day of June, $209.95; hospital fund of U. S. troops to 1st of June, $100, Dr. W. W. Winn, late post surgeon, having neglected to sign the hospital returns from 1st to 13th June under which there has accrued about $150 it cannot therefore be used until he makes his return. The returns from 13th to 30th June inclusive have not been received from hospital. I respectfully request that I may be advised of any change made in the rations since entering upon your duties.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

J. CHRISTOPHER, Capt., 16th Inft., Act. Asst. Commissary of Subsistence, U. S. Army.

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CAMP NEAR CORINTH, MISS., July 16, 1862.

Brig. Gen. P. A. HACKLEMAN.

GENERAL: I have already in the Missouri Republican of 18th June ultimo published an account of the condition and treatment of the Union soldiers captured at Shiloh by the rebels into whose hands they fell. But as Brigadier-General Oglesby, commanding this (Second) division, Army of the Mississippi, requested a written statement through you of the facts connected with the murder of Lieut. W. S. Bliss, of the Second Michigan Battery, and the treatment of the Federal soldiers taken with him, I comply with his request and send you the following, which came under my own personal observation, or as attested by my late fellow-prisoners.

Lieutenant Bliss was murdered on the 1st or 2d day of May. He and other officers and others who had the means had been in the habit of buying cakes and milk at a house near a well whence we brought water and had on the morning of that day left his canteen at this house to be filled in the evening. At about 5 p.m. Lieutenant Bliss and Lieutenant Winslow of the Fifty-eighth Illinois, went to the well for water, under guard of course. Arrived at the well Lieutenant Bliss stepped to the back window of the house in question, distant about ten or twelve paces, to get his milk. Ordered by the guard to come away he replied that he merely wanted to get his milk, at the same moment receiving it from the woman of the house and in return handing her a shinplaster in payment. The guard, standing about six paces from him, repeated the order. Lieutenant Bliss said, “In a minute,” and receiving his change stepped back some three feet. At this moment the guard raised his piece and Bliss perceiving the movement exclaimed, “Good God! you will not shoot me, will you?” Saying he “must do his duty” the guard fired, shooting Bliss through the heart, who fell dead without a groan or motion.

The guard although standing almost within reach of Lieutenant Bliss had made no effort to prevent him from going to the window nor could he have supposed he would escape, since all parties were in a yard, nor did {p.231} he inform him that he was violating orders, nor had the prisoners been informed that the purchase of milk was prohibited.

That this atrocious and most inhuman murder is not to be charged to the brutality of the individual soldier, although by no means innocent, is proved by the assertion of Capt. D. S. Troy, the highest Confederate officer in Montgomery, made to me that the shooting was “according to orders.”

At Tuscaloosa two enlisted men were killed by the guard for looking out of the window of their prison, one of them being shot before any notice was given them prohibiting them the poor privilege of looking at their mother earth. After the first killing a written notice was posted up that the guard were to discharge their pieces at any prisoner seen looking out of a window. Several were shot at but none wounded.

At Tuscaloosa the prisoners were confined in close rooms; only a few were allowed to go out for water and to the sinks at a time, and although the diarrhea was prevailing in the prisons to a terrible extent the unhappy victims were obliged to use tubs during the night, which were often not removed until 9 a.m. Alive with vermin such prisons must rapidly develop every form of disease and death claim many a noble mark.

At Montgomery upward of 500 privates and 100 commissioned officers were confined in a cotton shed. Within it were their sinks, many as in the field, open trenches. They were almost wholly without blankets, hundreds without coats, while many had sold their clothing, even to their pants, for food. No clothing of any description was forwarded to them, and their only beds were the hard earth and harder planks, mitigated for a short time by a small supply of damaged hay, soon exhausted and never replenished.

The sick were sent to hospitals in the cities where they had such care as surgeons of our own number could give them, with entirely inadequate supplies of medicines and-hospital necessaries. The diarrhea, ague and milder forms of disease at Montgomery were treated by Dr. W. A. Morse, a lieutenant of Twelfth Iowa, who never had less than 150 cases, and was many times for several successive days entirely without medicines. The deaths of prisoners were announced as follows: “Died, a Yankee prisoner,” among the deaths of slaves-no name or rank being given. Such were the obituaries of many well-educated officers and privates.

The rations issued at Tuscaloosa and Montgomery, where I was confined, were of the most execrable description. Corn bread made of unsifted, coarsely ground meal, a small slice of wheat bread, and two or three small pieces of meat, often spoiled, and fetid salt beef constituted the ration for a day. Occasionally small allowances of sugar, rice, stock pease and molasses were made, the whole not exceeding half rations. Miserable as was this allowance it was in a few weeks reduced one-half, until no more than a quarter ration was issued. I have often seen men consume at one meal the amount received for three.

It is no wonder that upon such subsistence men became reduced in health and strength until death from starvation stared them in the face.

These officers and men who had manfully held their ground at Shiloh until 5 o’clock p.m., and until ordered back, and who had repulsed every attack of the enemy, were obliged to drag out a miserable existence in prisons overrun with vermin under circumstances at which humanity revolts and to which felons are not condemned by civilized nations. But I have given the main facts in the case and have no desire to deepen the picture. They speak their own language; further details are unnecessary.

{p.232}

Of the 2,300 to 2,400 captured on the 6th, 1,600 have either been released by death from the barbarism of traitors, have been paroled or have made their escape.

God grant that the remainder may soon be restored to their friends and homes.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. DORR, Lieutenant and Quartermaster, Twelfth Iowa Infantry.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, Camp near Corinth, July 19, 1862.

I inclose for the notice of the commanding generals of the post, district and department the official statement of Lieut. J. B. Dorr, Twelfth Iowa Infantry, in regard to the treatment and punishment of Union soldiers, prisoners of war at Montgomery and Tuscaloosa, by the rebel authorities. I have asked for the communication that it may be officially known, as far as it is possible to make it official, the barbarous and inhuman treatment our soldiers receive as prisoners of war from the rebel army.

Most respectfully forwarded.

R. J. OGLESBY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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PROVOST-MARSHAL’S OFFICE, Palmyra, July 16, 1862.

General J. M. SCHOFIELD, Commanding District of Missouri.

SIR: In consequence of Colonel McNeil being in the field and his headquarters in transitu as per movements of a certain outlaw, Jo. C. Porter, it may be some little time before he can communicate to you the facts causing the issue of Orders, No. 34, Division of Northeast Missouri. I will endeavor to give you some of the facts that within my knowledge led to the issue of said order.

Inclosed please find a letter from the Widow Owen, published in the Herald; also the Jesuitical comments of the editor. This letter has caused the murder of at least one Union man, a very estimable citizen named Pratt, of Lewis County, and the letter has been seized as a holy thing by all the traitors in our section. Its appeal for assassinations has done irreparable mischief already-it has continually aided and comforted the opponents of the Government.

The facts in the case of John L. Owen you will perceive by the letter published in the Quincy Whig, also inclosed. Please find inclosed a copy of petition or something of that kind as a mere sample of the feelings of the loyal men of this section (composed of all parties) on the subject. The same feeling pervades Illinois, efforts having been made there to obtain an order from the honorable Secretary of War for its absolute suppression as an establishment. The complaints of its pernicious influence were universal from all directions prior to the issue of Orders, No. 34, and since a general feeling of satisfaction has been expressed.

Trusting that this may answer for the nonce until such time as Colonel McNeil may be able to reply giving all the facts in the case,

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM R. STRACHAN, Provost-Marshal.

{p.233}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

[From the Quincy (Ill.) Herald, July 3, 1862.]

-Statement of facts, plain and truthful, concerning the capture and murder of Maj. John L. Owen, written by his wife, Mary A. Owen, and certified to by his mother, Nancy Owen:-

About the 1st of September my husband, John L. Owen, then captain of a company of six-months’ men (sworn into the State service about the middle of June), started to General Price. He was promoted to major and returned home the 6th of December. Since that time to my certain knowledge he has had no company nor part of a company; neither has he been connected in any way with a company. And I do know and can say with truth that he never either before or since his return from the army has been engaged in what is termed bushwhacking and that he has never shot into the cars. On the contrary I know he was always opposed to that kind of warfare. I have frequently heard him speak on the subject, therefore I know his opinion.

And I can assert with truth that I have known his whereabouts ever since his return from the army and that he has never borne arms since, but has merely tried to keep out of the way of the Federals, and that for months he never left his mother’s house by night or day. But they had their spies busy, who watched him and found out by some means that he never left the house, and these same spies were two men whom he had especially befriended. Then came the troops to search for him but failed at that time to get him. After the first searching (which took place just seven weeks before they succeeded in getting him) he never slept in the house, but slept on his own and his mother’s premises. He had his own provisions and I cooked them, and a part of the time he came for them, and when he did not I conveyed them to him myself. It was my wish as well as a pleasure to do so, and I would continue to feed him if they by their cruelty had not deprived me of the blessed privilege.

And now to the capture: On the 8th day of June before we had risen in the morning we were surrounded by Federal troops knocking at the doors for admittance. My mother, her two sons who live with her, Amsley and William, myself and child were all who were in the house. The soldiers came in, searched the house, took both Amsley and William prisoners and took them away, while others came and surrounded the place. Persons who saw them estimated their numbers at about 300. They had their pilots with them. They dashed through the fields like so many fiends, and into the meadow where my husband had slept the night before (and no doubt he had been watched to his sleeping place), and oh, they found him in a little cluster of bushes not more than 200 or 300 yards from the house and in plain view of the house. They found him alone, unarmed and defenseless; one poor man, without any resistance at all, gave himself up to his savage captors. Resistance would have been vain and he knew it. Oh, the savage yells they sent up when they found him-they ring in my ears yet.

They brought him to the house. We saw them coming. I was greatly troubled to think they had him prisoner; but oh, I could not conceive that persons calling themselves men and Christian men could have hearts cruel enough to murder him in the brutal manner in which they did. They all halted at the fence and got water. While here they questioned him as to who stayed with him, and several other questions, among the rest where was his company. He told them he had no company. His mother and myself told them the same. They called us all liars and said they knew he had a company for they had been told so, and that he had to tell where it was. We all assured them {p.234} that he told the truth, but they would not believe us. They said, “Take him away from these women, and if he does not tell us we will hang him.” He said just as they started from the house if they would treat him as a prisoner of war and according to the honors of war he had no fears.

I feared from their savage appearance that they might abuse him or do him some harm, and I followed them about a quarter of a mile entreating them to spare his life-that he was innocent of the charges they had against him, and not to take an innocent luau’s life. They assured me they would not kill him, and told me to go back home now and come down to Palmyra the next day and see him. That satisfied me. I turned and came home.

They did not go over half a mile farther till they killed him. From the best information I can get they made him sit down on a log which lay close to a fence, tied his hands across his breast and tied his elbows back to the fence, so that he could not move; tied him with hickory bark and there took the life of an innocent, unresisting man. They left him there on the public road, shot down like a wild beast, then went on to one of the neighbors and told them what they had done, and told them if he had any friends they might dig a hole and throw him in, and sent me word that they had shot my husband and where I could find him; also sent me a cartridge with the word that they had put eight like that in him. They also thrust him through the breast with a bayonet. One ball entered his face just at the left side of his nose and passed through his head; one near his collar bone; two through his breast, not more than two or three inches apart, passing entirely through his body and lodged in the fence behind him. His left arm was all shattered to pieces from the elbow down. The murderers stood so near him that his clothes were scorched by the powder.

I still have the cartridge they sent me in such unfeeling manner, and when some kind friend sends it through one of their black treacherous hearts then it will have fulfilled its mission.

Oh, does not his innocent blood call for revenge? Will not his friends avenge his brutal, cruel death?

MARY A. OWEN.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

[Editorial from the Quincy (Ill.) Herald, July 3, 1862.]

LETTER FROM MRS. OWEN.

A communication appears in this morning’s Herald from Mrs. Mary A. Owen, widow of the late John L. Owen, who was shot two or three weeks ago by some of the Federal troops in Missouri, giving her version in detail of his arrest and the manner of his death. We know nothing of the circumstances connected with the arrest and death of Owen or the cause or causes that led to his arrest further than what has been published in the newspapers; but whether guilty or not of any or all the crimes that have been alleged against him he should have undergone at least the forms of a trial, either by a court-martial or a civil tribunal, unless found in actual hostility with arms in his hands. If he came to his death in the manner related by Mrs. Owen the act was nothing less than cold-blooded murder. If he had been shot in the actual perpetration of any of the crimes alleged against him he would have received but his just desert.

At any rate we think the affair should be inquired into either by the civil or military authorities of Missouri, that the facts of Owen’s career since the commencement of the rebellion to the time of his death may be known and the justice of his death properly vindicated.

{p.235}

[Inclosure No. 3.-Letter In Quincy Whig.]

THE FACTS IN OWEN’S CASE-WHAT THE QUINCY HERALD DOES FOR SECESSION IN MISSOURI.

PALMYRA, July 5, 1862.

PHILLIP SNYDER, Esq.

SIR: I am led to thank you for your happy answer to a letter purporting to have emanated from Mrs. J. L. Owen describing the manner of the death of her husband. Whilst every person can sympathize with the wife in her affliction and regret she was so unfortunate in having so guilty a husband, still every loyal right-minded citizen must be satisfied with the merited punishment of so notorious a traitor as John L. Owen.

I wish to give points in the career of this “Maj.” John L. Owen which may expose the outrage of publishing such a letter as that in the Herald, J. L. Owen was the first man who inaugurated bushwhacking in this portion of the State of Missouri. His company by his orders burned some eight or ten passenger coaches on the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, burned a depot building at Monroe Station, tore up the railroad track, destroyed culverts and fired into passenger cars. On one occasion they met a man by the name of Hotchkiss who never had carried arms and was particularly inoffensive, being engaged in trading with the farmers in the vicinity of Monroe City for butter, eggs, &c., and in return delivering them coffee, sugar, cotton, &c. He had never committed any higher crime than that of voting for Abraham Lincoln, yet this man while watering his horses was deliberately shot down; eight balls were put into him and he was left for dead. The man, however, was taken care of by the Sixteenth Illinois’ surgeon and I believe is now alive in Hannibal.

These outrages were committed by Owen so long ago as last July. I have the affidavits on hand of men belonging to his company of their being ordered to take the private property of peaceable citizens by this same J. L. Owen while acting as their captain in that neighborhood. This spring a man by the name of Preston, a worthy citizen, a husband and father, was seized and carried off and is undoubtedly murdered, although his body has not been found. Another worthy farmer, an old respected citizen named Carter, living in Ralls County but a few miles from this Owen’s neighborhood, having been suspected of giving information which led to the apprehension of a notorious bridge-burner (who was tried and proven guilty, sentenced to be shot and the sentence approved by General Halleck) was visited by a party of some six or eight men, called out of his house and shot in his own dooryard and in the presence of his wife and children.

I could give you a long list of outrageous atrocities perpetrated by this John L. Owen and his brother outlaws, and for which he was probably more responsible than any other man in this section; all of which appears to have been overlooked by the Herald, for it cannot be supposed that any paper could publish so plain and palpable an attempt to incite to assassination as is the letter and comments alluded to in the Herald if apprised of the facts.

Again, John L. Owen has been hiding from justice since Christmas, lying concealed, sleeping in the brush, and was found in his bed in the brush, and armed.

General orders from headquarters are imperative that this class of men caught under arms in this part of the United States are to be shot on the spot. These orders have been published to the world. Mr. Owen was not shot in the presence of his family, he was not tied, he {p.236} was not abused; but the general orders that commanded him to be shot were read to him, and he was regularly executed in accordance with military usage. John L. Owen was the first or about the first citizen against whom the grand jury of the U. S. circuit court and district courts for Missouri found a true bill of indictment for the high crime of treason.

I trust that you will arrange these facts in proper shape for publication and use them so that loyal Union men may be on their guard in reference to what they may see in the Herald, and thereby discharge to the full your duty as a patriotic journalist. As to the Quincy Herald I can assure you that it has either wittingly or unwittingly done more to keep alive rebellion in our midst here than all the rebel papers and rebel missionaries put together.

I remain, truly, &c.,

WM. R. STRACHAN, Provost-Marshal, Palmyra, Mo.

[Inclosure No. 4.]

HANNIBAL, MO., July 15, 1862.

W. R. STRACHAN, Esq., Palmyra, Mo.

DEAR SIR: I inclose you the autographs of a few of our loyal citizens who desire to express their approval of the prohibition of the sale of the Quincy Herald in these parts. It would surprise you to notice the avidity with which every Union man to whom it has been presented places himself upon record. I had but an hour or so this morning in which to circulate it, but if desirable can obtain the signature of every true Union man in the city. All now would be glad to see the same course pursued toward the Chicago Times.

Hastily, yours,

T. D. PRICE.

[Sub-inclosure.]

We, the undersigned, loyal citizens of Hannibal, Mo., would take this method of showing our hearty approval of the course recently taken by Col. John McNeil in prohibiting the sale of the Quincy Herald in Northeast Missouri, believing as we do that the treasonable course of that paper has done much to give aid and comfort to the traitors of Northeast Missouri in their war against the Government, and it is our belief that the treasonable plottings of the traitors in this portion of our State have been kept alive and encouraged in a great measure by its disloyal teachings.

JOHN L. LATHROP. GEO. H. NETTLETON. P. B. GROAT. [And forty others.]

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor District of Columbia.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that Surg. H. Griffin, of the Fiftieth Virginia Volunteers, who has been unconditionally released as a prisoner of war, be furnished transportation to Fort Monroe, there to report to Major-General Dix to be forwarded through our lines to the South by the first opportunity.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.237}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. D. H. HILL.

SIR: I have just learned through Major Rogers and Captain Tayloe, bearers of a flag of truce now at Shirley, that you were yesterday on your way to that point expecting to meet General Dix there.

On the morning of the 15th instant I received a communication from General Lee, dated the 14th, informing me that he had appointed you to arrange with General Dix the terms of a general exchange of prisoners, and designating the 16th instant as the day and Shirley as the place of meeting. I immediately replied that General Dix would not have time to reach there on the day named, and having in my previous communication expressly asked that the conference might take place beyond the lines of my pickets I suggested that it should be held at Haxall’s, understood to be out [of] the immediate vicinity of the outlying pickets of both armies. At that point the conference could take place either on shore or on the steamer which was to take up General Dix. And I stated to General Lee that unless I heard from him in the meanwhile General Dix would be at Haxall’s Landing at 10 o’clock this morning prepared to meet you. General Dix is now at Haxall’s Landing.

Regretting the delay and inconvenience which has been occasioned you, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. IRVIN MCDOWELL, Commanding Third Corps d’Armée.

GENERAL: The inclosed petition* and indorsement* by the Secretary of War is referred to you. You will please instruct General King to seize a sufficient number of disloyal persons in Fredericksburg and send them to General Wadsworth, in this city, to be kept in close custody until the persons mentioned in the petition are released and returned to their homes.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 17, 1862.

Col. JAMES WALLACE, First Eastern Shore Maryland Volunteers, Drummondtown, Va.

SIR: Two hundred prisoners of war escaped from Fort Delaware night before last. You will take measures to capture such of them as may come down the peninsula.

[WM. D. WHIPPLE,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.238}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 137.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Corinth, Miss., July 17, 1862.

I. Brigadier-General McKean having been assigned to the command of paroled prisoners at Benton Barracks, Mo., is hereby relieved from duty at this place. He will proceed at once to Saint Louis and take command, in accordance with Special Field Orders, No. 161, from Headquarters Department of the Mississippi.

...

III. John D. Chadwick and Francis E. Whitfield, of the county of Tishomingo and State of Mississippi, having been guilty of holding treasonable and forbidden communication with the enemy, it is ordered that they each be confined as prisoners in the penitentiary at Alton, Madison County, Ill., where prisoners guilty of such offenses are kept. Col. Clark B. Lagow will proceed with them at once to said prison and deliver them into the custody of the officer in command of the same. The assistant quartermaster U. S. Army at this place will furnish the necessary transportation for said prisoners.

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

[JOHN A. RAWLINS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 17, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: Your report of the 10th instant upon the location and condition of Camp Douglas has been received with the letter inclosed from Doctor Bellows on the same subject. Whilst the expensive, not to say extravagant, arrangements for sewerage, water supply, &c., which were referred to this department, could not be authorized, for reasons sufficiently set forth, the department will approve the reasonable repair of the sheds to make them waterproof. If the prisoners have as good quarters as our own soldiers in the field can be supplied with it seems that all that humanity requires and much more than our own men, prisoners South, get, is supplied. For these repairs the prisoners themselves should do the work. For police and sanitary labors certainly the prisoners themselves should be required to do the labor. If not willing to keep themselves and their camp clean and wholesome and supplied with water I presume it is in the power of the guard to compel obedience to regulations.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster. General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 18, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor respectfully to request that you will be so good as to furnish me with information respecting the present condition of Maj. Richard H. Woolworth, Third Regiment Pennsylvania {p.239} Reserve Corps, who was wounded in the battle of June 30, and subsequently taken prisoner at the temporary hospital established on the New Market road.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 18, 1862.

General D. H. HILL.

GENERAL: Your note of yesterday* duly reached me. I feared that you might have been waiting some time at Carter’s (Shirley’s) and that you might deem me guilty of neglect and discourtesy in failing to inform you of the cause of the non-appearance of General Dix. I beg, general, that you will think no more of the matter and let it pass from your mind as it has from mine. Mistakes of the kind will happen in spite of us.

Yours, very truly,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 18, 1862.

Brigadier-General STONEMAN, Commanding Cavalry.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that the session of the commission appointed to meet at Haxall’s to negotiate for an exchange of prisoners has been adjourned until Tuesday next, and I am directed to say that the scouts of the cavalry along the river will meanwhile be made as usual.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HAXALL’S LANDING, July 18, 1862.

[MEMORANDUM.]

A difference having arisen between the undersigned in regard to a general exchange of prisoners of war it is agreed that the exchange of prisoners shall go on, man for man and officer for officer, as heretofore, until the authorities at Washington can be consulted.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General. D. H. HILL, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 18, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit.

COLONEL: I have yours of the 14th instant. As there is now a probability that an arrangement for a general exchange of prisoners {p.240} will be soon made it will be necessary to defer any measures for increasing our prison accommodations for the present. Should these arrangements fail provision must of course be made to meet the necessities of the case.

Very respectfully, yours,

C. P. BUCKINGHAM, Brigadier-General and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Columbus, July 18, 1862.

Col. D. G. ROSE, Commanding Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind.

COLONEL: In speaking with you yesterday I neglected to mention that Captain Ekin is the quartermaster who will under your direction make the purchases with the prisoners’ fund. He understands my views perfectly and I am sure will suggest no purchases except those which are right and proper. The commissary at the camp who is also quartermaster there is treasurer of the fund and will only have to pay the bills which are presented. He makes no purchases himself. The bills will be made in Captain Ekin’s name and will be approved by you and these will be the vouchers for the treasurer. Without such vouchers he will be held accountable for any payments he may make. Let him understand this distinctly. If he has already made purchases without having such a voucher let him obtain one immediately. I want to impress on you that he is to make no expenditures himself. He is young in service and experience and must be trusted with no such responsibility.

On examining the account of the funds I found the disbursements under the authority of the council of administration certainly made for improper things and in many cases without any vouchers. The payment for postage stamps was it appears entirely unreasonable and the purchase of tobacco seemed to be unnecessarily large. Please observe the articles to the purchase of which it is to be confined under my regulations and adhere to them as closely as possible. Payments for the pursuit of escaped prisoners are of doubtful propriety and must only be resorted to [incomplete sentence]. A liberal quantity of vegetables should be supplied. Lieutenant Palmer presented his accounts in a very satisfactory condition, furnishing vouchers for all disbursements. The amount remaining on hand he is ready to turn over to his successor. I wish the monthly account of this fund with a list of all the articles purchased during the month sent to me on the 1st of August. The commissary must keep the account up day by day so that at the end of the month there will be no delay in furnishing it. Examine the list of employés at the camp who are paid extra pay from this fund and see that no more are employed than are necessary and limit the highest extra pay to 40 cents a day. Let these accounts be made out in due form, specifying the time and the duty and make the payments regularly at the end of the month. These accounts, like all others, will be made in the name of Captain Ekin approved by you. I learn by the accounts presented that a citizen is employed as paymaster at $50 per month. I do not approve of this. The non-commissioned [officer] selected to receive and examine letters must be the paymaster for prisoners and as is provided in the regulations you will allow him extra pay for his services. Discharge the citizen immediately. {p.241} Hurry the completion of your rolls and the return for June as much as possible. The War Department [wishes] them immediately.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Wheeling, Va., July 18, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SIR: I am informed that some prisoners have been released from Johnson’s Island that were sent from this department of which no report has been made to these headquarters. It is very desirable that I should have notice of the release of prisoners so that my record of them may be complete.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 18, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have completed my inspection of Camp Butler and have affairs regulated there as well as circumstances will permit. I respectfully request instructions to return to Detroit. I have been quite unwell for the past two days but have made my daily visits to camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 19, 1862.

Col. J. DIMICK, First U. S. Artillery, Comdg. Port Warren, Boston, Mass.

SIR: The Secretary of War authorizes you to permit Marshal Kane,* of Baltimore, to visit Boston during two weeks as often as may be deemed necessary by the surgeon of the post to obtain such medical treatment as his case requires, on giving his parole to communicate with no person except his medical adviser and upon the subject alone of his medical treatment.

I am, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* See Vol. I, this Series, p. 619, for correspondence relating to imprisonment of Marshal Kane.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 19, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, U. S. Army, Detroit:

The Secretary of War says ascertain and report at once how many prisoners of war have escaped from Camps Douglas and Butler and see that a remedy is applied.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.242}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 19, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, U. S. Army, Detroit, Mich.:

The Secretary of War is not satisfied in regard to your reports concerning prisoners, and directs you to repair to this city without delay.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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BERKELEY, VA., July 19, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: About 350 of our wounded taken prisoners in the recent battles having been released on parole have arrived from Richmond. Among them are a number of officers. They will go down the river to-day. I shall this morning send to City Point for another party of our wounded.

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, July 19, 1862.

N. B. BAKER, Clinton, Iowa:

Paroled prisoners are obliged to do guard, police and fatigue duty for the proper order of their own corps. Those who refuse are mutineers.*

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* In relation to this matter, see also quotation from Halleck in Ketchum to Thomas, July 28, post.

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FORT MONROE, VA., July 19, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I have just arrived from Harrison’s Landing and leave in half an hour for Washington in The Ariel. It is important that I should see you to-night in regard to prisoners of war and return here immediately. Will you have a carriage sent to the landing, Sixth avenue [street], for me? I will come directly to the War Office, and I hope be with you at 9 o’clock this evening.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 19, 1862.

Hon. DAVID TOD, Governor of Ohio.

DEAR SIR: I inclose a copy of the telegram* received from the War Department in relation to paroled prisoners at Columbus, from which you will perceive that paroles are to be granted only under the circumstances provided for in the two orders which I inclosed to you this morning. I told Colonel Mulligan I would expect him to carry out the regulations [as] to visitors very rigidly and I request you will grant permits only to persons sent by Governor Johnson for political purposes. Of several requests for interviews which he sent to Sandusky there was but one at all of this character and the interview should not have {p.243} been granted. I will try to leave for Washington on Tuesday next, but I am not sure I can accomplish it.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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DETROIT, MICH., July 19, 1862.

General L. THOMAS:

Fifty-five rebel surgeons have been discharged under General Orders, No. 60, viz:

Chicago-Joseph Sandek, Samuel H. Caldwell, Thomas J. Taliaferro, J. Maclin, Driver Delmas, F. Crowell, Matthew H. Oliver, Robert H. Redwood, Caleb Foxey Elisha G. Greenleaf, Robert G. Rothrock, John F. Kennedy, Kell Williams, John T. McDowell, Robert A. Felton, Thomas B. Elkin, William A. Martin, Michael J. Bolan, Samuel P. Johnson, James W. Dupree, Lewis Barber, Charles B. Parker.

Order General Halleck, July 15, at Sandusky-James Allison, O. Becker, B. McCroxton, J. J. Dement, J. E. Dixon, H. Griffin, P. F. Gould, J. F. Grant, A. J. Gupton, J. M. Jackson, L. Lindsay, W. B. Mills, M. L. Neely, R. S. Napier, W. J. Owen, F. F. Pratt, W. J. Rodgers, W. R. Smith, F. R. Straube, E. T. Taliaferro, J. M. Taylor, W. V. Turner, A. H. Voorhies, C. H. Edwards, H. D. Wheatley, T. W. Nichols, military prisoner.

Alton, Ill., June 23-James P. Evans, John S. Frost, William D. Horton.

At Camp Chase, June 27-M. M. Johnson, J. D. Johnson, Tomlin Braxton, Theophilus Steele, E. W. Harris, O. F. Knox.

Drs. Lewis Barber and Charles B. Parker were released at Chicago by order of General Halleck. There were no reports from Camps Butler and Morton. They have been called for.

WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 19, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith the petition of Dr. W. H. Newell, a prisoner of war. From the report of General Viele it appears that he was taken and has been held as a surgeon in the Confederate service, and in this view of his case I respectfully suggest that he is entitled to his discharge under General Orders, No. 60, paragraph IV.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 24, 1862.

Let Doctor Newell be unconditionally discharged under General Orders, No. 60, current series.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War

{p.244}

[Inclosure.]

BALTIMORE, June 27, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: Holding the position of surgeon in Confederate Army, attached to Major-General Longstreet’s division, I was on special duty in the District of Norfolk prior to the evacuation of that district. I was wounded from a shell from one of the gun-boats of the Union forces at the bombardment of Sewell’s Point and vicinity. At the evacuation it was impossible for me to be removed before the Union forces took possession, which placed me a prisoner within their lines. I have been released on my parole by General Viele and now write you concerning my release under the article of June 7, allowing as I understand an unconditional release of all surgeons.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

W. H. NEWELL, Surgeon, C. S. Army.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Norfolk, Va., July 10, 1862.

Doctor Newell reported himself at these headquarters as a surgeon in the Confederate Army. There was no evidence of the fact excepting his own statement. He appeared to be actuated by a very nice sense of honor in reporting himself and was consequently released on his parole of honor not to serve until exchanged.

EGBERT L. VIELE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mick., July 19, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Asst. Com. Gen. of Prisoners, Camp Butler, Springfield, ill.

CAPTAIN: Your letter of July 15* asking for instructions in reference to rolls has been received. In reply I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to state that duplicate rolls of prisoners are required by him and the War Department and that you will please have them made out immediately and so forwarded to this office. Muster-rolls are not required. For further information concerning the rolls to be furnished and returns of prisoners required I am directed to refer you to paragraph 1 of the general regulations from this office. Whenever prisoners are received at the camp in any considerable numbers rolls will be immediately made out and forwarded to this office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 19, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Third Infantry, U. S. Army, Springfield, Ill.

CAPTAIN: I return you Major Fonda’s return* of prisoners of war for the month of June. It requires the aggregate last month and {p.245} explanations of the alterations. Please observe my letter of instructions of the 10th instant in this particular. Call Major Fonda’s attention to the circular of regulations bearing on rolls and returns. I wish the rolls and returns to be made as complete as possible with a letter of full explanation. I believe that more have died and have escaped whose names are not thereon, and if there is reliable testimony of this fact I want it stated. Have this matter attended to immediately.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Omitted.

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OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, Mo., July 19, 1862.

Maj. T. A. SWITZLER, Provost-Marshal-General Southwest District, Springfield, Mo.

MAJOR: Your letter concerning the release of Benjamin F. Simmons, a prisoner at Indianapolis, is received. By a recent order of the War Department no more prisoners are at present to be released. I have no jurisdiction over the prisoners at Camp Morton, Indianapolis.

Very respectfully, yours,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General, District of Missouri.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 19, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 13th instant has just been received. The fencing at Camp Butler is nearly completed. Affairs there are progressing satisfactorily. Your instructions are all being enforced as rigidly as the inexperienced troops forming the guard will permit. There has been a set of the muster-rolls of the prisoners made out, but upon examination I find it to be incorrect. There is another partly made out, but a set of blanks are required. Shall these rolls when completed be forwarded to you? With regard to the return for June I fear it will not be very correct as affairs were quite disorganized before my arrival and the prisoners had not been counted since Colonel Morrison had been relieved. The reports from the orderlies were received daily, but I found that they had connived at the escape of prisoners under their charge and had made incorrect reports.

I would respectfully recommend the construction of a new guardhouse. The present one is nothing but a common frame building, from which the prisoners could easily escape if not closely watched by the guard. The prisoners and troops are now confined in the same prison, which for obvious reasons I think should not be permitted.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 19, 1862.

Maj. W. S. PIERSON, Commanding Depot of Prisoners of War, Sandusky, Ohio.

MAJOR: Your letter of July 16 with the accompanying applications of live prisoners of war for parole has been received. In reply I am {p.246} directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that the statement of the surgeon of the post in attendance is required in such cases. This statement is to be one of medical facts in the case of each prisoner as to his claim to a parole and is to be accompanied by the official opinion of the medical officer in each case. The detailing by the prisoner of his case during the time that he has been in the surgeon’s care is of no importance and can only be useless matter of incumbrance. On the applications will be indorsed your approval or disapproval of each, it is not to be construed from this communication that any favorable action will be taken in these particular cases.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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LACON, MARSHALL COUNTS, ILL., July 19, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: I beg leave to call your attention to the fact that 1,300 paroled prisoners taken at Shiloh are now held at Benton Barracks, Saint Louis, Mo., by the officer in command there against their will and compelled to do military duty in violation of their parole. Having two sons in that body of men-one of whom, John P. Winslow, was wounded and is in feeble health, having been in three engagements-I demand as a matter of justice to these brave fellows that some steps should be taken to prevent their further abuse.

It is enough surely that Government is now in arrears of pay to many of them for over eight months, and that they have suffered almost unheard of hardships. They are now entitled to be paid off and to go on furlough until regularly exchanged. I think I know enough of your character to justify the expectation that as soon as your attention is called to this matter it will receive immediate correction. I learn from my son that all the men refused to violate their parole and were threatened with incarceration in the guard-house if they persisted in refusing. This ought not to be, and if the fact becomes public will do much to embarrass our operations in recruiting under the new call for additional troops.

I have the honor to be, your sincere friend and obedient servant,

ROBERT F. WINSLOW.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Corinth, Miss., July 20, [1862.]

Capt. GEORGE S. PEIRCE, Military Commander, Dubuque, Iowa.

SIR: In reply to your telegram with reference to the discharge of paroled prisoners I have the honor to state that permanently disabled paroled prisoners will be discharged from the service on certificates of disability the same as other soldiers.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

S. M. PRESTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 28.}

HDQRS. DIVISION OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., July 20, 1862.

It is represented from various quarters that the bands of guerrillas and outlaws of all kinds infesting the country within the limits of this {p.247} division are increasing and concentrating their forces for renewed depredations upon the peaceful and law-abiding citizens of the country and against the legitimate soldiery stationed throughout the same for the preservation of law and order. Believing that there is some foundation for these representations, the attention of officers commanding posts and scouts is called to the necessity of the utmost vigilance in collecting information concerning these lawless bands and to existing orders requiring that such lawless bands of guerrillas, when their existence is ascertained, be pursued and exterminated without mercy.

...

By order of Brig. Gen. James Totten, commanding division:

LUCIEN J. BARNES, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 20, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, ill.

COLONEL: I yesterday called on you by telegram* for the number of prisoners escaped from Camp Douglas but as yet I have received no reply. I hope by to-morrow by telegraph to learn the number or that you cannot tell. For the greater security of the prisoners you will with as little delay as practicable change the position of the line of fence below the stables as was suggested when I was [at] Camp Douglas, and at the same time remodel all the fence, giving it sufficient height and stability with all the frame-work on the outside. A sentinel’s walk will be constructed at convenient distances. Secure the top of the fence on the outside so that the sentinel may have a good view of all inside the fence near his post. The walk will not be required along the fence next to the street and it may not be necessary in rear of the quarters occupied by the regiment inside. It may be found necessary to make the walk continuous, but for the present we will try it with intervals of fifty to seventy-five feet. For making these changes use all the old lumber about the camp with as much of the old stables as may be necessary. Let it cost as little as possible. The calling of the prisoners’ rolls must not be trusted to corporals or sergeants. They must be superintended by officers, as many as may be necessary detailed for the purpose permanently, or with temporary details of a week at a time, the whole superintended by a field officer who should make his morning report to you. Put this order in force immediately and see that it is rigidly enforced. The police of the prisoners’ grounds and quarters must be inspected daily and reports made of it daily in writing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 20, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Ill.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant with its inclosures, in which you desire instructions as to the disposition of five female prisoners at Camp Douglas. In {p.248} reply I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that you will please to ascertain if they cannot be placed in some position in the hospital as nurses or laundresses, as it is not proper that they should be allowed to remain longer at the camp as prisoners, though, if employed as above indicated, they would be kept within the prison limits. If this cannot be done you will if the prisoners are unable to provide for themselves ascertain if some arrangement cannot be made with the authorities of the [illegible] or some suitable institution to receive them, for which if consented to by the authorities they may be allowed a reasonable compensation. Should the prisoners not desire to remain they may be furnished with passes and transportation to the limits of our line. You will in this matter act as in your judgment will secure the most proper disposition of them should they desire to remain with the other prisoners, but if they remain within prison limits it can only be in the capacity already indicated, viz, either as nurses or laundresses.

With much respect, I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 20, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit Mich.

COLONEL: Upon closer examination of muster-rolls of prisoners already completed I find that they are very incorrect. Having no other guide we must rely upon the statements of the prisoners themselves. The roll now completed was made out from their statements upon their arrival, but it is my impression that many at that time gave assumed names and incorrect account of themselves. Since the formation of this roll many prisoners have escaped without the knowledge of the authorities and I find some have been reported to escape who have not done so. There are some names on the roll of whom I can procure no information whatever. I doubt whether they ever were prisoners at the post. The rolls now in formation are made out from the different squads, and each squad is called up for the verification of its roll. Every means shall be taken to insure its correctness.

I would respectfully recommend that an inclosure be constructed around the prisoners’ grave-yard; also that a record be kept of the deaths and of the position of each burial. There is ample material at the camp for the construction of this fence and the labor can be performed by the prisoners themselves, so there will be no expense accrued to the Government. There are now approaching 400 graves, and a due regard for the feelings of their friends would certainly warrant this expenditure.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 20, 1862.

Maj. JOSEPH DARR, Jr., Provost-Marshal-General, Wheeling, Va.

MAJOR: You will doubtless recollect that while at Columbus, Ohio, you desired instructions in regard to the directions to be given by you {p.249} for the greater security and health of the prisoners confined at the various prison camps within your department. I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that it is his desire that you concentrate so far as practicable all of the prisoners at Wheeling which are or may be in your department, thus avoiding the additional expense and trouble of such preparation at each camp. He further requests that you prepare for his examination a report as to what farther arrangements are necessary to be made for the accommodation at that point of at least 300 prisoners. Report the number for which you at present have prison room and the facilities generally, [illegible] together with an estimate of the proposed expense of this. It is necessary that you immediately comply with these instructions, as Camp Chase has already its full complement.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF-PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 20, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Third Infantry, U. S. Army, Springfield, Ill.

CAPTAIN: Your letter of July 11 [18] in which you state that your orders have been fulfilled, as far as circumstances will permit, and your [request for] instructions to return to this point has been received. In reply I am directed by the commissary-general to inform you that you will remain at Camp Butler until all instructions which you may have received are completely put in force and carried out minutely in daily practice under your immediate supervision by the commanding officer at that place, and that they be so fully understood by him that further instructions to him from this office regarding the regulation of matters appertaining to the prisoners as detailed to you will be unnecessary, as it is not sufficient in these cases simply to give orders but to see them carefully executed. You are desired especially to attend to all forms of official papers and to see [that] the details relating to military prisoners and to the manner of reporting citizens are particularly attended to and in a proper manner. The commissary-general further directs the purchase by you of six Farmer’s boilers, barrel sizes (40 gallons), of the new pattern. These are completely enveloped by the fire and set down into the heat as far as the upper flange in a similar manner that the heater of a common glue pot receives the inner vessel of fluid. He requests you to have them put into daily use and he expects as a result a corresponding economy of fuel. They will be purchased by the quartermaster, who will have them prepared, but he will suspend operations [as to] the use of the same for the present, as it is expected that they may be paid for by the prisoners’ fund accumulating from the savings. This same plan will be adopted by the quartermaster in the purchase by the quartermaster of all articles for the use of the prisoners and those ordered by you to be purchased by him, as it is desirable that all such expenditures should be covered in this manner. All expenditures ordered by you will be made by the quartermaster in town, as the placing of money [in] the hands of inexperienced or irresponsible volunteer officers is, as far as possible, to be avoided.

Having particularly performed this duty you will proceed to Alton, Ill., and by conferring with Major Flint, the commanding officer at {p.250} that point, you will ascertain what further instructions and explanations are necessary to completely carry out the views of the commissary-general, and so far as you have been authorized you will give them. The only particular suggested by the commissary-general is the introduction of Farmer’s boilers at that place, to which you will attend.

With much respect, I am, captain, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 21, 1862.

His Excellency DAVID TOD, Governor of Ohio.

SIR: Yours of the 14th instant was duly received and at once laid before the Secretary of War. He said in reply that arrangements were about to be made for a general exchange of prisoners, which if done would obviate the necessity of a new prison at Columbus.

Should the arrangement fail I will call his attention to the subject again.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 21, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, Senate.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th instant inclosing a communication from His Excellency Governor Kirkwood, covering one from J. B. Dorr, quartermaster of the Twelfth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, with regard to 1,450 soldiers of Iowa regiments, paroled prisoners of war, and 250 officers now confined at Selma, Ala., and in reply to say that the Department is making every effort for a general exchange of all prisoners of war and has now strong hopes of its early accomplishment.

Inclosed please find a copy of General Orders, No. 72,* regarding paroled prisoners, &c.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* Omitted here; see p. 94.

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CLINTON, IOWA, July 21, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

Will not Iowa soldiers of the Eighth, Twelfth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth Iowa sent home on parole be furloughed until exchanged? Was this not by officers commanding below Saint Louis? Who has a right to detail them for further service? Was not the detail for relief of the Twenty-third Missouri a violation of their parole?

N. B. BAKER, Adjutant-General of Iowa.

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CLINTON, IOWA, July 21, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

I object to Iowa soldiers who are on parole doing anything which by implication or indirection may make them violate that parole. Most {p.251} of these men are at Benton Barracks and should be furloughed to their homes until exchanged. They are as brave and willing men as ever lived. They have proved what they are. They understand their parole prohibits any service. Should you put them in service for the relief of the Twenty-third Missouri and put muskets in their hands? Do not allow punishment to brave and gallant men who have done their duty.

N. B. BAKER, Adjutant-General of Iowa.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 21, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor herewith to transmit lists* of certain of our wounded taken prisoners in the recent battles and who have been released on parole. I shall send to City Point to-morrow for another party of our wounded.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

* Omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 21, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: It has come to my knowledge that many of our citizens engaged in peaceful avocations have been arrested and imprisoned because they have refused to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, while others by hard and harsh treatment have been compelled to take an oath not to bear arms against that Government. I have learned that about 100 of the latter class have been released from Fortress Monroe. This Government refuses to admit the right of the authorities of the United States to arrest our citizens and extort from them their parole not to render military service to their country under the penalty of incurring punishment in case they fall into the hands of your forces.

I am directed by the Secretary of War to inform you that such oaths will not be regarded as obligatory and persons who take them will be required to render military service. Should your Government treat the rendition of such service by these persons as a breach of parole and punish it accordingly this Government will resort to retaliatory measures as the only means of compelling the observance of the rules of civilized warfare.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, July 21, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. MORGAN, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cumberland Gap.

GENERAL: Inclosed* you will find a list of prisoners of war, paroled by my order, and to-day directed to be sent within your lines. Accompanying {p.252} the detachment are two officers of the medical staff in your service. They are released as non-combatants, in compliance with existing orders from my Government. Your communication of the 5th instant sent under flag of truce would have been acknowledged by me, but I have been absent some time sick and have just returned to duty in the department. I will give its subject my immediate attention, and in acknowledging your courtesy, general, subscribe myself, with feelings of respect,

Your most obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH, Major-General, Commanding.

* Nominal list of 130 names omitted.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: The articles specified in your requisition of the 7th instant for issue to prisoners of war at Fort Delaware have this day been ordered from the depot in this city to Capt. A. A. Gibson, commanding Fort Delaware.

By order of the Quartermaster-General:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. J. PERRY, Assistant Quartermaster.

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DETROIT, July 21, 1862.

General L. THOMAS:

One hundred and three prisoners escaped from Camp Douglas and forty-three from Camp Butler. I leave for Washington to-day.

W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to forward the following papers, viz:

1. Letter from Captain Potter, assistant quartermaster, Chicago, Ill., requesting copy of your order to send rebel commissioned officers to Sandusky. Indorsed July 19, 1862, asking information.

2. Report of Post Surgeon McVickar on sanitary condition of the camp and employment of another contract physician. Indorsed July 16, 1862: Approved and referred.

3. Certificate* of post surgeon recommending parole of Thomas Coulter, Company D, Forty-ninth Tennessee, on account of ill-health. Indorsed July 20, 1862: Approved and referred.

4. Petition* of N. M. D. Kemp and others regarding certain prisoners of war, referred by General Halleck to commanding officer Camp Douglas, July 15, 1862. Indorsed: Release of Drake and Hail recommended, July 20, 1862.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

* Not found.

{p.253}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

OFFICE ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER, U. S. ARMY, Chicago, Ill., July 17, 1862.

Col. JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: I will thank you to send to this office as soon as convenient a certified copy of the order of Colonel Hoffman for transportation of rebel officers from this city to Sandusky, Ohio.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. POTTER, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, July 19, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Col. W. Hoffman, Third U. S. Infantry, commissary-general of prisoners, with the request that he will instruct me as to whether I shall furnish copies of his orders or correspondence with me.

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel, Commanding.

P. S.-I have not been to Chicago for some days and have not seen Captain Potter and know nothing of this request except what is contained in this communication.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

CAMP DOUGLAS, July 15, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding.

SIR: In obedience to your orders I submit a brief statement of the condition of the hospitals and the sanitary state of the camp generally. There are seventy-five prisoners in the camp [hospital] and fifty-seven U. S. soldiers. The diseases of the former are principally of the lungs and bowels, assuming a low form, and are complicated by a tendency to scurvy. The condition of the hospital generally is good, the patients cleanly and well cared for, ventilation good and the medical service intelligent and ably performed by the gentlemen with whom you have proposed to enter into contracts for that purpose. The frequent complaint that has reached your ears of neglect has arisen from the fact that four surgeons, the number you authorized, is not sufficient for the work. Five can by extraordinary exertion accomplish it, but without that number it cannot be done. The men sick among our troops are merely affected by slight colds and bowel disturbances, readily yielding to treatment. The service in barracks where attention to the slightly sick and the exercise of judicial supervision over the sanitary condition of the men is as important almost as the service at the hospital is performed by four assistant surgeons, aided occasionally by such additional services as we can secure from an occasional rebel surgeon who was taken prisoner in the ranks. In these quarters are between 200 and 300 men, and the number has been I find steadily increasing, who manifest a strong tendency to scurvy, which will eventually if not controlled give a fatal character to all forms of disease whatever their original character.

It may be proper to say here that, with a full sense of the importance of the subject and the responsibility devolving upon me I am instituting all proper measures to antagonize this great evil. The present {p.254} system of sinks, slop barrels and ditches through the camp is fraught with imminent danger to health. This system in my opinion admits of no discussion or suggestion of modification or improvement save the free introduction of water into the grounds and a perfect system of drainage.

Very respectfully,

B. MCVICKAR, Post Surgeon.

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OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Wheeling, Va., July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SIR: As there is a probability of my removal against which Governor Peirpoint will strongly protest I take the liberty to mention the matter to you with the request that if you think proper to do so I should like to have you apply to the Secretary of War to assign me to special duty under you, with the control of prison posts in West Virginia. I have no personal feeling to gratify in the matter. Governor Peirpoint has himself applied directly to Secretary Stanton to appoint me as chief provost-marshal of West Virginia, and this in view of the changes constantly made in limits of departments and commanders thereof in this section of the country. The policy pursued by me seems to meet the general approval of loyalists here and they have voluntarily expressed the desire that I should be retained. Without wishing to press the matter too much upon your attention I should say that an early interference on your part if deemed advisable by you would be most likely effectual.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

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CAMP BUTLER, ILL., July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General Prisoners of War, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I hereby inclose my general sanitary report for the month of June, 1862, of this camp for your information. After you have done with [it] please forward it to the Surgeon-General U. S. Army, as it is an accompaniment of my monthly or quarterly report of sick and wounded.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. COOPER MCKEE, Assistant Surgeon. U. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP BUTLER, ILL., July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners of War.

COLONEL: Camp Butler, Ill., is situated on the Great Western Railroad, six miles from the town of Springfield. The camp is established on a rather high and rolling piece of ground, surrounded by a high board fence, inclosing some fifteen acres of land. It was originally intended as a camp of instruction for volunteers. The barracks were built for two regiments. They are mere shells, single boards forming {p.255} the sides and roofs; the sides very low, about eight feet in height; the roofs covered with tarred paper. Erected by contract they afford protection neither from storms nor heat. During this month the thermometer has been steady at 102° for days in my own room. The effect of such intense and continued heat on the sick and well in these miserably constructed barracks has been prostrating in the extreme. The prisoners of war, over 2,000 in number, occupy the rows of barracks on the right; in front of these there are two rows of tents on a main street also occupied by them. Four of the barracks in this row are used as hospitals, part of another as a drug store. A line of sentinels surrounds all, leaving ample room for the prisoners to exercise, but they are generally indifferent to this and to their personal cleanliness. Two other hospitals outside of these lines are now allotted to convalescents on account of the shade. On my arrival here in May I found the hospitals, six in number, in a miserable sanitary condition. No one had taken the authority or trouble to better this. The floors were filthy; deodorizing agents were not thought of; slops and filth were thrown indiscriminately around. The sick were crowded in wooden bunks, some on the floor, many without blankets, and nearly all without straw, either new or old. No attention was paid to ventilation or drainage. The stench of the wards was horrid and sickening. Food was abundant but badly prepared; medicines were deficient. The stewards were ignorant and negligent of their business, the nurses and cooks insubordinate and inattentive to the wants of their sick companions. The condition of the prisoners, many of whom had been broken down in service prior to their capture, opened a favorable and unlimited field for the development of low types of disease, and accordingly typhus and typhoid fevers, pneumonia, erysipelas, &c., raged with violence and great fatality.

To carry out my plans of improvement required much explanation and persuasion. I was successful in what I undertook for the comfort of these unfortunate sick. Floors were scrubbed, lime applied freely on the walls and floors, ventilation and drainage attended to. A fever hospital (making seven) was established; another hospital was used for pneumonia, another for erysipelas. The surgeons (prisoners of war) were assigned to their own hospitals, stewards and nurses were encouraged to emulate each other in the cleanliness of their wards, all with the happiest effects. Cooks were supplied with necessary kitchen furniture, barrels were procured for slops, water was furnished in abundance for the sick, wards were limited to the number of thirty patients. The hospital fund procured many necessary articles, such as ice. The medical purveyor at Chicago sent me a full supply according to the standard supply table for six months. A drug store, under an excellent druggist, was established. A quantity sufficient for a change of shirts, drawers and sheets was obtained from the quartermaster, fresh straw and bed-sacks were also secured. Under these changes the difference in the mortality of my hospitals was remarkable and exceedingly gratifying. During the month of May 123 died, whilst in June only 30 died.

Of twenty-four cases of camp fevers (typhus) four died; of fourteen cases of typhoid, two died; of thirty-three cases of common, continued fever, two died. In two cases I was unable to diagnose whether they were typhus or typhoid until after a post-mortem examination. The former disease was sudden in its attacks, in two cases the patients died on the third day. Ammonia, tonics and stimulants had to be used in large quantities. One case (I thought of fatal relapse) was saved by blistering the whole length of the spine with ammonia and mustard.

{p.256}

Typhoid or enteric fever was treated much in the same way, with the addition of oil of turpentine, of which I cannot speak too highly. Quinia had to be employed freely among these men in nearly all diseases. They generally come from miasmatic districts. I can speak with the highest satisfaction of the use of muriated tincture of iron in the treatment of erysipelas, alternated with quinia it controlled the disease in all its forms. I found local applications, as of iodine and nitrate of silver, unsatisfactory in their results, not controlling the spread of the disease. I abandoned their use and applied emulsion of flaxseed, saving pain and trouble to my patients. The two fatal cases reported were complicated with other diseases.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. COOPER MCKEE, Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army.

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SPRINGFIELD ILL, July 21, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Your communication of the 19th instant, with monthly returns for June returned, was received to-day. I hasten to reply. I had already explained to the commanding officer the manner this return should be made out and the explanations you required. I have again repeated those instructions, shown him your letter and caused lists of those who have died and who, have escaped to be made out. These lists I believe to be correct. An accurate account of the deaths has been kept by the surgeon in charge of the hospitals. The list of prisoners who escaped may not be so correct, for during the month of June no roll-call was made and the reports of the prisoners in charge of squads was not always to be relied upon. This is the first return made out. I therefore in the alterations since last return have only included the number of those who have died and those who have been known to have escaped during the month. You must remember that during the greater part of this month the present commanding officer was not in charge and no reliable data have been obtained of deaths, escapes, &c., previous to his taking command. Undoubtedly unknown prisoners have escaped from here. No roll came with them. A correct roll has never been obtained. Much time and labor has been expended in endeavoring to make out one, but the proper measures have never been resorted to in order to insure its correctness. I believe that prisoners have been aided in escaping from here by disloyal persons living in the vicinity, rebel sympathizers who only act covertly. I believe that previous to your instructions regarding visitors being enforced that prisoners were aided to escape by persons from Tennessee and Kentucky visiting their friends and relatives confined in the camp. I have no reliable testimony of these facts, but such is the opinion of Col. P. Morrison, Major Fonda and others connected with the camp. During the month of June affairs here were in a state of complicated confusion and it has required much time and unremitted exertion on my part to unravel them. I have used every endeavor to have your instructions carried out and with as much success as the material at hand would admit of.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

{p.257}

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WASHINGTON, July 22, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: By the inclosed letters it appears some of the Iowa troops taken prisoners at Shiloh are at Benton Barracks. It is stated in one of the letters they are unpaid and without clothes. I hope this matter has been attended to ere this, but if it has not I earnestly ask that arrangements may be made at once for their relief. It appears from the letter of McMaken that the officers in command and the paroled prisoners do not understand alike the duties of the prisoners in their present situation, and that this misunderstanding has led and is likely to lead to very unpleasant results. I do not know which is right, but it is very desirable that a conflict such as is shown to exist should be avoided. Will you be kind enough to make some order in the matter and send me a copy? If the boys are in the wrong I will use my best exertions to set them right. I am well satisfied the best way is to exchange them, and as there are a large number of rebel prisoners at Chicago and elsewhere I do not see why it cannot be done.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

COLUMBUS CITY, LOUISA COUNTY, IOWA, July 16, 1862.

Hon. Mr. KIRKWOOD.

DEAR SIR: Please pardon the liberty I now take in addressing you with reference to a matter in which no one can feel a deeper interest than yourself. But to the point. I have been in regular correspondence with a member of Company C, Eighth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, ever since the mustering of that company into the service. Many of that regiment you are aware were taken prisoners at Shiloh with no other clothing than their fatigue suit. You no doubt are as well aware of their suffering ever since that period as any one. They are now at Benton Barracks in a destitute condition, without a change of clothing, being compelled to wash and dry one piece at a time, and exposed to all the privations, inconvenience, &c., incident to disorganized regiments or companies.

Now, dear Governor, is there no way by which these boys of the noble Eighth Iowa, who stood so nobly on that ever memorable and dreadful Sabbath at Pittsburg Landing from 9 a.m. until past 5 p.m., and though charged upon five times never faltered, standing nobly in the name of Iowa by the flag of this country, while death and disorder reigned and reveled all around, yet still standing like the noble Romans ready to die, but never for a moment thinking of turning their backs upon a foe (I am proud to know that Iowans never do turn their backs to a foe), while other regiments were being disorganized and fleeing in confusion and insubordination, yet still like the everlasting rocks they stood firm the noble boys of Iowa, until both right and left flanks gave way and let the enemy around them in overwhelming numbers, yielding only when they could resist no longer.

Now in the name of that incomparable conduct, the suffering of that raining and hailing night-wet, cold and hungry, and their future suffering as prisoners among barbarians-can we do anything for them? Can you by any effort secure their immediate back pay? The boys are penniless. If they cannot be paid off or in part immediately can you secure permission for them to return for the time being to their friends?

{p.258}

Pardon me for calling your attention to their present unhappy condition. I know your multiplicity of business and feared perhaps you might not have had sufficient time to look after this matter. I deeply sympathize with all our civil officers from Governors of States up to Cabinet members and President in these times of great care, unceasing anxieties and unending toil, having not only the ordinary labors and cares of office but all the additional labor and care of war times. We pray for you all. We feel that the Lord can sustain you all and overrule our present afflictions for our national and individual good. This war properly conducted will renovate, ennoble and bless our nation. We shall yet be a free and happier people. Only let us carefully observe the working and directions of Providence. Who can tell but like Esther in the Eastern court our present State and national officers have been called to the kingdom for just such a time as this; and though your labors, cares, anxieties, &c., may be greater than any of your predecessors for years yet the reward will be in proportion. It is nothing to build a ship compared with the skill, exposure and labor to run her safe among reefs, shoals, rocks, sands while the waves foam and lash and the tempest howls and beats furiously upon her and yet at last in spite of all land her safe in the desired haven. Our fathers did a great and good work to form and build up this beloved country but the men who will save it will accomplish a far greater.

Please pardon the trespass upon your time. I should not have presumed so much but for the fact that by birth and rearage we are both Marylanders; by adoption Iowans and profession patriots, and purpose death to traitors.

Yours,

J. H. BUSER.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

MIDDLETOWN, IOWA, July 18, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

DEAR SIR: Inclosed with this I take the liberty of sending you a letter I this day received from a brother in the Fourteenth Iowa Regiment, with the paroled prisoners at present at Benton Barracks, Saint Louis. You are acquainted I presume with the movements of these Iowa paroled prisoners since they entered the Union lines. It appears that they have got into some difficulty with the military authorities in regard to the performance of garrison duty which has been assigned them. It pains us to know that men who have braved death on the battle-field in defense of their country and endured the hardships and sufferings of prisoners in the hands of their enemies should be subjected to more humiliating and degrading treatment from their own Government (or those who represent it) than they did from the rebels. [The] Government should certainly require no duty of our paroled prisoners that could be construed as bearing arms against the rebel States, or which they (the prisoners) believed to be a violation of their oath. And if our Government wants 300,000 more troops it should see that its present volunteers were not treated as convicts. If the boys are wrong in the position which they have taken they are honestly and conscientiously wrong [and] measures should be taken that would be calculated to convince them of the fact.

They have not been paid since January and have been entirely destitute of funds since they returned to our lines, and it was only by great exertion they raised the necessary funds to pay for a dispatch to you in reference to their condition while at Nashville. The only apology which I shall make for troubling you with this is the interest I feel for these {p.259} paroled prisoners, portions of the Iowa Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth, who have done quite as much fighting and endured more hardships perhaps than any troops in the service. As I am almost a stranger to you, for the credibility of both these letters I would refer you to the Hon. James W. Grimes, to whom you may show this correspondence. As your position as chief executive of the State gives you a fatherly care over all our volunteers I take this liberty of calling your attention to this case if you have not been otherwise notified of it.

I remain, yours, truly,

J. J. MCMAKEN.

[Sub-inclosure.]

CAMP BENTON, July 14, 1862.

DEAR BROTHER: I received your letter of the 4th on Saturday evening, it being the first that I had received since we came in our lines. You may know that it was welcomed. I was rejoiced to hear that you were all well. We are all well at present and enjoying ourselves as well as could be expected under the circumstances. The weather is quite warm, but we do not suffer as much from it as we did at Cairo. That is one of the last places I would wish to stay. We had a heavy rain last evening. Old Camp Benton looks quite natural and much more pleasant than it did at any the last winter. The buildings have all been repaired and whitewashed and the grounds all cleared off and all present a healthy and beautiful appearance. I have seen no encampment in all our travels that will compare with it in beauty and convenience. There are but few troops here. It is garrisoned by but four companies of the Twenty-third Regiment Missouri. The remainder of that regiment were taken prisoners with us.

I propose to give you a few items relative to us paroled prisoners. I do not know that I am in the right mood to do so, for I am considerably out of humor as to the proceedings of the authorities here within the last twenty-four hours For all, it is nothing more than we expected when we left Cairo in such a hurry. To begin, as soon as we reached Nashville we were ordered to organize our company and regiment for the purpose they said of drawing our clothing and rations. This we did. On the heels of this came an order for us to do guard duty in and around our own camp. This we refused to do. The order was recalled. About that time the commandant of our camp was changed, a colonel from Indiana being put in command of us. He tried the same thing; first by calling for volunteers. No one responded. He said we must and should do duty. We paid no attention to the order more than to tell him candidly that we could not consistently do it with our oath. There the matter dropped. We were moved to Cairo. There General Strong tried the same thing, and by flattery and promise that he would stand by them through thick and thin he succeeded in getting some of the boys to promise that they would stand guard in their own camp, but in one day the whole thing fizzled and the boys went where they pleased. The evening after we came here we were called out in line and the colonel commanding the post harangued us for half an hour telling us he had sent on for orders to know what duties would be assigned us, and he hoped when he issued said orders that each man would perform those duties cheerfully. We talked the matter over and came to the conclusion that we would perform no duty, let the order come from whatever source it may. We do not feel like breaking our oath any quicker at the command of Secretary Stanton than any of his officers, but we question very much whether such an order has been issued by {p.260} the War Department. If, however, they have issued such an order compelling paroled prisoners to do garrison duty and relieve other troops to go in the field we have made up our minds to abide the consequence and suffer the penalty of a refusal. If our Government refuses to respect our oath under our present circumstances it has no right to exact of us the conditions of our former oath. We consider we are just as much prisoners as we were when we were inside of the rebel lines. We are here by no act of our Government. While we were in rebel hands it was a matter of choice with us either to take this oath and go home and remain out of the army or stay there. We felt it our duty for the sake of our families and our own health to go home. But behold! as soon as we reach our lines there is an attempt to press us into service, forcing us to do the very thing that they so strongly condemn the rebels for doing. Well, last night the colonel issued his orders to our acting captains of regiment calling on us for guard to-day. The captains flinched; would not stand fire; shoved the responsibility on the men. They went ahead and made the guard detail. The men were called on but promptly refused to obey, and are now lying in the guard-house with ball and chain to their limbs for refusing. It is the ordeal we all expect to go through. We are all perfectly willing to go into the service again if the Government will exchange for us, and it had a hundred times better do it than adopt the policy of forcing us in. I should like to have your opinion on the matter. You need not be afraid of influencing us to our injury, as our minds are made up and the thing commenced. Write soon. I shall write to father’s folks to-morrow if I can.

Yours, as ever,

WM. T. MCMAKEN.

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CLINTON, IOWA, July 22, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I explain at the request of General Thomas my dispatch of the 21st. Some 600 or 800 Iowa soldiers of the Eighth, Twelfth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth Infantry were taken prisoners at Shiloh and subsequently released on parole. Attempts were made to make them serve in violation of parole before they arrived at Chicago from Cairo. They were sent forward to be furloughed as was well understood when paroled. They were in some way detained at Benton Barracks and ordered by colonel of Twenty-third Missouri to relieve that regiment, and put on service which they deem inconsistent with their parole; they refused and are put in the guard-house. I want them sent home and furloughed until exchanged. It is proposed to treat them as mutineers. I object to such treatment to brave and willing men. I may be mistaken in my views, but the first order to relieve the Twenty-third Missouri was in effect a direct violation of parole. Please answer.

N. B. BAKER, Adjutant-General of Iowa.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 22, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I take the liberty of sending by the flag-of-truce boat to-day a quantity of medical stores and comforts intended for our sick {p.261} and wounded in your hands as well as for those of your own army, knowing that you will see them fairly applied to the purpose for which they are intended. I leave their distribution entirely in your hands.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 22, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: Mr. Clement Barclay, a wealthy citizen of Philadelphia, has been devoting himself for some months past to the humane object of relieving so far as it has been in his power the sufferings of the sick and wounded of our army. His charities have also been extended to the sick and wounded of your army in our hands whenever opportunity has offered. Mr. Barclay thinks that if permitted to visit Richmond he could gather information respecting the necessities of our sick and wounded officers and soldiers who by the fortune of war are your prisoners which would enable him to materially extend his sphere of usefulness. (Mr. Barclay is a wealthy citizen whose only object in this visit is the humane one I have stated. I should be much gratified if you should find it consistent with your views to grant the desired permission.) If therefore it is in accordance with your views I should be much gratified if the desired permission could be granted to Mr. Barclay, and I can assure you that in asking for it he has no other purpose in contemplation than that indicated.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 22, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: By direction of the commanding general I have the honor herewith to transmit a list* in two parts of our sick and wounded released on parole and delivered at City Point the 22d instant.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Omitted.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 22, [1862.]

Surg. J. C. HUGHES, Keokuk U. S. Hospital.

SIR: Your letter of the 21st instant has been received. Without letting it be known that you have done so report to the commanding officer at Alton without delay how many prisoners of war are ready for removal from your hospital.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Brigadier-General and Assistant Inspector-General.

{p.262}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, July 22, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Third U. S. Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: Inclosed herewith I have the honor to transmit a list* of prisoners of war now at Fort Leavenworth, both paroled and non-paroled, 265 in number. The effective strength of the garrison of the post is but about 300 men, and being in close proximity to a region but lately a hotbed of rebellion and treason and at present far from being confirmed in loyalty, these facts render the safe-keeping of these prisoners somewhat problematical. With every inducement to break their parole, and there being such restricted means of watching them, the general commanding has not seen fit to parole those recently captured in the Indian Territory. He directs me to ask your earliest convenient attention to this matter that they may be placed where they can be securely guarded.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. MOONLIGHT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 22, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to make the following statement of the condition of the prisoners at Camp Butler: There are 2,250 prisoners at this camp, principally citizens of the States of Tennessee, Arkansas and Alabama, and captured at Fort Donelson and Island No. 10. There are no commissioned officers prisoners at this camp. As a class the prisoners are quite ignorant, wild, reckless and inclined to be insubordinate. Many of them, accustomed to a life of exposure and outdoor exercise, chafe very much under confinement. Many are desperate men and will resort to desperate measures to obtain their ends. Men devoted to their cause and unscrupulous in the means employed. They are treated kindly. They have all necessary articles of comfort. They are allowed every indulgence compatible with their position as prisoners of war. They are quartered in fifteen frame barracks and nearly 200 tents. There are about seventy-five prisoners quartered in each barrack. These barracks are arranged on a line, on the west side of the camp, fronting toward the east. Immediately in front of the line of barracks the tents are arranged in a double line fronting on a wide street running from north to south, affording ample room for the prisoners to exercise and adding very much to the ventilation of the camp. The barracks are provided with good bunks and all other necessary conveniences allowed to soldiers in the U. S. Army. These barracks are not the least crowded, but are poorly arranged for ventilation. I found that cleanliness was not strictly enforced In these barracks and that they were but poorly policed. The tents were generally provided with board floors and some were in possession of camp bedsteads.

The tents I found in a much better state of police. The prisoners living in tents were very much the more comfortable. The barracks are mere shells of buildings, built by contract, poorly ventilated and {p.263} illy-adapted for the purpose for which they are employed. They afford but little protection from the extreme heat of this season. The thermometer in the officers’ quarters has indicated a heat of 102° for hours at a time. This extreme heat has had a prostrating influence upon the prisoners, increased the sick list, but every care has been taken to prevent epidemic. The barracks and surrounding grounds are now kept clean, policed every day.

The rations supplied the prisoners are good and wholesome. The amount furnished ample. Vegetables in sufficient quantities have been obtained by exchanging a portion of the Government ration issued them for such vegetables as they desired. There is nothing to indicate that they have suffered for a want of antiscorbutics. Their food generally has been well cooked. No fault can be found with their subsistence. Many of the prisoners are suffering for want of clothing; all need some. Many are sadly deficient, not having a change, while some are really suffering very much and cannot be employed at fatigue on this account. The health of the prisoners I consider good under the circumstances. Many came here sick, others broken down by the hardships of service; many are unaccustomed to camp and to the fatigues of a soldier’s life. The change from the fatiguing and exposed life of the soldier to their confined and indolent life as prisoners, together with the change of climate, has contributed to increase the sick list. There are seven hospitals for prisoners of war, each under the charge of one of their own physicians, the whole under the medical superintendence of Dr. J. C. McKee, U. S. Army. Their present condition is very favorable and reflects credit upon all connected with their management. The sick are treated with the utmost kindness. The beds are comfortable; blankets, bed-covers, sheets, mosquito bars, &c., are now provided. A change of shirts and drawers for the sick has been supplied. Every care has been taken by the enforcement of cleanliness, the use of deodorizing agents, ventilation, drainage, &c., to render these hospitals comfortable and pleasant. The number of sick in hospital was 185, quite one-half of which were chronic cases of long standing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. FREEDLEY, Captain, Third Infantry.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 22, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that among the articles already enumerated to be purchased for the use of the prisoners vegetables have been omitted. This was through mistake and the commissary-general requests that they be purchased from the prisoners’ fund in such quantities as may be deemed expedient for their wants, consulting of course both economy and their health.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.264}

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Columbus, Ohio, July 22, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Acting Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

CAPTAIN: I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that after you have complied with the instructions contained in my letter to you of the 20th instant addressed to you at Springfield, Ill., relative to duties at Alton, in that State, he requires that you proceed without delay to Saint Louis, Mo., and confer with the provost-marshal-general at that place upon all matters embraced in the printed regulations of the commissary-general’s office and upon all general instructions already given you not applicable to particular prison camps. You will fully communicate to the provost-marshal-general the views of the commissary-general of prisoners relative to their care, discipline and safety.

You will ascertain from him the number and location of all camps at which prisoners are confined in his department, the number of prisoners at each camp and the method pursued by him for their control and to secure their safety. Ascertain the particular measures adopted for this purpose, whether the prisoners are concentrated; if so at what points and in what numbers. You will not attempt to impose upon him the means concerning the care of prisoners detailed to you for your government in special cases, as the introduction of Farmer’s boilers, &c. You will, however, report the advantage or disadvantage of such applications wherever they may be made.

You will fully and minutely instruct him respecting the returns, reports and other papers required by the commissary-general, and that the records kept at the various prison camps should be uniform in character and such as will furnish in the simplest manner possible all data required at the office of the commissary-general of prisoners. This will be best done by adopting the forms already in use at that office.

Having performed this duty you will immediately return to Detroit, Mich., and personally submit in writing a full report of the result of your investigations.

With highest respect, I am, captain, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 22, 1862.

Capt. H. W. FREEDLEY, Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners, Springfield, Ill.

CAPTAIN: I am directed by the commissary-general of prisoners to inform you that among the articles to be purchased from the fund of the prisoners for their use are vegetables, and he requests that they be supplied in such quantities as may be deemed expedient, consulting of course both economy and their health.

With the highest respect, I am, captain, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.265}

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FORT DELAWARE, July 22, 1862.

Capt. A. J. PERRY, Assistant Quartermaster, Washington City.

DEAR SANDY: As you know I and several others were sent to Richmond on parole to effect exchanges. The Confederate States Government declined to make any special exchanges and I returned. I was sent from Fort Warren and expected to return there in case of failure. I have left there various things belonging to me and all my special friends. All the others who came with me except myself were allowed to return from here to that place, they paying their own expenses. I have many other important reasons for desiring to go there and request that as a favor you will endeavor to have me sent there in a similar manner to Colonels Hanson, Jackson, Baldwin, whose cases are precisely similar. If possible I should also like when a general exchange goes into effect (I understand it has been agreed upon) to be paroled so that I can see my family and to take my wife South with me. I could meet her in Baltimore, and if allowed to go South on parole instead of with a crowd this could be effected. If you could accomplish these matters for me you would confer a great favor upon your old friend. Please remember me to Mrs. Perry and the phenomenons.

Yours, truly,

[G. B.] COSBY.

[First indorsement.]

Respectfully referred to Brig. Gen. L. Thomas, Adjutant-General, with the request if not inconsistent with the interests of the Government that Major or Colonel Cosby’s wishes in the matter may be gratified.

ALEX. J. PERRY, Assistant Quartermaster.

[Second Indorsement.]

DEAR GENERAL: I don’t know if it be in your power, but if it is please do what you can to gratify Cosby for whom I have always had a special regard.

Yours, truly,

JUL. P. GARESCHÉ.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Bar, July 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX.

GENERAL: The commanding general has received from General R. E. Lee, of the Confederate service, a communication of which the inclosed is a copy.* He desires your attention called to the allegations of the first two paragraphs with a view to ascertain how far they are sustained by actual occurrences.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Omitted here; Lee to McClellan, July 21, p. 251.

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FORT MONROE, July 23, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I have just arrived from Haxall’s Landing. General Hill and I came to an agreement yesterday. The articles agreed on are those presented by him with the alterations submitted to you and three of those {p.266} prepared by me. I will send a copy by this evening’s mail. It is very important that we should get the prisoners of the insurgents off our hands without the loss of a day unnecessarily as they are paroling and delivering our sick and wounded. Large numbers of our men die after delivery and are counted in the exchange, while theirs who die before the delivery are not counted; so we lose both ways.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 23, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose the articles of agreement entered into by Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill and myself for a general exchange of prisoners of war.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HAXALL’S LANDING, ON JAMES RIVER, VA., July 22, 1862.

The undersigned having been commissioned by the authorities they respectively represent to make arrangements for a general exchange of prisoners of war have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE 1. It is hereby agreed and stipulated that all prisoners of war held by either party including those taken on private armed vessels known as privateers shall be discharged upon the conditions and terms following:

Prisoners to be exchanged man for man and officer for officer; privateers to be placed upon the footing of officers and men of the Navy.

Men and officers of lower grades may be exchanged for officers of a higher grade, and men and officers of different services may be exchanged according to the following scale of equivalents:

A general commanding in chief or an admiral shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for sixty privates or common seamen.

A flag officer or major-general shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for forty privates or common seamen.

A commodore carrying a broad pennant or a brigadier-general shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or twenty privates or common seamen.

A captain in the Navy or a colonel shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for fifteen privates or common seamen.

A lieutenant-colonel or a commander in the Navy shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or for ten privates or common seamen.

A lieutenant-commander or a major shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or eight privates or common seamen.

A lieutenant or a master in the Navy or a captain in the Army or marines shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or six privates or common seamen.

Masters’ mates in the Navy or lieutenants and ensigns in the Army shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or four privates or common seamen.

Midshipmen, warrant officers in the Navy, masters of merchant vessels and commanders of privateers shall be exchanged for officers of equal rank, or three privates or common seamen.

Second captains, lieutenants or mates of merchant vessels or privateers and all petty officers in the Navy and all non-commissioned officers {p.267} in the Army or marines shall be severally exchanged for persons of equal rank, or for two privates or common seamen, and private soldiers or common seamen shall be exchanged for each other, man for man.

ART. 2. Local, State, civil and militia rank held by persons not in actual military service will not be recognized, the basis of exchange being the grade actually held in the naval and military service of the respective parties.

ART. 3. If citizens held by either party on charges of disloyalty or any alleged civil offense are exchanged it shall only be for citizens. Captured sutlers, teamsters and all civilians in the actual service of either party to be exchanged for persons in similar position.

ART. 4. All prisoners of war to be discharged on parole in ten days after their capture, and the prisoners now held and those hereafter taken to be transported to the points mutually agreed upon at the expense of the capturing party. The surplus prisoners not exchanged shall not be permitted to take up arms again, nor to serve as military police or constabulary force in any fort, garrison or field-work held by either of the respective parties, nor as guards of prisons, depots or stores, nor to discharge any duty usually performed by soldiers, until exchanged under the provisions of this cartel. The exchange is not to be considered complete until the officer or soldier exchanged for has been actually restored to the hues to which he belongs.

ART. 5. Each party upon the discharge of prisoners of the other party is authorized to discharge an equal number of their own officers or men from parole, furnishing at the same time to the other party a list of their prisoners discharged and of their own officers and men relieved from parole, thus enabling each party to relieve from parole such of their own officers and men as the party may choose. The lists thus mutually furnished will keep both parties advised of the true condition of the exchange of prisoners.

ART. 6. The stipulations and provisions above mentioned to be of binding obligation during the continuance of the war, it matters not which party may have the surplus of prisoners, the great principles involved being, first, an equitable exchange of prisoners, man for man, officer for officer, or officers of higher grade exchanged for officers of lower grade or for privates, according to the scale of equivalents; second, that privateers and officers and men of different services may be exchanged according to the same scale of equivalents; third, that all prisoners, of whatever arm of service, are to be exchanged or paroled in ten days from the time of their capture, if it be practicable to transfer them to their own lines in that time; if not, as soon thereafter as practicable; fourth, that no officer, soldier or employee, in the service of either party, is to be considered as exchanged and absolved from his parole until his equivalent has actually reached the lines of his friends; fifth, that the parole forbids the performance of field, garrison, police, or guard, or constabulary duty.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General. D. H. HILL, Major-General, C. S. Army.

SUPPLEMENTARY ARTICLES.

ART. 7. All prisoners of war now held on either side and all prisoners hereafter taken shall be sent with all reasonable dispatch to A. M. Aiken’s, below Dutch Gap, on the James River, Va., or to Vicksburg, on the Mississippi River, in the State of Mississippi, and there {p.268} exchanged or paroled until such exchange can be effected, notice being previously given by each party of the number of prisoners it will send and the time when they will be delivered at those points respectively; and in case the vicissitudes of war shall change the military relations of the places designated in this article to the contending parties so as to render the same inconvenient for the delivery and exchange of prisoners, other places bearing as nearly as may be the present local relations of said places to the lines of said parties shall be by mutual agreement substituted. But nothing in this article contained shall prevent the commanders of two opposing armies from exchanging prisoners or releasing them on parole from other points mutually agreed on by said commanders.

ART. 8. For the purpose of carrying into effect the foregoing articles of agreement each party will appoint two agents, to be called agents for the exchange of prisoners of war, whose duty it shall be to communicate with each other by correspondence and otherwise, to prepare the lists of prisoners, to attend to the delivery of the prisoners at the places agreed on and to carry out promptly, effectually and in good faith all the details and provisions of the said articles of agreement.

ART. 9. And in case any misunderstanding shall arise in regard to any clause or stipulation in the foregoing articles it is mutually agreed that such misunderstanding shall not interrupt the release of prisoners on parole, as herein provided, but shall be made the subject of friendly explanations in order that the object of this agreement may neither be defeated nor postponed.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General. D. H. HILL, Major-General, C. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 23, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to return all the papers sent to me relating to the negotiations for a general exchange of prisoners of war by Major-Generals Wool and McClellan.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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FORT MONROE, July 23, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

There are sea-going steamers enough here to bring all the insurgent prisoners at Fort Delaware to this place.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 23, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: The inclosed letter is* in behalf of the Rev. M. P. Whelan, a Roman Catholic priest, captured by us at Fort Pulaski. Judge Pierrepont {p.269} and I examined him at New York and discharged him on parole till he could be sent home. I recommend that a pass be granted to him.

The following is a copy of an order issued at Richmond:

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 46.]

RICHMOND, July 1, 1862.

...

III. All chaplains taken prisoners of war by the armies of the Confederate States while in the discharge of their duties will be immediately and unconditionally released.

By command of the Secretary of War:

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

Medical officers are also discharged by the insurgents without condition.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant expressing your desire that permission be given to Mr. Clement Barclay to visit Richmond to obtain information respecting the necessities of your sick and wounded in our hands. I thank Mr. Barclay for his kindness to our sick and wounded prisoners and appreciate his benevolent intentions with reference to his countrymen who are with us. But the arrangements now in process of execution will I hope soon place your sick and wounded where they can more fully enjoy the kind attentions of Mr. Barclay than it would be possible for them to do in Richmond and render his proposed visit unnecessary.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant with reference to your desire to forward medical stores and comforts for the use of your sick and wounded in our hands and also for our own. I hope that in a few days your sick and wounded will be under your own care where they can enjoy the comforts intended for them, and in the meantime they shall receive such attention as it is in our power to bestow. I thank you for your kind consideration of our own sick and wounded, but we must endeavor to provide for them from such stores as we possess.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

{p.270}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 23, 1862.

Hon. A. LINCOLN, President of the United States.

SIR: Have you yet considered the order* I proposed to issue yesterday which directs all male citizens living within the lines of the army under my command and in the rear of it to be arrested-such as take the oath of allegiance and give sufficient security for its observance to be allowed to remain at home and pursue their accustomed avocations; such as do not to be conducted South and put within the lines of the enemy, with a notification that if hereafter found within the lines or in the rear of the U. S. forces they will be considered and treated as spies? I find it impossible to make any movement, however insignificant the force, without having it immediately communicated to the enemy. Constant correspondence verbally and by letter between the enemy’s forces and the so-called peaceful citizens in the rear of this army is carried on which can in no other way be interrupted. A thousand open enemies cannot inflict the injury upon our arms which can be done by one concealed enemy in our midst. I have the honor, therefore, to ask your decision in the case.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

* See General Orders, No. 11, July 23, 1862, p. 271.

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BALTIMORE, MD., July 23, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

At 5 o’clock this evening the second branch of the city council of the city of Baltimore failed to pass the appropriation of $300,000 for the raising of volunteers for the State of Maryland. The same branch voted $500,000 for the defense of the city of Baltimore on the 18th day of April, 1861. There is evidently considerable excitement among the Union people and danger of violence inflicted upon the members of the council. Several Union men, viz, Col. William L. Schley, Fifth Maryland Volunteers; Thomas H. Gardner, clerk criminal court of Baltimore; Alfred D. Evans, late warden of the penitentiary of Maryland, have called upon me to wish the members of the council arrested that they may elect a new council and pass the bill. Brigadier-General Morris is in command but is at Fort McHenry. General Wool gone to Wheeling. There will probably be a violent demonstration in the city to-night unless they are arrested. Shall I arrest them? The crowd is now awaiting the coming forth of the council. A strong force of police, however, to protect them, and they may get into the country without violence. They have not asked for military aid, although they were in my office this morning.

WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Lieutenant-Colonel and Chief of Staff.

P. S.-The members are now coming out one at a time and being escorted home by the police. They are greeted by yells and groans as they appear. No danger of a riot, however.

W. D. W.

{p.271}

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GENERAL WOOL’S HEADQUARTERS, Baltimore, July 23, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

Your dispatch* is received and is satisfactory. The assurance that the Government would take the matter [in hand] was all that saved the last member of the council from being hung. The crowd followed him with a rope and it was as much as 100 policemen could do to save him. All is quiet now.

WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT, Baltimore, Md., July 23, 1862.

W. A. VAN NOSTRAND, Marshal of Police, Baltimore, Md.

SIR: Bvt. Brig. Gen. W. W. Morris, commanding in Baltimore and vicinity during the temporary absence of the major-general commanding the department, directs that you arrest and send to Fort McHenry the following persons, viz: Charles H. Kehr and Henry McCaffrey, the composer and publisher of a piece of music entitled the Stonewall Quickstep, dedicated to T. J. Jackson, general, C. S. Army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[WM. D. WHIPPLE,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 23, 1862.

Commanders of army corps, divisions, brigades and detached commands will proceed immediately to arrest all disloyal male citizens within their lines or within their reach in rear of their respective stations.

Such as are willing to take the oath of allegiance to the United States and will furnish sufficient security for its observance shall be permitted to remain at their homes and pursue in good faith their accustomed avocations.

Those who refuse shall be conducted south beyond the extreme pickets of this army and be notified that if found again anywhere within our lines or at any point in rear they will be considered spies and subjected to the extreme rigor of military law.

If any person having taken the oath of allegiance as above specified be found to have violated it he shall be shot and his property seized and applied to the public use.

All communication with any persons whatever living within the lines of the enemy is positively prohibited except through the military authorities and in the manner specified by military law, and any person concerned in writing or in carrying letters or messages in any other way will be considered and treated as a spy within the lines of the U. S. Army.

By command of Major-General Pope:

GEO. D. RUGGLES, Colonel, Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

{p.272}

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FALMOUTH, July 23, 1862.

Col. GEORGE D. RUGGLES, Chief of Staff:

I sent to Washington to-day in charge of my aide, Captain Benkard, four citizens of Fredericksburg whom I arrested last night pursuant to orders from General Pope as hostages for an equal number of Union men seized and sent to Richmond.

RUFUS KING, Brigadier-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 19.}

HEADQUARTERS, Suffolk, July 23, 1862.

I. A military commission to consist of Maj. Samuel Wetherill, of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and Maj. B. F. Onderdonk, of the Seventh New York Mounted Rifles, will assemble this afternoon at 5 o’clock to examine sundry prisoners captured by the scouting parties of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry and the Seventh New York Mounted Rifles on the 21st and 22d instant, and report the disposition that should be made of them and of the horses and arms captured to these headquarters.

II. Lieutenant-Colonel Dodge will appoint a secretary to the commission and mounted orderly. The commission will assemble at the provost-marshal’s office or such other place as they will find most convenient, with full power to send for witnesses, and will adjourn over and sit till they shall have completed their duties. The quartermaster of the post will furnish the necessary stationery.

By command of Brigadier-General Mansfield:

C. H. DYER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Helena, Ark., July 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. T. C. HINDMAN, C. S. Army.

GENERAL: I am in receipt of yours of the 15th instant under flag of truce relating to prisoners and surrendering Surg. A. Krumsick, who has been some time in your lines.

All the prisoners for whom you desire exchange have been sent to district headquarters, where I will refer your letter. The same is true in regard to prisoners referred to by General McBride. I shall hereafter be glad to exchange instead of sending off prisoners as I have formerly done in consequence of the constant shift of my headquarters.

Surgeons will be sent home as soon as possible. I have released scores of them without exchange or parole.

If my arrangements with General Van Dorn have not secured the release of Captains Hallowell and Galloway, it may be because they were not found and, according to agreement, others were substituted; there [were] such terms in our agreement.

In regard to Assistant Surgeon Evans I objected to his recognition as entitled to the ameliorations extended to civilized warfare, as by his own showing he was acting as the surgeon of a regiment of Indians. I am now told we have Indians mustered into our service to meet those we met at Pea Ridge. It will be proper for each party hereafter to allow exchange or a release and I shall recommend this rule to apply to Surgeon Evans.

{p.273}

If you send to my lines any of my soldiers which you have as prisoners I will send equivalents as soon as possible. Colonel Fry was sent to Saint Louis in charge of a navy surgeon. I regret that some harsh language was used against Colonel Fry under the impression he had ordered our drowning men to be fired on. Subsequently the colonel’s denial satisfied Colonel Fitch, who commanded on the occasion, that the charge was unfounded and the improprieties were not committed by his orders.

I will take great pleasure in urging his exchange on fair terms, as I am told your correspondence with him, captured on the occasion, recognized him as colonel and he has been so registered as a prisoner of war.

I have the honor, general, to be, very respectfully, yours,

S. R. CURTIS, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 23, 1862.

Col. G. LOOMIS, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Columbus, N. Y.

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 7th instant you will please make the paroled prisoners who refuse to serve with arms do police duty at Fort Columbus and put any in close confinement who refuse to obey.

I am, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 23, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: In reply to your letter of the 12th instant relative to the supply of clothing for prisoners of war in western camps you are respectfully informed that your requisitions if made on this office will be ordered immediately.

By order of the Quartermaster-General:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALEX. J. PERRY, Assistant Quartermaster.

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OFFICE OF PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Wheeling, July 23, 1862.

Capt. H. M. LAZELLE, Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

SIR: I received this morning your letter of 20th instant, postmarked 21st. Commanders of posts have been directed to forward all prisoners to Wheeling with descriptive lists and charges. The prison here is in the second story of a large building formerly occupied as a carriage depot. It is divided into two apartments, one occupied by the guards and the other by the prisoners. One hundred and twenty have been accommodated in the latter during the winter. In the summer it would not be advisable to quarter more than seventy. Prisoners have always been sent to Camp Chase when the number here reached 100 so as to {p.274} reduce it to about forty. There is only one company of infantry at this post (eighty men) and they are obliged to guard also the commissary, ordnance and quartermaster’s stores. Application was made frequently for another company to be stationed, but the necessities of the service prevented it. To accommodate 300 prisoners new buildings must be erected within the fair grounds on the island opposite this city. In company with Captain Downing, assistant quartermaster, I examined these grounds, which have for the past year at times been occupied by troops, with a view to ascertain if the buildings now there could not be reconstructed for your purpose, but found them unfit. I have consulted a builder here, who has done work frequently with justice to the Government, and he estimates the cost of two buildings to quarter 300 prisoners, with sleeping and mess arrangements and board inclosure, at about $1,000. The work to be done under the direction of the quartermaster and by special contract. The time to be occupied in building, twenty-one days. The plan proposed in the new buildings is to have two structures of about 100 feet or more in length with sleeping bunks on second floor and mess-room underneath, &c. If you prefer any particular plan, by sending it with specifications I can give you estimate of cost at this post. There is now a building on the grounds which will answer for a hospital. In case it should be necessary to send 200 or 300 prisoners here immediately I can procure temporary accommodations in three empty warehouses adjoining one another and near the present prison in the city. I have briefly reported as above, being anxious to make an immediate reply to your letter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. DARR, JR., Major and Provost-Marshal-General.

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FREDERICKSBURG, July 23, 1862.

Col. L. A. WHITELEY, Superintendent New York Herald Correspondence, Washington:

Pursuant to an order from General Pope, Captain Chandler, of General King’s staff, arrested last night four of the most influential citizens of Fredericksburg, Messrs. Knox, Barton Gill and Wellford, to be held as hostages for the release of certain union men carried off by the rebels last spring. The parties were taken from their beds late at night and sent to Washington this morning in charge of General King’s aide-de-camp, Captain Benkard. There are now a large number of individuals visiting their families here on furloughs from the rebel army and plans are being arranged for their capture to-night. Day before yesterday the Third Indiana Cavalry met with the enemy several miles from here on the Richmond telegraph road, leaving 1 killed and 6 prisoners. Two companies of the Brooklyn Fourteenth and a squadron of the Harris Light Cavalry are in pursuit of the enemy.

CARPENTER.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 24, 1862.

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: To carry out the cartel that has been agreed upon for the exchange of prisoners Mr. Robert Ould has been appointed agent {p.275} on the part of this Government. He will be at Aiken’s Landing to meet your agent at 12 m. to-morrow. I regret that a mistake as to the time of meeting prevented Mr. Ould from being at the landing at noon to-day.

I have the honer to be, general, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 24, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor District of Columbia.

GENERAL: If the four citizens of Fredericksburg recently taken as hostages by General King pursuant to orders from these headquarters and now in confinement in Capitol Prison have not already been informed of the cause of their arrest General Pope desires that they be informed that it was in consequence of the seizure of an equal number of Union citizens of Virginia by the rebel authorities. The general also desires they be informed that whenever those Union citizens shall have been released from their confinement in Richmond they also shall be set at liberty.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEORGE D. RUGGLES,] Colonel and Chief of Staff.

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CAMP ON CLEAR CREEK, July 24, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN.

COLONEL: A brother of mine, James B. Stanley, is confined as a rebel prisoner at Fort Delaware. He was in New Orleans at the breaking out of the rebellion and he says he accompanied the army in a civil capacity to Yorktown; that there he passed into our lines and gave himself up; that he took the oath of allegiance by advice of General Fitz-John Porter who told him he would be released. He is still held a prisoner, and if his statement to me be correct I hope there is no serious obstacle in the way of his release. If he gave himself up of course he is not a subject for exchange. Will you have the kindness to examine his case and advise me as to what can be done in his case? I think I can safely offer myself security for the young man that if released he will go straight home and behave himself hereafter. Hoping soon to hear from you, colonel, upon this subject,

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. S. STANLEY, Brigadier-General, Comdg. Second Division, Army of the Ohio.

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HEADQUARTERS PIATT’S BRIGADE, Near Winchester, July 24, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

Your telegram in relation to rebel officer is just received. I have given orders to arrest all persons coming near the field-works. The circumstance referred to is this: I was lying in my tent unwell and was informed that a rebel cavalryman was in my camp. I asked how {p.276} he came there. The answer was that Doctor Franklin, acting surgeon of the Thirty-ninth New York Volunteer Regiment, had been taken prisoner and that this man had returned him safe without parole. Exasperated, I immediately ordered him out of my lines and reprimanded the surgeon, who instead of obeying my order took the officer up to the works where the Thirty-ninth New York Regiment Volunteers is stationed to protect the works. Learning this disobedience of orders I placed Doctor Franklin under arrest. It was for this I asked where the authority was for a general court-martial and for which I am referred to general orders for 1861, No. 111. This order I have not. In fact it is necessary that I have a full file of orders. The statement is untrue. I am well aware how necessary it is to prevent any person to go near the works and ordered the Thirty-ninth to the advanced position to prevent it.

Lieutenant-Colonel Nicholls, of the Eighth Louisiana, is gone from this point. I have never seen him or known of his being here until I received a letter inclosed to him, when on inquiry I was told by a paroled Confederate prisoner that he had left here for some point south on the Strasburg road, he, as the Confederate told me, being on general parole. The Confederate cavalry are becoming bolder every day. News has reached me through various sources that seven wagons were captured with escorts on the Front Royal road. On the same day an officer came through, stating to me that he had not seen any sign of the enemy between here and Front Royal. From this I judge that they were informed of the train coming and crossed over on that road 100 strong and then retired. It is very humiliating to me for these men to come so close and not take them. Every hand I have is upon the work to fill your order. My scouts up the Shenandoah have not yet returned.

Respectfully,

A. SANDERS PIATT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., July 24, 1862.

General ASA ROGERS. (Care of postmaster, Leesburg, Va.)

SIR: General Wadsworth directs me to state to you that the persons ordered released from Richmond in exchange for yourself and others have not been heard from and there is evidently some mistake in the matter. He desires to learn from you their whereabouts and what information you have concerning them, until which time he necessarily holds you as hostage.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. SHERBURNE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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COLUMBUS, KY., July 24, 1862.

Major-General GRANT.

DEAR SIR: Since writing you from Paducah I understand my regiment has been ordered to Helena, Ark. I now repeat the substance I wrote you, for fear you would not get my first letter. I was taken prisoner the 25th of June and promised if I could to get exchanged for Col. Alexander J. Brown, of a Tennessee regiment, who was taken {p.277} prisoner at Island No. 10, and supposed to be at Columbus, Ohio, or at Boston, all of which I stated to you on my arrival at your headquarters. You immediately wrote on the subject, as I supposed from the inquiries made at the time. If it becomes necessary for me to go to Washington to effect the exchange I will do so by your permission. You will please in that event to send me a pass. My honor is at stake on this subject to surrender myself a prisoner or procure the exchange. I hope you will write me at Memphis soon, as I will remain there and wait your answer.

Your obedient servant,

P. KINNEY, Colonel, Comdg. Fifty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Militia.

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GENERAL HOSPITAL, Savage Station, Va., July 24, 1862.

General WINDER.

SIR: I address you at this time on behalf of the sick and wounded soldiers now in confinement in your city and at this place.

I had supposed from assurances received from the medical director and purveyor of the Confederate Army that we should not be retained any time within your lines, and hence we remained quiet and have so continued until forbearance has ceased to be a virtue.

When I send a surgeon to look after the interests of the sick and wounded you place him in a lock-up, where he can do no good and can only see patients under guard; only two of these surgeons have returned to report, and theirs is a sad one.

I send you a copy of my instructions from General McClellan and then ask you-

1. If I can visit the place where the sick and wounded are imprisoned and again return to this place without any obstructions or delay?

2. Are we at liberty to return to our lines in accordance with these instructions, of course under proper regulations which you shall specify and arrange?

3. Can I send or take some of our surgeons who are ill to our transports that they can recuperate? If they stay here they are sure to die. Yesterday we paid the last sad tribute to a departed surgeon of our mess; others will soon go unless relieved.

4. Can we have rations suitable for the sick and wounded? I am sure you do not know the limited and in some instances the absolute bad character of the food furnished for us all. Up to three days since the only rations furnished us was flour and bacon. Yesterday we had rations sent for three days, consisting of good flour, while bacon and shoulders were absolutely filled with maggots. Now if you judge this the kind of food furnished your sick and wounded prisoners North, or is in accordance with the usages of war among civilized nations, you are mistaken. I have had to buy fresh meats for soups and bread to supply the deficiency, since we have no means of cooking flour suitable for the sick. Now I submit that flour and poor bacon alone are entirely unfit for the sick and wounded, since many have died from sheer exhaustion or starvation, and many more will die unless more carefully fed. Many of those taken to Richmond and retained so long in the depot without proper attention have also died. Now, sir, all I ask is to have the sick and wounded who have become the recipients of my care receive the attention due them as prisoners of war agreeably {p.278} to the usages of civilized people, and that the surgeons to whose care they are intrusted be treated not as felons but in accordance with the precedents which have been established and which you publish in all your papers as the law of the land. If we cannot be fed in accordance with the common usages of war, in other words if you have not the material wherewith to feed us so as to keep us from starvation, I feel assured that your elevated sense of humanity will assist us to reach our own lines where we can be attended to. I have seen and attended your sick and wounded at New York, Philadelphia, Fortress Monroe and in this hospital, and have never seen any distinction made between them and our own. Now with the insufficient nourishment supplied us, our own funds falling, what are we to do? I leave the answer to your impulses of humanity and ask you in the name of the common obligations due from man to man that you interpose your dictum and change the status of our condition.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

JOHN SWINBURNE, Surgeon in Charge.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Washington, D. C., July 24, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following as the approximate number of prisoners of war held at the several prison stations:

Fort Warren, Boston500
Fort Delaware, Del.1,000
Fort McHenry, Md.500
Fort Monroe, Va.1,000
Depot at Sandusky, Ohio1,300
Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio1,500
Camp Morton, Indianapolis4,000
Camp Douglas, Chicago7,800
Camp Butler, Springfield2,000
Military prison, Alton500
Military prison, Saint Louis400
20,500

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 24, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I regret to inform you that the inclosed list* of prisoners are reported to have escaped at the respective dates, twenty-one last night. The particulars of last night’s escape are: At 9 o’clock a musket was fired by the sentinel on post No. 57 and a call for the guard made. Other musket shots were soon heard, and the soldiers in and outside of camp were instantly on the alert. The facts proved to be that a body of prisoners made a rush at the fence on his, No. 57’s, beat with three ladders constructed rudely of boards with cleats nailed upon them. The sentinels in the neighborhood fired on them and gave the alarm. A number, however, escaped at that point and have not been {p.279} found yet. A hole was found dug under the fence at another point and the musket and equipments of the sentinel on the ground, but the sentinel was gone and doubtless some prisoners escaped by collusion with him. The name of the sentinel who deserted is Private Charles White, Company C, Sixty-seventh Regiment Illinois Volunteers. The man was enlisted in Chicago. I have given notice to the police authorities in the city who will co-operate with my force in endeavoring to capture the escaped prisoners and the deserter.

I am carrying into effect the directions in regard to the fences contained in your letter of the 20th instant. These improvements were urgently needed as the insecurity of the fences is a constant temptation to the prisoners to attempt to escape, and numerous props and irregularities on the inside afford ready means of climbing over quickly. The structure and form of this camp is very unsuitable for the confinement of prisoners and it is impossible to increase the number of sentinels on duty with our present force. The guard detail is 1 captain, 7 lieutenants, 13 sergeants, 24 corporals and 382 privates. Besides this a patrol force is on duty every night outside the fence, the extent of which is estimated to be three miles. I have abundant evidence that there are numerous traitorous sympathizers in Chicago who are constantly on the alert to aid prisoners to escape and are ingenious in their schemes to communicate with them and corrupt our own soldiers. I have no hesitation in saying that in my opinion martial law should be declared over the city of Chicago and the command vested in the commanding officer of this camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

P. S.-Some of the prisoners who escaped last night are being retaken.

J. H. T.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 24, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 20th instant. The telegram for number of escaped prisoners was received late on Saturday and the reply sent to office immediately. I have commenced the measures for the greater security of the prisoners directed and will prosecute them to completion with all diligence.

I forward estimate for clothing for prisoners and would ask you to authorize the issue, as it is immediately necessary for decency, health and safety. Many of the prisoners are entirely destitute and without a change, while others have portions of citizen’s dress which they had received before I assumed command. This I wish to take from them and substitute a cheap dress which Captain Potter has on hand, some of which was taken from the enemy. He has not a sufficient amount of captured clothing. He can get more like it manufactured. I forward an estimate made by S. S. Greeley for introduction of sewer, for sinks connected therewith and for the supply of water for the camp. This estimate I am informed was handed to you by Mr. Greeley while you were here. I do not send the estimate as approved by me; I merely lay it before you. I inclose estimate for bakery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.280}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

Estimate for a wooden sewer through Camp Douglas, in Chicago, and leading thence into Lake Michigan; also for privies or sinks connected therewith and for the supply of water for the camp.

Feet, B. M.
1. A sewer 2,600 feet long, 8 inches wide at the bottom, 2 feet wide at the top, and 2 1/2 feet high:
Bottom plank, 2 inches by 12 inches, any length5,200
Side plank, 2 inches thick, 16 feet long28,000
Top plank, 2 inches thick, 14 feet long12,500
Inner bottom board, 1 inch by 8 inches wide1,800
Battens for sides, 1 inch by 6 inches, 16 feet long7,000
Battens for top, 1 inch by 6 inches, 14 feet long3,300
Rib-bands at upper corners, 2 inches by 4 inches3,500
2. A sewer 650 feet long, 8 inches wide at bottom, 18 inches at top, 20 inches high:
Bottom plank, 2 inches by 12 inches1,300
Sides and top, 2-inch plank, any length and width7,800
Inner bottom board, 1 inch by 8 inches450
Battens, 1 inch by 6 inches2,000
Rib-bands, 2 inches by 4 inches900
Braces, across the top (both sewers)900
3. Box drain, 10 inches by 12 inches inside, 1,000 feet long:
Sides and top, 2 inches by 14 inches7,000
Bottom, 2 inches by 10 inches1,000
4. Five man-holes for access to sewer in deep excavation:
Plank, 2-inch, 16 feet long1,000
Uprights for corners, 2 inches by 4 inches, 16 feet125
5. Four catch basins, for admitting surface drainage:
Plank, 2-inch, 16 feet long1,000
Corners, 2 inches by 4 inches, 16 feet long125
6. Ten privies, each 16 by 30, with water-tight soil box:
Planks for soil boxes, 2-inch, 16 feet long4,000
Sills, 6 inches by 6 inches, 16 feet long3,360
Joists, 2 inches by 10 inches, 16 feet long1,120
Common boards, 1-inch25,000
Studding, 2 inches by 4 inches.3,000
118,380
118,380 feet of lumber, at $11, delivered$1,302.18
5,000 pounds of nails and spikes, at 4 cents200.00
If the deep excavation from the lake to the camp fence is done by contract instead of prison labor it will cost as follows:
1,200 cubic yards, 14 to 19 feet deep, quicksand bottom, and replacing same at 50 cents1,200.00
2,702.18
The sides of the trench must be lined with 2-inch plank, braced across during the progress of the work to prevent caving in.
Water supply:
2,060 feet of 3-inch cast-iron pipe laid, the trenching to be done by prisoners, at 50 cents1,030.00
800 feet of 2-inch lead pipe, at 40 cents320.00
Taking up and resetting 8 of the present hydrants with box leading to sewer, at $540.00
Pipe and cocks and plumbing for supplying the soil boxes of the privies with water and for flushing them out, 10 privies, at $440.00
Three tanks, of 500 gallons, for flushing out the sewers, with sewer connections75.00
Water connections of same, at $5 each15.00
4,222.18
In the above estimate all earth-work inside the camp is supposed to be done by prison labor. It is quite probable that part, perhaps most, of the carpenter’s work will have to be done either by mechanics hired by the day or by contract. The sewer, 3,250 feet long, could probably be laid mostly by prisoners, except the part outside the camp, with proper superintendence.
Laying the sewer outside the camp in the deep trench, 850 feet, at 10 cents85.00 {p.281}
Other carpentry and skilled labor within the camp, say$200.00
Engineering250.00
4,757.18
The board of public works of the city of Chicago, having in charge the city water works which at present supply the camp, state that the present street main, from which the supply is drawn, is not large enough for the proposed extension within the camp, and that it would be necessary to replace it by a large main, costing, as they estimate3,500.00
Total cost, allowing for contract work outside the camp, and prison labor within8,257.18

The work will probably occupy nearly six weeks after it is actually begun.

SAMUEL S. GREELEY, Civil Engineer.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Estimate for ovens at Camp Douglas, in Chicago, Ill., capable of baking bread for 12,000 men.

Four ovens, 18 by 10 feet, $260 each$1,040
Lumber for building, 20 by 60 feet480
Lumber for building, 14 by 60 feet, for ovens with shed roof140
Doors and windows50
Nails, spikes, door hinges, &c.50
Iron for grates, &c.40
Work by prisoners of war200
Total cost2,000

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HEADQUARTERS, Alton, Ill., July 24, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I herewith inclose a requisition for clothing for issue to prisoners. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. F. FLINT, Major Sixteenth Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

Requisition for clothing and camp and garrison equipage for the use of the prisoners of war at Alton Penitentiary, at Alton, Ill., for two months, commencing August 1, 1862, and ending September 30, 1862.

Commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers and privates’ flannel shirts:
Required, August 1, 18621,000
On hand, to be deducted
To be supplied1,000

I certify that the above requisition is correct and the articles are necessary for the public service, rendered so by the following circumstances: For the use of the prisoners of war at Alton, Ill.

FEED. E. DE COURCY, First Lieut., Thirteenth U. S. Infty., Actg. Asst. Qmr., U. S. Army.

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FORT DELAWARE, July 24, 1862.

The MINISTER PLENIPOTENTIARY OF FRANCE, Washington.

Mr. MINISTER: At a time when a general exchange of prisoners appears to be on the point of being effected between the North and the {p.282} South the undersigned deems it his duty to bring to your knowledge the following facts in order that his position as a Frenchman may be well established, and that if hereafter any difficulties should arise in regard to him he may be claimed by the consuls of his nation.

In a note written in English which I had the honor to address to you on the 22d of April-a note which has remained unanswered-in which I claimed of you to have me set at liberty on my parole to give [no] aid or assistance to the Confederates, a parole on which citizens of the United States embarked on the Royal Yacht had been released. The same favor had been granted to citizens of the United States embarked on the same privateer as myself. These latter alone had taken oath of allegiance.

It is useless to recall to Your Excellency the facts which have led to my captivity. These facts have been transmitted to you by the consul at Philadelphia.

On the 3d of June last we were at City Point about to be exchanged. The officer who was in charge of the exchange caused all the officers of the privateers to sign a parole by which they bound themselves not to communicate with the enemy and not to take up arms before being regularly exchanged. I refused to Colonel Whipple to sign this parole, giving as a reason that I had no need of crossing the Confederate lines; that no engagement bound me to the Confederate States; that my sole engagement was with the privateer Petrel; that this vessel being sunk my engagement was in fact broken; that my case was very different from that of a foreigner engaged in a regiment, which foreigner in order to elude his engagement might wish to remain North. In spite of all these good reasons the only answer which I could obtain was this: We have taken you near the South; we return you to the South. (Sic.)

The negotiations being broken up I had no opportunity of protesting. Such was my intention if I had been forced to return to the South, for should the contingency arise I declare to you, Mr. Minister, that I will only yield to armed force and after protestation.

If I am forced to go to Richmond I hope that the consul of France may be able to obtain for me a pass to return North. Perhaps I shall be compelled to claim this of this functionary if the Confederate Government on the strength of having given an officer in my place for the exchange should wish to compel me to take service, for once arrived in Richmond I am free from all engagement and become a French subject again. I hope therefore that the consul may be able to furnish me with a pass to return North. I speak here on the hypothesis of an exchange should the case occur. If I returned North would I be liable to be arrested again by the Federal authorities?

I must observe to Your Excellency that I have addressed to the Secretary of War several requests which have remained unanswered, and in which I offered to give my parole in the terms which might be desired provided it were not an oath of allegiance which compelled me to other duties than those which I owe to my own flag. Every oath of allegiance to another nation draws on a Frenchman the loss of his civil rights; would lead at the same time in my case to the withdrawal of my commission as a captain of merchant vessel trading with foreign ports and to the loss of my nationality, and I am too sure of my title as a Frenchman to wish in any case to lose it.

You are not unaware, Mr. Minister, that many foreigners were in the South at the time when its revolution broke out. Not having means {p.283} to return North they were under the sad necessity of engaging themselves in order to live. My profession of seaman caused me to go on board a privateer. I have paid for my compulsory error by a year’s imprisonment. The Government of the United States ought to be kind enough to take these facts into consideration and to not force foreigners to return to the South which course exposes them to finding themselves in the same position as before.

I venture to hope that Your Excellency will condescend to take these facts into consideration and that you will be pleased to take some steps in order that I may be enabled to remain in the North.

I am, with profound respect, Mr. Minister, your very humble and very obedient servant,

A. PEYRUSSET, Captain of Merchant Vessel Trading with Foreign Ports.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

The rolls of prisoners held by us are not on file in this Department. They have been ordered to be made out with all dispatch. The number of prisoners of war held by us is reported to be over 20,000. The rolls will be ready in as brief a time as possible. Have named you and General Franklin as our agents of exchange. The commissary of prisoners thinks he can have the rolls in five days. They will be transmitted to you as soon as possible.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

You and Major-General Franklin have been appointed our agents for the exchange of prisoners. The agents appointed by the rebels will be at Aiken’s at 12 m. to-morrow, where you will please meet them. Advise General McClellan whether you will be present or not.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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FORT MONROE, July 25, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The intention was to have one agent here for the exchange of prisoners and one at Vicksburg. The Confederates will have but one at each place. I beg to be excused from this duty. My presence here is indispensably necessary. I have arranged to go to Point Lookout this evening to settle some matters there. General Franklin can do all that is necessary. If two are needed here General Van Alen, who commands at Yorktown, can be spared without inconvenience.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

{p.284}

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MCCLELLAN’S HEADQUARTERS, July 25, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The following has just been received from the Confederate lines:

Captain HOPKINS:

Send word to Doctor Collins at City Point to notify General McClellan that our agents for exchange of prisoners will be at Aiken’s to-morrow at 12 o’clock meridian. Acknowledge receipt of this dispatch.

R. E. LEE, General.

I beg to urge upon you the immediate appointment of the agents.

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Major-General Dix and Major-General Franklin are appointed our agents for the exchange of prisoners. If either of these cannot attend you may name some one to take his place. Major-General Dix has been notified of time and place of meeting.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

A dispatch from General McClellan states that the agent for exchange of prisoners on the part of the Confederates is to be at Aiken’s to-morrow at 12 o’clock. I think you had better go up and explain why our rolls of prisoners are not ready and that they will be furnished and the prisoners sent on immediately. General McClellan can then appoint General Franklin or some one else to act as agent and General Halleck designate an agent at Vicksburg. It is important there should be no misunderstanding and you can prevent it better than any one else. Your visit to Point Lookout appears to be of minor importance to this.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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FORT MONROE, July 25, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON:

By a dispatch from General Williams just sent to you it will be seen that the agent of the insurgents was at Aiken’s yesterday. I understood that General McClellan would send some one to act for his army until an appointment could be made at Washington. Paroled prisoners arriving here from Richmond every day and they look for prompt action on our part.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 25, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Department of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have just been informed that your agents for the exchange of prisoners will be at Aiken’s [Landing] at noon to-day prepared to {p.285} meet ours. The power to appoint the agents was not delegated me but as soon as the cartel had been signed I urged upon the Government their immediate appointment. I regret to say that I have not yet been informed of any action in the matter but I will at once repeat my request and will inform you when the appointment is made and the time when the meeting can take place, which I trust will be at no distant day.

I have taken the liberty of communicating the substance of this direct to your agents.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 25, 1862.

To the [CONFEDERATE] AGENTS FOR THE EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS, Aiken’s.

GENTLEMEN: I have just learned that you will reach Aiken’s at noon to-day expecting to meet there our agents for the exchange of prisoners. I regret to have to inform you that as far as I am aware no agents have yet been appointed for the purpose by the Government, but I have urged their immediate appointment and will at once repeat the request.

I will advise General Lee of their appointment and the time when the meeting can take place, which I trust may be within a very brief period.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

SIR: Your letter of the 22d instant has been referred to the Secretary of War. I am directed to say in reply that arrangements have been made for a general exchange of prisoners which it is hoped will remove all further cause of complaint on the part of paroled prisoners of war. The principle, however, is settled that our soldiers when sent back by the enemy on parole must not be placed on any duty that will increase the effective force of our army by relieving other troops and permitting them to act more effectively against the enemy.

By order of Secretary of War:

C. P. BUCKINGHAM, Brigadier-General and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 25, 1862.

Brig. Gen. RUFUS KING, Fredericksburg:

Please ascertain and forward the names of the four Union citizens of Fredericksburg recently seized by the rebel authorities and now confined in Richmond. If there have been other Union citizens seized by the rebel authorities in the neighborhood of Fredericksburg and now {p.286} held captive by such authorities please forward their names, as we may be able to exchange them with prisoners now confined in Capitol Prison.

By command of Major-General Pope:

[GEO. D. RUGGLES,] Colonel and Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, July 25, 1862.

General Dow will confine Martin Fullman in Fort Saint Philip at labor for giving information to guerrillas while claiming to be a natural subject of Great Britain.

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 144.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Corinth, Miss., July 25, 1862.

...

VI. Hereafter all charge of political prisoners will be left with the provost-marshal under direction of the provost-marshal-general. All prisoners confined will have their cases examined into with as little delay as practicable and the result of the examination reported to these headquarters. Major-General Ord, commanding post, will furnish the provost-marshal-general with all orders heretofore issued pertaining to the duties from which this order relieves him. The provost-marshal-general will be charged with granting permits for all persons not connected with the army to pass over the railroads and through the lines with such restrictions as are or may be ordered.

...

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

[JOHN A. RAWLINS, ] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Columbus, Ky., July 25, 1862.

All persons within the limits of the district who have, served in the rebel army and have returned to their homes and taken the oath of allegiance to the United States Government will immediately turn over to the nearest commanding officer of the U. S. forces all arms of any description which they may have. If any such persons shall be discovered or detected with arms in their possession it will be considered a hostile act, nullifying their oath of allegiance and will subject them to confinement and treatment of prisoners of war. Hereafter all persons taking the oath of allegiance will certify that they have no arms in their possession and that they will not carry or procure them without permission.

By order of Brig. Gen. I. F. Quinby:

M. ROCHESTER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.287}

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT OF WASHINGTON, D. C., July 25, 1862.

SUPERINTENDENT OLD CAPITOL PRISON.

SIR: The names of the four Union prisoners who were arrested in Fairfax County, Va., and carried to Richmond by the rebels are Maj. Charles Williams, Moses Morrison, Thomas Morrison and Peter Couse. They have also in confinement the following-named Union prisoners of Fairfax County, Va.: George Bayless, Abraham Lydecker, Mr. Murphy and Julius Visser. A like number of civil prisoners are held by the United States as hostages for the above, subject to exchange. The five Turners, Wybert and Peacock, ordered released from Richmond on the 8th instant, have not been heard from.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN P. SHERBURNE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT WARREN, July 25, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: The following-named prisoners of war profess that they are loyal men and urgently request that they may not be forced to go back to the Confederate States as prisoners of war, but be permitted to take the oath of allegiance and remain, viz: James Wilson, gunner; James Waters, third assistant engineer; Virginius Cherry, carpenter (these three men say that the oath of allegiance was administered to them on board the gun-boat Rhode Island during the passage from New Orleans); Theodore Holt, third assistant engineer; B. Dart, lieutenant, Louisiana volunteer artillery; R. Silk, Texas volunteers; B. F. Head, sergeant, Seventeenth Virginia Volunteers.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. DIMICK, Colonel First Artillery, Commanding Post.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 25, 1862.

Col. W. HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners:

All the prisoners of war fit to travel were sent to Alton, Ill., on the 19th instant. There remains here in hospital 105, and 25 convalescent and new arrivals.

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal.

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 25, 1862.

Mr. STIRLING, In Charge of Commissary-General’s Office, Detroit, Mich.:

I inclose a copy* of instructions sent by me to Captain Freedley which I wish that you would copy in the book and submit to the inspection of Colonel Hoffman the moment he arrives as he may desire to make essential changes in them. I wish that you would look at the list of the names of prisoners sent to this post during the month of June which was forwarded to Colonel Hoffman but a short time (a few days before I left Detroit) since. It was sent as a sub-voucher to the monthly return. The number of names on it should be 197. If this is {p.288} not the case please return it to me. You had better perhaps return it to me whether it is so or not and then I can arrange everything here and correct it. Please do so at once. My address is American House, Columbus. Did you send my telegram to Captain Freedley? Did he receive it?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Captain, Eighth Infantry.

* Omitted here; Lazelle to Freedley, July 20, p. 249.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 90.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 26, 1862.

I. The principle being recognized that chaplains should not be held as prisoners of war it is hereby ordered that all chaplains so held by the United States shall be immediately and unconditionally discharged.

...

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. W. S. KETCHUM, Saint Louis, Mo.:

It is represented that paroled prisoners at Benton Barracks are made to do duty violating their parole. The Secretary of War directs you to examine into and report on this and to stop it.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 26, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Commanding Fort Monroe, Va.

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs me to inform you that no inclosures accompanied your letter of the 23d instant in which you state that you return all papers sent to you relating to the negotiations for a general exchange of prisoners of war by Generals Wool and McClellan, and that these papers have not yet been otherwise received at this Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Berkeley, July 26, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Army.

GENERAL: I have seen to-day nearly a thousand of our sick and wounded just returned from Richmond. Some refugees have also arrived and a number of surgeons and chaplains taken prisoners at Bull Run. All of these who have enjoyed any opportunities of observation unite in stating that re-enforcements are pouring into Richmond from the South. ...

I have, &c.,

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, U. S. Army.

{p.289}

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NASHVILLE, July 16, 1862.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN:

In the exchange of prisoners reported soon to take place all Tennessee prisoners who are not willing to take the oath of allegiance and enter into bonds, &c., should be exchanged first, and if there should be any left I hope they will be at once released upon taking the oath, &c., and permitted to return to their homes. I hope the Tennessee prisoners will be held up for the last, except those who are deserving of being sent back to the rebel army. Let them go. The expense and burden of the rebellion must be felt by rebels. I wish the commanding general of this department would issue an order like that recently issued by General Pope, which is universally approved by the Unionists of Tennessee. We have all come to the conclusion here that treason must be made odious and traitors punished and impoverished. I am doing the best I can.

ANDREW JOHNSON, Military Governor.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. RUFUS KING, Fredericksburg:

General Orders, No. 11, directing arrest of all disloyal citizens, and to which you refer in your dispatch of this morning, has been sent to you by the boat which left this morning. Do not act until you shall have received the official order.

By command of Major-General Pope:

GEO. D. RUGGLES, Colonel and Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Washington, July 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. RUFUS KING, Fredericksburg, Va.:

I wish another person arrested and sent here to replace Mr. Barton who has been paroled on medical certificate of infirmity from old age.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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FORT MONROE, [July 26,] 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

I returned this afternoon from Harrison’s Landing. The meeting at Aiken’s took place yesterday. Mr. Ould, a private citizen and late district attorney at Washington, is the agent of the Confederates. General McClellan will send Colonel Key on Monday to meet Mr. Ould and explain the cause of delay in making out the rolls. General Franklin is not very well. It is thought important and General Halleck concurs that Colonel Key should be able to say to Mr. Ould on Monday that transports have been ordered to Fort Delaware to receive the prisoners there and bring them on as soon as practicable. General Halleck has just left for Washington.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

{p.290}

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CIRCULAR.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, July 26, 1862.

The term paroled prisoners used in Special Orders, No. 143, Headquarters District of West Tennessee, Corinth, Miss., July 24, 1862, refers to U. S. soldiers paroled by the rebels.

By order of General Rosecrans:

W. L. ELLIOTT, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, Memphis, Tenn., July 26, 1862.

Maj. Gen. T. C. HINDMAN, C. S. Army.

GENERAL: Yours of July 21 has just reached me. General Grant is not here at present, but I at once promise to the families of Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson and others free and unobstructed passage beyond our lines toward Little Rock.

I prefer that Surgeon White should not remain, but all the families will be allowed to depart with their escort, their servants and their household goods, and I will cause one of my aides to visit the families named with your letter to show them that you advise them to come to Little Rock.

Very respectfully,

W. T. SHERMAN, Major-General.

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[JULY 26, 1862.-For Maj. Gen. O. M. Mitchel to the Secretary of War concerning the return of slaves to their masters after being promised protection from the U. S. forces and the resultant correspondence, see Series I, Vol. XVI, Part II, pp. 583-586.]

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES IN KENTUCKY, Louisville, July 26, 1862.

...

IX. Major Mansfield will repair immediately with his battalion to Russellville, Ky., reporting to Colonel Bruce, commanding at Bowling Green. He will proceed to put down all rebel bands in Logan and adjoining counties, shooting down those found in arms as guerrillas, disarming all disloyal citizens and turning over their arms to those who are loyal.

By command of Brigadier-General Boyle:

JOHN BOYLE, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIV. OF THE MISS., Trenton, Tenn., July 26, 1862.

I. The general commanding has undoubted knowledge that the sympathizers with this rebellion within the limits of this command are aiding in a species of warfare unknown to the laws and customs of war, the suppression of which calls for more rigorous and decisive measures {p.291} than have been heretofore adopted. The allowing of bands of guerrillas to encamp in the neighborhood without giving information of the fact, the firing upon pickets, the feeding of parties who are hiding from our forces and the carrying of information to and from the enemy have become matters of daily occurrence. It is therefore ordered-

II. That any neighborhood, town or village that allows marauding bands or guerrillas to remain or camp near them without immediately sending word to the nearest military post will be levied upon, and a certain portion of the property of all known sympathizers of this rebellion that can be used by the U. S. forces, to be determined by the commander of the division, will be taken, and the citizens will be held personally responsible for the acts of the band. Where pickets are fired into the sympathizers of the rebellion being near the place will be arrested and held until the guilty party is brought to light, and when any injury is done the picket there will be assessed upon the disloyal citizens living near the place an amount not exceeding $10,000, as the commanding general may determine.

III. Citizens who encourage returned soldiers and deserters to hide in the woods and form bands to return to the rebel army will be arrested and held responsible for all depredations committed by these bands; and when it comes to the knowledge of any of the commanders of posts of this command that returned soldiers or deserters are lurking about, hiding and not coming forward as required they will arrest and hold for hostage the nearest disloyal relative to the soldier, such person to be held as hostage till the soldier delivers himself or is delivered up.

IV. Any person, white or black, free or slave, who brings reliable information of guerrilla bands, marauding parties and of citizens who are breaking any provisions of this order, which information proving to be of benefit to the U. S. forces, will receive a liberal reward. If a slave he will be guaranteed against receiving punishment for bringing such information.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. M. Dodge:

GEO. M. REEDER, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 26, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: The inclosed* requisition of Capt. A. A. Gibson, Second Artillery, commanding at Fort Delaware, for a safe and asking the erection of a bakery is respectfully referred to you. The case of the bake-house ought to be paid out of the savings of the prisoners’ rations. A safe if provided should be paid for in the same way.

By order:

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, and Deputy Quartermaster-General.

* Omitted.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Adjutant-General THOMAS.

GENERAL: You will please act as agent for the exchange of prisoners of war on the part of the United States under the agreement between Major-General Dix and Major-General Hill.

{p.292}

You will take measures to have the prisoners in the East transferred for exchange at Aiken’s, on the James River, and those in the West to be exchanged at or near Vicksburg as agreed upon.

You will communicate with General McClellan and inform him of your directions and the measures you are taking to execute the agreement.

By order of the President:

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Brigadier-General MEIGS, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you provide to-day if possible transports to take the prisoners of war from Fort Delaware to Aiken’s, on the James River, to be exchanged. There are from 3,000 to 4,000.

I am, sir, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, July 27, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a communication from General R. E. Lee dated the 24th instant, received by a flag of truce, together with a copy of my reply, and I respectfully request that the War Department will furnish me at the earliest possible moment with the information necessary to answer General Lee’s inquiries respecting the confinement of Captain Walker, lately commanding the steamer Theodora, who is said to be in irons.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA, July 24, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Army of the Potomac.

GENERAL: Information of a trustworthy character has been received that Capt. George D. Walker, of Wilmington, N. C., lately commanding the steamer Theodora, who was captured with his vessel and a cargo of arms and ammunition by the U. S. Blockading Squadron off Cape Fear, is kept in irons in Fort Columbus. Having no knowledge of the case beyond this report I am directed to request that you will cause inquiry to be made and give me information of the facts. The arms and ammunition on board the Theodora were intended for the use of the Government of the Confederate States.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

{p.293}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 26, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 24th instant in regard to the reported confinement in irons of Capt. George D. Walker, lately commanding the steamer Theodora. In reply I have the honor to state that I have no information in regard to this matter but will at once forward a copy of your letter to the War Department, with the request that the facts in the case may be made known to me and I will promptly acquaint you with the answer to my inquiry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 14.}

HDQRS. FIRST CORPS, ARMY OF VIRGINIA, Sperryville, Va., July 27, 1862.

In accordance with General Orders, No. 11, from Headquarters Army of Virginia, the provost-marshal of the First Corps d’Armée, assisted by the provost-marshals of divisions and independent brigades, will immediately proceed to have arrested all male inhabitants within and near the lines of this corps. He will send to these headquarters the names of all such persons, with their age, occupation and place of residence, who are unwilling to take the oath of allegiance to be disposed of by the commander of the corps. A list of the persons arrested who have taken the oath and of those who have refused to do so has to be filed in the office of the assistant adjutant-general of the corps.

By command of Maj. Gen. F. Sigel:

T. A. MEYSENBURG, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Harrison’s Landing, Va.:

Transports have been ordered to Fort Delaware to convey the prisoners of war to Aiken’s. By direction of the President I have been appointed agent of the United States for the exchange of prisoners under the agreement between Generals Dix and Hill. I shall accompany the prisoners from Fort Delaware.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 27, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Ten of the prisoners who escaped on the evening of the 23d have been recaptured, and one, a lad named Charles Ellis, Twentieth {p.294} Mississippi, returned and gave himself up. No new facts have been developed from their examination.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington City, July 27, 1862.

Col. GEORGE H. CROSMAN, Deputy Quartermaster-General, Philadelphia, Pa.:

The Secretary of War directs that transports be provided to-day if possible to convey prisoners of war from Fort Delaware to Aiken’s, on the James River, to be exchanged. There are 3,000 or 4,000. Can steamers be procured in Philadelphia? If so charter and dispatch to Fort Delaware at once. Reply immediately.

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, and Deputy Quartermaster-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Col. JAMES BELGER, Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Baltimore, Md.:

Are there any chartered steamers in Baltimore that you can dispatch to Fort Delaware this afternoon to transport prisoners of war from thence to James River? If not are there any that you can charter for the purpose? Reply by telegram at once how many of either kind can be started.

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, and Deputy Quartermaster-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Capt. GRIER TALLMADGE, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Fort Monroe, Va.:

How many steamers can be spared from Fort Monroe to transport prisoners of war from Fort Delaware to James River to start at once on notice being given? Is the Vanderbilt at Fort Monroe and ready for sea? Answer by telegraph as soon as this dispatch is received.

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, and Deputy Quartermaster-General.

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FORT MONROE, July 27, 1862.

General MEIGS, Quartermaster-General:

There are now three steamers here capable of bringing from Fort Delaware to this place 2,700 prisoners. Coatzacoalcos 900, Atlantic 900 and Merrimac 900. The Coatzacoalcos can go up James River. The other two can transfer their passengers here to river boats. The above estimate is rather under than over. The Vanderbilt has not yet returned from New York.

GRIER TALLMADGE, Assistant Quartermaster.

{p.295}

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27, 1862.

Capt. W. W. MCKIM, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Boston, Mass.:

Can you charter steamers to start at once with prisoners of war at Fort Warren for James River? Reply on receipt of this dispatch.

By order:

E. S. SIBLEY, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, and Deputy Quartermaster-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 27, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

On recommendation of General Schofield have paroled S. H. Colms, major First Battalion Tennessee Infantry, ranking as colonel, to go to Sparta, Tenn. He wants to be exchanged for Colonel Minter, Eighteenth Missouri Volunteers. Major Colms’ address is care McClure, Buck & Co., Nashville, Tenn. Colonel Minter is here.

B. G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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WASHINGTON, July 28, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

I inclose certain papers in regard to certain Iowa troops taken prisoners at Shiloh, since paroled and now at Benton Barracks.

The difficulty between them and the officers there is very unfortunate and will have a bad influence on recruiting in our State. It will be some time before they can be exchanged. Cannot orders be sent releasing them from any duty until exchanged or sending them to Davenport, Iowa, to occupy the Government barracks there until exchanged?

They have not been paid since January 1, but I think I have arranged for that to-day.

Please give this matter early attention.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

[Indorsement.]

JULY 29, 1862.

Respectfully submitted to the War Department.

A. LINCOLN.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

BENTON BARRACKS, Saint Louis, Mo., July 12, 1862.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

SIR: We the undersigned, paroled prisoners, members of the Eighth Iowa Regiment, desire to make the following statements concerning our treatment since the battle of Shiloh:

April 6 we arrived on the battle-field between 8 and 9 o’clock a.m. and were surrounded and completely cut off at 2 o’clock p.m. so we have been told, but were not taken prisoners until twenty minutes past 5 o’clock p.m., when we were overpowered by superior numbers. After an imprisonment of no ordinary severity, hardships and indignities of which few if any could form a correct opinion without being placed {p.296} under the same circumstances we were delivered over to our own forces. Part of us arrived at Huntsville May 28, but the majority of us May 30. We were kindly received and treated by our soldiers at Huntsville. May 31 we started toward Columbia, distant from Huntsville eighty miles. The train was loaded with cotton, and we had to march seventy-five miles in three days. We from close confinement and insufficient food were hardly fit for this march; yet though difficult it was accomplished and we arrived at Nashville June 3.

At Nashville from some unaccountable circumstances which appear very mysterious to us privates who have no means of seeing the workings of the hidden machinery [we were detained until] June 30, notwithstanding an order was posted up emanating from the War Department to the effect that all paroled prisoners were considered on leave of absence and were to report their post-office address to the Governors of the respective States to which they belonged. No countermanding order was made public to us, yet we were told that in our case this order was revoked. But in the face of all this the Ohio troops were sent home on furlough.

On the 24th of June another change took place in the programme; furloughs were made out dated June 3 and countersigned by the commanding officer at Nashville. These we have never received. Payrolls were made out and our descriptive lists taken that when the propitious moment should arrive all would be ready. June 30 an order came for our removal to Louisville, but on reaching that point we were put aboard a boat and reached Cairo July 2 and were quartered in dirty barracks little or no better than a hogpen, and if our senses of sight and smell did not deceive us these barracks bad previously been occupied by this and some other animals, and it is doubtful if any of the lower apartments of the barracks had not been visited more than once recently by some of the brute creation and yet there were no means furnished us of cleansing them.

We were here informed by the commanding officer that he would treat us as brothers; that we would be paid off and discharged; that he would see to it that we should have every cent which rightfully belonged to us and the machinery which the Government had put between them and us should not deprive us of it, either; that we should get all the conveniences allowed us and even that ice should be furnished us. And then as at Nashville the inducements, threats, or both, to break our parole by standing guard were depicted to us in glowing colors. Yet 1,300 or 1,400 paroled prisoners well know that here (Cairo) as at Nashville we have never got full rations; that we had to carry three-fourths of all the water used from the Ohio River, distant three-quarters of a mile; that the citizens locked or nailed up their wells so we had to get water as we best could from the river and the so much longed for ice was a myth.

July 9 much to our astonishment the Iowa, Missouri, Illinois and Wisconsin troops were ordered to Saint Louis, while an extract from a newspaper gained credence amongst us that we were to report at Jefferson Barracks for such duty as might be assigned us. The officer in charge of us reported at that point and we were ordered to Benton Barracks. Since being taken prisoners no camp equipage or cooking utensils whatever have been furnished us either to cook or eat our victuals with, except a cup and plate apiece to the prisoners at Tuscaloosa, Ala., and one plate, one cup, one knife, one fork and one spoon to every seven prisoners at Macon, Ga. Since coming within our own lines nothing of this kind has been furnished us but a few pans and far {p.297} fewer kettles. We are thus, comparatively speaking, wholly destitute of anything to eat our victuals with and wretchedly supplied with anything to cook them with. To-day requisitions have been made out for these much-needed articles which we fain hope and expect will be furnished to us. Since our first sight of Nashville we have been fed on empty promises for which we have no more appetite, and owing to the uncertainties which surround our future disposition very few if any of us have received any word from home.

In making these statements to you we do not mean to make an unsoldierly or whining complaint to you over what we have suffered but it must be remembered that those who would have attended to our wants and not suffered us to be trampled upon are now lying in Southern prisons, and now it does appear to us we have none who care for us further than to make so many stepping stones of us for their own promotion to office.

We make these statements to you that you may understand our situation and if you think necessary take such steps as you see proper under the circumstances, and that whatever our rights may be we may have them, that our parole may be respected and we not driven to the alternative of violating our conscience by perjury or suffering as mutineers. Very many of us would consider ourselves released from the parole if discharged and would either join the old or enter the new regiments, while all would make this preferable to being scattered to different places and duties, under officers we know not and who care not for us.

Form of parole.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., May 23, 1863.

I do hereby solemnly swear and pledge my most sacred word of honor that I will not during the existing war between the Confederate States and the United States of America bear arms or aid and abet the enemies of said Confederate States or their friends, either directly or indirectly in any form whatsoever, until regularly exchanged or released.

Parole given at Macon, Ga.

I do solemnly swear that I will not take up arms against the Confederate States of America or form any alliance to defeat them until regularly exchanged or otherwise honorably discharged.

Given and sworn to May 24, 1862.

Names and signers to the above statement: A. B. Smith, Company A, in behalf of 18 men; T. F. Greenlee, Company G, in behalf of 15 men; Sumner Smith, Company K, in behalf of 27 men; David S. Fuller, Company B; Jacob L. Tinkhan, Company D, in behalf of 36 men; Norman Sloan, Company F; Edward Young, for and in behalf of 26 men, Company B; John Pruitt, for and in behalf of 8 men, Company I; William Kirkpatrick; for and in behalf of 31 men, Company H; Gideon McHenry, Company C, in behalf of 32 men.

P. S.-I have been authorized to add that Companies E and K have never yet received any pay from the Government. The other companies have been paid up to the 31st of December, 1861.

GIDEON MCHENRY.

JULY, 13, 1862.

Necessity compels us, the undersigned, this Sabbath evening to state to you that we have orders this evening from General Schofield to be fully armed and equipped so that we can relieve the Twenty-third Missouri, now on duty. Guards to be detailed this evening to report at {p.298} guard mounting to-morrow morning at 8 o’clock, and there is not a man who has signed this paper but would prefer to return to their Southern prisons before perjury.

G. MCHENRY. S. R. PALMER. ARTHUR J. MCCUTCHEON. DAVID KILGORE. T. ROBERTSON.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

CAMP BENTON, SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 14, 1862.

Adjutant-General BAKER.

DEAR SIR: I proceed to write to you by informing you of the critical circumstances that we (paroled prisoners) are now in.

We are in Camp Benton, arriving here the evening of the 10th, and now after being in the Southern prisons two months and being fed upon one-fourth rations-I need not tell you the kind-we are placed here by our own will by subscribing to the following oath rather than to die in filth and not a morsel of bread to fill the vacuum in our stomachs. Oath:

I pledge my most sacred honor that I will not during the existing war between the Confederate States and the United States of America bear arms or aid or abet the enemy of said Confederate States or their friends directly or indirectly in any form whatever until exchanged or released.

Besides taking this oath they have taken our description, and now after going through all this form and after getting back into our lines we are now used as dogs.

The commander here has given orders for us to stand guard. This every one of us will not do even to a man, believing it to be a violation of our oath. Already forty of us are in the guard-house and the rest are ready to go at a moment’s notice to be tried by a court-martial. No telling of the consequences. There are 600 Iowa boys here; not one of us has received a cent pay since the 1st of January. We unanimously ask you to see into this affair and see what shall be done. We are here without officers and this is known to be the case and we are run over and trampled below the Secesh prisoners.

With this explanation and asking help, I submit, yours,

COMPANY D, Twelfth Iowa, Cerro Gordo.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

SAINT LOUIS, MO., July 11, 1862.

Governor S. J. KIRKWOOD.

RESPECTED SIR: Perhaps I am presuming too much in troubling you with matters which may not concern you, but however I will have to ask a hearing and your aid if such you deem necessary.

Our condition has been and is as follows: On the 6th of April at the battle of Pittsburg Landing we were taken prisoners and released on parole the 25th of May. We were kept at Nashville until the 29th ultimo. While there every plan which they could devise was taken to get us in service again as a Tennessee regiment, but all their schemes proved of no avail. They found us as firm as the Secesh found us on the battle-field. We are now here and the same proceedings are to be acted over again. They want us to do guard duty notwithstanding our parole of honor. Now if we are not to be exchanged why not be called to our own State and not be here to be bamboozled by a colonel that is intoxicated the greater part of the time.

{p.299}

I have always considered a parole honorable for any prisoner to take, at least most people think so when lying in Southern prisons nearly naked and their flesh raw from the effects of vermin.

But the officers here and at Nashville act as though they thought differently. We have been treated but little better since our release than we were while in the South. We have not had munch over half-rations and these of the poorest quality, having sour bread and rotten meat. This remark is not entirely applicable to our treatment here for it is some better.

I have now given you an indefinite idea of our condition, and if you can lend us any assistance we will consider ourselves much indebted; if you cannot, at least write me, with your advice with regard to our duty as paroled prisoners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. HAZLETT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, Mo., July 28, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington.

SIR: In obedience to your telegraphic dispatch I visited Benton Barracks, Mo., and respectfully report as follows:

On the 14th instant a petition was made by the paroled prisoners and on the 19th instant General Halleck decided as follows:

Paroled prisoners of war must do guard, police and fatigue duty in their own camps. This is not military duty in the belligerent sense of that word; it is simply for their own order, cleanliness and comfort and is not in violation of any parole not to bear arms against the enemy till exchanged.

Since this announcement there has been no trouble, and had it not been for the adjutant-general of Iowa telegraphing and writing I think there would have been but little trouble. I called all officers and enlisted men together who had copies of their paroles. The paroles forbid the men bearing arms against the Confederate States, or aiding or abetting their enemies or friends directly or indirectly until regularly exchanged or released. One parole forbade the use of any information acquired against said Confederate States, and one other forbade the serving in any capacity the Army of the United States. Some of the prisoners were opposed to doing anything, even to policing their own quarters and premises, while others were willing to do anything not considered violation of their parole.

General Halleck’s decision appeared to settle the matter and now there is no trouble. In order that the views of the Department might be known I handed your dispatch to General McKean to read, and will furnish him with a copy. I explained to the paroled prisoners that the concentration of them at camps of instruction was for the purpose of feeding, clothing, mustering and paying them and have them properly accounted for and in readiness for an exchange, and not with the view of ordering them to take the field or take up arms against the Southern Confederacy. I conversed with them freely, asked them many questions and replied to all their inquiries, and they left my presence apparently contented and satisfied to do what was required of them for their own order, health and comfort. I told them they would not be required to violate their parole by either the Government or its agents.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Brigadier-General, Assistant Inspector-General.

{p.300}

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LACON, MARSHALL COUNTY, ILL., July 28, 1862.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States.

HONORED SIR: I trust no apology will be deemed necessary for calling your attention to the fact that some 1,300 of the prisoners taken by the rebels at the battle of Pittsburg Landing were returned to us on parole and are now at Benton Barracks, Mo. These men are suffering greatly; they as you are aware endured great hardships during their imprisonment, and are in consequence generally unfit for the rigor of active service. They have not received any pay for a period extending beyond eight months and feel anxious to go home to their families and carry with them the hard-earned pittance to meet their pressing necessities, but the commandant of the post exacts from them all the ordinary duties of the service, and for refusing to violate the obligations of parole punishes them with the utmost severity. About 100 of these brave boys are now in irons for this cause.

I cannot for one moment entertain a doubt but that you will promptly interfere in their behalf, and by so doing you will relieve us of much embarrassment in obtaining new recruits under your recent call.

Your obedient servant,

ROBERT F. WINSLOW.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 28, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to say that he has had the honor to receive your letter* of the 14th instant, inclosing copy of a note addressed by Lord Lyons to the State Department under date of the 12th instant-

Touching the cases of British subjects, prisoners of war in this country, who when captured by the U. S. forces were serving against their will in the ranks of the rebels, and asking that such cases may be inquired into fairly and dealt with leniently,

-and to submit to you the following reply:

The Department has no information upon this subject other than that gathered from the note of Lord Lyons, and as that fails to mention the name of any British subject supposed to have been captured, while serving against his will in the ranks of the rebels, it is manifestly out of the power of the Department now to take any action in the premises. It may be well, however, to acquaint Lord Lyons with the fact that applications for release and parole on precisely this ground are almost daily made to the Department by citizens of the United States captured from the insurgent ranks and held as prisoners of war, but the Department has uniformly declined to inquire into these cases or to deal with them otherwise than with cases in which no such ground was urged.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* Not found.

{p.301}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: In the execution of the duties confided to you as agent of the United States in arranging for the exchange of prisoners of war the Secretary of War directs that you visit such points as you may find necessary.

I have the honor to be, sir, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 28, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN POPE, Comdg. Army of Virginia, Washington, D. C.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that Colonel Mulligan, now at New Creek, Va., be placed in arrest and called to account for the charges made against him in the inclosed letter* from Col. J. H. Tucker. Please return the inclosures.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Omitted here; Tucker to Hoffman (inclosure), p. 180.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 28, 1862.

Brigadier-General WADSWORTH, Military Governor District of Columbia, Washington, D. C.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you send all the prisoners of war now confined in this District to Fort Monroe under a suitable guard to be exchanged. Call upon the quartermaster’s department for transportation.

I am, sir, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

In answer to your inquiry I have the honor to state that Dr. Carter W. Wormley, a political prisoner now in confinement at Fort Delaware, was arrested at his home on the Upper Pamunkey for giving aid and information to the enemy. His residence is such that if now released he could do no injury to our cause under existing circumstances.

G. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

I request that you will give me as much notice as possible of your anticipated time of arrival on the James River with the prisoners so {p.302} that I can communicate the same to the Confederate authorities and thus save delay. The Confederate agent has returned to Richmond and will not be at Aiken’s again until he hears further from me.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Army of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that the Government has appointed Brig. Gen. Lorenzo Thomas as agent on the part of the United States for the exchange of prisoners.

He will accompany the prisoners of war from Fort Delaware for whom transports have already been ordered and may be expected in the James River within a very few days. I will endeavor to give you as early notice as possible of the time when he will be at Aiken’s that there may be no unnecessary delay in making the exchange at that place.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28[27], 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: By direction of the commanding general I have the honor herewith to transmit in two parts a list* of our sick and wounded delivered by the Confederate authorities at City Point July 25, 1862.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: By direction of the commanding general I have the honor herewith to transmit part 3 of the list* of our sick and wounded delivered at City Point the 25th instant. Two portions of this list were forwarded by yesterday’s mail.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[S. WILLIAMS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 28, 1862.

Maj. Gen. G. B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of Virginia.

GENERAL: I am advised by the Adjutant-General of the Army that Capt. George H. Smith, of the Twenty-fifth Virginia or Heck’s Regiment {p.303} Virginia Volunteers, is exchanged for Capt. Charles J. Whiting, of the Fifth U. S. Cavalry.

Will you please inform General Lee.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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FORT MONROE, July 28, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS:

The Atlantic, Merrimac and Coatzacoalcos leave to-day for Fort Delaware. Each can carry and cook for 1,000 men. If Captain Gibson gets rid of 3,000 prisoners he ought to be able to spare a company for each vessel. I cannot spare a man. I have not men enough for guard and police duty. Captain Gibson will of course receive the necessary orders from Washington.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, July 28, 1862.

Madam Dubois having disobeyed the order of the assistant military commandant to deliver up the keys of the school-house on the corner of Robertson and Bienville streets she will be confined on Ship Island until further orders.

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 28, 1862.

Capt. C. W. THOMAS, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army:

Pursuant to instructions received from the Quartermaster-General the major-general commanding directs that you cause the steamers Atlantic, Capt. D. S. Babcock; Merrimac, Capt. F. A. Sampson; Coatzacoalcos, Capt. Jefferson Many, to proceed without delay to Fort Delaware, Del., there to report to Captain Gibson, Second Artillery, commanding at that post, for the purpose of receiving such prisoners of war as he may place on board and to return with such prisoners to this post, reporting their arrival to the major-general commanding.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. T. VAN BUREN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 28, 1862.

General E. L. VIELE, Commanding, Norfolk, Va.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that Dr. W. H. Newell, a prisoner of war, be unconditionally discharged under General Orders, No. 60, current series. As the doctor was paroled by you it is proper that this order should pass through your hands.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

{p.304}

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BOSTON, July 28, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

Prisoners of war leave Thursday morning. Shall send Flag-Officer Barron, Commander Mitchell and all Navy prisoners. Shall send also two lieutenants of the Navy, De Bree and Glassell, unless otherwise ordered. Some eight or nine prisoners say they will be hung if they go South. Some have taken the oath of allegiance. Further orders.

J. DIMICK, Colonel, Commanding.

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, July 28, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Third Infantry, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to you the following report upon the condition of matters connected with the prison camp of Camp Chase at this place upon my arrival here and at the present time:

I am glad to be able to inform you that the written instructions contained in my letter to the commanding officer here directing certain improvements in the prisons and other departments connected with them, and which have already been submitted to your approval in a previous report, have in most cases been put in force by the commanding officer, and this too previous to my arrival. As a consequence a marked change is observed in the health, cleanliness, police and comfort of the prisoners and decidedly for the better. The quartermaster has already completed a very complete grading of all of the prisons thereby securing a complete drainage. They will soon be provided with complete privies, those in prison No. 3 being finished and the others in a fair way toward fitting them for use. The quarters are nearly all thoroughly whitewashed, and this together with the free use of lime in connection with the changes referred to render the atmosphere of the prisons comparatively pure.

The prisoners in No. 3 do all of their cooking by the six Farmer’s boilers and twelve stoves, two to each mess, to enable them to bake their corn-meal and prepare in various ways a few small articles of the ration. The method adopted by them is that generally followed in the Army of boiling their rations and making soup. Fresh beef is issued five times a week. I have directed that rice or beans shall be issued daily to the prisoners, one in lieu of the other when hominy is not issued; when, however, hominy is issued neither beans nor rice for that day, the object being to give them one and only one of these articles of food at the same time, or forming a part of the same ration. This is somewhat less than the allowance at present given under the recent commissary regulation to exist during this war, there being allowed under it a full ration of either two, as beans and rice, beans and hominy, rice and hominy. But I believe that it was more than enough for men taking little or no exercise, and more particularly as of most of the food a considerable portion daily finding its way to the slop tubs. I have directed that hominy be issued in the proportion of two-sevenths and beans or rice five-sevenths, and corn-meal in place of bread or flour five times per week. The prisoners are quite successful in the use of the boilers, and there is no doubt but that their cost would soon be replaced by the immense saving of fuel over stoves. The use of milk by the prisoners has been allowed by permitting the sutlers to sell it.

The camps are thoroughly policed twice each day (or rather the prisons) in the manner detailed to be done in my first report to you.

{p.305}

All accumulations of every kind are removed from within or about the quarters, and but for your telegram from Washington the buildings would all be soon raised and platforms constructed in front of them.

As it is the boards will be sawed off whenever they project below the floors to admit as free a circulation of air as possible under them. And generally all the means for improving the condition of the prisons directed by me to be put in force by the officer commanding the camp and stated in my first report to you have been put in successful and constant operation under my own supervision, with the exception of those parts or points already referred to you and not meeting with your approval, as the planking of the large camp drain, and in accordance with your instructions I shall continue them so far as no expenditure is involved, in accordance with your telegram from Washington.

I have required Captain Walker, the post commissary, to live at Camp Chase and to personally attend to all issues and duties of his position and to make out and submit to me for your inspection at the end of this month an abstract of the daily savings of rations for the prisoners’ fund. Instructions have been received here from the Commissary-General’s Office in Washington (in reply to a letter which I directed to be addressed to him upon the quantity of rations to be furnished by the contractors) which require a great improvement in the quality of the ration over that at present furnished. I shall see that this is done and that the post commissary who has been going quite at large remains at the camp and does his duty. The commanding officer has informed me that he has been at the camp but three days for the past two weeks and has been absent without permission three-fourths of the time. I will forward to you in a day or two as soon as I can possibly collect the items a strong case against the capability of this gentleman, if not a more serious charge, which I respectfully request that you will forward to the Commissary-General at Washington if it appears to you worthy of that notice.

The quartermaster here informs me that he has not sufficient funds to pay Mr. Aiken at present unless he takes 6 per cent. U. S. bonds. This Mr. Aiken is unwilling to do. I shall direct the quartermaster to make a special estimate to cover this debt if you approve of this course. All the necessary books required by me have been furnished by him for the prison records, and I am now having the entries made in them in the proper forms and in a uniform, regular manner which will hereafter be pursued so as to conform as much as possible to the forms used in the office of the commissary-general of prisoners, and such as will in the simplest manner furnish all necessary data.

Some considerable number of communications to the State authorities, as the Governor, quartermaster-general and others, from prisoners have been up to the present time sent from the prisons sealed and without previous examination simply because addressed to these functionaries. They have been forwarded under the prisoner’s seal. I have directed that all communications from prisoners of whatsoever nature and to whomsoever addressed go unsealed to the commanding officer first, in order that Articles I and X be strictly enforced of the regulations from your office, and that nothing improper in matter or manner be permitted to go from the prisons. I have done this to prevent the obviously mischievous effects of ex parte representation by prisoners to people outside not officially concerned.

The prisons will at present accommodate 1,800; 2,000 could be crowded in. At present there are about 1,600 prisoners. I have the {p.306} honor to inclose for your approval requisitions* for prisoners’ clothing. The quartermaster at this place has on hand a sufficient supply. I inclose seven certificates* for parole and discharge. These include several particular cases made out at my request of perfectly harmless prisoners. Two have lost their arms, two are insane and several are idiotic. The prisoners are greatly in want of clothing. I inclose the application* for release by reason of a former parole of a prisoner of the name of Vincent. The case has been referred to me, as you will observe, or I should not trouble you with it at present at least.

In reply to your letter of the 15th instant, in which you wish to know how many prisoners were on parole in the city of Columbus when I arrived here and how many are on parole now, I inclose a statement* comprehending these points. I have informed Governor Tod of your request that all prisoners in this city be returned to Camp Chase except the two who fear violence by reason of their communications. As yet he has not complied with your request.

With the highest regard, I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners

* Not found.

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QUARTERMASTER’S DEPARTMENT, U. S. ARMY, Indianapolis, Ind., July 28, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL: Inclosed please find a bill* for Cincinnati Commercial furnished prisoners of war by order of Colonel Rose, commandant at camp. I did not think that the account was an allowable one, although I am of the opinion that the paper man should be paid. This expenditure has been stopped, as it should be, but this bill stands, and I not feeling authorized to approve it most respectfully refer it to headquarters.

I am, colonel, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES A. EKIN, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army.

* Omitted.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Adjutant-General Thomas will take the prisoners to be exchanged from Fort Delaware, stopping at Fortress Monroe. He will consult with you respecting the course to be taken with the prisoners referred to in your telegram.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Adjt. Gen. L. THOMAS, U. S. Army.

GENERAL: In exchanging prisoners I beg to direct your attention specially to the following classes:

1. The Texas troops captured by Van Dorn and others.

2. Telegraphic operators, of whom several are held as prisoners.

{p.307}

3. Hospital assistants and private persons who were in attendance upon the sick and wounded in hospitals, among whom are Felix Brunot, esq., of Pittsburg, and his assistants, taken at Savage [Station] Hospital. We released a great number of surgeons unconditionally recently under the assurance that such persons should not be held as prisoners.

4. Persons who decline to be exchanged, citizens of Northern States, aliens who wish to remain in the North, &c. In respect to these you will observe such directions as may be given by the General-in-Chief.

Yours, truly,

EDWIN M. STANTON.

P. S.-Arrange in making up your first exchange to leave behind the fourth class if there be enough of the others to be exchanged for all of our troops held as prisoners.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Governor WILLIAM A. BUCKINGHAM, Norwich, Conn.:

Why should men of such comparative insignificance as Colonel K. be rigorously dealt with when the conspicuous personage named in your letter* of the 18th instant has as stated therein so little influence that you do not think it advisable to take any further notice of him? Colonel K. was doubtless encouraged by his example and it is neither just nor wise to seize small criminals while large ones are permitted to do the same acts with impunity. Besides the colonel’s offense seems much less flagrant than that of the other.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

* Not found.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Col. J. DIMICK, U. S. Army, Fort Warren, Boston:

The eight or nine prisoners referred to and those who have taken the oath of allegiance will not be sent to Fort Monroe. Parole Major Granbury, of Texas, that he may attend his wife while having a surgical operation performed at Baltimore, then to report to General Wool, in Baltimore. Modify Colonel Kane’s parole so as to read as follows:

Not to commit any hostile or injurious act against the Government of the United States by word or deed, nor to communicate in any form with any person on the subject of politics or the war.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Colonel DIMICK, U. S. Army, Fort Warren, Boston:

Henry Myers will be embarked with the prisoners of war and General Dix informed before the transport reaches Fort Monroe if he is to be exchanged.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.308}

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 29, 1862.

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

SIR: After writing my letter of the 23d instant I concluded not to send the papers relating to the negotiation for an exchange of prisoners of war by mail but to reserve them for a private messenger. They are in my possession and will be sent the first safe opportunity.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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FORT MONROE, July 29, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

There are several insurgent prisoners here who are very unwilling to return to the South. Some are willing to take the oath of allegiance; others desire to give their parole of honor to remain North and neither to bear arms nor to serve in any capacity against the Government of the United States. Of the latter class there is a captain whose family has large property in New Orleans.

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Col. D. H. RUCKER, Chief Quartermaster and Aide-de-Camp, Washington:

You will furnish transportation to Fortress Monroe for a body of 110 prisoners of war from this place. A guard will be furnished by the Military Governor, General Wadsworth, Adjutant-General Thomas will inform you as to the time of starting. Any steamer which is ready to return to the Chesapeake may be used for the purpose.

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 29, 1862.

Captain MCKIM, Quartermaster, Boston, Mass.:

The Ocean Queen must carry prisoners to Fort Monroe on her way to New Orleans. You will receive instructions from the military authorities.

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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HDQRS. MILITARY GOVERNOR OF NORTH CAROLINA, New Berne, July 29, 1862.

Capt. S. HOFFMAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of North Carolina.

CAPTAIN: Governor Stanly instructs me to refer the accompanying communication to General Foster with the request that the prisoner be informed of the charges against him if not inconsistent with the public service.

I am, your obedient servant,

J. L. VAN BUREN, Major, Aide-de-Camp and Military Secretary.

{p.309}

[Inclosure.]

BEAUFORT, July 27, 1862.

Hon. EDWARD STANLY, Military Governor of North Carolina.

DEAR SIR: I am arrested and in the guard-house for some cause and detained from my business. Will you, if you please, see General Foster or whoever tends to this case and let me know the charges and penalty, as my vessel is laying on expenses and I can’t attend to everything. The marshal is not here. He has gone to Swansborough and has been gone three days, and I don’t know the charges preferred against me; but I pledge my word and honor I have not said or done anything against the Government in any way to my knowledge. Every gentleman here knows me and I don’t think any of them would say I have said or done anything against the Government. I may have been arguing some point and somebody mistook my words or misrepresented them for some cause or other. Please attend and let me know the charges and penalty.

From your humble servant,

JOSEPH HARTICK, Commander of Schooner Velasco, of New York.

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PHILADELPHIA, July 30, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I have just searched the house of a lady named Emley, who has four women at work making clothing for secesh prisoners. She does not deny it. Says all her sympathies are with them. There are other parties connected with her. 1 found two letters addressed to her from Captain Gibson, commander Fort Delaware, thanking her for her kindness. What shall I do with the parties? Strong feeling here against such parties. It operates against recruiting.

WILLIAM MILLWARD, U. S. Marshal.

Answer by telegram as I have an officer upon the premises.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 30, 1862.

WILLIAM MILLWARD, Esq., U. S. Marshal, Philadelphia:

Send the two letters to this Department. Mistress Emley must be permitted to exercise her charity by supplying clothing or other necessaries or comforts to those who are sick or in prison.

P. H. WATSON, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WINCHESTER, July 30, 1862.

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

Mr. Cridge is here with Miss Boyd as prisoner. What shall be done with her?

JULIUS WHITE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.310}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, July 30, 1862.

Brigadier-General WHITE, Winchester, Va.:

Direct Cridge to come immediately to Washington and bring with him Belle Boyd in close custody, committing her on arrival to the Old Capitol Prison. Furnish him such aid as he may need to get her safely here.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Harrison’s Landing, July 30, 1862.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a communication from General R. E. Lee,* dated the 21st instant, in regard to the alleged arrest and imprisonment of citizens of the rebel States who have refused to take the oath of allegiance to the United States. I also inclose copies of reports from Maj. William H. Wood, acting provost-marshal-general, and Major-General Dix. In addition to these reports I respectfully state that so far as my knowledge extends no transactions of the nature alleged have taken place in this army.

I have the honor to request that these papers may be laid before the War Department for its consideration and that the Department will furnish me with such information as to the facts and its views in the premises as will enable me to reply to General Lee.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

* Omitted here; Lee to McClellan, July 21, p. 251.

[Enclosure No. 1.]

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 23, 1862.

Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL: In reply to your communication of the 22d instant inquiring “if during the progress of this army in Virginia any citizens of Virginia engaged in peaceful avocations have been arrested by this Department and imprisoned on the ground of refusal to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, or having been imprisoned for other causes have been refused release on the ground of declining to take the oath of allegiance,” I have the honor to state that to my knowledge no citizens have been arrested on that ground only nor have any citizens been refused release on the same ground.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. WOOD, Major Seventeenth Infantry, Acting Provost-Marshal-General.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 28, 1862.

General S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL: I have received yours of the 23d, inclosing a copy of a letter from General R. E. Lee, stating that “citizens engaged in peaceful {p.311} avocations have been arrested and imprisoned because they refused to take the oath of allegiance to the United States, while others by hard and harsh treatment have been compelled to take an oath not to bear arms against that Government.” He adds, “I have learned that about 100 of the latter class have been released from Fortress Monroe.”

In reply to the inquiry of the major-general commanding how far these allegations are sustained by actual occurrences I have the honor to state-

1. I have no knowledge that any citizen has been arrested and imprisoned for refusing to take the oath of allegiance. I do not believe any such case has occurred in my command. If so it was without my authority and without my knowledge. All prisoners are sent to Fort Wool and their cases are personally examined by me, and it is not at all probable that any such case would have escaped my scrutiny.

2. In regard to the “100” prisoners released from Fortress Monroe I can speak positively. The prisoners alluded to were confined at Fort Wool. Their “treatment” was neither “hard” nor harsh.” They were not “compelled” to take any oath at all. In fact they took no oath. The number of prisoners released was ninety-three.

Nearly all of them were taken during the change of position made by the army from the Chickahominy to the James River. I examined their cases myself, having gone to Fort Wool two days for the purpose. Several of them wrote notes to me before I went there asking to be released on their parole of honor not to do any act of hostility to the United States during the continuance of the war. I inclose the form of the parole given by them and of the certificate which each one received. No one objected to the parole. On the contrary it was solicited by many and given with cheerfulness by the others. I did not speak to every one myself but I did speak either to each one or to some one who responded for him.

These prisoners as well as the prisoners of war at Fort Wool were treated with all possible kindness. They had the same food which was provided for our own men and no effort was spared to make them comfortable.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

[Sub-inclosure.]

FORT WOOL, ___, 1862.

The bearer, ___ ___, of ___, having given the following parole, is discharged from custody.

By order of Major-General Dix:

___ ___.

FORT WOOL, ___, 1862.

I, ___ ___, of ___, do hereby give my parole of honor that I will do no act of hostility to the United States and that I will give no information, aid or comfort to their enemies during the existing war.

___ ___.

In presence of-

___ ___.

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FORT MONROE, July 30, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Wool sent here to-day sixty prisoners without any letter or explanation of any sort. On examining them I found forty to be prisoners {p.312} of war and sent them to Fort Wool to wait General Thomas’ arrival. The other twenty were political prisoners and I declined to receive them. There is no place here for political prisoners. Fort Wool is so crowded now that our men are in the way of the engineers, who are going on with work.

JOHN A-DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 30, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: Professor Brooks, of Maryland, who will hand you this note, was presented to me while I was in Baltimore as a true Union man. His son has been sent here for exchange. I do not consider him a subject for exchange as he is not in the rebel service and he is very averse to returning to Virginia. I have therefore sent him back to Baltimore as there is not room here for political prisoners.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, July 30, 1862.

Mrs. Jane C. Beach and daughter, Mrs. Spooner, having made application for the remission of the order sending Madam Dubois to Ship Island her sentence is revoked and she may be discharged upon the express condition, however, thus: Madam Dubois shall not in any way give aid or information to the Confederate States or in any way interfere with the schools at the corner of Robertson and Bienville streets.

BENJ. F. BUTLER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Huntsville, July 30, 1862.

Major SMELL, Headquarters, Nashville:

What troops are at Clarksville and what numbers? Refer the subject of political prisoners to Governor Johnson and get his views about sending them North and act upon them.

JAMES B. FRY, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Douglas, Chicago, July 30, 1862.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington.

GENERAL: In view of the probability of arrangements being effected by the Department of War for a general exchange of prisoners I respectfully ask for instructions which will cover the cases of prisoners who do not wish to be exchanged. I have numerous written communications from prisoners who state that they entered the rebel service unwillingly; some through fear of being drafted, some to escape from actual imprisonment and some from the impossibility of finding any other employment. Others and principally those whose homes are now {p.313} within our lines while they do not claim to have been forced to take up arms, yet profess to be tired of the rebellion now and desire to return to their loyalty and their homes. I would be grateful to have information which will enable me to make the proper answers to these numerous inquiries and to know whether time will be allowed to those whose cases I have described to substantiate their statements.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOSEPH H. TUCKER, Colonel Sixty-ninth Regt. Illinois Vols., Comdg. Post.

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CAMP CHASE, Columbus, Ohio, July 30, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Third Infantry, U. S. Army, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: I have the honor to inform you that on the day of my arrival at this place I directed Mr. Stirling to telegraph to Captain Freedley to whatever point he might be that he should await instructions at Alton, Ill. I did this that he should not fail to receive at that place your orders to him given by you to me and mailed to him on the evening of the day of my arrival here, directed to Alton. After the telegram had been sent I feared that he would misinterpret it to mean that he should at once proceed to Alton, and acting on this would not receive at Springfield the instructions sent to him at that point on the 20th instant from your office relative to his duties at Alton. I consequently wrote to the commanding officer at Springfield that he should send to Captain Freedley all official communications without delay in case he had gone to Alton. I have no doubt but that through these means his instructions have all reached him. I have informed the Governor of your wish relative to recalling of all paroles given to prisoners allowing them the limits of the city of Columbus. He has not yet acted upon it. I inclose the corrected return* of prisoners for June, 1862, which I believe is now correct.

I am, colonel, with the highest respect, your obedient servant,

H. M. LAZELLE, Capt., Eighth Infty., Assistant Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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SECRETARY OF WAR: FREDERICKSBURG, July 30, 1862.

I have in my possession the most positive proof that M. Slaughter, of this place, is the channel through which the Confederate mail reaches Richmond. Other charges of the most outrageous character can be proven. He is a dangerous man to be at liberty at this time and place. Shall I arrest him?

L. C. BAKER.

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FORT DELAWARE, July 30, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General-U. S. Army.

SIR: I have the honor to state for Brigadier-General Pettigrew, C. S. Army, prisoner of war, that in consequence of a wound in the shoulder his right arm has become paralyzed. He requests that you permit him to go to Baltimore on parole to have the advantage of the application {p.314} of a galvanic battery to it, promising to report at Fortress Monroe at such time as you may designate. Being unable to go unattended he desires that I be permitted to accompany him on a similar parole.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BARROLL WASHINGTON, First Lieut. and Aide-de-Camp, C. S. Army, Prisoner of War.

[Indorsement.]

JULY 30, 1862.

This application cannot be granted.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 31, 1862.

L. C. BAKER, Police Agent, &c., Fredericksburg, Va.:

General King has received instructions to arrest Slaughter if the information you send is correct. See General King and give him the necessary information.

P. H. WATSON, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 31, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Department of Northern Virginia.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I have been apprised that the prisoners of war in our hands confined at Fort Warren will leave that place to-day for the James River on the steamer Ocean Queen.

The prisoners from Fort Delaware are expected here within a day or two.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN,] Major-General, Commanding.

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FORT DELAWARE, July 31, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

The prisoners of war are being embarked and two of the steamers will be ready this evening but may not sail before early to-morrow. The Atlantic had to go to Philadelphia for coal and may not return to the fort before night. Everything, however, is in readiness. Upward of 3,000 will be embarked. I leave 40 sick and 301 who will take the oath of allegiance. I found it necessary to separate the latter from the rebels. A number of them say they would be shot if exchanged. A number of them desire to enter our service. I shall take the little steamer, Henry Burden, which can be spared, and she will be very useful to me on the James River.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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FORT DELAWARE, July 31, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX, Commanding, &c.

GENERAL: On the arrival of the steamer Atlantic you are requested to have the prisoners of war, some 1,200, transferred to vessel of lighter {p.315} draft to proceed up the James River. I leave this place some time to-morrow.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, July 31, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe: (For Adjutant-General Thomas.)

Henry Myers, paymaster of rebel steamer Sumter, was sent with prisoners of war from Boston, Secretary of State says: “Though not properly a prisoner of war question had better not be raised and let him be exchanged.”

I have sent you rolls from Delaware and this city yesterday and from Sandusky, Camp Morton, Fort Columbus, Saint Louis and Fort Warren to-day.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Monroe, Va., July 31, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. K. F. MANSFIELD, Commanding at Suffolk, Va.

GENERAL: There are no Springfield rifled muskets at this post and I doubt very much whether there are any at Washington. There is nothing here but Austrian rifles and our own smooth-bores. I do not think the oath of allegiance should be exacted from the people living in Suffolk or in the surrounding country. Our hold upon it, considering the very large force which the enemy has at Richmond and at Petersburg, must be regarded as uncertain and precarious. If we should be compelled to retire the persons who took the oath of allegiance would be subject to persecution by the insurgents and would very likely be stripped of their property. They certainly would if the oath were voluntarily given, and if it were extorted from them it would not be considered as binding. I think therefore it should not be exacted except from persons exercising official trusts. If private citizens misbehave themselves they should be punished by imprisonment and if suspected of disloyalty they should be compelled to give their parole of honor not to render aid or comfort or furnish information to the enemy during the continuance of the war. I consulted General Halleck on the subject when he was here a few days ago and he concurs with me fully. It is unnecessary to add that if a parole is given and violated the punishment shall be exemplary.

I have asked for a regiment of cavalry for you and I shall continue to urge the application until it is granted.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 231.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, July 31, 1862.

It having come to the knowledge of the commanding general that the Commercial Bulletin newspaper was conducted by Captain Seymour, a {p.316} paroled prisoner of war, such parole is hereby revoked and Captain Seymour is to be kept at Fort Jackson as a prisoner of war.

By order of Major-General Butler:

R. S. DAVIS, Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS TRANS-MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, Little Rock, Ark., July 31, 1862.

Maj. Gen. S. R. CURTIS, Commanding U. S. Forces, Helena, Ark.

GENERAL: I send to your lines under flag of truce a number of prisoners of whom a list* is inclosed. You will please indorse your receipt thereon and return the same.

I have directed that prisoners held by my officers at other points be sent in the same way to the nearest Federal commander. The same course will be adopted by me as to prisoners sent to my lines from your army.

It is a mistake to rank Capt. Joseph Fry as “colonel.” We have no officers of that title in our Navy. If any communication from me found with him when captured has that address it was the mistake of a clerk or telegraphic operator. It is not even correct to style him “captain,” except that the ordinary usages in similar cases justify it. His true rank is that of first lieutenant, C. S. Navy. He commanded the gunboat Maurepas and hence derived the title of captain without the rank. I propose the exchange of your Capt. Joseph Indest, Third Regiment Missouri Infantry, for Lieutenant Fry, which is in exact accordance with the scale of exchanges in such cases as I understand.

To effect this exchange Capt. Joseph Indest is paroled for twenty days from the time when he reaches your lines. If at the end of that time Lieutenant Fry is not released and granted safe conduct to me Captain Indest is to return himself as a prisoner.

1 beg again to call your attention to the excess of prisoners released by General Van Dorn, as he thinks, over the number released by you, and ask that you make up the deficit, if any.

Your attention is also called to the reports which come to me directly and from innumerable sources of great atrocities committed by your troops on their march to Helena and since, such as the burning of houses, robbing women and children of their clothing, bedding and last pound of meat and breadstuffs; taking medicines from planters and practicing physicians; in some cases offering personal violence to females even to the horrible extent of ravishing them.

These are crimes against humanity and civilization. If you doubt that they have been perpetrated I propose to you a joint commission to proceed under flag of truce to places which I will indicate and thereby get all the facts.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. C. HINDMAN, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF SOUTHERN MISSOURI, Helena, Ark., August 5, 1862.

Respectfully referred to department headquarters by the hands of Captain Indest. The flag-of-truce bearer has been sent home without {p.317} reply except a verbal message requesting General Hindman not to send so many flags of truce.

The list of prisoners has been receipted, copy kept here, and they returned to duty, not having been paroled.

By order of Major-General Curtis:

H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Omitted.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a report of Maj. F. F. Flint concerning the escape of thirty-six prisoners of war from the military prison at Alton, Ill. Nothing is said to show that all proper precautions were taken to discover the preparation of the means of escape, nor is it explained how so many men could pass so near the sentinel without detection.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

[First indorsement.]

AUGUST 9, 1862.

The escape of these prisoners was the result I think of carelessness. I advise that a court of inquiry be ordered. None but the President can order it.

H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

[Second indorsement.]

AUGUST 20, 1862.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

A court of inquiry is directed by order of the President.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, Alton, Ill., July 26, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN, Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I regret to report the escape of some thirty-six prisoners from this prison last night. They effected their escape through a hole or long trench dug under the wall on the west side and coming to the surface some six or eight feet from it and not far from the end of the sentinel’s post. The hole was first discovered by the sentinel at daylight. A thorough examination was made of the interior of the prison to find the opening on the inside. No place in the vicinity of the wall could be found. At length upon examining the interior of the buildings, sheds, &c., the opening was discovered on top of an old pile of brick masonry, some twenty inches or two feet beneath the roof of the shed, which has been used as a wash-house by the prisoners. There was no dirt or other indications of the digging visible on entering the shed, and the hole was found by climbing upon the masonry, where the dirt was packed away closely between the top and the roof of the shed.

{p.318}

The trench is some fifty or sixty feet in length and must be several feet below the surface to pass under the foundation of the wall. The work has probably been progressing for many weeks. Large knives were found at the outside hole which appear to have been used in digging through the clay and loam. Among the prisoners who have escaped are Colonel Magoffin* and his two sons, Colonel Murrell and Captain Sweeney, a one-armed man. I have sent out several parties to scour the country in the vicinity with the hope that some of them will be captured. Many have undoubtedly crossed the river at this place, as several skiffs are missing.

I have telegraphed the provost-marshal-general at Saint Louis and the commanding officer at Saint Charles, Mo.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. F. FLINT, Major Sixteenth Regiment, Commanding.

* See Vol. I, this Series, p. 292 et seq., for trial of Ebenezer Magoffin. Not found.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster. General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith requisitions* for clothing for prisoners of war at Camp Chase and at the military prison at Alton, Ill., and I request an order may be given immediately for the issue.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Not found.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Camp Douglas, Chicago, ill.

SIR: Pursuant to General Orders, No. 90, current series, from the War Department, all chaplains in your charge as prisoners of war will be immediately and unconditionally released.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Copies of above letters have been mailed this day, July 31, to the following commanding officers: Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill.; military prison, Alton; Camp Morton, Indianapolis; depot of prisoners of war, Sandusky, Ohio; Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio.)

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill.

COLONEL: A general exchange of prisoners of war is expected to take place immediately, and for this purpose you will prepare a roll of all prisoners of war in your charge which will include all those absent on parole. This roll must be made up within four days and if you cannot detail a sufficient number of competent clerks for this duty from {p.319} your command direct the quartermaster to hire as many as may be necessary. If the rolls can be prepared in less time let it be done, and retain the rolls till I call for them. The rolls heretofore called for by this office, together with the return for June, must be forwarded immediately.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

(Same to Col. C. W. B. Allison, commanding Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio; Col. D. G. Rose, commanding Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind.)

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

Maj. JOHN G. FONDA, Commanding Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill.

MAJOR: Your letters of the 21st and 24th instant are received. Retain in confinement the citizen charged with harboring escaped prisoners and furnish me with a statement of the particulars in the case with the names of the witnesses, and do the same with any others against whom similar charges may be preferred. In the case referred to in your letter of the 24th send a description of him to the commanding officer at Cairo and ascertain if anything is known of him there. In the meantime if he is unruly or gives any trouble put him in irons.

Hereafter the accounts of private physicians with your certificate attached must be referred to the Surgeon-General for payment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

Maj. F. F. FLINT, Sixteenth U. S. Infantry, Comdg. Military Prison, Alton, Ill.

MAJOR: Your letter of the 24th instant is received and I have to say in reply that the effects of deceased prisoners of war if not taken possession of by relatives present will be disposed of in any way you see proper for the benefit of the sick. If the Hon. A. G. Porter desires an interview with Mr. Brown with the hope of effecting his release on the ground that he is a Union man the interview may be granted; not otherwise.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., July 31, 1862.

Capt. H. M. LAZELLE, Eighth Infantry, U. S. Army, Columbus, Ohio.

CAPTAIN: Please say to Colonel Allison that I recall paroles granted to prisoners at Camp Chase giving them the privilege of remaining in or about Columbus, except in the two cases where their return to prison would probably lead to personal violence or in cases where from ill-health it is absolutely necessary that the paroles should be continued.

{p.320}

Please see that this order is carried out. Your report of the 25th instant is very satisfactory and the measures you have taken are approved. The estimate for clothing must be referred to the Quartermaster-General. It is expected that an exchange of prisoners of war will be made immediately and I have to-day given orders that rolls be made out immediately for this purpose. The roll should embrace the military alone and should include those absent on paroles. If there are any soldiers not belonging to a regular organization they should be put on a roll by themselves. Please see that this roll is made out without delay and that the rolls heretofore called for for this office are prepared at once. The duplicate for the War Department I telegraphed from Washington to be sent to the Adjutant-General.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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FORT PICKERING, Memphis, Tenn., July 31, 1862.

Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN.

SIR: On the 30th day of June, 1862, five men and myself of Company A, Forty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, were captured by Jackson’s cavalry and the men are still held. I have been paroled for sixty days to try to procure an exchange for myself and fellow-prisoners. There are thirty-seven enlisted men held with me at Grenada. General Villepigue proposes to release us if we will procure a like number of their men and deliver them up. I am anxious that the arrangement may be made, and if not compatible with your duty to furnish the men to make the exchange I should be happy to have you refer the matter to those who might act in the matter.

Respectfully, yours,

J. W. HEATH, Captain Company A, Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

[First indorsement.]

Captain Heath will have to call on Colonel Hoffman, superintendent of prisoners of war, Detroit, Mich., to effect this exchange.

U. S. GRANT, Major-General.

[Second indorsement.]

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, August 27, 1862.

Respectfully referred to General L. Thomas, commissioner for exchange of prisoners of war. The address of Captain Heath is Van Wert, Van Wert County, Ohio.

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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FORT DELAWARE, July 31, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: The conduct of Lieutenant Wood, of Fort Lafayette, toward me while a prisoner at that place has induced me to address you the following facts:

Upon my arrival at Fort Lafayette, June 11, 1862, 1 was required to deliver into the hands of Lieutenant Wood all articles of value in my {p.321} possession (for which he gave no receipt). Among other things I delivered to him my money, which consisted of $75 gold and 10 shillings silver (English), also a small Colt revolver which as a present I valued very highly. I was assured that all would be returned to me upon my departure. When I left Fort Lafayette I was given to understand that my money and pistol would be transferred to the officer in whose charge I should leave the fort. I am now informed by Captain Gibson, of this fort, that he received my money in bank notes, which in New York were at least 7 per cent, below the value of gold and which to me are almost valueless. The pistol he did not receive at all. I am satisfied that this unjust conduct was wholly unauthorized and therefore feel justified in bringing it to your notice. As I am soon to be exchanged I will not be able to receive any communication which you may see fit to make upon the subject. I therefore respectfully request that any such communication be addressed to Mr. B. W. Sanders, Fort Delaware, who will attend to it in my behalf.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

ALBERT O. STONE, Ex-Master Schooner Rebecca.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 1, 1862.

Major-General WOOL, Baltimore:

It is stated by General Dix that sixty prisoners were sent from your command yesterday to Fort Monroe “without any letter or explanation of any sort” and that twenty of them are political prisoners. You will please report to this Department why and by whom the prisoners were sent forward without explanation or information to General Dix and also by whose direction any political prisoners were sent to Fort Monroe. You will send a list of their names by mail and a statement of the time when and by whose order they were arrested and why they are held as prisoners. If sent back by General Dix you will keep them until further orders.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 1, 1862.

Adjutant-General THOMAS: (Care of Maj. Gen. John A. Dix, Fortress Monroe.)

Please bear in mind to secure the exchange of General Prentiss.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

(Same to care of General McClellan.)

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, August 1, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

A large number of rebel prisoners beg of me to protect them against an unconditional exchange. They are yet liable to military duty to the rebels and wish to avoid it. Is there any way to relieve them?

DAVID TOD, Governor.

{p.322}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE, Knoxville, August 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. MORGAN, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cumberland Gap.

GENERAL: It has been reported to me that by your orders peaceable citizens without your lines have been arrested on account of their political opinions and are now held as prisoners. Since assuming command in this department I have arrested but seven persons for political offenses, and of these six have been released. By my intercession many who before my taking charge of the department had been sent South and confined have been released. I have ever given to the citizens of East Tennessee protection to person and property regardless of their political tenets. Six hundred and sixty-four citizens escaping to Kentucky, most of them with arms in their hands and belonging to military organizations in open hostility to the Confederate States, have been taken prisoners. All of these have been released excepting seventy-six, who previously had voluntarily taken the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States Government and are now held as prisoners of war. This policy has been pursued with the earnest desire to allay the horrors of war and to conduct the campaign with as little severity as is consistent with the interests of my Government. It is therefore, general, with deep regret that I hear of your arresting peaceable citizens without your lines, thereby inaugurating a policy which must bring great additional suffering on the two contending people. I cannot but hope that this course has resulted from a misapprehension of my policy and a want of knowledge of my treatment of the Union element in East Tennessee. I have constantly had it in my power to arrest numbers of citizens disloyal to the Confederate States but have heretofore refrained from so doing for the reasons above stated, and hoping all the while that the clemency thus extended would be appreciated and responded to by the authorities of the United States. It is perhaps needless for me to state that if you arrest and confine citizens from without your lines whom the usages of war among civilized nations exempt from molestation I shall be compelled in retaliation to pursue a similar course toward the disloyal citizens of my department, and shall arrest and confine the prominent Union men in each community. I hope, however, that this explanation may correct any misapprehension on your part regarding my policy and thereby obviate the necessity of my pursuing a course which is to say the least a disagreeable duty. This communication will be delivered you by Mr. Kincaid, who hopes to be able to effect the release of his father now held as a prisoner. Inclosed is a list* of political prisoners arrested by me since assuming command of this department.

E. KIRBY SMITH, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE GULF, New Orleans, August 1, 1862.

J. C. Dinnies, associate editor of the Commercial Bulletin, for having written and published a seditious article, is hereby ordered to be sent to Fort Jackson until further orders.

By order of Major-General Butler:

[R. S. DAVIS,] Captain and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.323}

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, August 1, 1862.

Hon. Secretary STANTON.

DEAR SIR: Please allow me to make a statement to you of my capture as a prisoner and the conditions upon which I was released for the time being. On the 25th of June last I obtained leave of absence of General Grant for twenty days to go home and visit my family. My regiment was quartered twenty-eight miles from Memphis on the Charleston and Memphis Railroad. I went on the train as a passenger, the first train that started from Memphis to Corinth. When about sixteen miles from Memphis the rails had been removed from the track, throwing the locomotive down the bank, no person being hurt seriously. In about half an hour after the accident, or perhaps not so long, we were attacked by Colonel Jackson with 600 cavalry, surrounded and taken prisoners, about forty in all. At the time of the attack we had but six muskets, which were fired twice at them.

I was taken about forty miles south near a town called Holly Springs. While there Colonel Jackson told me he had a relative, Col. Alexander J. Brown, of a Tennessee regiment, that was taken prisoner by our army at Island No. 10, that he thought was at Johnson’s Island or Boston, and that if I would procure the exchange for Colonel Brown he would let me go and send me back. I was to have this done if possible in sixty days from the 13th of June. On my return to Memphis I reported the facts to Major-General Grant. He immediately wrote to the proper authorities on the subject of exchange. I have written him twice on the subject, but owing to attacks or firing into boats on the river I presume he has not received my letters. I thought the most prudent and most expeditious way was to write from here, as there seems to be a general order to report at Columbus all that are not on duty.

I was at the surrender of Donelson and also at the battle of Pittsburg Landing. My regiment is now at Helena, Ark., Third Brigade and Third Division, General Wallace commanding. I have never been from my regiment for one day since we left Ohio until I was taken prisoner. I am very anxious to be with them before they proceed to Little Rock, Ark. I hope you will give me the necessary order for the exchange, for under my promise I will be compelled to surrender myself and be shut up in some Southern prison, there to lie and rot. I have been in the service about eight months. I have written to E. Jordan, esq., Solicitor of the Treasury, who is from our town and is acquainted with me. He will call on you. I will remain here until I hear from you.

Very respectfully,

P. KINNEY, Colonel, Comdg. Fifty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a report* of Colonel Tucker, commanding Camp Douglas, in relation to the escape of prisoners from that camp.

The alterations in the fence which I ordered while waiting for authority from Washington will go far toward preventing such frequent {p.324} escapes, but while there are so many sympathizers outside to influence and bribe sentinels escapes will continue to be made. The charges which I sent in May 20 against Lieutenant Higgins, Twenty-third Illinois Regiment, for aiding or attempting to aid prisoners to escape have not been-noticed, and the exemption from punishment in his case may have induced others to have had less fear of following his example than they would otherwise have felt.

I inclose also the report** from Captain Freedley, my assistant, in relation to the state of things at Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill., to which I beg attention as showing the difficulty of preparing rolls of the prisoners there confined. Until recently Col. P. Morrison, of the Regular Army, my senior, was in command there. No rolls were sent with the prisoners to the camp and it appears that in giving an account of themselves they would at one time say one thing and at another they would contradict it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

* Omitted here; see Tucker to Hoffman, July 24, p. 278.

** Reference is to report of Freedley to Hoffman, p. 216.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

General M. C. MEIGS, Washington, D. C.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 17th ultimo. From the last paragraph I judge that erroneous impressions are entertained as to what labor is required of prisoners of war and what they are willing to do. I beg leave to call attention to my letters of the 10th ultimo to which yours is a reply in which I clearly state that the work is to be done by the prisoners, and I believe that they have not at any time refused to work even in cases of doubtful propriety, such as putting up fences that we may hold them with greater security.

My great desire has been to be governed by the strictest economy in all cases, and no work will be hired that can properly be done by the prisoners themselves.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

Col. J. H. TUCKER, Commanding Camp Douglas, Chicago.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 21st is received. The order for the removal of prisoners to Sandusky was necessary to Captain Potter as part of his vouchers and it was therefore proper to furnish him a copy. It is only under such circumstances that it is proper for him to ask for copies of orders or letters. An order from you based on my order does away with the necessity of furnishing him a copy of my order. He should give his reasons for asking for a copy.

Four physicians with four attendants should be ample to attend to 275 sick, and I could not consent to increase the number even if there {p.325} was not a prospect of an immediate exchange of prisoners. The presence of scurvy among men where there is an abundance of vegetables and antiscorbutics is a novel state of things to me, and I fear grows out of a want of attention somewhere, but as I cannot speak advisedly on the subject I will only say that I wish you to give your personal attention to the matter.

Doctor McVickar speaks of the unwholesome condition of the police of the camp and you approved his report. There is no excuse for this as I have given positive and specific orders in relation to this matter. All the necessary means have been provided and if the camp is not in a good state of police it must be owing to great neglect. I will not go into details again but simply say that the camp must be put in a thorough state of police every day by the work of the prisoners themselves. Of course the quarters must be well aired and policed by removing all bedding and clothing from them once a week and there must be a free use of lime everywhere to neutralize all impurities. There can be no excuse for non-compliance with this order.

Under the order of General Halleck you will release J. D. Drake and W. F. Hail, prisoners of war, on their taking the oath of allegiance. On the recommendation of Surgeon McVickar you will parole Thomas Coulter, Company D, Forty-ninth Tennessee, for thirty days to the city of Chicago, he fixing a place at which he may be found at any time he may be wanted.

Hereafter, including last month’s, the accounts of private physicians approved by you will be referred to the Surgeon-General at Washington for payment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

Col. C. W. B. ALLISON, Commanding Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio:

Please say to A. G. Davis and all prisoners who have similar applications to make that they will neither be brought to trial nor will paroles be granted to them that they may return home to establish their innocence. Whatever can be said in their favor to secure their release must be prepared for them by their friends and forwarded through you to me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

Col. D. G. ROSE, Commanding Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind.

COLONEL: There are a number of prisoners of war confined in the jail of Indianapolis at a large expense to the Government. This should not be and you will immediately take back to the camp all so confined except in cases where it is absolutely necessary from peculiar circumstances that they should remain in the jail and you will immediately {p.326} report such cases to me. Subscriptions to newspapers is not a proper charge against the prisoners’ fund under the regulations and bills contracted for such purposes must be paid by some other means. The responsibility for improper expenditures will rest with you. The accounts of private physicians will hereafter, including July, approved by you, be referred to the Surgeon-General of the Army for payment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, Mich., August 1, 1862.

Maj. J. DARR, Jr., Provost-Marshal, Wheeling, Va.

MAJOR: Your letters of the 21st and 24th have been received. It is not contemplated at present to erect additional barracks for prisoners of war at Wheeling. It will give me pleasure to unite with Governor Peirpoint in the endeavor to have you retained at Wheeling as provost-marshal.

In referring petitions of prisoners to this office please let it clearly appear whether they are civil or military prisoners. It will not be convenient to have you furnished with the disposition made of prisoners sent to Camp Chase or elsewhere from your depot. Those who wish information must write to the camp to which prisoners are sent.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS, Detroit, August 1, 1862.

Capt. J. A. POTTER, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Chicago, Ill.

CAPTAIN: On reflection I think it was scarcely proper for me to give you an order in relation to the removal of prisoners of war from Prairie du Chien to Madison. It was done under instructions from some other authority without my knowledge and it is not therefore right that I should give one to cover it. You received some orders in relation to the movement, and that, whatever it was, will complete your vouchers. Even your own certificate will be sufficient, as the necessity of the case is perfectly approved. I must request, then, you will not use my order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 1, 1862.

Lieut. A. ARNOLD, Provost-Marshal, Ironton, Mo.

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of July 31 and to say in reply thereto: Prisoners taken in arms against the United States who are regularly in the service of the so-called Confederates are prisoners of war subject to exchange.

{p.327}

Those in arms not regularly in the said service are guerrillas to be held for trial by a military commission. You will forward all prisoners of the first class hereto, with statement of company, regiment, State, rank, when and where taken. The last class will be sent hereto with charges and specifications of the various acts and the same statement as that which should accompany the first class.

...

I am, lieutenant, very respectfully,

[H. L. MCCONNEL,] Assistant Provost-Marshal-General.

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FORT DELAWARE, August 1, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: I have been impelled by the conduct of Lieutenant Wood at Fort Lafayette to address the following letter to Capt. A. A. Gibson under date 30th ultimo:

SIR: I do not desire to trouble you about our vexed pecuniary affairs further than my sense of right and justice impels me. Will you please state below that you received no gold from Lieutenant Wood, of Fort Lafayette, for me?

Yours, respectfully,

B. W. SANDERS.

To this note the captain sent the following answer:

FORT DELAWARE, July 30, 1862.

The account rendered for money in trust for Mr. B. W. Sanders makes no specification of its kind except that it was “good money,” nor have I gold sufficient to pay it in coin.

A. A. GIBSON, Captain, Second Artillery.

In making the above statement I desire to call your attention to the fact that when I was imprisoned in Fort Lafayette I delivered up my portemonnaie upon the desire of Lieutenant Wood. He asked me how much money it contained. I replied, $77; $70 in gold, $5 in a Pennsylvania bank note and the rest in change. He did not open the purse before me, but placed that, with my watch, upon the table and ordered the sergeant to conduct us to our quarters. I asked him for a receipt. He replied that it was not necessary to give one. This conversation occurred in the presence of the lieutenant who carried us over from Fort Hamilton on the 10th or 11th of July. The next day all the prisoners were transferred to this post together with a list of their deposits. I was mentioned as having $66.94 in “good money,” as stated by Captain Gibson. On delivering up our funds to-day Captain Gibson paid me off in bank bills, mostly on the city of Delaware. I desire to know by what authority Lieutenant Wood substituted paper money in lieu of gold, particularly when it was worth in New York 17 to 18 per cent. and from 75 to 100 per cent. in the South, and I feel sure he has acted in violation of his duties. He had no right to touch my money as I gave no order on him whilst under his charge, yet the amount falls short by $10, and the residue is returned in “good money.” I had several strange coins that I had collected in Europe and the West Indies and though not of much value yet greatly prized by me. I can prove that all of my money was in gold by the officers on board the Princeton, and particularly the steward or by Acting Master Rogers, of the Bienville, who was prize officer on board the Morning Star.

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Mine is not an individual case as there are others in the same predicament. I trust that you will take this affair under consideration and make Lieutenant Wood give an account of dealings with me.

Yours, respectfully,

B. W. SANDERS.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., August 2, 1862.

His Excellency ANDREW JOHNSON, Governor of Tennessee, Nashville:

The following dispatch just received from the custodian of the prisoners at Indianapolis, viz:

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

There are at Camp Morton from 1,000 to 1,200 prisoners who want to take the oath of allegiance and protest against being exchanged. What rule will be adopted in their case? They are principally Tennesseeans.

JAS. A. EKIN, Assistant Quartermaster.

In the temporary absence of the Secretary of War I take the liberty of inquiring what course you advise in regard to these prisoners.

P. H. WATSON, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., August 2, 1862.

Governor TOD, Columbus, Ohio:

None of the prisoners who are willing to take the oath of allegiance and who will evidently abide by it in good faith will be exchanged.

By order of the Secretary of War:

C. P. WOLCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS C. S. ARMY, Near Richmond, Va., August 2, 1862.

GENERAL COMMANDING U. S. ARMY, Washington.

GENERAL: On the 29th of June last I was instructed by the Secretary of War to inquire* of Major-General McClellan as to the truth of alleged murders committed on our citizens by officers of the U. S. Army. The cases of William B. Mumford, reported to have been murdered at New Orleans by order of Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler, and Col. John L. Owen, reported to have been murdered in Missouri by order of Major-General Pope, were those referred to. I have the honor to be informed by Major-General McClellan that he had referred these inquiries to his Government for a reply. No answer has as yet been received. The President of the Confederate States has since been credibly informed that numerous other officers of the Army of the United States within the Confederacy have been guilty of felonies and capital offenses which are punishable by all laws human and divine.

I am directed by him to bring to your notice a few of these best authenticated. Newspapers received from the United States announce as a fact that Major-General Hunter has armed slaves for the murder {p.329} of their masters, and has thus done all in his power to inaugurate a servile war, which is worse than that of the savage, inasmuch as it superadds other horrors to the indiscriminate slaughter of all ages, sexes and conditions, Brigadier-General Phelps is reported to have initiated at New Orleans the example set by Major-General Hunter on the coast of South Carolina. Brig. Gen. G. N. Fitch** is stated in the same journals to have murdered in cold blood two peaceful citizens because one of his men while invading our country was killed by some unknown person while defending his home.

I am instructed by the President of the Confederate States to repeat the inquiry relative to the cases of Mumford and Owen and to ask whether the statements in relation to the action of Generals Hunter, Phelps and Fitch are admitted to be true, and whether the conduct of these generals is sanctioned by their Government. I am further directed by His Excellency the President to give notice that in the event of not receiving a reply to these inquiries within fifteen days from the delivery of this letter that it will be assumed that the alleged facts are true and are sanctioned by the Government of the United States. In such event on that Government will rest the responsibility for retaliatory measures which shall be adopted to put an end to the merciless atrocities which now characterize the war waged against the Confederate States.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* See p. 134.

** See Fitch to Halleck, August 22, p. 419.

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HEADQUARTERS C. S. ARMY, Near Richmond, Va., August 2, 1862.

GENERAL COMMANDING U. S. ARMY, Washington.

GENERAL: In obedience to the order of His Excellency the President of the Confederate States I have the honor to make to you the following communication: On the 22d of July last a cartel for a general exchange of prisoners of war was signed by Maj. Gen. John A. Dix on behalf of the United States and by Maj. Gen. D. H. Hill on the part of this Government. By the terms of that cartel it is stipulated that all prisoners of war hereafter taken shall be discharged on parole until exchanged.

Scarcely had the cartel been signed when the military authorities of the United States commenced a practice changing the character of the war from such as becomes civilized nations into a campaign of indiscriminate robbery and murder. A general order issued by the Secretary of War of the United States in the city of Washington on the very day that the cartel was signed in Virginia directs the military commanders of the United States to take the property of our people for the convenience and use of the Army without compensation. A general order issued by Major-General Pope on the 23d of July last, the day after the date of the cartel, directs the murder of our peaceful citizens as spies if found quietly tilling their farms in his rear, even outside of his lines. And one of his brigadier-generals, Steinwehr, has seized innocent and peaceful inhabitants to be held as hostages to the end that they may be murdered in cold blood if any of his soldiers are killed by some unknown persons whom he designated as

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Some of the military authorities seem to suppose that their end will be better attained by a savage war in which no quarter is to be given, and no age or sex to be spared, than by such hostilities as are alone recognized to be lawful in modern times. We find ourselves driven by our enemies by steady progress toward a practice which we abhor and which we are vainly struggling to avoid.

Under these circumstances this Government has issued the accompanying general order* which I am directed by the President to transmit to you recognizing Major-General Pope and his commissioned officers to be in the position which they have chosen for themselves, that of robbers and murderers, and not that of public enemies entitled if captured to be treated as prisoners of war.

The President also instructs me to inform you that we renounce our right of retaliation on the innocent and will continue to treat the private enlisted soldier of General Pope’s army as prisoners of war, but if after notice to your Government that we confine repressive measures to the punishment of commissioned officers who are willing participants in these crimes the savage practices threatened in the orders alluded to be persisted in, we shall reluctantly be forced to the last resort of accepting the war on the terms chosen by our enemies until the voice of an outraged humanity shall compel a respect for the recognized usages of war.

While the President considers that the fact referred to would justify a refusal on our part to execute the cartel by which we have agreed to liberate an excess of prisoners of war in our hands, a sacred regard for plighted faith which shrinks from the semblance of breaking a promise precludes a resort to such an extremity. Nor is it his desire to extend to any other forces of the United States the punishment merited by General Pope and such commissioned officers as choose to participate in the execution of his infamous order.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Omitted here; see p. 836.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH ARMY CORPS, Baltimore, Md., August 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

The accommodations at Fort McHenry are altogether too limited for the number of political prisoners and prisoners of war now confined there. I request that fifteen of them be ordered to be removed to Fort Lafayette.

[JOHN E. WOOL,] Major-General.

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FORT MONROE, August 2, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

General Thomas has arrived with 2,200 prisoners of war from Fort Delaware. Eight hundred more are expected to-night. He has received your dispatch