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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 50, P. I, Ch. LXII–Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER LXII.
OPERATIONS ON THE PACIFIC COAST.*
JANUARY 1, 1861-JUNE 30, 1865.
PART I.
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CORRESPONDENCE.**

* The operations reported in this volume were carried on in that portion of the territory of the United States lying west of the Rocky Mountains, including so much of the Territory of Utah as lay west of the one hundred and seventeenth meridian of west longitude and so much of the Territory of New Mexico as lay west of the one hundred and tenth meridian of west longitude. This area composed the Departments of California and Oregon. The Department of California was created by General Orders, No. 10, War Department, Adjutant-Generals Office, of September 13, 1858, and included the territory west of the Rocky Mountains south of Oregon, except so much of Utah as lay east of the one hundred and seventeenth meridian of west longitude, and of New Mexico as lay east of the one hundred and tenth meridian of west longitude. It also included the Rogue River and Umpqua Districts in Southwestern Oregon. It was commanded on January 1, 1861, by Lieut. Col. Benjamin L. Beall, First U. S. Dragoons, who had assumed command, by seniority of rank, on the death of Bvt. Brig. Gen. Newman S. Clarke, colonel Sixth U. S. Infantry, which occurred on October 17, 1860. It was merged into the Department of the Pacific on January 15, 1861. The Department of Oregon was created by General Orders, No. 10, War Department, Adjutant-Generals Office, September 13, 1858, and was composed of the Territories of Washington and Oregon, except the Rogue River and Umpqua Districts. It was commanded on December 31, 1860, by Col. George Wright, Ninth U. S. Infantry, under assignment dated June 8, 1860. It was merged into the Department of the Pacific on January 15, 1861.

{p.428}

** Correspondence, etc., July 1, 1862-June 30, 1865, see Part II.

Abstract from returns of the Departments of California and Oregon, commanded respectively by Lieut. Col. Benjamin L. Beall and Col. George Wright, for the month of December, 1860.

Command.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
Officers.Men.present.and absent.
Department of California721,0501,5371,711
Department of Oregon711,1951,7421,937
Total1432,2453,2793,648

Organization of troops in the Department of California, commanded by Lieut. Col. Benjamin L. Beall, First U. S. Dragoons, December 31, 1860.

  • FORT CROOK, CAL.
    Capt. JOHN ADAMS.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons, Company F.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company E.
  • FORT UMPQUA, OREG.
    Lieut. LORENZO LORAIN.
    • 3d U. S. Artillery, Company L.
  • FORT TER-WAW, CAL.
    Lieut. GEORGE CROOK.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company D.
  • FORT HUMBOLDT, CAL.
    Capt. CHARLES S. LOVELL.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company B.
{p.429}
  • FORT GASTON, CAL.
    Capt. EDMUND UNDERWOOD.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company B.
  • FORT BRAGG, CAL.
    Lieut. EDWARD DILLON.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company D.
  • BENICIA BARRACKS, CAL.
    Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Companies G and K.
  • BENICIA ARSENAL, CAL.
    Lieut. JULIAN MCALLISTER.
    • Detachment of Ordnance.
  • PRESIDIO OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
    Lieut. Col. CHARLES S. MERCHANT.
    • 3d U. S. Artillery, Company I.
  • ALCATRAZ ISLAND, CAL.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons (Detachment of Recruits), Lieut. Eugene M. Baker.
    • 3d U. S. Artillery, Company H, Capt. Joseph Stewart.
  • FORT TEJON, CAL.
    Maj GEORGE A. H. BLAKE.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons, Companies B and K.*
  • NEW SAN DIEGO, CAL.
    Bvt. Maj. LEWIS A. ARMISTEAD.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company F.
  • FORT YUMA, CAL.
    Maj. ALBEMARLE CADY.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company E
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company C.
  • FORT MOJAVE, N. MEX.
    Capt. GRANVILLE O. HALLER.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company I.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Company I.
  • FORT CHURCHILL, NEV. TER.
    Capt. THOMAS HENDRICKSON.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons, Company A.
    • 6th U. S. Infantry, Companies A and H.

* Companies D and G at Fort Breckinridge, N. Mex

Organization of troops in the Department of Oregon, commanded by Col. George Wright, Ninth U. S. Infantry, December 31, 1860.

  • FORT VANCOUVER, WASH. TER.
    Maj. WILLIAM S. KETCHUM.
    • 3d U. S. Artillery, Companies A, B, C, D,
      G, and M.
  • VANCOUVER DEPOT, WASH. TER.
    Lieut. WILLIAM T. WELCKER.
    • Detachment of Ordnance, U. S. Army.
  • FORT COLVILLE, WASH. TER.
    Bvt. Maj. PINKNEY LUGENBEEL.
    • 9th U. S. Infantry, Companies A, C, I and K.
  • CAMP PICKETT, SAN JUAN ISLAND, WASH. TER.
    Capt. GEORGE E. PICKETT.
    • 9th U. S. Infantry. Company D,
  • FORT STEILACOOM, WASH. TER.
    Lieut. Col. SILAS CASEY.
    • 9th U. S. Infantry, Companies F and H.
  • FORT WALLA WALLA, WASH. TER.
    Maj. ENOCH STEEN.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons, Companies C, E, and I.
    • 9th U. S. Infantry, Companies B and E.
  • FORT DALLES, OREG.
    Capt. JOSEPH H. WHITTLESEY.
    • 1st U. S. Dragoons, Company H.
    • 9th U. S. Infantry, Company G.
  • FORT YAMHILL, OREG.
    Capt. DAVID A. RUSSELL.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company K
  • FORT HOSKINS, OREG.
    Capt. CHRISTOPHER C. AUGUR.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Companies F and G.
  • FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER.
    Capt. HENRY D. WALLEN.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company H.
  • CAMP CHEHALIS, WASH. TER.
    Capt. MAURICE MALONEY.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company A.
  • FORT TOWNSEND, WASH. TER.
    Capt. LEWIS C. HUNT.
    • 4th U. S. Infantry, Company C.
{p.430}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., January 3, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN WHITEAKER, Governor of Oregon, Salem, Oreg.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of December 28, with respect to Mr. Thompson’s proposed expedition into the Snake country and the rescue of the four children said to be in the hands of the Snakes. The subject of the investigation of the truth of the report with regard to these children and of their rescue, if they be in captivity, had from the first moment of the receipt of the intelligence attracted my warmest interest. Messengers dispatched by Major Steen, commanding the troops at Fort Walla Walla, and Mr. Cain, the Indian agent in that neighborhood, have been sent into the Snake country to ascertain if there be any children captives there. These messengers being Nez Percé Indians, known to the Snakes, will not excite their suspicion, and being a small party and acquainted with the country, and not likely to encounter the hostility of the Snakes, they will probably be able to penetrate to the remote locations of the Snakes at this time, notwithstanding the rigor of the season. If the children be alive, they are, if possible, to obtain them by negotiation forthwith. At all events, they are to return and report the information acquired without delay. I have received no report of the return of this party, but hope to hear in a few days. Major Steen, an officer of high reputation for his knowledge of Indians and Indian warfare, and who has spent many years on the frontier and in campaigns in the Indian country, may be safely relied upon to achieve all that can be accomplished at this time. Besides the confidence I have felt in this, on the 18th of December I sent instructions to Major Steen to persevere in the search for the children, and to use all the means in his power for their rescue. I shall not fail to take any other steps that may seem necessary to secure this end. That the troops at Fort Walla Walla are to be relied on for any service that duty and sympathy for suffering call for is sufficiently evinced by their late successful expedition immediately after the receipt of the news of the massacre, the result of which was the rescue from death of twelve human beings. The necessity of bringing these helpless sufferers as soon as possible into the settlements prevented Captain Dent from prosecuting at the time further search and punishing the Snakes as far as practicable, although when he started on his return to Walla Walla he was and the snows. Au energetic campaign against the Snakes, to be commenced early and continued late, has been, as you have been informed, determined upon. The matter has been made the subject of correspondence with the authorities at the East. It is hoped that the necessary appropriations for the object and for the post at Boisé will be made early. It is not seen that any useful result can be obtained by the proposed expedition of Mr. Thompson with twenty-five men. You may rest assured that whatever can be done for the rescue of the children will be done by Major Steen. What he proves himself unable to achieve I doubt if others will be better able to accomplish as the circumstances now are.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.431}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, January 5, 1861.

I. Bvt. Maj. D. C. Buell, assistant adjutant-general, will proceed to San Francisco, Cal., and relieve Maj. W. W. Mackall, of the same department of the staff at the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, when the latter will repair to this place.

...

By command of Lieutenant-General Scott:

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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FORT WALLA WALLA, WASH. TER., January 5, 1861.

General JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON, Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I take the liberty and feel it my duty to call your attention to the Fort Benton wagon road, as I believe from experience in the service, and crossing the plains frequently for the last thirty years, that the cost of sending recruits or horses to this coast by that route will be ten times as much as by the route from Fort Leavenworth via Forts Kearny, Laramie, Hall, and Boisé to this post; for by the boat to Benton each soldier will cost $100 and each wagon the same; then to get mules or oxen for the wagons would be double the cost that it would be at Leavenworth. Purchase your horses, wagons, and oxen or mules to transport your supplies at Leavenworth, and if the transportation is not heeded here on its arrival, it can be sold at public auction for its full value in the States. By this means each soldier will hardly cost $10, whereas by the Fort Benton route each one would cost $300 by his arrival here. One more suggestion. Could not the $100,000 already appropriated, and not yet expended, be transferred to the old road I speak of? It is much the shortest and best route, and emigrants come through every season, arriving here by the end of September, their animals in very good condition. A post is to be established at Boisé in the spring, and there will always be troops at Fort Hall to protect emigration, and all that is needed are ferries at these posts, and very little work on the road. There will then be grass, water, and all that is requisite for a military or emigrant road. I do believe that if the $100,000 is expended and the Benton road finished, that not ten emigrants will travel it for twenty years to come. But suppose you make the road from Saint Paul to Benton; then you must establish a line of posts through the Sioux and Blackfoot country requiring at least 1,500 soldiers at a cost of half a million annually, and there would be a war at a cost of $300,000,000 or $400,000,000 more. In a conversation with Major Blake, of the Army, who came by the Benton route with 300 recruits last summer, he spoke favorably of the route, and said he would apply to bring over horses from Saint Paul via Benton to this department. Now, I am satisfied that the cost by that route will be ten times as much as by the route from Leavenworth, via Laramie, Hall, and Boisé, and in addition the major’s route is much the longest, and in the months of May and June, from Saint Paul west, say 1,000 miles, you have much wet and marshy prairie, which I consider impassable. Starting in July, then, you could not come through {p.432} the same season, and wintering in the mountains northeast of us would cause much expense, the loss of many animals and much suffering among the men.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. STEEN Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., January 8, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of California, San Francisco:

MAJOR: In reply to your letter of yesterday I have the honor to state, for the information of the colonel commanding, that I have on hand for disbursement on subsistence account $11,631.04. The Commissary-General has regularly and promptly answered my requisitions upon him for funds, but these requisitions have not yet been filled by the Treasury Department. The following posts in the Department of California are supplied with subsistence as follows: Forts Yuma, Churchill, Crook, Ter-Waw, Gaston, and detachment at Honey Lake to about July 1,1861; Fort Mojave to about May 1, 1861; Fort Umpqua to about March 31, 1861; Forts Tejon, Bragg, and Benicia Barracks to about March 1, 1861; New San Diego, Forts Humboldt and Alcatraz, and Presidio to about February 1, 1861. The amount of subsistence stores on hand in this city, with the exception of pork, is very small. All requisitions upon me for the department of California have been filled.

Very respectfully, major, your obedient servant,

M. D. L. SIMPSON, Captain and Commissary of Subsistence.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., January 11, 1861.

Capt. M. MALONEY, Fourth Infty., Comdg. Camp Chehalis, Gray’s Harbor, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Your report of the 21st ultimo has been received. The colonel commanding finds it quite satisfactory. The petition is subscribed thus: “J. L. McKee and seventy-two others.” The statement of Matthew McGee, Quineault County, who was ordered to leave the Quineault country by the Indians, taken captive, &c.; Absalom Armstrong, north side of Gray’s Harbor, whose house had been three times broken open, &c.; Mr. J. L. Payn, north side of Gray’s Harbor, who has lost his property by theft, threatened by Indians, &c.; also of David Helser. David Helser and G. A. Wood accompany the petition. A certificate as to the respectable character of the last-mentioned affiants is signed thus: “Lyman Shaffer and thirty-six others.” The statements all speak of the general hostility of the Indians in your region. Your letter of the 26th has also been received. Your request that your post may be called Fort Chehalis and be constituted a double-ration post has been forwarded to the War Department approved. Colonel Wright had thought of discontinuing the post at Chehalis in the spring, but in view of the fears of the settlers he judged it expedient that a post be maintained there for some time yet, and has so recommended. The force, however, will not be increased.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. A. HARDIE, Captain, Third Artillery, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.433}

ORDERS, No. 1.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, January 15, 1861.

The arrival of Bvt. Brig. Gen. Albert S. Johnston completes the arrangements contemplated in General Orders, No. 10, of November 22, 1860, headquarters of the Army. The Departments of California and Oregon are merged into one department. The general assumes command of the Department of the Pacific.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, January 15, 1861.

Col. G. WRIGHT, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: By direction of Brigadier-General Johnston I transmit the order* by which he assumes command of the Department of the Pacific, and requests you to furnish him with a report of the condition and station of the troops in the District of Oregon and the state of the Indian relations and of all movements in contemplation; also the state of the funds in the hands of disbursing officers.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See next, ante.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, January 17, 1861.

Col. S. COOPER, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report my arrival at this place on the 14th instant, and that, in accordance with the orders of the General-in-Chief, I assumed command of the department on the 15th. I beg leave to ask the attention of the General-in-Chief to the fact that the different staff departments of this department are without funds. The quartermaster’s department is destitute, and the other departments nearly so, having on hand only very small amounts of money. It is indispensable to the public interest that they should be promptly furnished with funds. If it be true that there is a large amount of public money in the mint at this place, which I have heard, I would respectfully suggest that a sufficient portion of it to meet the wants of the Government for the military service be placed to the credit of the disbursing officers of the department. The requisitions of the chiefs of the staff departments not having been filled-it is to be presumed from a scarcity in the sub-treasuries of the East-it is therefore that I take the liberty to suggest that there probably exists the ability to comply with then at this place.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

{p.434}

STEAMER PACIFIC, Baker’s Bay, Wash. Ter., January 18, 1861.

Capt. JAMES A. HARDIE, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Headquarters Department of Oregon:

SIR: I would respectfully state that as the field operations of the military road from Fort Walla Walla to Fort Benton will be resumed by the 1st of April that an escort of not less than eighty men and two officers be granted me, under the instructions from the War Department, to protect my work and its operations, and that they may be provided with subsistence and clothing for fifteen months. I desire to leave Walla Walla by the 1st of April.

I am, sir, truly and respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN MULLAN, First Lieut., Second Artillery, in Charge of Mil. Road Expedition.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, January 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. A. S. JOHNSTON, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

GENERAL: The General-in-Chief desires that you will order down from Fort Vancouver two companies of artillery to the posts near San Francisco, and that the fort at the entrance of the harbor be occupied by one company with as little delay as practicable.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY’S SHIP TOPAZE, Esquimault, January 24, 1861.

Col. G. WRIGHT, Headquarters Department of Oregon, Fort Vancouver:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt on the 22d instant of your letter of the 20th of December, with in closures, on the subject of the military reserves on San Juan Island. I perfectly concur with you that an arrangement respecting the extent of each reserve would be advisable, and also that as little land should be closed to settlers as may be compatible with the maintenance of discipline and the other requirements of each camp. I therefore beg to propose that the two officers in command of the detachments of U. S. troops and of Her Majesty’s be instructed to meet, and keeping in mind the foregoing considerations, should conjointly settle and arrange the extent of the respective reserves, a plan of which, when agreed upon, should be exchanged. With regard to that paragraph of your letter wherein you propose “that whatever amount of land Captain Pickett shall now or hereafter include within his special military jurisdiction, Captain Bazalgette shall be at liberty to include an equal amount within his camp limits, and no more.” I cannot refrain from observing that such an arrangement would seem to be at variance with the terms of the joint occupancy, which provide for perfect equality of rights in all respects, not that the officer commanding the troops of Her Majesty is to be guided in every particular by the actions of the officer in command of the troops of the United States. It is with this view that I propose a {p.435} mutual agreement between these two officers, and I beg to assure you that whatever they may conjointly agree upon in this matter I shall be prepared to confirm.

I must, sir, in conclusion, take this opportunity to express what pleasure I have derived from the very cordial and friendly feeling which had existed between the troops of the two Governments during the time of the joint occupation, and I have on all occasions received from Captain Bazalgette the assurance of having always experienced the utmost courtesy and friendliness on the part of Captain Pickett.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN D. S. SPENCER, Captain and Senior Officer.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Steilacoom, Wash. Ter., January 25, 1861.

Capt. JAMES A. HARDIE, 3d Arty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: The copies of communications from Acting Governor McGill and others relating to Indian affairs on the Sound have been received. I have the honor to report as follows: Early in December last a man by the name of Ferguson, living near the mouth of the Skokomish, reported to me that a white man had been killed by an Indian. He informed me that the Indian agent, Mr. Simmons, was then at the reservation, near the mouth of that river. I told him that it was the duty of the agent to make an official report to me of an occurrence that would require military aid, but that I would attend to it. The Massachusetts being about to proceed to San Juan Island with Lieutenant Casey, of the engineers, and a surveying party, I directed that she should go by the way of the Skokomish River. I directed Lieutenant Casey to confer with the agent and investigate the matter so far as he was able. It appears that a white man by the name of Carter living near the mouth of the Skokomish was killed by an Indian by the name of Paemps, with the assistance of one of his sons, who was known by the name of Charley. The agent informed Lieutenant Casey that he did not think that any of the other Indians had anything to do with it, and that 100 or more of them were hunting up the murderers, and furthermore that he thought it not best for the troops to interfere, as it would tend to frighten the Indians. Paemps and his son have frequently been at this post, and I know them; he is half Klickitat and half Skokomish, the latter one of the tribes on the Sound. He has been a priest and preacher among the Indians for some time, but of late has taken to drink and lost much of his influence among them. It is the general opinion that his desire not to be considered a kultus fellow has induced him to commit this murder. I endeavor to impress upon the Indians with whom I come in contact the necessity of taking the murderers, and I am confident they will do so if possible. I inclose the copy of a communication which I received from Mr. Simmons, late agent. I received not long ago a petition signed by twenty-four citizens of White River, setting forth that they feared an outbreak of the Indians. I dispatched Lieutenant Alexander, of the engineers, with two men to visit the settlements on the Puyallup and White River, and to inquire into the foundation of the report. Lieutenant Alexander reported that so far as he could learn there was no good cause for the alarm, and that the settlers appeared to be satisfied; also that most of {p.436} their fears were not well founded. A report taken by the mail rider from Steilacoom to Seattle was the principal cause of the alarm. I have information from the Indian agents at Nisqually, Bellingham Bay, and Puyallup, and the agent for Muckleshoot, which is a short distance above the White River settlement, called upon me in person. Their united testimony is that there is no cause to fear an outbreak among the Indians. I concur in that opinion. These Indian rumors on the Sound have not escaped my attention, and had I considered them of sufficient importance to trouble the headquarters of the department it would have been reported before.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SILAS CASEY, Lieutenant-Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding Post.

P. S.-The interest of the service, in my opinion, requires that the two companies at this post should be filled up. I have no troops to spare for any detached service, should they be required, as for several months past there have been hardly sufficient men here to perform properly the duties of the post.

S. C.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF-OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., January 26, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco:

SIR: Your letter of the 15th instant, inclosing Orders, No. 1, from the headquarters Department of the Pacific, reached me on the 23d instant. The order has been distributed within the district. For a view of the condition of the troops, the state of the Indian relations, and of the movements in contemplation in the late Department of Oregon, I request that reference may be had to my letters and reports to Army headquarters, copied in the department letter book from page 132 forward. The letter and order books are sent by express by the steamer which conveys this. The condition of the pay, quartermaster, and subsistence departments is exhibited by the accompanying reports of Majors Alvord and Babbitt. The papers likewise for the quartermaster and subsistence departments for the last quarter of 1860, required by paragraph 950, Regulations 1857, are forwarded to the chiefs of those bureaus at Washington through the headquarters of the department, in order to afford the department commander an opportunity to obtain from them such information as they may afford. A copy of the department return for November and an unfinished return for December on which are consolidated all the posts heard from for December are inclosed. The department return due from the Department of Oregon for December it is proposed to complete here when Fort Colville and Camp Pickett shall have been heard from. Paymaster Winston’s abstracts for November and December, 1860, are likewise transmitted. Two packages of papers for action of department commander are sent herewith, with explanatory memoranda indorsed. A letter from Lieutenant Casey and map* (the latter put in the letter book for safe carriage) accompany this. Captain Pickett was promised a copy of the map. I ought to state that a letter to Captain Spencer, Royal Navy, of December 20 (see letter book, page 222), remains unanswered. It is believed {p.437} that the arrangement will be satisfactory. I have to mention before closing that I had applied to the Secretary of War for a leave of absence of twelve months before the receipt of Orders, No. 1, from the headquarters Department of the Pacific.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

* On file in office of the Chief of Engineers.

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VICINITY OF FORT TEJON, CAL., February-, 1861.

General A. S. JOHNSTON, U. S. Army:

We, the subscribers, having heard the removal of Fort Tejon is in contemplation, desire to enter our earnest protest against this intention representing for your consideration the following facts: The position of Fort Tejon is such as entirely to command three populous and rapidly increasing districts, which by its abandonment would suffer the most disastrous consequences from the incursions and inroads of the Indians from which it now protects us. These people are as yet without the means of self-defense, and relying upon the permanence of the fort and the protection of the Government, have passed thus far into the interior, settling and developing the resources of a hew country, with the implied assurance, from the location of Fort Tejon, of protection for their lives and property. If this protection is to be withdrawn, those who have under its promises made their homes in the wilderness will be left to the mercy of ruthless savages, and a beautiful district about to be reclaimed by civilization again abandoned to its original condition. These resources are agricultural and grazing, and it would be useless to remind you of the vast mining interest stretching from Mono Lake to the Colorado, over an immense extent of country rich in every mineral, and now being examined by thousands of our citizens, which the abandonment of Fort Tejon would leave entirely without protection, and in consequence of which all the anticipated wealth of that region be utterly lost to the country. Under these circumstances we feel justified in remonstrating in the strongest manner against the removal of Fort Tejon. The value of our property and our personal security all render imperative the protection it affords.

We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

SAMUEL A. BISHOP, E. F. BEALE, F. B. KERLIN, [AND 85 OTHERS].

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OFFICE SECRETARY OF TERRITORY, Olympia, February 3, 1861.

COMMANDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a certified copy of a memorial of the legislative assembly of this Territory passed at its session just closed, and respectfully to call your attention to the same.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. MCGILL, Secretary of Washington Territory.

{p.438}

[Inclosure.]

To the COMMANDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC:

We your memoralists, the legislative assembly of the Territory of Washington, would respectfully represent that since Fort Bellingham has been abandoned by the military the numerous tribes of Indians residing in the vicinity have shown unmistakable evidence of hostility to the whites, growing out of the non-fulfillment of treaty stipulations on the part of our Government. The settlement on Bellingham Bay is also liable to be surprised at any time by the Northern, or British, Indians, who periodically visit the sound for plunder, and situated near the forty-ninth parallel, it is of the utmost importance that Fort Bellingham should be reoccupied by at least one company of U. S. troops for the protection of said settlement of Bellingham Bay.

Passed the House January 17, 1861.

LYMAN SHAFFER, Speaker House of Representatives.

Passed the council January 18, 1861.

PAUL K. HUBBS, President of the Council.

SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Olympia, Wash. Ter., February 1, 1861.

I hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and perfect copy of the original memorial on file in this office.

HENRY M. MCGILL, Secretary of Territory.

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ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., February 4, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. William N. Grier, First Dragoons, with forty men of his company, will proceed to-morrow morning to the Umatilla to confer with the agent, Mr. Abbott, concerning certain recent depredations by a party of Indians on the Columbia, and, if necessary, to proceed to the Indian camp, secure and punish the offenders, and remove the remainder to the reservation. He will take ten days’ forage and rations. The assistant quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Major Steen:

JAMES WHEELER, JR., Second Lieutenant, First Dragoons, Post Adjutant.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 6, 1861.

First Lieut. J. MCALLISTER, Commanding Benicia Arsenal, Cal.:

SIR: The commanding general wishes a list of the arms in the arsenal, the amount of powder and ammunition. He directs you to send 100 rounds of ball cartridges and twenty rounds of blank cartridges to Alcatraz Island for the carbines lately issued to the dragoon recruits. But if you have already furnished any ammunition for those arms you will reduce the present amount by the then supply.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.439}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., February 7, 1861.

Bvt. Brig. Gen. ALBERT S. JOHNSTON, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENERAL: Herewith I have the honor to transmit a copy of a project for the continuation of the work on the Fort Benton and Walla Walla military road, submitted to the Secretary of War by Capt. Andrew A. Humphreys, Corps of Topographical Engineers. The Secretary approves of the same, and directs that you give the necessary instructions for carrying out its provisions. A detail of an assistant surgeon to accompany the expedition will be made from your command, whom you will instruct to attend the citizens employed by Lieutenant Mullan.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant. General.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF EXPLORATION AND SURVEYS, Washington, January 24, 1861.

Hon. J. HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: In the latter part of December I submitted to the Department, with a recommendation, the project of Lieutenant Mullan, U. S. Army, in charge of the military road from Fort Benton to Fort Walla Walla, for continuing the operations during the ensuing season through the next winter and the following spring and summer (in all about fifteen months from 1st April next), together with an estimate of the expense of executing the work. The amount available for this operation, including the probable amount of sales of animals and other property at the conclusion of the field-work, was estimated by Lieutenant Mullan to be on 1st April next $85,000. This sum was probably in excess about $2,500. Having understood that the above-mentioned paper has been mislaid, and that it is desired I should submit a substitute for it, I beg leave to say that it is not in my power to state the exact number of assistants and employés and extent of outfit and the monthly cost of maintaining the party proposed by Lieutenant Mullan, nor should I wish to make out a project in detail to govern that officer, as it might cramp him and impair the efficiency of his party. After a careful examination of his project I propose that the number of his assistants should be one less than he asked for, and that instead of employing a physician an assistant surgeon should be detailed to accompany his escort (100 strong), and be directed by the Surgeon-General to attend the civil employés of the party. Much of the work to be done upon the road consists in building bridges, and Lieutenant Mullan proposed that the party should winter on the route, and be employed during that season upon those constructions, and resuming the other labors upon it in the spring, reach Fort Benton in time to descend the Missouri in the latter part of the summer. Whether more time would be lost by this plan of operations, or by returning to Walla Walla toward the end of the fall and discharging the party and reorganizing it again and taking the field in the following spring, it is difficult to decide. I propose, therefore, that discretionary authority should be given to Lieutenant Mullan to send back to Walla Walla and discharge a portion or the {p.440} whole of his party toward the approach of winter, and to enjoin upon him the strictest economy in his expenditures consistent with efficiency. The estimated expense of Lieutenant Mullan’s party was about or near $4,600 per month. The amount of the appropriation for the road now in the Treasury subject to requisition is $68,000. Lieutenant Mullan requested that the sum of $30,000 should be placed to his credit in New York. He will probably require:

3 assistants (civil engineers and clerk), at $125 per month$375
1 guide and interpreter, at $125 per month125
1 wagon-master, at $100 per month100
2 blacksmiths, at $80 per month160
4 carpenters, at $75 per month300
30 laborers and teamsters, at $50 per month1,500
4 herders, at $30 per month120
2 cooks, at $30 per month60
50 enlisted men on extra duty, at 35 cents per day525
Subsistence of party, 47 hands, at 50 cents per day705
Contingencies at 10 per cent397
Total monthly expense of party4,367
Expense of party for 16 months70,000
Estimated cost of outfit12,500
Aggregate82,500

I beg leave to suggest that Lieutenant Mullan be instructed that the project submitted by him is approved, excepting the number of assistants, which should be one less than he proposes, and excepting the employment of a physician, if an assistant surgeon accompanies the escort; that the strictest economy be exercised by him in his expenditures, and that in no event should the amount of the appropriation be exceeded, and that he will in his discretion winter with the whole party on the route, or reduce it upon the approach of winter or return and disband it at Walla Walla.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Captain, Topographical Engineers, in Charge.

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ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Dalles, Oreg., February 9, 1861.

I. Captain Whittlesey, First Dragoons, with twenty-nine men of his company, mounted and equipped for the field, will cross the Columbia River at Dalles City and proceed without delay to Big Island and adjacent country, for the purpose of finding and chastising the Indians who have recently stolen horses, mules, and other property from the whites on the Umatilla River, Willow and Butter Creeks. Should any property be recovered from the Indians, it will be restored to owners, as far as practicable, or brought to this post. Captain Whittlesey will take with him twelve days’ rations for his command, and not less than sixty rounds of ammunition per man.

II. The quartermaster’s department will furnish twelve mules, equipped for packing, and employ one guide and five packers to accompany Captain Whittlesey.

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

{p.441}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Dalles, Oreg., February 9, 1861.

Capt. JOSEPH H. WHITTLESEY, First Dragoons:

SIR: In addition to the requirements of the order herewith,* you will co-operate with any troops sent from Fort Walla Walla on the same service, and if necessary communicate with the commanding officer at Fort Walla Walla and these headquarters by means of expresses. You will take every precaution to guard against surprise or the loss of the property in your charge, and endeavor to accomplish the object for which you are dispatched, thoroughly and as speedily as practicable. The accompanying letter from Mr. C. M. Grover will make known to you where the depredations were committed and the probable location of the Indian depredators.** After completing your search for the hostile Indians on the north side of the Columbia River, it will be well to cross the river and scout in the vicinity of the settlements on Willow and Butter Creeks before returning to this post. I understand that the Indian agent has applied to the commanding officer at Fort Walla Walla to send troops to the Umatilla country. The depredators are said to be renegades from the Snake, Yakima, Cayuse, Columbia River, and Walla Walla Indians, who acknowledge no chief and claim the entire country as their own.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth infantry, Commanding Post.

* See next, ante.

** See next, post.

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Statement of Caleb M. Grover, in relation to Indian depredations.

On Friday morning, the 1st February, 1861, a party of about twenty Indians, well armed, made their appearance on Butter Creek and attempted to enter the house of a settler by the name of Reeder, which was then occupied by Mrs. Reeder and her children, four or five in number. Mrs. Reeder barricaded the door, and in spite of their threats and efforts prevented their entrance. The Indians then drove off the horses and mules of Reeder and Boggs, which were in the range near by. They then proceeded to the house of French and Barnes. The Indians had divided their party. One party commenced driving off their horses. While French and Boggs went out to prevent this the other party entered the house and robbed it of two guns, one revolver, blankets, provisions, &c., taking with them these articles, their horses, and at times threatening the settlers. The Indians then appeared to have passed near the mountains to the head of Willow Creek, and made their appearance at a settlement on the wagon road from The Dalles to Walla Walla, on the second day following, the 3d instant, and broke into the house of the undersigned and robbed it of one double-barreled gun, one rifle, one revolver, blankets, clothing, provisions, and about $300 in gold coin. This party was discovered a short time after this by Mr. Thomas Richmond and a friendly Indian in his employ. Mr. Richmond attempted to approach them, but was prevented by their threats and presentation of guns to him. The friendly Indian did approach them, and ascertained they had many American horses, some mules, and much stolen property. He further says they are Indians {p.442} that live on the Columbia River, near the foot of “Big Island.” The next day Richmond and another man tracked them to the Columbia River and found they had crossed to the north side. The undersigned has been informed that the house of Mr. Jobe, on Umatilla, was robbed about this time. The undersigned says the robbing of his house is of his own knowledge, and that the other statements made above are from reliable information, and he believes them to be true.

C. M. GROVER.

Samuel Johnson says he has just arrived from Walla Walla, and has heard the above statements from various persons along the route, and has seen and conversed with Mr. French, one of the parties above named, and that the statements of Mr. Grover are corroborated by them, and he believes them to be true.

SAMUEL JOHNSON, By O. HUMASON.

FORT DALLES, OREG., February 9, 1861.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., February 10, 1861.

Maj. E. STEEN, U. S. Army, First Regt. Dragoons, Comdg. Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter.:

MAJOR: A rumor has reached here that Indians have been committing depredations on and in the neighborhood of Willow Creek. Colonel Wright desires you to send a party of dragoons at once to the region of Willow Creek, as well as to the Umatilla Reservation, and if there be truth in the rumor to cause a thorough scout to be made to apprehend the marauders, if possible. The colonel further directs that should any of the guilty be captured, instant and summary punishment is to be had upon them, that their fate may be a warning to others.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. A. HARDIE, Captain, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WARM SPRINGS INDIAN RESERVATION, OREGON, February 12, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report for the information of the general commanding that the forage furnished by the acting assistant quartermaster at Fort Dalles for the public animals under my charge at this reservation will have been consumed on or about the 20th of March, and the supplies furnished by the subsistence department on the 1st of November last, and for five months, will subsist my detachment until the 1st of April. Since the arrival of my command at this reservation on the 15th of October last no aggressions have been committed by Snake Indians, nor have I any certain knowledge that individuals or parties of Snakes have passed the limits of the reservation at all. The Indians of the reservation have been free to hunt at great distances from the agency, without any sufficient cause for alarm. The difficulties attending the keeping of dragoons at this place are great. Its distance {p.443} from Fort Dalles is seventy miles, and the road is altogether impracticable for wagons. All short forage consumed here must be supplied from the vicinity of The Dalles and at a cost of 7 cents per pound. Long forage cannot be had at all as it cannot be transported. There has been no grass at all in the vicinity of the agency during the winter, and consequently the dragoons’ horses have subsisted solely on the ration of barley. At the most favorable season the grass in this vicinity is very sparse, and this is at once eaten off by the large herds of Indian horses. Owing to the fact that the Indians assembled on this reservation are of several tribes, between which there exist jealousies and enmities, they have not been able to protect themselves against repeated aggressions on the part of the Snakes. Especially has this been the case when a considerable portion of the young men have been absent at the Columbia River taking fish for their winter provision. I cannot believe but that the permanent absence of the Indian agent contributes much to make the Indians incapable of self-defense; that if, instead of residing at The Dalles, he were here in the proper discharge of his duty, the Indians might be so disciplined as to be able to protect themselves. The withdrawal of troops from the reservation would, I fear, produce unpleasant results. A detachment of twenty men is sufficient for the only purposes that can be accomplished by troops at all, to wit, to prevent the possibility of the Snakes attacking the agency and to inspire the Indians with sufficient courage to pursue their ordinary avocations. These purposes could as well be performed by a detachment of troops of another arm as by dragoons. In the event of my command being withdrawn without being replaced by other troops, I would respectfully recommend that the several buildings erected by me be placed in charge of the Indian Department, to be kept (unoccupied by Indians) for the use of such troops as may hereafter be sent to the reservation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. MCM. GREGG, Second Lieutenant, First Dragoons, Commanding Detachment.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 15, 1861.

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Army Headquarters, New York:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of instructions of January 19, and in answer thereto transmit my order of this date, showing that the post at the entrance will be occupied to-day. The companies from the north will be ordered by the first steamer.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 15, 1861.

1. In obedience to instructions from the General-in-Chief, Company I, Third Artillery, will take post at the fort at the entrance of this harbor. The commanding officer of the Third Artillery will see this order executed to-day.

2. Companies A and B, Third Regiment of Artillery, will be embarked on the steamer Oregon, at Fort Vancouver or Portland, and proceed to the harbor of San Francisco.

{p.444}

3. The depot quartermaster, Major Babbitt, will notify the commanding officer of Fort Vancouver the arrangements made by him for transportation, and the troops must be got in readiness to embark on the return trip of the steamer to this port.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 15, 1861.

Capt. J. F. GILMER, Engineer in Charge of Fortifications, Fort Point, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: The general commanding has examined your instructions from the Secretary of War of January 14, viz: “That all operations of constructions upon the works under your charge be at once discontinued and that no further liabilities be contracted,” &c. He has, however, orders * of a subsequent date from the General-in-Chief to occupy Fort Point with troops, and as this order confers of necessity the authority to do all such acts as are necessary to render the occupation secure and the place inhabitable, he relieves you from the obligation of obeying the order of the Secretary to that extent and directs you, so far as you may be able, to execute the works he has pointed out.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Thomas to Johnston, January 19, p. 434.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 17, 1861.

First Lieut. J. MCALLISTER, Ordnance Corps, Commanding Benicia Arsenal:

SIR: Brigadier-General Johnston directs you to invoice to Capt. J. Stewart, Third Artillery, commanding at Alcatraz Island, and turn over to the quartermaster without delay, 10,000 rifled muskets, model 1855, 10,000 sets of accouterments, 150,000 cartridges with elongated balls for the muskets sent under this order.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

N. B.-A supply of percussion caps proportioned to the supply of cartridges will also be sent.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 17, 1861.

Lieut. Col. THOMAS SWORDS, Deputy Quartermaster-General, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Ten thousand stands of muskets and as many sets of accouterments have been ordered, with 150,000 cartridges, by the general from Benicia to Alcatraz Island. He wishes them transported without delay. {p.445} He does not wish them kept at the wharf in this city during the night. If the Government brig can bring them down at once it appears to him the better plan. Please report the course taken, that I may order a suitable guard for the arms in transitu.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 18, 1861.

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Army, Hdqrs. of the Army, New York:

SIR: I inclose a copy of a letter* from Captain Spencer, senior officer of Her Britannic Majesty’s forces in the Sound, and of my answer. I am unwilling to permit any questions to arise now for discussion, and in my answer I have tried to close the correspondence begun by Colonel Wright.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, New York, March 18, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to the General-in-Chief. The reply of General Johnston to Captain Spencer has not been received at Army headquarters.**

H. L. SCOTT, Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

* See Spencer to Wright, January 24, p. 434.

** But see Johnston to Spencer, next, post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 18, 1861.

Capt. J. D. S. SPENCER, Senior Officer, Comdg. Her Britannic Majesty’s Ship Topaze, Esquimault, Vancouver Island:

SIR: Your letter of the 24th ultimo addressed to Col. George Wright, headquarters Department of Oregon, in relation to the occupation of land as reserves for military purposes by the officers in command, respectively, of Her Britannic Majesty’s troops and those of the United States on San Juan Island, has been submitted to me by Colonel Wright, whose late command has been merged into mine. To this I now have the honor to reply. I find all the pleasure you have derived and so kindly expressed from the very cordial and friendly feeling which has existed between the troops of the two Governments during the joint occupation. I am most desirous that this cordial and friendly feeling may continue to the end, and seeing no reason to suppose that either officer has, or is disposed to occupy, more ground than, in his judgment, is required for the comfort and discipline of his command, or to close more to settlers than is required by these interests, I think it better that, as heretofore, each be left to consult the wants of his own {p.446} service. Nevertheless, the proposition made by you in the third paragraph of your letter is so clearly equitable that I cannot hesitate to accept it, if more agreeable to you. I have therefore communicated it to Captain Pickett, and instructed him to enter into it, if called on by the officer commanding Her Britannic Majesty’s troops.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 18, 1861.

Lieut. Col. C. S. MERCHANT, Third Artillery, Commanding Presidio of San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Brigadier-General Johnston directs me to say that he wishes you to exercise a general supervision over the fort at Fort Point, commanded by Captain Lendrum, Third Artillery. The following instructions will be given to that officer, and enforced, viz: First. There must be, night and day, at least two sentinels, one on the barbette battery, and one at the gate. Second. When the gates are closed and opened it must be done under the supervision of the officer of the day, in whose charge the keys must always remain. Third. The postern gate must never be opened in the morning until the sentinel on the barbette battery has examined the circuit of the work, nor main gate be opened until the grounds within musket range of the work has been examined by a patrol. Fourth. During the absence of the patrol the guard must remain under arms. Fifth. The fastenings of the lower shutters to be examined by the officer of the day at retreat. Sixth. During the time employed by a part of the garrison in removing powder and stores from the outer store-houses the remainder of the garrison must be under arms and properly stationed. Seventh. No smoking will be allowed on the parade ground. Eighth. The men will not be permitted to go on the barbette battery except on duty. Ninth. Proper orders will be given and supervision had to prevent the destruction of public property of the engineers. Tenth. Supply of cartridges to be prepared for the flank guns on land face and placed in service magazine. Eleventh. The main magazine must never be opened or entered except under the supervision of a commissioned officer, and with all the precautions usual in such cases. Twelfth. Until all the guns are mounted for the defense of the ditch, loaded shells must be kept on the land face of the barbette over the main gate. Thirteenth. The quartermaster must immediately prepare rough gun-racks. Fourteenth. He further directs that the regimental quartermaster be placed on duty at the fort until the place is put in order and reported for his orders.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., February 18, 1861.

Capt. JAMES A. HARDIE, 3d Arty., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of February 10, directing me to send a party of dragoons {p.447} to Willow Creek, and also to forward the accompanying reports for the information of the district commander. I had anticipated the colonel’s order by detaching Major Grier upon receiving the first reliable information of the depredations, and sent Lieutenant Reno to the old fort in time to intercept a portion of those Indians driven up the river by Major Grier. Lieutenant Reno executed his orders with an energy and zeal which gives me the greatest satisfaction. I am sorry the major did not persevere a little longer, as he might have secured them all. The miners are flocking into the Nez Percé country daily. From the best information I can gain a large number of California miners are expected this spring. Trouble will be the result unless something is done to purchase the mineral land immediately from the Indians. They are very much dissatisfied, and their only confidence now is in the troops, who they say have promised to protect them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. STEEN, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 20, 1861.

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Army Headquarters, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: In obedience to the orders of the General-in-Chief received here on the 15th instant, Fort Point was occupied by Captain Lendrum’s company, Third Artillery, on the same day, and an order was immediately transmitted to the commander of Fort Vancouver to send Companies A and B, Third Artillery, from that post on the steamer Oregon to this place. These companies will constitute the regular garrison of Fort Point on their arrival. A few days before the receipt of your order Captain Gilmer, of the Engineer Corps, had instructions from the War Department to suspend operations at the fort, and had discharged the mechanics and laborers, leaving the quarters for the officers and soldiers in an unfinished state and a small portion of the defenses. To make the quarters habitable and to complete other unfinished work, involving but a small expenditure, I have found it necessary, for these objects only, to suspend the Secretary of War’s orders to Captain Gilmer, and have (see orders herewith*) instructed him to go on and complete the quarters, &c. I invoke the interest of the General-in-Chief to have a remittance made to Captain Gilmer. The appropriation for the fort is not exhausted, and, as heretofore reported, funds are in the sub-treasury in this city. The workmen now employed on credit will, if this is not done, soon suffer. The island of Alcatraz is garrisoned by Captain Stewart’s company, Third Artillery, and fifty-two recruits, making a force of 120 men. They are provided with subsistence for ninety days, and everything necessary for defense. I have ordered 10,000 rifled muskets, accouterments and ammunition to be placed in store on Alcatraz, and some heavy guns to be sent to Fort Point. The guns for the complete armament of Fort Point are insufficient, but all that have been furnished will be mounted as fast as it can be done. In ordering a small number of the arms from the arsenal at Benicia, I have not been influenced by any appearance of a necessity for it, but because there is in doing it a manifest military propriety. I beg leave to say that Colonel Casey, commanding at Fort Steilacoom, {p.448} reports a great deficiency of men in the two companies under his command. His return for January shows the number to be eighty. It is earnestly desired that the companies in this department should be kept filled to the number allowed by law, and that the deficiencies be supplied as early in the spring for that purpose as practicable, to be ready for active operations should they become necessary. If authorized, great expense might be saved to the Government and our ranks kept full by opening a recruiting rendezvous in this city.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

* See Mackall to Gilmer, February 15, p 444.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 20, 1861.

Capt. J. STEWART, Third Artillery, Commanding Alcatraz Island, Cal.:

SIR: Brigadier-General Johnston directs me to say that he expects and orders you to maintain your post and defend Alcatraz Island against all efforts to seize it, from whatever direction such efforts may be made. No interruption will be given to the commerce of the harbor by hailing boats passing in any direction, or at any distance, or even coming to the island, unless, in this last case, from the numbers and appearance of the persons on board an attack from them may be feared, and then, be the answer what it may, no gun must be fired; the sentinel or guard must report without delay. The only conditions on which you will be justifiable in using your arms will arise when an organized attack is made on your post, and of this fact you must be the sole judge, and are forbidden to delegate the authority to fire, or to order any party to be fired on, to any officer, non-commissioned officer, or sentinel.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 20, 1861.

Capt. J. S. ELLIS, Commanding California Guard, San Francisco, Cal.:

DEAR SIR: The fort at Fort Point having lately been turned over to the troops of the engineers, and many preparations being required on the part of the troops to put it in proper order, the general is compelled to suspend the permission given by the Secretary of War to you to exercise your company therein until a more convenient season.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 20, 1861.

H. M. MCGILL, Esq., Secretary of Washington Territory, Olympia, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 3d instant, transmitting the memorial of the legislative {p.449} assembly of Washington Territory, requesting that a company of U. S. troops may be stationed at Bellingham Bay. I have a report from Colonel Casey of January 24 [25], in which he gives me the opinion of the three agents at Nisqually, Bellingham Bay, and Puyallup that an outbreak of the Indians in those districts is not apprehended, but as the inhabitants, and the assembly thinks, feel insecure, and the presence of a military force will no doubt reassure, I will, as soon as practicable, send a small force to that place.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 22, 1861.

Capt. G. E. PICKETT, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding on the Island of San Juan, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: The inclosed extracts* from a correspondence between the general commanding and Captain Spencer are for your information, and if called on by the officer commanding the English troops on the island of San Juan to enter into the arrangement proposed by Captain Spencer, the general directs you to do so. He is pleased to learn from Captain Spencer that between the forces occupying the island harmony prevails. He is anxious that this continue and, if possible to be avoided, no questions for discussion may be raised.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found as inclosures, but see Spencer to Wright, January 24, and Johnston to Spencer, February 15, pp. 434,445.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, February 26, 1861.

Lieut. Col. C. S. MERCHANT Commanding Third Artillery and Fort at Fort Point, Cal.:

COLONEL: Brigadier-General Johnston directs me to say that as soon as you have within the fort a sufficient supply of shot and shell for all contingencies, such as then remains may be left outside, provided the piles are under the fire of the fort.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT, February 28, 1861.

Hon. J. HOLT, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of A. S. Johnston, brevet brigadier-general, at San Francisco, and referred by your department to me.* In reply I have to state that on all the

* See Johnston to Cooper, January 17, p. 433. {p.450} requisitions for the military service on the Pacific the warrants have been issued and the remittances will be forwarded as soon as the U. S. Treasurer can issue the numerous drafts therefor.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX, Secretary of the Treasury.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 2, 1861.

EDWARD R. GEARY, Esq., Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Portland, Oreg.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter addressed to Colonel Wright, commanding the Military District of Oregon, requesting that thirty or forty rifles may be placed at your disposal for the use of the employés at the Fort Simcoe Agency. I have no authority under the law or regulations to make any disposition of the public arms other than for the use of the troops, and I could not do so unless the exigency of the occasion was such as to furnish a full justification for acting without the sanction of either. In the case presented there seems to be no urgency for immediate action, as you propose to provide the arms now as a precautionary measure. For these reasons I do not conceive it to be in my power to comply with your request. By the act of the 3d of March, 1825, the President, under certain restrictions, is authorized to have arms unsuitable for the military service sold. There may be rifles at Fort Vancouver of that description, in which case I do not doubt you would, on application to the War Department, be authorized to purchase for your department whatever number may be needed.

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 4, 1861.

Companies A and B, Third Artillery, will take post at the fort at Fort Point. On their arrival Company I, Third Artillery, will resume its station at the Presidio.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., March 5, 1861.

Maj. WILLIAM S. KETCHUM, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Fort Dalles, Oreg.:

MAJOR: The superintendent of Indian affairs fears an attack by the Snake Indians on the Warm Springs Reservation, should Lieutenant Gregg’s detachment be withdrawn. The colonel commanding the district directs that Lieutenant Gregg remain there until further orders, and that you supply him with subsistence to enable him to remain without delay.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. A. HARDIE, Captain, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.451}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 6, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: The commanding general directs you to send Lieutenant Collins with a party of thirty men to the Eel River, or to the settlements on its tributaries, to give protection to the inhabitants and their property, both of which, it is reported to the general, have been attacked and in some instances destroyed by the Indians. Direct him to chastise any party of Indians who may commit depredations and to report to you fully on the character of the country, the numbers and location of the inhabitants and their stock, the numbers and character of the Indians, and the best position for a post in that district, and the benefits to be expected from one; the roads and the facilities for building. &c. This detachment will remain in the field until this report has been submitted to the general and his orders received.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Crook, Cal., March 7, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army:

MAJOR: Having received some rather indefinite rumors that the Hot Creek (that is the band generally dreaded by the people) Indians were collecting in numbers from 100 to 200 about McElroy’s Bridge, which is on one of the roads to Red Bluff I sent a detachment of men there with orders merely to show themselves, and also to ask the two men who live at the bridge if the Indians were there. These men said the Indians were doing no harm, nor were they apprehensive of any. I have received other reports that these Indians are on Pitt River, some twenty miles from this post, and have cattle in their camp. But as no one hereabouts has lost any cattle, nor is there any direct complaint made against these Indians, I would hesitate to commence hostilities. The white inhabitants of this section are more than anxious to be at war with these Indians. For this reason the Indians are afraid to go into the valleys for roots and berries, so that I cannot imagine how they live, and must think they merit some consideration for not stealing. At present there is from 300 to 400 Indians in the immediate neighborhood of this post. No complaints are made against them. I think the route which will be generally traveled between Yreka and Red Bluff this season will be by what is called the Oak Run road, some ten or twelve miles distant, and diverging from the old or Lockhart road. As my company is very small, it will hardly be practicable to keep detachments on both these routes or on the emigrant trail. None of these roads will be open for teams before the 1st or 15th of May. I would respectfully ask for instructions whether to give the protection of this garrison to the road most traveled, or to that one which will be taken by some of the teams, and which is probably the most dangerous. This latter is the Lockhart road. I suppose of course the emigrant road via Honey Lake, Fort Churchill, and so on, must be protected, but the emigration will not arrive to within seventy-five miles of this post {p.452} before July. It is very probable that the Indians-that is, the Hot Creek-will be troublesome.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN ADAMS, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, March 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. ALBERT S. JOHNSTON, U. S. Army, Commanding Pacific Division:

SIR: I have received numerous petitions from citizens of the counties of Humboldt and Mendocino representing that the Coast Range from Mendocino to Humboldt and Trinity has been rendered valueless from the continued outrages of the Indians to the stock-growers of that region, and asking that they may have protection for their property. I have heretofore had occasion to make representations to the late General Clarke of depredations committed upon the property of citizens of California by hostile Indians, and it affords me pleasure to state that prompt measures were taken by that officer to redress the grievances complained of. It would seem that the citizens inhabiting the Coast Range from Mendocino to Humboldt and Trinity Counties feel justified in asking that a corps of volunteers should be called out by the State to effectually redress the great outrages committed by the Indians, and as I conceive it to be my plain duty to first ask if you can send a force sufficient to afford protection to the lives and property of our citizens in that region, and would be justified in calling for volunteers only in the event that you were unable to render the protection demanded, I trust that you will at your earliest convenience so inform me.

Respectfully, &c.,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 12, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of California, Sacramento, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellency’s letter of the 11th instant on the subject of the depredations of the Indians in the Coast Range, from Mendocino to Humboldt and Trinity, and asking if a sufficient force can be sent to afford protection to the lives and property of the citizens of that region. I beg leave to observe that three companies have been permanently stationed in that region for the protection of the population, viz, one at Humboldt, one at Camp Bragg, and another at Fort Gaston. Since the perpetration of the outrages complained of detachments have been sent out from Humboldt, embracing the whole company, to range as far as the scattered condition of the people will admit in front of the settlements for their protection and the chastisement of predatory Indians. A detachment of the company stationed at Camp Bragg has been some time at the Round Valley Reservation, and I will to-day order the remainder of the company in two parties into the field, and also the company at Fort Gaston, divided in parties of suitable strength, to commence ranging with the same object and with like instructions. This force of about 200 men will be kept actively employed as long as the circumstances may {p.453} make it necessary, and as it is not likely that these detachments will not be sufficiently strong to cope with any Indians they may meet with, it is hoped by me that the force will prove sufficient for the object. At this time there is no other force available, without withdrawing it from positions whose security at present would seem to demand its presence. In a short time, if the circumstances should then demand it, I hope to be able to send additional force.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 12, 1861.

Second Lieut. EDWARD DILLON, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Bragg, Cal.:

SIR: The commanding general directs you to take the field with your detachment and proceed to the region of country between the Coast Range and the coast watered by the Eel River and tributaries. You will keep your command in motion and visit the settlements in that region, giving protection to the settlers and their stock, pursuing and attacking any parties of Indians who may commit depredations. A detachment from Humboldt has been ordered to the same district. On reaching the neighborhood put yourself in communication with the commanding officer, and you will then be able to concert your movements and thus better attain the object had in view. If at any time you find that a force greater than your own is required you must unite your forces.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 16, 1861.

Capt. JOHN ADAMS, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Crook, Cal.:

SIR: Your letter of March 7 has been submitted to Brigadier-General Johnston. He replies, your company will be re-enforced in the early spring, and you must employ all the force at your command in giving such protection to the roads as may be practicable. The mode of doing this must be decided by yourself.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 34.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 20, 1861.

I. The detachment of Sappers and Miners under Lieutenants Casey and Alexander will proceed to West Point, N. Y.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.454}

WAR DEPARTMENT, March 21, 1861.

Hon. MILTON S. LATHAM, Senate:

SIR: In accordance with your request of the 19th instant, instructions have been issued this morning to the commanders of the military posts along the Overland Mail Route from Saint Louis to San Francisco, via Fort Smith and El Paso, to furnish suitable escorts to the mail coaches from post to post through the Indian country.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE Washington, March 21, 1861.

Bvt. Brig. Gen. A. S. JOHNSTON, Col. 2d Cav., Comdg. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that a copy of the inclosed circular order bearing directions to the commanding officers of posts to comply with its requirements on presentation has been furnished for the use of the Overland Mail Company.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

CIRCULAR.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, March 21, 1861.

The commanding officers of military posts on that part of the present southern Overland Mail Route to California, which lies between Fort Bliss, Tex., and Fort Yuma, Cal., will give to the Butterfield mail contractors, or their agents, suitable military escorts from post to post through the Indian country while the company is moving its stock, &c., from the present southern mail route to the central route from Saint Joseph, Mo., to Placerville, Cal.

By order of Lieut. Gen. Winfield Scott:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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NEW SAN DIEGO, CAL., March 21, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gem., Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to state that having heard on the morning of the 17th instant that Señor Esparza had been superseded as Governor of Lower California by Mathias Moreno, with an armed body of men, acting under orders from the Government of Mexico, which force sailed from La Paz and landed at a place called Descanso, which Señor Esparza had fortified, which they took by surprise, I proceeded immediately to a ranch called Oti, about fifteen miles from here and about three miles from the line, as near as I could get to the line with wood, water, and grass, and from thence sent word to the Indians that they must take no part in the matter either on one side or the other. I do not think they will. Frequent occurrences of the foregoing nature {p.455} have produced and continue to cause great disquiet on this frontier. I beg leave to say that the four men against whom charges were forwarded by the last mail should be tried. This is the second time one of the men has deserted (Stapleton). There is no artillery at this post. If the general would have two 6-pounders sent here I could teach my men the artillery drill, and they might otherwise be useful.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. A. ARMISTEAD, Brevet Major Sixth Infantry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, Sam Francisco, March 21, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Headquarters Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: The general commanding has received the letter of Edward R. Geary, esq., superintendent of Indian affairs for Oregon, in relation to the necessity of troops on the Warm Springs Reservation. In answer to this letter, by you transmitted, he directs me to inclose a copy of his letter on the removal of the detachment of Lieutenant Gregg, and to say that he assumed that the detachment placed there by you was sufficient, and was necessary, and should therefore be unchanged; but if you now think it ought to be re-enforced you are authorized so to do.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 1, 1861.

Second Lieut. D. MCM. GREGG, First Dragoons, Comdg. at Warm Springs Reservation, Oreg.:

SIR: Your letter of February 12 has been submitted to the commanding general. No change will be made for the present and he directs you to estimate for your supplies on The Dalles from time to time as you may need them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MARCH 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER:

DEAR GENERAL: Prepare to sail from New York the first of the next month to relieve Brevet Brigadier-General Johnston, in the command of the Pacific Department, say for a tour of some years. The order to sail, &c., will reach you by the next mail, but remain unpublished till you are on the Pacific Ocean, for confidential reasons.

In haste, yours, truly,

WINFIELD SCOTT.

{p.456}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 37.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 23, 1861.

Lieut. Col. Robert C. Buchanan will join the headquarters of his regiment at Fort Dalles and take command.

By order of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 86.}

WAR. DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, March 23, 1861.

Brigadier-General Sumner will, without delay, repair to San Francisco and relieve Brevet Brigadier-General Johnston in the command of the Department of the Pacific, whereupon the latter will return to Washington to receive further orders.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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SACRAMENTO, March 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. A. S. JOHNSTON, Commanding U. S. Troops in California:

SIR: At the request of several gentlemen from Humboldt County, in this State, I write you in relation to the Indian troubles at present existing in that country. A residence in that part of the State for some years made me familiar with the people, the Indians, and the condition of affairs there generally. From the first settlement of the whites the Indians have been constantly in the habit of killing stock, robbing houses, committing depredations generally, and quite a large number of our citizens have been murdered by them. It has been nothing unusual for them to deprive one of our people of all of his property in a single night. Under such circumstances it is not strange that the whites should become exasperated and take redress into their own hands. That region of country in which is found the sources of Russian River, Eel River, South Fork of Trinity, Mad River, and Cottonwood is exceedingly mountainous, and very difficult of access, affording shelter for a larger number of Indians than can be found in any other portion of this State, and next to the Pitt River Indians they have been the most warlike and troublesome. Indeed, in the early days of the country they had frequent intercourse with each other, and it is not at all improbable that many of the Pitt River Indians have escaped from their own country and are now to be found in Humboldt County. Your knowledge of frontier life and of Indians will at once suggest to your mind the difficulties to be encountered in subduing them, and restoring peace to the settlers. Volunteers have generally been found to be the most efficient for such service, and I cannot too strongly urge on you the necessity of calling on the Governor for a small force of that description, say thirty men, to act in conjunction with the regulars. Mr. R. M. Williams, who will hand you this, is a gentleman who can be relied on implicitly, and he can give you such particular information as you may desire. Prompt action ought to be taken, for if not, I fear we shall soon hear of a general turning out of the whites and massacre of the Indians.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. DENVER.

{p.457}

SACRAMENTO, March 23, 1861.

General A. S. JOHNSTON, U. S. Army, Commanding Pacific Division:

The undersigned respectfully represent that they have reliable information that for some considerable time past the Indians in the southern portion of Humboldt County have been engaged in hostilities against the whites, and have killed many citizens of the State and destroyed property of immense value; that hostilities still exist, and the lives and property of our neighbors and friends are in continual jeopardy; that the whites in that section must be protected or they will be compelled to sacrifice their homes and property and leave one of the best portions of the State and yield it again to the possession of the savages. We would further represent that in our opinion a small force of volunteers, acting in conjunction with what regular troops you may be able to place in the field, would aid materially the success of a hostile expedition into that country. We would therefore request, if compatible with your duty as an officer, and if in your power, that you would use the influence of your recommendation for the purpose of calling out a small volunteer force to act in conjunction with such force as you may deem fit to send to the hostile country. Ample evidence will be given you of the necessity of taking immediate action in this matter.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAS. T. RYAN, J. P. HAYNES, J. LOGAN, [AND 10 OTHERS.]

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 25, 1861.

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Army Headquarters, New York:

COLONEL: In consequence of the frequent depredations by the Indians upon the property of the inhabitants of the Coast Range in Mendocino, Humboldt, and Trinity Counties, not unfrequently accompanied by loss of life, 1 have concluded, for the purpose of better protection and to chastise the depredators, to distribute the companies stationed at Forts Gaston and Humboldt, and Camp Bragg, in detachments, to range along the frontier and keep as much of it as practicable under constant observation, and for the purpose of giving the most effect to their operations I have thought it expedient and proper to ask Governor Downey to authorize the enrollment of thirty volunteers for three months, viz, two sergeants, two corporals, and twenty-six men, acquainted with that mountainous country, and who I think can be attached to the different detachments as guides with decided advantage.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 25, 1861.

JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of the State of California:

SIR: I have already acquainted you with my intention to post the companies at Forts Humboldt, Gaston, and Camp Bragg in detachments {p.458} along the frontier for the protection of the settlements, interposing them as far as practicable between the settlers and predatory Indians. The force so arranged I do not doubt will be sufficient for the purpose, if by the aid of guides it can be applied in the most effective manner. I have therefore to request that you will authorize the enrollment for three months of thirty volunteers in Humboldt or Mendocino, men who are well acquainted with the mountainous parts of the country, whom I will cause to be distributed among the several detachments to be employed as indicated above. I will accept the service of two sergeants, two corporals, and twenty-six privates, who will be mustered into service at Fort Humboldt as soon as they are enrolled and reach the rendezvous. They will, whilst in service, receive the pay and allowances provided by law for-infantry soldiers.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry and Brevet Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 25, 1861.

Capt. EDMUND UNDERWOOD, Fourth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Gaston, Cal.:

SIR: Brigadier-General Johnston directs you to send two detachments, under non-commissioned officers, of eighteen men, to the region of the country between the Coast Range and the coast watered by the Eel River and tributaries and South Fork of the Trinity. Direct these non-commissioned officers to keep their detachments in motion and give all the protection in their power to the inhabitants, their stock, and property against the predatory Indians. Should they find that any depredations have been committed, or should any be committed while they are in the country, they will endeavor to ascertain the party or parties, and then pursue them with the greatest activity, and when found, punish them with the utmost severity. These detachments will remain in the field until further orders, and should never remain in the same camp more than two or three days at a time. Should they come in the vicinity of the officers now in command of detachments in that region, they will report to them and combine their operations under their orders.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 41.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 28, 1861.

The headquarters of the First Regiment of Dragoons will be re-established at Fort Tejon. On the requisition of Lieutenant-Colonel Beall, commanding, the quartermaster’s department will furnish transportation for the non-commissioned staff of the regiment.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.459}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, March 28, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: The commanding general directs me to inform you that in addition to the detachments sent from your company in the region of country watered by the Eel and Trinity Rivers, he has ordered to the same district two detachments of a sergeant and eighteen men each, from Fort Gaston, and one of a subaltern and fifty-nine men from Fort Bragg. He directs you to exercise a general supervision over the movements of all these parties, and see that they are kept actively engaged in moving over the country requiring protection, and that you charge yourself with supplying them from time to time with provisions. Send an extract from this letter to each, that your authority may at once be recognized and such reports as are needed sent to you. He further informs you that at his request the Governor of this State will cause to be enrolled at Humboldt two sergeants, two corporals, and twenty-six men. This party you will muster into service as infantry, and assign them as guides in equal numbers to the detachments above mentioned, taking care to assign the guide-sergeants to detachments commanded by commissioned officers. The employment of these volunteers is an experiment, from which the general hopes to derive an advantage to the Government more than commensurate with the expense, and he relies on your exertions to take such measures as will render their service most effective. If depredations are now committed on the settlements by Indians, with guides thoroughly acquainted with the country and the Indians, and a sufficient force to chastise the parties when found, he thinks security should be given to the frontier.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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DRAGOON BRIDGE, HONEY LAKE VALLEY, CAL., April 1, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that a band of Indians, supposed to be under the control of one known as Smoke Creek Sam, has driven stock from this valley at three different times within the past six weeks-in all, supposed to be about fifteen head. The fact of the depredations was reported by some prospectors recently returned from the Humboldt. All stock has been driven from the mountains where the cattle were taken, so that no opportunity or inducement is now presented for similar thefts. The war chief of the Pah-Utes, Winnemucca, was here about two months ago. He said that he could not control Sam; disclaims all responsibility for his thefts, and that he will punish him. Sam is partly a Pitt River Indian, his mother being a Pitt. His band is composed of renegade Indians from both tribes. With the citizens Sam is reputed a very bad Indian, and accused as the originator of hostilities between them and the Pah-Utes last spring. Recent valuable discoveries of gold and silver on the Humboldt will cause a large amount of travel between this valley and that river.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. R. WARNER, Second Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Commanding.

{p.460}

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., April 4, 1861.

Capt. HENRY E. MAYNADIER, Tenth Regiment of Infantry:

SIR: By the third section of the act making appropriations for the support of the Army, approved March 2, 1861, $50,000 were appropriated “for the protection of emigrants on the overland routes between the Atlantic Slope and the California and Oregon and Washington frontier,” ... “to be expended under the direction of” this Department. It is contemplated to organize and equip from 50 to 100 men as a protective corps to be used as guards and sentries, scouting parties, and in such other ways as the best means of affording protection to emigrants may require. The Department understands that the protection contemplated in the act is protection not only against hostile Indians, but against all dangers, including starvation, losses, accidents, and the like, so far as the means provided will suffice. You are hereby detailed as the superintendent of the emigration, and will proceed without delay to organize a party of not less than fifty young, able-bodied men who are desirous of emigrating to the Pacific Slope. You will procure the arms, equipments, and horses necessary to make an efficient corps of this party, and will distribute them to the men, charging them the cost price of each article, which will be deducted from their pay in case of loss or damage through want of proper care. Von will purchase a supply of provisions of the kind and quality provided by the Subsistence Department of the Army sufficient to last five months, by which time you will meet a supply forwarded from the Pacific Coast and ordered to be deposited at some point on the road. You will purchase a sufficient number of wagons and animals to transport the baggage and provisions of your party, with such tools, implements, and material as may be required to fit out a train in the most complete manner. You will procure your employés’ equipment, supplies, and transportation at those points which appear to insure the most economical and effective organization for your party, being careful to establish such arrangements that the expenditures for the completion of the work and the closing up of the expedition may not exceed the amount which will be furnished you from the appropriation. The following assistants are authorized to be hired at the rates of compensation herein specified: 1 principal assistant at $200 per month; 3 assistants at $150 per month; 1 physician at $150 per month; 1 guide (if necessary) at $125 per month; 1 clerk at $75 per month; 1 wagon-master at $75 per month; 15 teamsters, herders, cooks, &c., at a rate not exceeding $30 per month You are authorized to pay the actual traveling fare of your employés from the places at which they are engaged to the place from which the expedition will leave the Missouri River, and to furnish them with subsistence while on duty with the expedition in the field. You will be allowed the sum of $35 per month in lieu of quarters and fuel, and the usual mileage of 10 cents when traveling on duty connected with the expedition. In view of the great advantages which employment in the Protective Corps will afford to young men desirous of emigrating, it is expected that a sufficient number can be obtained for a sum not exceeding $15 per month in addition to their outfit and subsistence. Immediately after the receipt of these instructions you will commence to procure the necessary supplies for the expedition, and will direct your assistants to enlist the required number for the Protective Corps; you will appoint a rendezvous at some point on the Missouri River, and specify a time at which all shall be at that point. You will then, by publication in the newspapers and by hand-bills {p.461} widely circulated, notify persons intending to emigrate of the arrangements to be made, and invite them to avail themselves of the means of protection the Government offers them. You will take care to start early enough to insure a timely arrival on the Pacific Slope, and will endeavor to concentrate the emigrants by the time they reach the mountains, so that they can travel within easy reach of each other. If, after passing the South Pass sufficiently far, the emigrants desire to divide and take different routes, you are authorized to divide the Protective Corps, and place detachments under your assistants to accompany the parties, giving them such instructions as may be required. If the number of emigrants should require, and the funds allow, you may increase the number of the Protective Corps, employing, if possible, the emigrants themselves. You are also authorized to obtain a supply of goods for presents to Indians and compensation for their services in case you should find it necessary to employ them, but you will not expend a greater sum than $300 for this purpose. Having thus indicated generally the views of the Department, the execution and the arrangement of many of the details are left to your judgment, admonishing you that this is an exercise of the liberality and protection of the Government, which will be materially enhanced by an economical use of the means it has provided. After the emigrants have reached the settled parts of the Pacific Coast you will disband the Protective Corps, and dispose of the property and material on the best terms you can obtain. You will then proceed to San Francisco, Cal., and thence by the Panama steamer to New York and this city, where you will close your accounts and report to this Department the material incidents and results of the expedition. The sum of $35,000 will be placed to your credit with the assistant treasurers of the United States, as follows:

Assistant treasurer at New York$5,000
Assistant treasurer at Saint Louis20,000
Assistant treasurer at San Francisco10,000
35,000

Von are hereby authorized to obtain from the quartermaster, commissary, ordnance officer, or surgeon at any military post such public stores, including medicines, as they may be able to furnish, paying for them the cost price and transportation to the place where you receive them. You will report direct to the Adjutant-General and keep [him] informed by every opportunity of the progress of the expedition. You will render your accounts quarterly to the Adjutant-General according to the forms specified in the General Regulations of the Army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 50.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 8, 1861.

1. A detachment of two subalterns, two sergeants, two corporals, and ninety-six picked men will be selected from Companies A, C, I, and K, Ninth Infantry, at Fort Colville, and E and B, Ninth Infantry, at Fort Walla Walla, proportioned as follows, viz: From Colville, two subalterns, Second Lieut. Nathaniel Wickliffe, and Bvt. Second Lieut. Salem S. Marsh, three non-commissioned officers, and seventy-six men; and from Walla Walla, one sergeant and twenty men.

{p.462}

2. This detachment will form the guard to the Walla Walla and Fort Benton road party, and be under the command of First Lieut. J. Mullan, Second Artillery.

3. The command will be furnished with provisions and clothing, and medical stores, for sixteen months, and 300 rounds of ammunition.

4. The meat ration will consist of one-third pork and two-thirds cattle on the hoof; a reasonable supply of desiccated vegetables will be taken.

5. Eight months’ provisions will be taken from Fort Walla Walla, and the remainder under arrangements to be made by the chief commissary of the department.

6. The detachment from Colville will move to Cœur d’Alene Lake at such time and by such route as may be notified to the commanding officer at Fort Colville; the detachment from Walla Walla will move under the immediate orders of Lieutenant Mullan.

7. The detachment from Colville will be supplied with no more provisions than may be necessary to reach the Cœur d’Alene Lake and wait the arrival of Lieutenant Mullan.

8. Captain Kirkham, assistant quartermaster, will furnish transportation for the detachment and its supplies, adopting, on consultation with Lieutenant Mullan, the most economical measures compatible with efficiency.

9. If boots are on hand at Fort Vancouver or Walla Walla, two pairs per man will be supplied in the place of shoes.

10. The ordnance officer at Vancouver Arsenal will furnish the ammunition called for by this order on the requisition of Lieutenant Mullan.

11. Asst. Surg. Lewis Taylor will accompany the detachment.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., April 8, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to instructions from the War Department I am about to resume work upon the Fort Walla Walla and Fort Benton military road, and anticipate taking the field from Fort Walla Walla at a date not later than the 5th proximo, and in conformity to a notification from the department that an escort of 100 men, 3 officers and a physician would be furnished me by the general commanding the Department of the Pacific, I would respectfully make requisition for said escort to join me at Fort Walla Walla, or such other point as the interests of the service may permit. By the plan of operations submitted to and approved by the War Department, our field work will occupy a period of not less than fifteen continuous months, but to provide against contingencies I shall take in the field supplies for sixteen months, which will take the expedition to Fort Benton, enabling us to winter in the Bitter Root Valley, or some other equally suitable point. Having reached the Missouri River, a period of two months will be necessary for a return to Walla Walla, and the supplies needed for these two months could be economically and judiciously shipped from Saint Louis in the spring of 1862, and for which {p.463} a special requisition could be hereafter made. With a view to economy and a regard to the movements of the expedition into the Bitter Root Mountains, I have thought it best to start from Fort Walla Walla with a wagon train with supplies for one-half of the period, eight months, thus establishing a depot at the Cœur d’Alene Mission, from which point the train could return to the mouth of the Palouse for the remaining eight months, to be there shipped at a date depending upon the freshet of the Snake River, which last supplies would be thrown forward to the Bitter Root Valley to cover our winter’s wants. The train thus empty would be then occupied in moving the party leisurely toward our winter camp as the work progressed. I would therefore respectfully make requisition for commissary supplies for the escort for a period of sixteen months with wagon transportation for eight months. The allowance of pork or bacon should not exceed one-third the meat ration, the remainder to be beef on the hoof. A judicious supply of antiscorbutics should be furnished. I would make requisition for clothing for twelve months, and would ask that two pairs of boots be allowed each man, in lieu of the same number of pairs of shoes, the snows of the mountains rendering this necessary, looking toward the comfort of the men, &c. Twelve months’ supply of medicines would be ample for the entire period of field work. A supply of ammunition sufficient to cover the ordinary allowance for target practice and the contingencies of the march through the Indian country should be had. I know not how we shall find the mood of the Indians, but I am confident that the elements of disturbance still exist to a certain extent with the Cœur d’Alenes, but I trust our wants for ammunition may be limited to target practice alone. It would be well, provided it be not inconsistent with the interests of the department, could one of the officers who accompany the expedition be detailed from Fort Vancouver or Fort Walla Walla who could act as commissary and quartermaster to the escort, and with whom I could confer in arranging and directing such details as the wants of our movements suggest before we move into the field, Walla Walla is quite a good outfitting point, but to provide against contingencies I shall mostly provide my civil party with its equipment from Portland, Oreg. I have not entered into the minutiæ as regards the special wants of the escort in each particular department, they being such, however, as are needed with a body of troops moving into the Indian country with wagon-train transportation for a period of eight months. I would state that I leave for Oregon tomorrow, and shall without delay proceed to Fort Walla Walla, to there organize an expedition for the prosecution of the work on the road.

I am, sir, truly and respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN MULLAN, First Lieut., Second Arty., in charge of Military Road Expedition.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 9, 1861.

Col. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to tender the resignation of my commission in the Army of the United States, and to request that it may be submitted to the President for his action; and I have also respectfully {p.464} to ask that my successor may be appointed and ordered to relieve me as soon as practicable.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

A. S. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Cavalry, Brevet Brigadier-General.

[First indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, May 3, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

MAY 3, 1861.

Accepted.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 13, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: Your letter of March 24 [23*] has been submitted to the general commanding. He is pleased to hear that the reported depredations by the Indians have been greatly exaggerated, and therefore that there is better prospect of complete protection from the guides and troops now at your disposal. Your orders to Lieutenant Lynn are approved-the duty imposed on you by the general in the prompt pursuit of the actual depredators in each case and their punishment, but no indiscriminate slaughter of the guilty with the innocent. Knowing that killing women and children by the troops in retaliation for injuries inflicted by the Indian bands would not be resorted to by the officers or soldiers of the Army he gave no orders in the case. It may be frequently the case that two, three, or four men will form a sufficient party, if led by competent guide, and it was on this account that he gave four or five to each detachment.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See p. 6.

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FORT BRAGG, CAL., April 15, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that, in consequence of complaints made by the citizens of Long Valley against Indians in that neighborhood, 1 have ordered the detachment now in Round Valley to take a position on Eel River and equidistant from Round, Long, and Eden Valleys. The sergeant in command has been directed to dislodge the Indians in that vicinity, giving protection generally to the citizens and their property. This arrangement enables me to supply the detachment more readily, as it brings it nearer to this post and on the left bank of Eel River, thus avoiding the almost insuperable difficulty of {p.465} crossing that river (which will be high till the middle of May) with pack animals. This detachment being rationed only to the 1st of May, I have sent provisions to the camp above indicated, and upon the return of my pack train I shall proceed to execute the order contained in your letter of March 12. All the streams throughout the country in which I am directed to operate are still-high, owing to the unusual quantity of snow now covering the mountains, and it will be impracticable to operate to advantage before the 1st of May.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

EDWARD DILLON, Second Lieutenant, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., April 16, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen. Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Superintendent Geary has just returned from the Nez Percé Reservation, where he has succeeded in making a very satisfactory arrangement with the Indians in reference to the mining region. The Nez Percés agree to yield to the miners the country north of Clear Water, and allow them the right of travel on the trail to the ferry near Red Wolf’s Crossing of Snake River, the only stipulation of the Indians being that the remainder of their country shall be protected from the encroachments of the whites. This is but fair, seeing that they have been promised no compensation, and therefore, upon the request of Mr. Geary, who urges the necessity of the movement, I shall send Captain Smith’s company to the reservation probably by the 22d of the month. The distance is not greater than 100 miles, and the company can be recalled in a few days if their services are needed elsewhere. The horses will thrive on the rich bunch grass which abounds in that region, and, moreover, the presence of troops will give confidence to the Indians, who have always placed great reliance upon the military. I think that if Company H, First Dragoons, now at Fort Dalles, could be sent to re-enforce Captain Smith, that the presence of the squadron in that country during the summer would effectually prevent any disturbance. The Nez Percés have always been, and are now, disposed to yield a great deal and remain friendly, provided the Government shows a disposition to uphold them in their rights; but if this is not done I fear there will be trouble. I would beg leave to offer a suggestion with regard to the summer’s operations on the emigrant road. The subjugation of the Snakes, so effectually as to bring them to sue for peace, would require a large and expensive force, perhaps ten or twelve companies, necessarily requiring a large number of citizen employés as packers, herders, guides, &c., and the result would not be certain, as their country affords great facilities for concealment and escape. The remaining squadron of dragoons, with a company of infantry from this post, would keep the Indians from their fisheries all summer and afford ample protection to whatever emigrants may come across; besides, the expense would be almost nothing. For a force of that size nearly all the packing and work could be done by soldiers.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. STEEN, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

{p.466}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 60.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 18, 1861.

...

3. Maj. William S. Ketchum, Fourth Infantry, is assigned to the command of Fort Townsend, Wash. Ter. Transportation for his horses will be furnished by the quartermaster’s department.

4. Maj. George A. H. Blake, First Dragoons, is assigned to the command of Fort Crook, Cal. Transportation for his horses will be furnished by the quartermaster’s department.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 61.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 20, 1861.

The pontoons will be stored at Fort Point, and turned over to the chief engineer. The quartermaster will furnish the transportation.

By command of Brigadier-General Johnston:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT GASTON, CAL., April 20, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen. Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that in consequence of Indian troubles existing in the valley, on the 8th instant I sent for the head Indian chiefs of all the ranches in this valley and informed them that they must deliver up to me all the fire-arms in their possession, and I gave them four days to bring them to this post. On the day appointed several of the chiefs came to the post bringing a few rifles. Learning from an Indian who had had some considerable difficulty with some others of his race that there [were] more among the tribes, I dismissed the chiefs, informing them that I was aware they had more arms in their possession, and if they were not brought in at once I would send the men of my command over and take them. For several days the Indians came in, one or two at a time, bringing their arms, until I think I have them nearly all collected from these Indians that live in this valley. The excitement among the Indians has been great, and they seemed disposed not to surrender their guns without a struggle, inasmuch as these arms are their greatest wealth. Although I did not apprehend an attack from the Indians, I took the necessary precaution by issuing ammunition to my men and doubling my guards. I think that so long as a considerable force remains here there will be no trouble with the Hoopas for some time; but should the troops (or a large portion of them) be withdrawn from here I am apprehensive that the Indians may commit depredations upon the property of the whites. The white inhabitants of this valley are much excited, and from their long acquaintance with the Hoopa Indians apprehend trouble. The citizens of the valley are at present engaged building a block-house, and I know if these troops be withdrawn the families will leave the valley {p.467} for the bay. After delivering up their arms the Indians living in two of the principal ranches on the Trinity River left the valley, taking with them most of their arms, a supply of provisions, and all their movable goods. The whites feel insecure without the presence of a large military force, and many families speak of moving should the troops, or any considerable number of them, be ordered out of the valley. From all the information I can gain, there are at least 1,500 Indians living within a circle of ten miles from this valley, whilst the white population amounts only to about thirty men, of whom three have families. The principal chief is disposed to friendship. The last lot of arms brought in to me numbered some seven or eight. Some thirty Indians were with the old Mowhema at the time. The old man said he did not wish to fight, he was too old. He wanted to be buried where all his tribe were buried. He tries to control the younger bucks, but I am sorry to say with but little success. I would communicate more fully upon the state of Indian affairs in this valley, but owing to my bad health I am hardly able to attend to the duties either of the bureau or field. For several days past I have hardly been able to leave my room. I am the only commissioned officer with this command, and there is no physician, either civil or military, residing nearer this post than Arcata, Humboldt Bay, about forty miles distant.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDMUND UNDERWOOD, Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, Portland, Oreg., April 20, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

DEAR SIR: I inclose you herewith a copy of an agreement made with the Nez Percé Indians in regard to the occupation of a part of their reservation by the whites for mining purposes. The existence of extensive deposits of gold in the Nez Percé country is now placed beyond conjecture. Hundreds of white men are already in their country, and daily accessions will soon swell the number to thousands. This is inevitable, and the agreement entered into with these Indians was the only measure left me for preserving the peace of the country and protecting this tribe, which has ever been so faithful to our Government, from the fearful evils arising from the presence among them of a mining population. Many of the chiefs seemed fully aware of the evils arising from the presence of the miners, and their strenuous opposition to their presence was only overcome by assuring them that military force would be provided for the preservation of order to aid the agent in executing the intercourse laws, and prevent the aggression of the miners on the inhabited portion of their reservation. I have therefore earnestly to press the importance of having a proper military force without delay placed so as to protect the whole reservation from the intrusion of whisky traders, and from the beginning to aid the agent in enforcing the laws regulating trade and intercourse in the Indian country. I would regard dragoons as the most efficient class of troops for the service required, and am satisfied that a squadron could be maintained in the vicinity of these mines at an expense to the Government little greater than that required should they remain in garrison. There will be little difficulty in obtaining abundant supplies of {p.468} fuel, grass, and water. I trust, sir, the views I have hastily expressed will meet your concurrence, and that you will present to General Johnston, commanding this department, the urgent necessity of carrying the stipulations of the agreement into effect, and of ordering the military force stipulated for into the Nez Percé country at the earliest practicable moment. Permit me to say that severe illness, confining me to my room for several days, has prevented me from laying this subject before you at an earlier day.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD R. GEARY, Superintendent of Indian Affairs.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., April 24, 1861.

Respectfully forwarded to the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific. It is recommended that the request of the superintendent of Indian affairs be complied with.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

Articles of agreement made this 10th day of April, 1861, between Edward R. Geary, superintendent of Indian affairs for Oregon and Washington Territory, and A. J. Cain, agent for the Nez Percés in behalf of the United States, and the chiefs and head men of the Nez Percés in behalf of the said nation, said parties acting in accordance with authority vested in them by the second article of the treaty between the United States and the Nez Percés nation, of the 11th of June, 1855.

1. That portion of the Nez Percé Reservation lying north of the Snake and Clear Water Rivers, the South Fork 01 Clear Water, and the trail from said South Fork by the Weipe Root Ground, across the Bitter Root Mountains, is hereby opened to the whites in common with the Indians for mining purposes; provided, however, that the root grounds and agricultural tracts in said districts shall in no case be taken or occupied by the whites, but shall remain for the exclusive use and benefit of the Indians.

2. No white person other than those in the service of the United States shall be permitted to reside upon or occupy any portion of the Nez Percé Reservation south of the line above described without the consent of the superintendent, agent, and tribe, except that the right of way to the mining district north of the said described line may cross Snake River at any eligible point below the mouth of Clear Water.

3. The entire portion of the Nez Percé Reservation thus hereby opened to the whites for mining purposes shall in all respects be subject to the laws of the United States regulating trade and intercourse in the Indian country, and no person shall be permitted to trade therein without obtaining license and giving bond as provided by law.

4. It is furthermore agreed on the part of the United States that a sufficient military force shall be placed on the reservation to preserve the quiet of the country and protect the Nez Percés in the rights secured to them by treaty and these articles of agreement.

{p.469}

In testimony whereof we have hereunto set our hands this day and year aforesaid at Lapwai, Nez Percé Reservation, the Territory of Washington.

EDWARD R. GEARY, Superintendent Indian Affairs, Oregon and Washington. A. J. CAIN, U. S. Indian Agent, Washington Territory.

[Signed on the part of the Indians by Lawyer, head chief of the Nez Percé nation, and forty-nine chiefs and head men.]

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ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 25, 1861.

In compliance with Special Orders, No. 86, dated War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, March 23, 1861, I hereby assume command of this department.

All concerned will govern themselves accordingly.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 25, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver:

Brigadier-General Sumner, commanding the department, directs you to send the light battery of the Third Artillery, guns, horses, and men, by the first steamer to this place. Lieutenant-Colonel Swords will prepare transportation.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDERS, No. 21.}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., April 25, 1861.

Capt. A. J. Smith, with his company (C), First Dragoons, will leave this post on Monday, the 29th instant, and proceed to establish himself on the Nez Percé Reservation at the most suitable point for carrying out the arrangement recently made by the Indians and Superintendent Geary, and also for enforcing the intercourse law. The company will be supplied with thirty days’ rations and an ample supply of ammunition. The assistant quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Major Steen:

JAMES WHEELER, JR., Second Lieutenant, First Dragoons, Post Adjutant.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 64.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 26, 1861.

The detachment of Sappers and Miners, under Lieutenant Casey, will proceed to Alcatraz Island to-day and be reported to the commanding {p.470} officer for duty. Major Allen, assistant quartermaster, will furnish transportation.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 66.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 26, 1861.

Companies G and M, Third Artillery, will be sent by the commander of the District of Oregon to this place.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST CALIFORNIA REGIMENT, New York, April 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Acting on the inclosed, I have organized an infantry regiment substantially on the basis of the New York laws. I respectfully ask the Department to accept their services. Nothing can be more just to the sentiments of California and Oregon or do more to keep them loyal and patriotic. I have taken the liberty to inclose what I suppose to be such instructions and authority as the case requires.

Be pleased, sir, to remember that we have no executive officers through whom we can act, and I shall therefore require such authority as I suggest.

The men are pressing me every hour, and I shall soon make them efficient. I trust I need not say that I will use every precaution to limit the expense of equipment within reasonable military bounds. I hope you will see the importance of this measure in a political as well as military view.

Will you be pleased also to communicate a Yes or No by telegraph to my address, Astor House?

With great respect, your obedient servant,

E. D. BAKER.

[Indorsement.]

I most cordially concur in raising the regiment suggested by Senator Baker, and I hope this patriotic movement will be authorized.

JOHN E. WOOL, Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

NEW YORK CITY, April 27, 1861.

Hon. E. D. BAKER, New York:

SIR: A meeting of citizens of California and others, former residents of that State, was held in this city on the 21st instant. There were present between 200 and 300 persons, who comprised a large majority of those Californians now in New York and those who have lately been at Washington. The object of the meeting was to give expression to the feeling of confidence in our Administration, which animates us {p.471} equally with our brothers in the Atlantic States, and to devise a method in which we can most effectually strengthen the hands of Government and aid in crushing out the rebellion in our midst. We desired to also claim for California her proper share of the duty as well as honor of upholding and preserving the American flag and the integrity of the union of the States. It was there resolved to raise and offer to the Government a California regiment, to be composed as far as possible of persons at some time residents of California. It was also unanimously resolved that you be requested to accept the colonelcy of the regiment. Up to this time the organization has been vigorously pushed, and about 600 men have been enrolled and are now under drill by competent instructors, and we hope within the next forty-eight hours to be able to apprise you that the full complement of men is enrolled and ready to be mustered into service. As the chairman of our meeting, and instructed to acquaint you with their wishes, in their name, I beg you to accept the position named, and add your name and weight of character to our offering.

I have the honor to subscribe myself, your most obedient servant,

J. C. BIRDSEYE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 67.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 27, 1861.

1. Lieut. Thomas L. Casey, engineers, is relieved from duty with the Sappers and Miners, and will proceed to West Point, N. Y.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 27, 1861.

Capt. J. B. MOORE, Commanding National Guard, California State Militia:

CAPTAIN: General Sumner acknowledges the receipt of the patriotic offer of the National Guard, California State Militia, to serve as a garrison at Fort Point. For this offer he begs you to accept for yourself and present to your company his thanks. Fortunately, the national troops are now sufficient to guard all the property of the United States on this coast, and he therefore respectfully declines the offer.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 28, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I arrived here on the 24th instant, and on the 25th relieved General Johnston in the command of this department. My departure from New York was not known here till the night before my arrival. It gives me pleasure to state that the {p.472} command was turned over to me in good order. General Johnston had forwarded his resignation before I arrived, but he continued to hold the command, and was carrying out the orders of the Government. I have determined to re-enforce immediately and strongly the forts in this harbor, and have ordered down three companies of artillery (including the battery) from Fort Vancouver. I have also taken the liberty to detain the detachment of twenty-nine Sappers and Miners. I trust the General-in-Chief will not disapprove of this. My intention is to put 400 men on Alcatraz Island, 150 at Fort Point, and place the battery at the depot at Benicia, in addition to the two infantry companies now there. These troops will all be supplied with six months’ provisions, and additional arrangements will be made for water where it is necessary, so that they will be independent and secure for six months, and will hold the entire control of the entrance to the harbor. I think this disposition of the troops will not only secure the Government property, but will have the effect to foreclose at once all hopes on the part of the disaffected of their ever being able to precipitate matters here by seizing forts and arsenals.

There is a strong Union feeling with the majority of the people of this State, but the secessionists are much the most active and zealous party, which gives them more influence than they ought to have from their numbers. I have no doubt but there is some deep scheming to draw California into the secession movement; in the first place as the “Republic of the Pacific,” expecting afterward to induce her to join the Southern Confederacy. The troops now here will hold their positions and all the Government property, but if there should be a general uprising of the people, they could not, of course, put it down. I think the course of events at the East will control events here. So long as the General Government is sustained and holds the capital the secessionists can not carry this State out of the Union. I would respectfully say to the General-in-Chief that after my arrangements are completed-and they will be in two weeks-if he should think proper to authorize me to place Colonel Wright here in command of the department everything will be secure; and, if my services should be wanted elsewhere, I could be withdrawn from this department without detriment to the public service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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FORT GASTON, CAL., April 28, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, U. S. Army Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that in compliance with instructions received from your office, dated March 25, 1861, I have this day ordered a detachment, consisting of two non-commissioned officers and twenty-seven privates of Company B, Fourth Infantry, and eight volunteer guides, to proceed from this post to Pardee’s old ranch via the South Fork of the Trinity River. From that place the sergeant commanding the detachment has instructions to march in any direction (keeping the general’s letter of instructions in view) his guides may suggest I have also given him instructions that in case depredations are committed in the section of country through which he marches with his command to take prompt measures to pursue and capture the depredators; and if the fact of their guilt can be clearly ascertained to punish the whole {p.473} tribe, without the guilty ones are surrendered. The volunteer guides, one corporal and seven privates, did not reach this post until the 26th instant. Many of them were destitute of clothing, and in order to equip them for duty in the field I have been compelled to issue to them a small quantity of clothing. In consideration of the great excitement amongst Indians which has existed consequent upon the surrender of their arms (the fact was fully reported to department headquarters in my letter dated April 20, 1861), I did not consider myself justified in sending a larger force from this post at present, and I have now but thirty-four enlisted men left at this post. Considering the numerical strength of the Indians in this valley, to press any desirable result in case of an outbreak I would require my whole command.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ED. UNDERWOOD, Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Post.

P. S.-On the same day that the detachment left this post I forwarded a report of the same to Captain Lovell, Sixth Infantry, commanding Fort Humboldt, informing him that they had left. I also furnished the captain a copy of my letter of instructions to the sergeant in command of the detachment.

E. U.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 68.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 29, 1861.

1. Fort Mojave will be abandoned and the garrison and public property removed to Los Angeles.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, April 29, 1861.

Capt. W. S. HANCOCK, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Army, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: I inclose you an order* for the abandonment of Fort Mojave, and now give the following directions from the general commanding, viz:

Send your train out as early as possible; send sufficiently in advance notification to the commanding officer, by express, of the time he may expect the train. Send also the inclosed copy of this order. Select an eligible encampment for the troops as near Los Angeles as possible. Make its relations to your present depot such as to secure perfect protection. If this be not possible in the present position of the depot then select another having such relation to the encampment of the troops.

The commanding officer of the troops will be ordered to furnish you with such guards and escorts as you may require for your depot and train. If you are at any time of opinion that the train going to Tejon needs an escort, you will call on the commanding officer of Tejon, who will be instructed to furnish them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See next, ante.

{p.474}

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, New York, April 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: Owing to apprehensions which have been expressed that steamers of this company may be captured, with their mails, treasure, and freight, by privateersmen shipping as passengers, I respectfully request that you will direct the commanding officer in the Pacific to detail a guard of ten or fifteen men with an officer, either soldiers or marines, to each steamer sailing 1st, 11th, and 21st of each month from San Francisco, to aid in their protection. Such guard and officer will be carried and maintained on board said steamers at the expense of this company, and in case it is required by the Government, the pay of men and officer will also be disbursed at the company’s expense at Government rates. The importance and value of the Government mails carried by these steamers, as well as of the treasure, it is hoped, will lead to an early and favorable response to this application.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ALLAN McLANE, President.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., April 30, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Army:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have found it necessary to withdraw the troops from Fort Mojave and place them at Los Angeles. There is more danger of disaffection at this place than any other in the State. There are a number of influential men there who are decided secessionists, and if we should have any difficulty it will commence there. Fort Mojave is represented as an entirely useless post. There are no hostile Indians near it, and there is no traveling whatever on the road it was intended to protect.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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NEW YORK, April 30, 1861.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

Will you please send instructions to California per pony express for the steamers of this company to be furnished with a small guard of soldiers or marines to go on them between San Francisco and Panama? It will help to prevent their seizure from parties who may ship or travel for that purpose, and at the same time enable the captain to organize his crew properly for the repulsion of any enemy from outside.

ALLAN MCLANE, President.

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FORT BRAGG, CAL., April 30, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that, having supplied the detachment now on Eel River with two months’ provisions, I shall to-morrow {p.475} leave this post with twenty-five men and proceed to execute the order contained in your letter of March 12, 1861.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

EDWARD DILLON, Second Lieutenant, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

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ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., May 2, 1861.

Capt. James A. Hardie, Third Artillery, is relieved as acting assistant adjutant-general temporarily by First Lieut. John S. Mason, Third Artillery.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JAS. A. HARDIE, Captain, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SANTA BARBARA, CAL., May 3, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: I have within a few days received information that I know to be entirely reliable, that it is the intention of the secessionists to take possession of the peninsula of Lower California, Mexico, as one of the preparatory steps to the acquiring of a portion or the whole of Mexico. Having possession of the peninsula of Lower California, their intention is to cut off our commerce with Mexico, seize the Panama steamers, and with the aid of the treasure so acquired to be able to extend their conquest to Sonora and Chihuahua at least. The possession of the peninsula of Lower California is absolutely and indispensably necessary to the proper advancement and protection of the Pacific interest of the United States. The native-born population of this State, without one solitary exception, will join the secessionists. The most of the Mexicans and French will do the same. Rather than the filibustering secessionists should get possession of the peninsula of Lower California I think our Government quite warranted (in case no arrangement can be made with the Mexican Government for its purchase) in taking possession of it for our own protection; at least to hold it as against the designs of the secessionists. For information in relation to the peninsula of Lower California, I refer you to my last report to Secretary Cass.

With high respect, I remain, your obedient servant,

THOMAS SPRAGUE, Late U. S. Commercial Agent at La Paz, Lower Cal., Mexico.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 71.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 3, 1861.

Company K, First Dragoons (Carleton’s), will be detached from Fort Tejon, and will proceed to and take post at Los Angeles.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.476}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 3, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. J. H. CARLETON, Captain, First Dragoons, Fort Tejon, Cal.:

SIR: The commanding general directs you to establish a camp at the most eligible position in the immediate vicinity of Los Angeles, capable of fulfilling the conditions called for in the inclosed letter of instructions to Captain Hancock, assistant quartermaster.* The two companies from Fort Mojave will be included in your encampment and in your command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Mackall to Hancock, April 29, p. 473.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR, May 4, 1861.

Postmaster-General:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 2d instant respecting the application made to this Department by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company for an order to detail a military guard to each of the mail steamships conveying the mails between San Francisco and Panama; and I beg leave to inform you, in reply, that believing it to be more convenient for the Navy Department to furnish marines for the purpose, and that they would be best adapted for the service, I have referred the application of the company to the Secretary of that Department, inviting his attention to the subject.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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SAN FRANCISCO, March [May] 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a communication to the President of the United States tendering my services to raise, organize, and command a brigade or regiment of volunteers in California to aid in garrisoning the posts and harbor of San Francisco and other assailable points on the coast of California, and I respectfully request that you will forward it with the accompanying letters.*

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. STEVENSON, Late Colonel Comdg. First Regiment New York Volunteers.

* Not found as inclosures.

[Inclosure.]

SAN FRANCISCO, May 4, 1861.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

SIR: During the war with Mexico I had the honor, under the authority of James K. Polk, at that time President of the United States, to raise, organize, and conduct to California the First Regiment of New {p.477} York Volunteers, who took possession of and garrisoned the interior posts and the coast of California from Sutter’s Fort in the north to La Paz, Lower California, in the south. How faithfully I discharged the duties of that important trust the archives of the War Department will prove. I have been a permanent resident of California ever since the disbanding of my regiment in October, A. D. 1848, and now beg leave to say that the same love of country which impelled me to leave my native home (New York) for distant service at that time under the flag of my country prompts me now most respectfully to tender my services to the President, to raise, organize, and command a brigade or regiment of volunteers to aid in garrisoning the harbor of San Francisco and the other assailable points on the coast or elsewhere.

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. D. STEVENSON, Late Colonel Comdg. First Regiment New York Volunteers.

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ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Los Angeles, Cal., May 4, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Special Orders, No. 68, from headquarters Department of the Pacific, of April 29, 1861, and letter of instructions of same date, from same source. I shall attend to the matters referred to therein as promptly as possible. I will be able to send thirty wagons, and that number will, I think, be sufficient to bring in everything valuable. One of the trains is returning from Fort Mojave (it will be here in a few-days); another is on the route to Fort Tejon, and will be here in about the same time. The half train will be here to-morrow. I will advise you in a few days as to the date the train may be expected to reach Fort Mojave, and as to other matters. No time shall be lost in bringing in the troops. In the meantime I believe if there is trouble here I will be able to defend the public property with the supporters of the Federal Government to be had on my call from among the citizens of Los Angeles. If there should be a difficulty in California it is likely that it will first show its head here, but I do not think the matter is ripe yet for any serious movement. It will, I think, be deferred until a demand is made for direct taxes to support the Government, or for troops to actively assist in putting down insurrections, or possibly not until after they have mustered their forces at the next general election-say for Congressmen. There are people here anxious for a difficulty and there may be (I believe there are, although not yet formidable) organizations to that end. The people generally are scarcely prepared for strife, and there is a strong loyal element among them. On the other hand, there is quite a number of reckless people who have nothing to lose, who are ready for any change, and who are active in encouraging acts tending to hostilities, and I regret to say that it is unfortunate that, as a general rule, those persons who have heretofore been influential and active leaders in politics, and have exercised great control over the people, are encouraging difficulties here by open avowals of their opinions. It may as well be said in this connection that there is here belonging to the State a new bronze field piece and carriage (I think a 6-pounder gun), which in case of difficulty is not likely at first to be in the hands of persons supporting the Federal Government. I would respectfully suggest, therefore, that it might be wise {p.478} to send here a gun of equal or greater caliber. The moral effect would not be trifling in case of a difficulty, and the adverse party in possession of the other gun. A 12-pounder howitzer, it seems to me, would be the best (two might be better). The harness should be sent here also. I could furnish suitable mules. It might be manned by a detachment of infantry or by a detachment of dragoons. The latter would be the best, for these people will be mounted.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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SAN FRANCISCO, May 4, 1861.

Maj. G. A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Fort Tejon, Cal.:

SIR: Report at this place in person instantly for special duty. Answer.

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., May 6, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Your communication of the 25th ultimo reached me on the 29th, and your telegraphic dispatch was received on the 2d instant, being dated en the 26th ultimo, 2 p.m. The light battery and Companies G and M, Third Artillery, are now embarking on the steamer Cortez. The troops are under the command of Capt. E. O. C. Ord, Third Artillery. I beg to call the attention of the general to the fact that but one small company is left at this post, numbering about fifty men all told. It will be recollected that this is a very important position at this moment, being the main depot from which all the troops in the district, excepting the small force on the waters of Puget Sound, are supplied. One company, even were it full, could not properly guard the public property, storehouses, and other buildings of this large post. We should have at least three companies. It is believed that companies can be drawn from the posts east of the Cascades without detriment to the service. As I have no authority to move troops, or, in fact, to give any orders in the district, with a single exception, a remote contingency, I trust this subject may receive the early attention of the general commanding the department. I beg leave to ask the attention of the commanding general to Orders, No. 2, from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, dated January 17, 1801, which, taken in connection with the communication addressed to me from the same headquarters on the 13th of February, 1861, which will show that the special powers delegated to the commander of this district, under the provisions of General Orders, No. 10, of November 22, 1860, from the headquarters of the Army, are very limited-in fact, practically the district commander is powerless. The letter of February 13, above referred to, places even Major Babbitt, the depot staff officer at my headquarters, beyond my control.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.479}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 76.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 7, 1861.

1. The garrison of Fort Umpqua, Company L, Third Artillery, with the exception of one subaltern and twelve men, will be brought to the Presidio of San Francisco by the Government transport brig Floyd.

2. Capt. Henry B. Judd, Third Artillery, will proceed to Fort Umpqua, embark, and accompany the command.

3. The assistant surgeon will accompany the troops.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 77.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 7, 1861.

Special Orders, No. 76, is so far modified as not to prescribe the mode of transportation of the troops from Fort Umpqua.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Los Angeles, Cal., May 7, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that a site for an encampment for the troops has been selected, which will be assigned to them unless it is not approved by the general commanding. It is outside of the town, beyond all buildings some distance, and directly in front of my corral, and in full view of it. I am putting up store-tents in the corral and will remove all the public property from the present store-house, so that there will be but one point to guard. The troops will be half a mile distant therefrom or less and on the side of the town toward San Pedro. Water will be hauled to the troops by water carts, for which facilities are at hand, as the town is supplied in that manner. The horses will have to be ridden about half a mile to water. But the advantage is that you do not have to pass through the town to get to the point to be protected, which would be the case were they encamped along the river above the town. With the troops placed as proposed there would probably be no necessity of having more than a picket guard of three men in my corral, and they only at night. Possibly they would not be required at any time, as the troops would have entire command of the corral from that point. I do not think that there will be serious trouble here soon. Still a command of troops under good discipline stationed near the town would be well enough, judging from recent developments. No good citizen would be interfered with, and their presence is desired by many of the population. The “bear flag” was paraded through the streets of El Monte (twelve miles eastward) on the 4th instant, and was escorted by a number of horsemen, varying (according to the reports) from forty to seventy, most probably the former. It was understood that it would be paraded here the next day. It was not. Then it was said that it would be on the subsequent day (yesterday, the day of the municipal election). I was prepared for it. It was not attempted, however. The “bear flag” {p.480} is being painted here, and I think it will be paraded soon, possibly next Sunday, or some other day when the company, known here as the secession company, drills; I have taken all the precautions possible and that I think necessary, and I believe I can get all the assistance I require, until the troops arrive, from among the citizens to resist any open attack upon the public property (but I do not think they are ready for such an attempt). The leaders in politics among those who have sympathies antagonistic to the Government, and the principal citizens, do not wish to see force used (they are men of property), and oppose carrying matters to extremities; yet the open expression of their opinions has helped to inaugurate disaffection. Since it has been thought wise to send troops here, a sufficient number to have a strong moral effect should be sent, and it would be better that a show should be made at once, since it is known that it is to be made at all. It would be better, I think, even were it to be but a temporary matter, that the dragoons (with at least a piece of artillery) should be at hand. When once a revolution commences the masses of the native population will act, and they are worthy of a good deal of consideration. If they act it will be most likely against the Government.

I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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Los ANGELES, May 7, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL:

The “bear flag” was raised at El Monte, twelve miles distant, on the 4th instant. The escort was, say, forty horsemen. I have, I believe, reliable evidence that it will be raised here on Sunday, the 12th instant-that is, that flag will be paraded through our streets under a strong escort. I do not then anticipate an assault; yet, to avoid insult to our flag, it might be well to have all the efficient dragoons from Fort Tejon at this point by Saturday next Major Carleton is to leave to-morrow, and if his presence here be desired a dispatch can reach him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 8, 1861.

Col. B. D. BAKER, U. S. Senate, &c., Washington, D. C.:

SIR: You are authorized to raise for the service of the United states a regiment of troops (Infantry), with yourself as colonel to be taken as a portion of any troops that may be called from the State of California by the United States, and to be known as the California Regiment. Orders will be issued to the mustering officer in New York to muster the same into the service as soon as presented. In case the proper Government officers are not prepared to furnish clothing for the men of your regiment at the time you find it necessary, you are authorized to purchase for each man an outfit of clothing, provided the same is properly charged on the muster-rolls of your command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.481}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 9, 1861.

Col. W. SEAWELL, Sixth Infty., U. S. Army, Comdg. Benicia Barracks, Benicia, Cal.:

COLONEL: The commanding general directs you to double the guard at the magazine, and directs me to say that the whole public property at Benicia-barracks, arsenal, and depot-is under your protection, and he calls on you for untiring vigilance, and reminds you that this property must be preserved at all hazards.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 9,-1861.

Capt. D. MCDOUGAL, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Brigadier-General Sumner directs me to say that he learns that you, have reason to doubt the security of the navy-yard under your command at Mare Island, and that you have not the means of increasing your force so as to put it beyond danger, or to move the temptation presented by its apparent defenseless condition. He therefore informs you that if such is the case, at your request he will send a battery of light artillery for its better security.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., May 10, 1861.

Lieut. Col. B. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters Army, Washington, D. C.

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have found it necessary to withdraw Brevet Major Carleton’s company of dragoons from Fort Tejon and to place it at Los Angeles. This will give a command at the latter place of one company of horse and two of infantry. The detachment will be commanded by Major Carleton. I have also to report the arrival of three companies of artillery from Oregon. The battery will take post at the depot at Benicia, and the two foot companies at Fort Alcatraz. I have informed Captain McDougal, the commander of the navy-yard, that, if he does not feel perfectly secure and wishes any further protection, I will place a company of artillery there. Captain Burton has been assigned to the command at Fort Alcatraz.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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COMMANDANT’S OFFICE, U. S. NAVY-YARD, Mare Island, May 10, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I am in receipt of your communication of yesterday’s date. I am under many obligations to General Sumner for his prompt tender {p.482} of assistance in the protection of the navy-yard in case of necessity. I have too much faith in the strong Union feeling now existing in California to believe for one moment that an effort of the kind would be even attempted, though, should I have the least reason to suspect such an attempt, I shall avail myself promptly of his offer. I have forwarded your letter to the Honorable the Secretary of the Navy, and have directed Lieut. Comdg. F. Stanly to hand you this and confer with the general.

I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. MCDOUGAL, Commandant.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 10, 1861.

Capt. D. MCDOUGAL, U. S. Navy Commanding Mare Island Navy-Yard, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I am directed by Brigadier-General Sumner to say that, since my letter to you of yesterday, further reflection on the offer therein brings him to the conclusion that a company of foot artillery will form a better force for the yard than the light battery, and he will, if the guard is wished by you, send the foot.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, May 10, 1861.

Lieut. Col. B. L. BEALL, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Tejon, Cal.:

COLONEL: Carleton’s company was ordered to Los Angeles. Has it gone?

W. W. MACKALL.

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NAVY-YARD, Mare Island, May 11, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Your letter of yesterday’s date has been received. Lieutenant Commanding Stanly was the bearer of my reply to General Sumner’s tender of the 9th instant. Nothing has transpired to alter my opinion expressed yesterday as to the necessity of a guard at the navy-yard. But as the general has superior means of gaining information in relation to the movements of the day, I would be under many obligations to him if he would communicate anything which would, in his opinion, affect us at the island.

With many thanks for his offer of yesterday, I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. MCDOUGAL, Commandant.

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ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Los Angeles, Cal., May 11, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: On the 7th instant I wrote a dispatch to you, which was telegraphed on the 8th at 10 a.m. I transcribe it here.* I supposed {p.483} the presence of the dragoons might alone prevent such a scene; still, on the first occasion of showing this flag I do not anticipate difficulty. The violent party is not yet strong. Success will make it stronger. The native Californians will take the strong side. Those of them who have taken sides are with the violent party. The Union men, irrespective of party, are organizing here, and I think will soon be formidable enough to control matters-certainly until there is a great change in political matters on the Atlantic side, or until direct taxes for the support of the war be levied, probably then also.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

* See Hancock to Mackall, May 7, p. 480.

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ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Los Angeles, Cal., May 12, 1861-8 p.m.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: There was no trouble here whatever to-day. Having failed to do what they had promised to do, I have no anxiety for the future. Those intending to parade here to-day thought better of it. The fact is, their principal advisers, or those to whom the turbulent spirits looked to for countenance, have found that they were being compromised in an affair for which they were not prepared. The Union men have been quite busy during the last few days in organizing for the purpose of commanding order, and have found their numbers so formidable that, together with the moral effect produced by the reported proximity of troops, they have but little fear for the future.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

–––

CAMP AT WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION, OREG., Maj. W. W. MACKALL, May 12, 1861.

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that a few days ago a party of eighty warriors from this reservation returned from the Snake country, where they had been to recover horses stolen from them by the Snakes at various times during the last year. The party had but small success, only having recovered some twenty horses. They took prisoners Po-li-ni, a noted chief, and seven of his men, but unfortunately they were all released on their promise to return on the morrow with all their people. The captives were not seen again. From information obtained from the Snakes themselves I am of opinion that no fears need be entertained of an attack being made by the Snakes on the agency during the summer. All the reservation Indians have removed with stock to the fisheries on the Columbia River. The presence of even a smaller force than that now here, and of any arm, would effectually prevent an open attack. Petty thefts can only be prevented by the presence of so large a force that occasional scouts could be made to the nearest Snake {p.484} villages. This latter service could well be performed by the reservation Indians when the presence of a very small detachment of soldiers assures them of the safety of their families.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. MCM. GREGG Second Lieutenant, First Dragoons, Commanding Camp.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 80.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 13, 1861.

1. The following movements will take place to day, viz: Company G, Third Artillery, from Presidio to Fort Point; Company A, from Fort Point, and M, Third Artillery, from Presidio, to Alcatraz Island. The deputy quartermaster-general will make and notify to the commanding officers the necessary arrangements for transportation.

2. Hardie’s company will proceed at once to Fort Point, and Andrews’ to the wharf at Fort Point and embark with Burton’s.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 13, 1861.

Maj. ENOCH STEEN, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter.:

MAJOR: Your communication of April 16 has been received, and the general commanding the department directs me to say in reply that he approves your compliance with the requisition of the superintendent of Indian affairs in detaching Captain Smith’s company. The general also approves of your suggestions with reference to this summer’s operations on the emigrant road, taking care, however, that your post is at all times properly garrisoned.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 13, 1861.

Capt. W. S. HANCOCK, Assistant Quartermaster, Los Angeles, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Your letters of May 4 and 7 have been received, and I am instructed by the general commanding the department to inform you that the site selected by Major Carleton and yourself in the vicinity of Los Angeles, and the measures you have taken to facilitate the rapid concentration of troops at that point, are highly approved by him. He directs me to inform you that Colonel Beall has been this day telegraphed to turn over to Major Carleton two mountain howitzers, with the requisite amount of ammunition for the same.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.485}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 13, 1861.

Col. G. WRIGHT, Ninth Infty., Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: I am directed by the commanding general to inform you, in answer to your communication of the 6th instant, that the subjects discussed therein will be taken into consideration by him as soon as it is ascertained whether any change will take place in the command of this department. In the meantime you are requested to withdraw a company from any post lying east of the Cascades for the purpose of re-enforcing Fort Vancouver. Major Babbitt has been informed from these headquarters that he is subject to your orders.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., May 14, 1861.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, Washington:

DEAR SIR: On the first arrival of news of the commencement of hostilities, Col. John D. Stevenson, of this city, expressed his desire to once more to offer his services in the maintenance of our cause and flag. He made his opinions heard and felt here and his determined loyalty, connected with his well-known and determined character, both as a citizen and a soldier, has done much to establish the present sound condition of our State. I know of no man, in this State or elsewhere, with whom I would sooner trust the honor of our country for prudence before or success in battle. He is an energetic, able, and brave man, and every inch of him the stuff of which not only soldiers but leaders are made. If any position the same or similar to that which he seeks is to be conferred upon any of our citizens on this coast, I earnestly recommend Colonel Stevenson for that place. He writes about service here, but he assures me that he is prepared to devote himself to the service anywhere.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. A. McDOUGALL.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 82.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 14, 1861.

1. Company I, Fourth Infantry (Brevet Major Haller’s), now en route from Fort Mojave, will immediately proceed to and take post at San Diego.

2. Upon the arrival of Major Haller’s company, Company F, Sixth Infantry (Brevet Major Armistead’s), will proceed as soon as possible to Los Angeles and report to Major Carleton.

3. Bvt. Second Lieut. James H.-Wilson, Corps of Topographical Engineers, will immediately report to Capt. George Thom for service connected with the construction of military roads.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.486}

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Los Angeles, Cal., May 14, 1861.

Maj. W. W. MACKALL, Asst. Adjt. Gen. Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Major Haller’s command may be expected to arrive here on the 13th of June. Major Carleton’s company (K) will be here to-morrow morning. He is now at Cohnenga Pass (twelve miles distant). There need be no anxiety concerning matters at this place, at least until political affairs materially change.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WINF’D S. HANCOCK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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ORDERS, No. 6.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 15, 1861.

I. Neither commanding officers of posts who avail themselves of leaves of absence of seven days, nor officers to whom such leaves are granted, will go to such distance from their posts that they cannot in the usual mode of travel rejoin their posts by the expiration of the leave. No leave will be extended at these headquarters, when this order is in the slightest degree violated.

II. All officers charged with the care of public property will hold themselves in readiness at all times to protect it at every hazard. No public property will ever be surrendered in this department.

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDERS, No. 7.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 18, 1861.

Any citizen in the employment of the Army in this department who is opposed to the Union will be instantly discharged.

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 18, 1861.

Capt. JOHN ADAMS, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Crook, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Send Company B, Sixth Infantry, to Benicia Barracks immediately.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., May 20, 1861.

Lieut. Col. B. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have found it necessary to withdraw the greater part of the garrison from Fort Umpqua and one {p.487} company of infantry from Fort Crook for the purpose of re-enforcing the commands at Benicia and the Presidio.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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ORDERS, No. 8.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 20, 1861.

I. Maj. D. O. Buell, assistant adjutant-general, and Capt. Richard C. Drum, assistant adjutant-general, having reported at these headquarters in pursuance of General Orders, No. 7, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, are announced on the department staff. Major Buell will accordingly relieve Major Mackall, assistant adjutant-general, and the latter will be governed by the orders which he has received from the Adjutant-General’s Office.

II. First Lieut. Armistead L. Long, Second Artillery, is announced as aide-de-camp to the general commanding.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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Los ANGELES, May 22, 1861-11.20 a.m.

General SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

The citizens here are to raise with ceremony the national flag over the court-house next Saturday. My command is invited to assist. Should U. S. forces, as such, take part in a civic celebration of this character?

JAMES H. CARLETON, U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 22, 1861.

Maj. J. H. CARLETON, First Dragoons, Commanding, Los Angeles, Cal.:

MAJOR: The general answers yes to your dispatch of to-day.

D. O. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 22, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: If in your opinion the further services of the detachment of volunteers under your command can be dispensed with the department commander directs that you discharge them. They will be paid as soon as the necessary funds are provided. In the event of your deeming it unadvisable to discharge them you are desired to report the reasons for that determination. I am also directed by the department commander to call your attention to the subject of the treatment of the {p.488} Indians within the limits of your supervision. The protection of the lives and property of the citizens is a duty which under no circumstances is to be relaxed, but when punishment of the Indians becomes necessary a discrimination must, as far as possible, be made between the innocent and guilty, and especially, under no circumstances, are the lives of women and children to be wantonly sacrificed. On the contrary, they are, as far as possible, to be screened from such treatment. Further than that he desires that you will endeavor to prevent collisions between the Indians and whites. Judicious precautions to prevent depredations by vigilance and influence over the Indians, prompt and just punishment when depredations are committed, so as to leave no ground for retaliation by the whites, together with the pacifying influence upon the latter, which by the judicious treatment you may frequently be able to exert, will go far to accomplishing the object in view.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 9.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 23, 1861.

The name of the quartermaster’s brig Floyd is changed to the General Jesup.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 88.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 23, 1861.

1. The several stations in this harbor, viz, Fort Point, Alcatraz Island, and the Presidio will in future be independent of each other.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Olympia, May 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit to you herewith a copy of a proclamation issued on the 10th instant for the enrollment and organization of the militia of this Territory. The number of public arms now on hand here is very small, and to meet any emergency I have respectfully and earnestly to request that you will direct as many of the arms at the various military posts within this Territory as can be spared, with a supply of ordinary musket, rifled musket, and howitzer ammunition, to be placed at one of the military posts, subject to the requisition of the governor.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor.

{p.489}

[Inclosure.]

PROCLAMATION.

By the Governor of Washington Territory.

Whereas, the President of the United States has issued his proclamation stating that the laws of the United States have been, and now are, opposed in several States by combinations too powerful to be suppressed in the ordinary way, and therefore calling for the militia of the several States:

Now, therefore, deeming it expedient that the militia of the Territory of Washington should be placed in readiness to meet any requisition from the President of the United States or the Governor of this Territory to aid in “maintaining the laws and integrity of the National Union,” I do hereby call upon all the citizens of this Territory capable of bearing arms and liable to militia duty, to report immediately to the adjutant-general of the Territory, and proceed at once to organize themselves into companies and elect their own officers in the manner prescribed by the act of January 26, 1855, and the amendatory act of February 4, 1858, to organize the militia.

The organization of each company will be immediately reported to Adjt. Gen. Frank Matthias, at Seattle, Wash. Ter., and through him to the Governor, when the commissions will issue to the officers elected.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the Territory to be affixed at Olympia, this 10th day of May, 1861, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-fifth.

[L. S.]

HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor Washington Territory.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 89.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 24, 1861.

1. Capt. Edward O. C. Ord’s battery, now at Benicia, will take post at the Presidio, San Francisco. The horses under the charge of a sufficient number of men, commanded by an officer, will proceed by land, and the remainder of the company and property will be embarked on board the Government transport General Jesup on Tuesday.

2. On the arrival of the General Jesup with Captain Ord’s battery, she will first be used to transfer Captain Lendrum’s company (I), Third Artillery, from the Presidio to Alcatraz Island, where it will take post. She will then convey Captain Judd’s company (L), Third Artillery, from the Presidio to Benicia to take the place of Captain Ord’s company.

3. Capt. Tredwell Moore, assistant quartermaster, will return to his station at Fort Churchill.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, May 26, 1861-9 p.m.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to inclose herewith, for the information of the commanding general of the department, a telegraphic dispatch {p.490} received by me a few minutes since from Virginia City, a town in this Territory, twenty-five miles west from this post. What reliance can be placed upon it I cannot say. The persons whose names are subscribed to it are said to be reliable men. They ask for arms for their own defense, I suppose, but we have none to spare to send them. Whether the parties mentioned have any such designs upon this post as is surmised in the dispatch it is impossible to say. I shall take every necessary precaution to circumvent such design should a party have the temerity to make a hostile attack upon this post. Should any additional information reach me upon this subject I will advise you by telegraph.

I have the honor to be, sir, with much respect, your most obedient servant,

T. HENDRICKSON Captain, Sixth Infantry, Commanding the Post.

[Inclosure.]

VIRGINIA CITY, May 26, 1861.

Capt. T. HENDRICKSON, Fort Churchill:

DEAR SIR: We are confidently assured that the secessionists have completed an organization of over 100, under Dr. McMeans, but for what purpose we are not positively advised. The general impression is to seize the fort and get possession of the Territory. Judge Terry is expected soon. It is important that our people should be secretly organized and equipped, but we are destitute of arms. Can you furnish us any from the fort, and if so, how many and when, and how shall we obtain them? We shall write you by express. Please answer immediately.

By order of Committee of Safety:

JNO. A. COLLINS, A. W. PRAY, Committee.

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CONFIDENTIAL.]

VIRGINIA CITY, NEV. TER., May 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General SUMNER:

DEAR SIR: I am instructed by the Committee of Safety of Nevada Territory to inform you that the secessionists have organized in this place under Dr. McMeans, ex-State treasurer of California. It is claimed by him that he has 125 men. In other parts of the Territory great activity prevails among that class. Terry is expected soon. I am not able to speak positively of their designs. It is strongly believed by many from evidences which have come to their knowledge that they intend to seize Fort Churchill and take possession of the Territory. Two-thirds of our population are loyal and devotedly attached to the Federal Government, but they are mostly destitute of arms, and comparatively powerless to protect themselves against a well-armed and disciplined foe, though vastly superior in point of numbers. Captain Hendrickson, of Fort Churchill, telegraphs us that he has not a surplus of arms. It is the desire of the committee of safety to organize and equip our citizens, that we may be prepared to meet any emergency that may arise. Can you furnish the committee with 300 or 400 stand of arms or a smaller number even? The committee will bind itself to {p.491} return them when this cloud shall have passed away. Captain Moore, or Mr. Frink, of the Tehama Hotel, will inform you who I am. If you shall conclude to favor the committee with any number of arms, be so kind as to have them so boxed as to resemble merchandise-long handle shovels, for instance-and direct them to “Taylor & Co., merchants, Virginia City, Nev. Ter.” Mr. Taylor is partner of John C. Fall, of Marysville, and is a member of the committee of safety.

Hoping to hear favorably from you at an early day, I am, dear sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. A. COLLINS, Corresponding Secretary.

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SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 27, 1861.

1. Six ordnance men will be sent from the arsenal at Benicia to Fort Point for temporary service to assist in mounting guns.

2. The strictest precautions will be taken by the officer in command of the troops at Benicia to guard against the communication of fire, through the use of lights, matches, or other means, to the ordnance buildings which they occupy and the stores in their vicinity.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 27, 1861.

Maj. G. A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The colonel commanding the department desires you, if you deem it necessary, to keep a company of dragoons moving on the Overland Mail Route, for a considerable distance in advance of your post, for the protection of life and property against Indian depredations.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 91.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 28, 1861.

1. The detachment now at Honey Lake, from Captain Lendrum’s company (I), Third Artillery, will be withdrawn and will join the company at Alcatraz Island, bringing with it the movable public property.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., May 28, 1861.

1. Company E, Ninth Infantry, is transferred from Fort Walla Walla to Fort Dalles, and Company G, Ninth Infantry, is transferred from {p.492} Fort Dalles to Fort Vancouver. These movements to be made without delay, the quartermaster’s department furnishing the necessary transportation.

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., 3d Regiment of Artillery, and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 29, 1861.

Hon. PABLO DE LA GUERRA, JAMES L. ORD, Esq., and others, Santa Barbara, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: The general commanding the department has received your communication of the 22d instant. He directs me to reply that the more pressing necessity for the presence of troops at other points will render the establishment of a post at Santa Barbara at this time impracticable.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH INFANTRY, Fort Dalles, Oreg., May 29, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The present would seem to be not an inappropriate time to invite the attention of the commanding general of the department to the very scattered positions of the Fourth Infantry and to respectfully request him, if not incompatible with the general interests of the service, to make such changes therein as will bring them more immediately under the supervision of the regimental commander. The regiment now occupies almost the entire length and no inconsiderable portion of the breadth of the Department of the Pacific, the companies being garrisoned at ten different posts and the commander with his headquarters at a post without even one of those companies with him. This post is the proper station of Maj. R. S. Garnett, Ninth Infantry, who is reported on the monthly return as “absent without leave,” and who was assigned to it in August, 1859, and is supposed to be on his return to it at this time. Could the companies of the Fourth Infantry now serving in Oregon and at the Cascades be transferred to Puget Sound and those of the Ninth on the Sound be transferred to Oregon, I think it would be beneficial to the interests of the service and would give each regiment a more direct interest in the section in which it would be serving. Should it not be deemed advisable, however, to make this arrangement, it would gratify me to have my headquarters changed to a more central position with regard to the stations of the regiment, or to have one of the detached companies ordered to this post.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel and Major Fourth infantry, Commanding.

{p.493}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 30, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. G. O. HALLER Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding San Diego, Cal.:

SIR: Orders have been given for sending to you two 24-pounder guns, and the department commander directs that you place them judiciously in battery so as to control as much as possible the harbor at San Diego and at the same time strengthen your position. They will reach you probably on the 3d proximo.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 30, 1861.

Maj. G. A. H. BLARE, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has had intimation from Captain Hendrickson and other definite sources, as well as from general rumor, of designs on the part of certain persons in the district of country about you, especially at Virginia City, to disturb the peace of this department by acts subversive of the authority of the General Government. These intimations go to the extent of anticipating an attack upon your post, or at least the seizure of public property there or elsewhere. The general does not much credit the existence of any deliberate plan for the object stated, though there may be in certain quarters such a disposition; but he deems it proper, nevertheless, that you shall be watchful of the proceedings about you, and fully prepared for any emergency. He wishes also, if the opportunity offers, that you shall, without ostentation or clamor, but in unequivocal terms, let it be understood that the proclamation of the President against unlawful combinations is as binding in this department as elsewhere, and that any attempt to subvert the rights of the people and the just authority of the General Government will be met in a very decided way. You are expected to report with dispatch any important information you may receive in reference to these matters. It is the intention of the general to re-enforce your post without delay if you think it necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT DALLES, GREG., May 30, 1861.

ACTG. ASST. ADJT. GEN., DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Special Orders, No. 6, of the District of Oregon, and to report that in the present condition of this command I shall feel compelled to detain Captain Black’s company until after the arrival of the other from Fort Walla Walla, which will be about the middle of next week, I presume, unless Colonel Wright should forbid my doing so by the Monday’s mail. The dragoon company having a detachment of twenty men at Warm Springs {p.494} is too weak to furnish the necessary guard for the protection of the public property and post and attend also to the care of its horses.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. C. BUCHANAN, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, Major Fourth Infantry, Comdg. Post.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 31, 1861.

Any vessel sailing under the secession flag, so called, which shall enter or attempt to enter any of the waters of the United States on this coast will immediately be captured by the troops stationed there. Any such vessel which shall fail to come to or surrender on being duly warned, or which shall attempt to escape, will be fired into and sunk, if necessary.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 93.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, May 31, 1861.

...

2. Colonel Wright, commanding the District of Oregon, will send to this city (if possible by the next steamer after the receipt of this order) that company of infantry which he can best dispense with. He will also send a second company, if in his opinion it can be spared from the district. These troops will receive orders for their further destination on their arrival here.

3. Fort Ter-Waw will be abandoned. Its garrison, with the movable property, will come to this city by the next steamer after the receipt of this order. The deputy quartermaster-general will give directions for the disposition of such quartermaster’s property as it may be inexpedient to bring along.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT BRAGG, CAL., May 31, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit, by direction of Captain Lovell, a copy of a report made this day to him.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

EDWARD DILLON, Second Lieut., Sixth Infantry, Comdg. Detachment in the Field.

[Inclosure.]

FORT BRAGG, CAL., May 31, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that there are several parties of citizens now engaged in stealing or taking by force Indian children from {p.495} the district in which I have been ordered to operate against the Indians. I am reliably informed that as many as forty or fifty Indian children have been taken through Long Valley within the last few months and sold both in and out of the county. The parties, I am told, at least some of them, make no secret of it, but boldly assert that they will continue to do so and that the law cannot reach them. It is pretended, I believe, that the children are purchased from their parents, but all who know these Indians can fully appreciate the value of this assertion. It is needless to say that this brutal trade is calculated to produce retaliatory depredations on the part of the Indians and exasperate them to a high degree, as well as to interfere materially with our efforts to find and chastise those Indians that deserve punishment, for these men keep the Indians constantly on the alert, attacking and chasing them before us and following in our wake for the purpose of obtaining children.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

EDWARD DILLON, Second Lieut., Sixth Infantry, Comdg. Detachment in the Field.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 1, 1861.

J. A. COLLINS, Esq., Virginia City, Nev. Ter:

SIR: The general commanding the department has received your letter of the 26th ultimo, written by direction of the committee of safety, and requesting a supply of arms for the purpose of resisting any attempt to involve the Territory of Nevada in the cause of secession. He directs me to say that he cannot at this time issue arms in the manner you propose, but he will take precautions which will enable him to arm promptly a sufficient force of loyal citizens if the supposed danger should arise, or even become imminent. In the meantime a thorough organization into companies and battalions or regiments is a thing entirely practicable, and very important as a precaution against lawless acts, which the general still hopes will not be attempted. The troops at Fort Churchill will be able to resist any attempt that may be made on that post, and will be still further re-enforced.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 1, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fort Dalles, Oreg.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 30th ultimo in relation to the detention of Captain Black’s company. I am instructed by the colonel commanding the district to say in reply that under the circumstances of the case you are authorized to detain Captain Black at The Dalles not later than Monday, the 10th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

{p.496}

BENICIA, June 2, 1861-5.45 p.m.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Tehama House:

SIR: The General Jesup left at 9 a.m. with the guns, carriages, and ammunition for San Diego.

J. MCALLISTER, Lieutenant of Ordnance.

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HEADQUARTERS, June 3, 1861.

Col. H. L. SCOTT, U. S. Army, New York:

Concert with Col. William B. Franklin, Brevoort House, and Colonel Tompkins, quartermaster, to arrest General A. S. Johnston, on his arrival in New York, perhaps by sending by means of the pilot-boat.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS, June 3, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST: (Care Maj S. Williams, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Saint Louis, Mo.)

The Secretary of War directs that you arrest General A. S. Johnston, if he returns from California by overland route.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco., June 3, 1861.

First Lieut. J. MCALLISTER Ordnance Department, Commanding Benicia Arsenal, Cal.:

SIR: The guns for San Diego referred to in your letter of the 18th instant [ultimo] are to be mounted on siege carriages, not as for a permanent battery.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN BERNARDINO, June 3, 1861.

General E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commander of the Pacific Division:

DEAR SIR: I beg to be excused for my presumption in addressing a letter to you when I am an utter stranger, yet feeling it to be my duty which I owe to my country, and believing that a fair, candid statement concerning the true position of all parties in this lower portion of the State may be useful to you, I thus lay them before you. There exists amongst us through all these southern counties a secret organization of secessionists, and in a settlement near Los Angeles there is an organized cavalry company which is ready at almost any moment to break out, holding an inveterate hatred toward the citizens of this place, and it is at this point they would make their first attack, and there are some in our midst who would receive them cheerfully and help them in their treacherous designs. I speak what I do know. I have only been here about seven weeks, and commenced the publication of a paper called the Weekly Patriot. I have received notice to {p.497} stop the publication of strong Union sentiments, as it will be unsafe for me to continue them any longer, but I am not to [be] frightened at any intimidations or threats. I shall continue on in the way I have commenced, and keep a sharp lookout for any disturbance which may break out. We are, and have been, expecting a rising of the secessionists, notwithstanding the late Union demonstration at Los Angeles, and nothing but the presence of the U. S. troops prevents them from rising there. Secret meetings continue to be held all over this lower country, and secession and disunion is boldly avowed in our streets. Shooting continues to be the order of the day, and drunken desperadoes and Southern cutthroats damn the Stars and Stripes and endeavor to create disturbances all of the time. We have a singular population, composed of Mormons, Mormon apostates, who are even worse, gamblers, English Jews, and the devil’s own population to boot, while we only have about a dozen good respectable families right in town, who are at the mercy of these desperadoes; and the secessionists of the Monte are only waiting the withdrawal of the troops from Los Angeles before they commence operations. If a company of dragoons could be stationed here it would give a feeling of security to every honest citizen and friend of the Union in this vicinity. Provisions are cheaper here than in any other part of the country, and it is the key to all the passes leading to Arizona and Salt Lake, and if a rebellion should arise the troops stationed here would form a nucleus around which every patriot can rally. For information as to who I am and my character I would refer you to Hon. N. Greene Curtis, grand master of the Grand Lodge of Masons, J. L. English, Hon. John G. Downey, Governor of this State, and of every prominent man in Sacramento, of which county I was formerly surveyor, and for myself I can inform you that I am a near relative of Major Sherman, of the flying artillery, U. S. Army, and I have seen service through the whole of the Mexican campaign.

With this information, hoping to receive an immediate reply, I remain your obedient servant,

EDWIN A. SHERMAN, Editor of the Weekly Patriot.

P. S.-I will inform you from time to time whatever news I am able to gather, so that they may be of service to you.

Yours, truly,

E. A. S.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, June 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to communicate a copy of a letter of the 3d instant, addressed to this Department by Mr. Thomas Sprague, late commercial agent of the United States, of La Paz, Lower California, relative to the supposed designs of the insurgents in this country to seize upon that province.* It is suggested that orders be given to the commander of the military forces of the United States on the Pacific with a view to prevent the execution of any such designs.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

* See May 3, p 475.

{p.498}

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 12.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 4, 1861.

Commanding officers of posts will promptly report to this office the execution of General Orders, No. 13, of April 30, 1861, from the War Department, requiring officers of the Army “to take and subscribe anew the oath of allegiance to the United States of America.” Special mention will be made of any failure to comply with the requirements of the orders.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 4, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I deem it my duty to invite the early attention of the general commanding the department to the defenseless condition of the posts and settlements on the Columbia River, as well as on the waters of Puget Sound. At this moment a single hostile steamer could enter the Columbia River and lay waste all the settlements to the Cascades, 150 miles, as well as the large and flourishing city of Portland, twelve miles up the Willamette River. Even this post and the ordnance depot are not prepared for defense against heavy guns. I am fully persuaded that no time should be lost; that a strong battery should be constructed without delay at the mouth of the Columbia on Cape Disappointment. Such a battery it is believed would effectually prevent any hostile ship from attempting to cross that dangerous bar. Point Defiance, twelve or fifteen miles north from Steilacoom, is a good position for a battery, and would guard the settlements on the sound above that point. Should any sudden danger threaten this coast, the presence of a naval force would be indispensably necessary for our protection. At this moment we are destitute of heavy guns, suitable for seacoast defense. Some eight or nine months since I made a requisition on the War Department for 15,000 stand of small-arms and equipments, as well as an ample supply of guns of heavy caliber. But my requisitions and warnings have remained unheeded. The sites which I have above recommended for planting batteries I had surveyed by an engineer officer last fall and reserved for fortifications. In an emergency it might be expedient to dismantle the Massachusetts. I believe she has eight heavy guns as her present armament. I would most respectfully invite the general to peruse my communication to the headquarters of the Army dated about the 20th of October last, in which was fully set forth the present condition, wants, and future prospects of the Department of Oregon.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, June 5, 1861.

Brigadier-General SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding the Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs that you act in concert with the naval commander on the Pacific station in preventing, so far as your {p.499} means will permit, any plans the secessionists may attempt to execute for subjecting or annexing Lower. California to the so-called Southern Confederacy.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 96.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 5, 1861.

The ordnance men recently ordered from the Benicia Arsenal for temporary duty at Fort Point will be returned to the arsenal without delay.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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VIRGINIA CITY, June 5, 1861.

General SUMNER:

MY DEAR SIR: The Union men of this portion of our beloved country are very anxious to have aid from the United States representative on the Pacific coast, around which we can rally and protect this territory from the sympathizers of disunion. Cannot something be done for us? We are eleven-twelfths Union men, but we are without arms or organization, while the rebels have control of all the public or private arms here. Our hearts ache on beholding the vile secession flag floating in our midst, and we unable to destroy it. A single file of soldiers with a commander is all we want, provided they bring arms for us to use.

Yours, truly,

JOSEPH F. ATWILL.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter., June 5, 1861-12 p.m.

Maj. DON CARLOS BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: A committee of gentlemen from Virginia City have just arrived and given positive information that a body of men numbering some 200 have organized themselves in favor of the Southern Confederacy. To-day they raised the rebel flag in that place, and say that they will put down any Union demonstration that the law-abiding citizens may attempt to get up. This gang of men is well armed and is composed of such men as have for some months bid defiance to the laws of the Territory. One of their number, Doctor McMeans, late State treasurer of California, avows openly that he is acting under authority. It is also rumored that Judge Terry has the commission of Governor of the Territory from Jeff. Davis, and is only waiting the proper opportunity to act. What reliance may be placed in this rumor is hard to determine, but the fact of their open organization and the raising of a rebel flag would warrant us in believing that there must be some truth in the statement. The Union men in Virginia and its vicinity are much alarmed for fear of their lives and property. They are well organized, but have no arms, and desire that at least 200 may be furnished them for the preservation of the peace. There are now 200 enrolled and determined to carry out the laws of the United States if {p.500} they can only obtain arms. As they are from the Northern States and generally quiet citizens they are without even revolvers, which are usually carried by the rowdies of this country. At Carson City there are some eighty odd stand of Minie muskets belonging to the State of California. These arms are now in charge of a Mr. Blackburn, who is looked upon with suspicion by Union men. They are also in such a position that a few resolute men could easily take them. It is feared that this may be done by persons in Carson who have kept themselves well posted on the secession movements. I would respectfully request that two companies be ordered here from California; also that 300 stand of arms with ammunition be sent as early as possible. I should also add that there is a rumor that the secessionists will attempt to surprise this post and secure the arms here. Inclosed you will find a letter from a man who seems to have some information. The writing has been recognized by one of the gentlemen from Virginia City. He also says that he is a true man. The wire is down, or a summary of this would have been sent by telegraph.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

[Inclosure.]

MAY 25, 1861.

BRIGGS, Esq.:

As an American citizen I deem it my duty to warn my countrymen and the lovers of this glorious Union and Constitution, that a company of 107 men have been formed here to help Jeff. Davis and crib, and to take this Territory and declare it as seceded from the United States Government. Those men are enrolled by McMeans. Terry is to join them soon, and John Brown, the man-killer, is on his way here. Prompt action is needed. If not, we are all lost. It is the intention of the party to capture the fort, and take all the arms from it. They have spoken of Jack Haist, but could not learn anything about it. I am watching. They boast also of having eighty-three stand of arms in the hands of Blackburn, sheriff. Now, sir, be cautious. I am ready for action-five pounds bullets and one and a half pounds powder to fight for the Union, for the Constitution, and shoot any traitor I may meet: So help me God. Keep this to yourself and act accordingly. I will keep you posted.

[Indorsement.]

The writer’s name is Charles Duval, who was afraid to attach his name. Mr. Duval is a truthful and very reliable man. He was approached by the McMeans party because he was a Southern man, a creole of Louisiana.

JNO. A. COLLINS, Corresponding Secretary Committee of Safety. J. L. VAN BOKKELEN, EPH. SMITH, Committee.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 5, 1861.

HENRY M. MCGILL, Esq., Actg. Governor, Territory of Washington, Olympia, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has received your communication of the 23d ultimo, requesting that a supply of arms may {p.501} be placed at the disposal of the Governor for arming the militia of Washington Territory. The general directs me to say that under existing circumstances he would not be authorized to act as you propose, but that the arms are in readiness, and can be promptly furnished whenever an emergency arises rendering the issue necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. O. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 6, 1861.

IRA P. RANKIN, Esq., U. S. Collector, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: In a conversation yesterday with Doctor Rabe, U. S. marshal, he said you were thinking about chartering a small steamer as a revenue cutter until the revenue cutter belonging to the Government could be repaired. I do not wish to have or exercise any influence in your department, but I have no hesitation in saying that I think a cutter of some kind for the use of the custom-house and the marshal is very necessary at this particular time. I would respectfully suggest that if you should determine to charter a vessel for the purpose, it would be well to report the fact immediately to Washington for the sanction of the proper authorities.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 6, 1861.

Maj. G. A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Hey. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department proposes to increase the garrison of your post by one or two companies of infantry, and he directs that you at once make the necessary preparation for quartering them. If buildings are to be erected they must be of the simplest character that will answer the purpose of temporary shelter; probably adobes will be the cheapest. Boards for flooring will be dispensed with, and shingle roofing also, unless it will cost very much less than heretofore at your post. The determination of this question must be referred to headquarters. All the labor must be performed by the troops.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MESILLA, ARIZ. TER., June 6, 1861.

Dr. B. N. COVEY, Late of the U. S. Army:

DEAR SIR: You will confer a great favor on the citizens of this Territory by representing to the department at Montgomery our exposed condition, with which you are perfectly familiar. We desire above all things a Territorial organization by the Confederate States of America, the subjugation of all the Indian tribes, and the administration of law {p.502} and justice. Should the Confederate Congress not deem it prudent to give us these, please ask that means be sent to this Territory to arm and equip one volunteer regiment to be kept in active service against the marauding savages. This would insure us peace with the Indians, would strengthen and perpetuate that sympathy with the South which now is unanimous. All this may be done without any conflict with the U. S. troops now here, unless it should be desired by the government of the Confederate States of America. You will also please represent that most, if not all, the officers who are not Republicans or Abolitionists in the U. S. Army will resign, and the vacancies will be filled by those who are opposed to the South, leaving in our midst directly opposed to the sentiments of the community, and between the marauding Indian and an opposition army without protection and laws it is fair to conclude that ere twelve months, abolitionism will be preached among us without fear, and hence opposition and open contest for North and South, You will be able to explain this more fully, and by so doing will confer a lasting favor on the people of Arizona and render the Confederate States of America some service, too.

With best wishes and the hope that you may have an opportunity of vindicating our country in redressing her wrongs, we are, your obedient servants,

SAML. J. JONES. R. P. KELLEY. JAS. A. LUCAS. L. S. OWINGS.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., June 7, 1861.

His Excellency J. G. DOWNEY, Governor of California, Sacramento, Cal.:

SIR: I have been informed of the organization and partial armament of a body of men in Carson Valley for the purpose of overawing the Union portion of the population there, and involving the Territory in the cause of secession and opposition to the Federal authority. Apprehension has been expressed of the seizure by these persons of certain arms at Carson City belonging to the State of California. I have therefore deemed it proper to take measures to secure them. The responsible agent will be furnished with the necessary receipts and the arms held subject to your orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS. No. 97.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 7, 1861.

1. Company G, Sixth Infantry, after being filled up by details from the other infantry companies at Benicia, will embark by steamer at 7 o’clock this afternoon for Sacramento, thence by railroad to Folsom, thence it will march to Fort Churchill with all convenient dispatch, and report to the commanding officer for duty. The company will go prepared for temporary and active service. It will take ten days’ rations, fifty rounds of ammunition, and only the necessary camp baggage. The deputy quartermaster-general will have in readiness the necessary transportation for this movement.

{p.503}

2. Colonel Wright, commanding the District of Oregon, will send to this place with the greatest possible dispatch seven of the infantry companies which can best be spared from his command. They will receive orders for their further destination on arriving here. The quartermaster’s department will provide the necessary transportation by water for these movements.

3. Fort Tejon will be abandoned without delay, and the garrison (the headquarters, and band, and company First Dragoons) will take post at Los Angeles. The movable public property will be transferred to the same place, and until that is effected an ordnance sergeant, or, if necessary, a subaltern, with a few privates, will remain in charge.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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BENICIA, June 7, 1861-2.10 p.m.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Your dispatch this moment received. Company G, Sixth Infantry, will move as directed this evening at 7 o’clock.

W. SEAWELL, Colonel Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, June 7, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fort Tejon, Cal.:

Fort Tejon will be abandoned and the garrison and property transferred to Los Angeles. Be prepared to move as soon as the order is received by mall.

By order:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, June 7, 1861.

Maj. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

Has Captain Moore accomplished the object of his mission and returned? Do you require more re-enforcements besides the infantry company which started on the 7th?

By order:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 7, 1861.

Judge GORDON N. MOTT, Associate Justice of the Territory of Nevada, Marysville, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has received information which leaves no doubt in his mind of the organization of an armed body of men in Carson Valley, having for their object to involve the {p.504} people of that Territory in the cause of secession and opposition to the authority of the General Government. This information he deems sufficient to justify proceedings for treason against certain leaders engaged in the movement. As yet the government recently provided by act of Congress for the Territory of Nevada has not been organized, and there is no authority at hand for the issuance of a writ for the arrest of the offenders. It has occurred to the general that having the appointment of the President as one of the justices of the Territory, you may under the circumstances feel yourself authorized to issue the writ. The general would desire, if practicable, that the arrest of these treasonable acts shall be effected through regular judicial proceedings, and if such means do not exist, then others must be resorted to. He has directed me, therefore, to bring the subject to your attention along with some of the information on which the proceedings against the leading disturbers of the peace would be based, and he requests that you will give him at the earliest possible moment your views in regard to your duty in the matter, and information as to the steps you may decide upon, so that he may be prepared to second you, or else take, himself, such steps as may seem necessary. The general directs me to suggest to you, with deference whether in case you should consider your authority adequate to such a step, and in view of the absence of all the civil functionaries of the new Territorial government, it would not be well for you to repair to the scene of threatened disturbance, where, under the protection and support of the military commander, you may be able to act more advisedly and efficiently.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 7, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Infty., Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Under anticipated exigencies the general commanding the department deems it necessary to withdraw a portion of the troops in your district for the purpose of increasing the force in this portion of the department. The proper orders are inclosed herewith.* The general desires to leave entirely to your judgment the designation of the points from which these troops can best be spared. It is considered important, however, that they should be sent forward with the utmost dispatch without waiting for each other. If this unavoidable withdrawal of troops from your command should jeopardize its quiet, their place must probably in that emergency be supplied by volunteers, and on these points the general will be glad to have your views.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Special Orders, No. 97, p. 502.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, June 8, 1861.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: In accordance with your suggestion of the 4th instant the commander of the forces on the Pacific Coast will be instructed to take {p.505} measures to prevent the execution of any design that may be entertained by the insurgents of seizing Lower California.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 98.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 8, 1861.

...

3. Captain Ord’s battery, Third Artillery, prepared for temporary and active service, will proceed at once by steamer to Sacramento, and thence march to Fort Churchill and report to the commanding officer. The deputy quartermaster-general will have the necessary transportation ready by Monday morning next. Captain Ord will send information to Major Blake of his approach in time to enable the latter to give him instructions at Carson City, if necessary, concerning his further movements.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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VIRGINIA, June 8, 1861-10.30 a.m.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have taken fifty stand of arms in Carson and Silver City. The Union men of this place have formed two companies. The oath is strong. Will I turn over the arms to them? The secession flag was to have been raised again to-day. My arrival put a stop to the movement. Will I take as prisoners those who refuse to turn over public arms?

T. MOORE, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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SAN FRANCISCO, June 8, 1861.

Capt. T. MOORE, Assistant Quartermaster, Virginia City, Nev. Ter.:

Issue the arms on receipt of responsible persons. Seize any public arms that are in store. Those who resist, disarm and make prisoners.

By order:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 8, 1861.

Col. W. SEAWELL, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Benicia Barracks, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has been advised that the steamer Diana, now lying at Benicia, has recently been under consideration by certain persons with a view to fit her up with an armament to be employed, as is suspected, for unlawful purposes against the {p.506} Government or commerce of the country. He desires that you will have this vessel under the special observation of some officer now at hand, and instantly report any suspicious movements about her.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, June 8, 1861.

Maj. G. A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

A full company of infantry left Benicia yesterday for your post. More troops will follow.

By order:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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Maj. D. C. BUELL, MARYSYILLE, June 8, 1861.

Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Your letter of yesterday has just been received, and in reply I have to say that after a very careful examination of the act of Congress organizing the Territory of Nevada I have come to the conclusion that I would not be authorized to act in the matter mentioned in your communication. The Governor has not arrived, the Territory has not been divided into judicial districts, and there is not a single territorial officer there. Until steps are taken for the organization of the territorial government I am of the opinion that I have no power to act in the premises.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GORDON N. MOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 10, 1861.

Col. LORENZO THOMAS, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have found it necessary to withdraw from Oregon a considerable part of the force stationed there to re-enforce the troops in California and Nevada Territory. The troops withdrawn are three companies of artillery, and will be nine of infantry. There is no secession element in Oregon and nothing to apprehend there but the possibility of some Indian disturbances, which seem to me of little consequence in comparison to preserving the integrity of the Union. As I reported on the 25th of April, I believe there is a large majority of Union men in this State, but they are supine from confidence, while there is an active and zealous party of secessionists who will make all the mischief they can. I have checked them in the southern part of this State by placing a strong command at Los Angeles, and they are now trying to organize in Nevada Territory, but I am moving re-enforcements rapidly to Fort Churchill, which will put down this movement. The leaders of this party claim to be acting by authority from the Montgomery government, which gives them {p.507} some weight in the country. In concentrating troops to meet these contingencies I have been obliged to break up the posts of Ter-Waw and Tejon, but they had ceased to be of any importance as military posts. I would respectfully and earnestly represent the great importance of organizing the civil government in Nevada Territory immediately. I believe if the Governor and other officials had been there this difficulty would not have arisen. There is no law or government there at all, and the Territory is a place of refuge for disorganizers and other unruly spirits. I would remind the General-in-Chief that if he needs my services at the East I can make such arrangements that everything will be secure here. I would not say this unless I knew I could do it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 99.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 10, 1861.

1. The order for the movement of Captain Ord’s battery to Fort Churchill is countermanded.

...

7. Company D, Fourth Infantry, will take post temporarily at the Presidio.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT CHURCHILL, June 10, 1861-10 a.m.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Captain Moore has just returned, having accomplished his mission. The force now en route is all that will be required here. Captain Moore issued the arms taken by him to a company enrolled last night at Virginia. The arms called for in my order will be required. There are now 400 men formed and sworn to support the Federal Government at Virginia. Good security will be given for the arms and ammunition.

Letter will explain more fully to-morrow.

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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(Received June 10, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. B. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding the Department of California, &c.:

The undersigned citizens of Siskiyou County, State of California, residing east of Yreka City, on the Indian frontier, in Butte Creek Valley and vicinity, would respectfully represent that we are exposed to the depredations of the tribes of Indians located east of us; that there is nothing to restrain these Indians from hostile incursions since the company of U. S. troops stationed near the Klamath Lakes last {p.508} year was ordered to Oregon. They further represent that these Indians, composed principally of the Modoc and Klamath Lakes tribes, make frequent inroads into our settlements and plunder our cabins and drive off our stock, and keep us in constant apprehension and anxiety as to the safety of our lives. In consideration of these facts, and for the purpose of protecting us from the raids and robberies of these Indians, we earnestly and respectfully pray that you will have stationed at some suitable point on this frontier a sufficient military force (and respectfully suggest that one company of U. S. troops would be sufficient) to protect us from the above-mentioned dangers until we become sufficiently numerous to protect ourselves.

JOHN B. ROHRER, WM. RITCHIE, JOSEPH BASEY, [AND 24 OTHERS.]

[First Indorsement.]

I would respectfully state that I am acquainted with the character of the Indians mentioned in this petition and the locality of the petitioners, and am satisfied that a military force is necessary to protect them from the raids and dangers which they represent in this petition, and therefore respectfully add my name, asking that their prayer may be granted.

A. M. ROSBOROUGH, County Judge of Siskiyou County, Cal.

[Second indorsement.]

Since this petition was circulated the Indians have ordered the citizens of Butte Creek Valley to leave or they would run off their stock. I think you would greatly subserve the interest of those citizens if you would send them a few troops for their protection.

R. M. MARTIN, Major-General, Sixth Division California Militia.

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FORT BRAGG, CAL., June 10, 1861.

Lieut. J. P. MARTIN, Seventh Infantry, Commanding Detachment in Field:

SIR: Inclosed find copies of all the instructions received by me and which will govern you.* Captain Lovell directs that any report of importance will be made through this command to the department headquarters and a copy sent to him. Keep two packers and seven or eight animals to pack provision for the scouting parties, and send the rest of the train back. Let those animals that you keep be mules. The identical mules and equipage that came with the volunteers must go back with them, when they go in to be mustered, but you will count those animals among the number above mentioned to be kept at your camp. Let me know when the train comes in what quantity (about) of pork you have on hand. Should you fail to see Lieutenant Collins as expected at the crossing of the East Fork of Eel River, you will have to take your volunteers into Humboldt by the 17th July. So arrange it as to let them be at Hyde’s Run on the 4th, and yet lose as little time as possible. I cannot tell when I will get out.

Very respectfully, your most obedient,

EDWARD DILLON, Second Lieutenant, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

* Not found as inclosures.

{p.509}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 10, 1861.

Company F, Fourth Infantry, will be moved without delay to Portland, Oreg., prepared to embark on the next steamer for San Francisco. On arriving at San Francisco, Captain Floyd-Jones will report to the general commanding the department. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 10, 1861.

I. Captain Dent with his company (B, Ninth Infantry) will move without delay from Fort Walla Walla to Fort Cascades, and relieve Captain Wallen, Fourth Infantry, in command of that post.

II. Captain Wallen, after being relieved by Captain Dent, will proceed with his company by first steamer to San Francisco and report to the general commanding the department.

III. Captain Archer with his company (I, Ninth Infantry) will march without delay from Fort Colville and take post at Fort Walla Walla.

IV. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation to insure the prompt execution of the movements above ordered. Captain Dent’s company will be sent down from Old Fort Walla Walla by water.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco. June 11, 1861.

EDWIN A. SHERMAN, Esq., San Bernardino, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has received your communication of the 3d instant. He directs me to reply that the necessary employment of troops elsewhere will prevent him from establishing a company of dragoons at San Bernardino as you suggest, but he hopes that the concentration of a more considerable force at a point not far distant will accomplish the same object.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev., June 11, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I would respectfully report that in carrying out your instructions by telegram of June 6, 1861, Captain Moore, assistant quartermaster, was directed to proceed to Carson City, accompanied by twenty dragoons, under the command of Lieutenant Baker, and take possession of all such public arms as might be held by citizens of that place ox {p.510} vicinity. Inclosed you will find the report of his action and the success with which he carried out his instructions from these headquarters. Captain Moore reports that the rumor that the secession organization in Virginia did intend to surprise this post and secure the arms here had a foundation in fact, and that the secession flag raised there on the 5th was undoubtedly to ascertain the strength of the secession feeling in the Territory. From all that can be learned I think that the force now en route for this post will be sufficient to preserve the Federal authority intact. I would, however, recommend that the arms called for in my letter of the 6th of June be forwarded, as the Union feeling is strong in and about Virginia, but unfortunately the law-abiding citizens are without arms and ammunition. I received June 4 a letter from Mr. Buckley, superintendent of the Overland Mail Company. He reports the Indians as quiet and as evincing a disposition to remain so. They are very poor, having but little food, and are really in a most destitute condition. Up to the present time everything remains quiet in Virginia.

I am, sir, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

[Inclosure.]

FORT CHURCHILL, NEV., June 10, 1861.

Maj. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Commanding:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, in accordance with your instructions of June 7, 1861, I proceeded to Carson, with the detachment of twenty dragoons under the command of Lieutenant Baker. On my arrival at that place I called upon Mr. John Blackburn to turn over to me the public arms in his possession. Those he had in Carson were at once transferred to me, he at the same time giving an order on Captain Curtis and Mr. Shiririch, of Silver City, for twenty-one stand left in their charge for safe-keeping. While in Silver City I heard of a number of muskets supposed to be in the hands of different individuals. On examining the houses of these persons none were to be found, and they all stated that the arms had been turned over to Benjamin F. Lippincott, who was the quartermaster of the command under Colonel Hays and who had authority to receipt for the arms of the command. At Silver City I learned that the secession flag was to be raised at 10 o’clock that day in Virginia City. Although my orders did not contemplate any resistance on the part of the people or that a demonstration adverse to the Federal authority would be made, I believed that the putting down of any movement of that nature would meet with your approbation.

On my arrival at Virginia everything was comparatively quiet, although there was considerable excitement among the advocates of the Southern rebellion. Immediate examination of all buildings suspected of containing arms was made. The building on which the rebel flag was hoisted a few days since was found to contain no arms, and the proprietor assured me that the hag was hoisted more for a joke than with the intention of causing any excitement. His statement, I believe, was intended for a blind, as I was subsequently informed from the most reliable residents of the place that there was, beyond a doubt, an organization to subvert the authority of the Federal Government in this Territory and declare in favor of the Confederate States. That there are arms in or near Virginia there can be no doubt, but the {p.511} organization has been so close in its operations that the responsibility can be placed on no one individual, nor can the Union men trace them to the haunts where they are probably secreted. Information against Captain Caperton of a nature sufficiently strong was presented as to warrant his apprehension. I was obliged to release him, as he brought witnesses to swear that the arms belonged to Captain Stover and the ones referred to had been turned in to the quartermaster of the command, Benjamin F. Lippincott. The arms secured by me were, by the direction of General Sumner, commanding department, turned over to a company enrolled in Virginia on the night of the 9th for the especial protection of the interests of the Union. Two companies were formed, of fifty men each, who, in addition to the oath of the club, were sworn to faithful obedience to the President and the laws of the Federal Government, to suppress rebellion, and to be ready at any moment to yield obedience to the President or other loyal authority under him for the preservation of the Union. Four hundred men are already enrolled. Of these one hundred are armed; the remainder, from the want of arms, are unable to place themselves in a state of such efficiency as they desire, but hope the general commanding will soon furnish the requisite arms and ammunition to enable them to carry out the object of their organization. After having taken such precautionary measures for the conservation of peace as I thought best, I returned to this post. In conclusion, I would call your attention to the faithful and efficient manner in which Lieutenant Baker and the men of his command carried out the orders given them under circumstances peculiarly embarrassing to an officer of the Army.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. MOORE, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 19, 1861.

The seizure of the arms as herein reported had the effect to check at once the action of the secessionists in Nevada Territory.

Respectfully forwarded to Army headquarters.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 11, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Special Orders, No. 93, of 31st ultimo, reached me yesterday. My orders transmitted to you by this mail will inform you of my action in the case.* The steamer is now at Portland, and will probably leave on her return trip to San Francisco to-morrow evening. It is not possible to send down either of the companies by this steamer, but they will both be in readiness to embark on the next. Captain Black with his company from Fort Dalles reached here last evening.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

* See next, post.

{p.512}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 9.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 11, 1861.

I. Fort Cascades will be abandoned forthwith, and the public property of every description turned over to the proper departments at Fort Vancouver. Major Babbitt and Lieutenant Mason will send their agents to the Cascades by the steamer to-morrow to receive the quartermaster’s and commissary property from Captain Wallen. Captain Wallen after turning over his public property will proceed with the greatest dispatch and embark his company on the steamer Cortez, now at Portland, and comply with his previous orders.

II. Company I, Ninth Infantry, under orders for Fort Walla Walla, will continue its march to Fort Dalles, descending the Columbia River by water. Company E, Ninth Infantry, under orders for Fort Dalles, will continue its march without delay to Fort Vancouver, where its commander will receive further orders.

III. Captain Dent, Ninth Infantry, with his company (B), under orders for Fort Cascades, will continue his march to Fort Hoskins and relieve Captain Augur, Fourth Infantry, in command of that post. Captain Augur will then proceed without delay with his company to Portland and embark on the first steamer for San Francisco, where he will report to the department commander.

IV. Fort Yamhill will be abandoned. The chiefs of the staff departments at these headquarters will take immediate measures to receive and secure the public property. Captain Russell, Fourth Infantry, with his company (K) will move promptly to Portland, and embark on the first steamer for San Francisco, where he will report to the department commander.

V. Camp Pickett, on San Juan Island, and Fort Townsend will be abandoned and the public property sent to Fort Steilacoom. Captain Pickett, with Company D, Ninth Infantry, and Captain Hunt, with Company C, Fourth Infantry, will embark on the first steamer for San Francisco. Major Ketchum, Fourth Infantry, will proceed with this command, and on his arrival at San Francisco report to the department commander.

VI. Camp Chehalis will be abandoned. The public property that cannot be removed, together with the buildings, will be placed in charge of a responsible agent. The company at Camp Chehalis (A, Fourth Infantry), will then move promptly to the mouth of the Columbia River and embark on the first steamer for San Francisco, where the commander will report to the department commander.

VII. The assistant quartermaster at Fort Steilacoom will employ the Massachusetts in removing the public property from the posts abandoned on the sound, and place the buildings in charge of responsible agents.

VIII. The officers of the medical department at Forts Yamhill, Cascades, and Townsend, and Camps Pickett and Chehalis, will accompany their respective commands.

IX. The officers of the quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation to insure a prompt execution of the movements herein ordered.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.513}

BENICIA ARSENAL, June 12, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco:

SIR: Please find below some information in reference to the arms and accouterments for issue to volunteers for the general commanding the department. We have on hand the following: 940 rifled muskets, caliber .58, directed to be issued to militia; 4,000 altered arms, caliber .69, with Maynard’s primers, and about 4,000 sets of infantry accouterments. The above is the amount we have at the arsenal without counting the arms and accouterments at Alcatraz Island.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MCALLISTER, First Lieutenant of Ordnance, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 12, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have submitted to the department commander your communication of the 4th instant relative to the defenseless condition of the coast of Oregon and Washington Territory. He directs me to say that although he appreciates the importance of the subject, yet the urgent necessity for troops at other points with a view both to our Indian and internal relations, renders it impossible to adopt the means which you recommend for coast defense. He directs me to say also that if you should find the safety of the frontier settlements in your district against Indian hostilities will be seriously jeopardized by the withdrawal of as many companies as were called for in Special Orders, No. 97, of the 7th instant, you may diminish the number to four.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 13, 1861.

Capt. CHARLES S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: A report has been made to this office by Lieut. Edward Dillon that parties of white men are engaged in stealing and carrying or selling into bondage the children of the Indians in the district in which he is operating. He states as a reliable report that as many as forty or fifty Indian children have been taken through Long Valley within the last four months and sold, both in and out of the country. The department commander directs that you use all means in your power to prevent such infamous practice.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.514}

WAR DEPARTMENT, June 13, 1861.

Col. J. D. STEVENSON, San Francisco:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th ultimo, with inclosure, offering to raise a regiment or brigade in California for service in that State. The Department has full confidence in your ability to command such a force, and in your loyalty to the Government, so well attested by your former well-known services, but it cannot at present give the leave asked for to raise the proposed regiment or brigade. Circumstances may hereafter occur to render such a step necessary, but existing circumstances do not seem to warrant it.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 102.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 14, 1861.

I. In pursuance of Special Orders, No. 136, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, the engineer detachment at Alcatraz Island will sail on the steamer of the 21st for the East. The three men of the detachment recently ordered on reconnaissance with Lieutenant McPherson will accompany it.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 14, 1861.

Maj. D. O. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: On receipt of Department Special Orders, No. 93, on the 10th instant, I ordered two companies to proceed to San Francisco, although the order left it discretionary with me whether I would send a second company or not. On the night of the 11th instant I received Department Special Orders, No. 97, and immediately issued instructions in compliance therewith, which you will receive by this mail. Under the circumstances of the case I was compelled to consider the second company, detached by me under Special Orders, No. 93, as one of the seven required by Special Orders, No. 97. I have been compelled to withdraw the troops entirely from Forts Cascades, Yamhill, and Townsend, as well as Camps Pickett and Chehalis. I have taken measures for the removal of the public property and the security of the buildings until required again for troops. Since August last fifteen companies have been withdrawn from this district, leaving now only thirteen, many of them much in want of recruits, the companies of the Ninth Infantry, on Puget Sound, being only about half full. I shall send down by the Cortez Captain Wallen, with his company (H), Fourth Infantry, and Lieutenant Fleming, with Company E, Ninth Infantry. The remaining six companies cannot possibly be sent before the return of the Pacific. Although nothing was said in the orders about the medical officers, yet, presuming that their services might be required with the troops, and not being required in this district, I ordered all {p.515} attached to the abandoned posts to accompany their respective commands. Yesterday I received the order for Surgeon Barnes to repair to New York, hence it becomes necessary to relieve him in his duties at Fort Vancouver, and further in view of the possible want of a medical officer to meet any contingencies which might arise in this quarter, I determined to retain Assistant Surgeons Brown and Ridgely, as you will perceive by my orders transmitted. The whole of the Fourth Infantry remaining in this district having been ordered to San Francisco, I have deemed it proper to order Major Ketchum, of that regiment, to accompany the troops of his post. I did not deem it proper for me to interfere with the headquarters of the Fourth, it having been located at Fort Dalles by orders from Army Headquarters. I would respectfully suggest that the general would take into consideration the propriety of the removal of the Fourth Infantry headquarters to the southern district of the department. The force in this district is so much reduced that an effective campaign against Indians on a scale of any magnitude is out of the question. All that we can do is to afford general protection to the frontier settlements. It will be borne in mind that the Ninth Infantry has 2 officers and 100 picked men on the escort for Lieutenant Mullan’s wagon-road expedition, and an officer with some thirty men as escort for the Boundary Commission, and that an officer with twenty men from the company of dragoons at Fort Dalles is at the Warm Springs Reservation. Although quiet at this moment throughout the district, yet, prudentially, I would recommend that the district commander be authorized to muster into the service of the United States such number of troops as might be absolutely necessary. More than two years since, when Fort Simcoe was abandoned, an ordnance sergeant was left at that post in charge of the ordnance and quartermaster’s property. He is still there, and possibly has a little public property on hand. I would recommend that the sergeant, with his property, be brought in to Fort Dalles and the sergeant then disposed of as the general may deem proper.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., June 14, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have this day abandoned this post, by instructions received from the headquarters District of Oregon, dated Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 11, 1861. The public property was all duly turned over to the proper departments at Fort Vancouver. Inclosed is the post return to date.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. D. WALLEN, Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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FORT WALLA WALLA, WASH. TER., June 14, 1861.

Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I would beg leave very respectfully to submit for the consideration of the Honorable Secretary of War a few facts in relation to this {p.516} Fort Benton wagon road and its influence upon military operations in this portion of the country. We have this summer, in addition to the disturbed state of the country at home, which has withdrawn a portion of the troops from Oregon, a mining excitement which is pouring all the restless and loose portion of the community into the Nez Percé country, and upon the very land which was promised them as their own exclusive soil, to be exempt from all encroachments of the whites. The Indians are naturally dissatisfied, and to keep peace troops will be needed in their very midst. This takes one company of dragoons from this post, who are now on the reservation, and there should be another out. There is a prospect also of a large emigration this summer via Fort Hall, and unless troops be on the road from this post to keep it clear of the Snakes there will be a repetition of last year’s massacre at Salmon Falls, an occurrence too horrible almost to contemplate. It is also advisable to keep our posts sufficiently garrisoned for the protection of the public property. To meet all these requirements, with the drain upon us by Lieutenant Mullan’s expedition for men and supplies, is too much. His escort of 100 men requires transportation and employés to be paid for out of the quartermaster’s appropriation for this post to the amount of more than $100,000 a year, thereby embarrassing the regular and legitimate operations of the post-and to what purpose? His road has already cost $300,000, and now he can’t travel the portion between this and the Bitter Root Mountains, a distance of 200 or 300 miles, but he is making a new road farther to the north, and when that is completed it will only be practicable a very few months in each year on account of the water, which renders the country a perfect lake. The road will never be a suitable emigrant or military road compared with the other, for the reasons which I have already given in my report to the Quartermaster-General, dated January 8, 1861. The distance from the usual starting point in the States, as can easily be seen by referring to the map, is 400 miles greater by this route, if he ever completes it, compared with the old road, and not half so good a road, and the danger will be more than double in the Sioux and Blackfoot country. These are plain facts. Now, if the object be to expend so large an amount of money for the benefit of this portion of the country, it can still be done, and some real benefit also derived by those who are nominally the objects of the enterprise by expending it on the old road in the manner recommended by me in my report referred to above. Mullan’s escort and the $50,000 appropriated for this summer’s emigration, if applied toward building a ferry or bridge at Fort Hall, to be protected by the Utah troops, and a ferry at Boisé under protection of this post, would be all that is necessary to make a splendid road from the Rocky Mountains to this country. Emigrants and troops could then reach this valley in three or four months from the States, and their animals not much the worse for the journey. They could cross Snake River at Fort Hall and travel on the north side of Boisé through plenty of grass, water, and all that is necessary for a good road. Mr. Craigie, an intelligent and trusty man, for many years in charge of the Hudson Bay Fort at Boisé, would be a very suitable person to take charge of the ferry at Boisé. He has a Snake wife and speaks the language perfectly, and if he were allowed a certain amount of beef cattle and provisions to give away occasionally to such Indians as come about him, it must have a very beneficial effect on reconciling them to the whites. Lieutenant Mullan’s road can never be of any real benefit to any one, on account of the enormous expense in traveling up the Missouri by steam-boat, or the enormous distance and time required compared with the other, if they come by land all the way. The road by {p.517} South Pass is the most direct, and the one cut out by nature for coming to this country, and you can never regard this Fort Benton scheme as anything else than a grand political humbug, and it is time it was stopped. I therefore most respectfully and earnestly suggest that the expedition be broken up before any more money is wasted on it. The troops will return to their legitimate duties and where their services are really needed, and Lieutenant Mullan ordered to his company.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. STEEN, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 15, 1861.

1. Capt. J. J. Archer, Ninth Infantry, with his company (I), now under orders for Fort Dalles, will continue his march without delay to Fort Yamhill, Oreg., and assume command of that post.

...

5. Company K, Ninth Infantry, now at Fort Colville, will move without delay to Fort Dalles, descending the Columbia River by water from Old Fort Walla Walla.

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 17, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: After making my orders on the 11th instant, I had an interview with Captain Russell, of the Fourth Infantry, the commander of Fort Yamhill. The captain, who is a very reliable officer, has represented to me the great importance of the post of Yamhill, there being at this moment some 1,200 Indians on the reservation at that place. Under these circumstances, upon mature consideration of the subject, I determined to order Captain Archer, of the Ninth Infantry, under previous orders for Fort Dalles, to continue his march and take post at Yamhill. In order that no delay might occur in the movement of Captain Russell, I have sent a small detachment from this post to Yamhill, to remain until the arrival of Captain Archer. I have also ordered Company K, Ninth Infantry, to move down from Fort Colville and take post at Fort Dalles. With the present reduced force in the district I believe I have made the best distribution possible. Captains Wallen and Floyd-Jones, Fourth Infantry, with their companies, are now on the Cortez, and I expect Lieutenant Fleming, Ninth Infantry, with Company E, down this evening, to embark on the same ship.

Trusting that my orders and the distribution I have made of the troops may meet the approval of the general, I am, sir, your very obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.518}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 12.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash, Ter., June 17, 1861.

Company E, Ninth Infantry, under command of First Lieut. H. B. Fleming, expected down on the steamer Julia this evening, will continue on and embark on the steamer Cortez, bound for San Francisco. Lieutenant Fleming on reaching the Cortez will report his command to the senior officer of the Army on that ship.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS New San Diego Barracks, Cal., June 18, 1861.

Maj. D. O. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Hdqrs. Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report my arrival at this post yesterday with I Company, Fourth Infantry, having a total of fifty-two enlisted men, aggregate fifty-three, being twenty-one days out from Fort Mojave, N. Mex., and having marched in eighteen days 387 miles. I have this day assumed command of this post, and relieved Brevet Major Armistead and his company (F, Sixth Infantry) from duty at this place.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. O. HALLER, Captain, Fourth Infantry, and Brevet Major, Commanding Post.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 106.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 19, 1861.

1. Maj. D. C. Buell, assistant adjutant-general, will make an inspection of Forts Humboldt and Bragg and their dependencies, and report on the condition of Indian affairs in their vicinity.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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DRAGOON BRIDGE, HONEY TAKE VALLEY, CAL., June 19, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that the troops evacuate this post to-day, in accordance with Special Orders, No. 91, from department headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. R. WARNER, Second Lieutenant, Third Artillery, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: There is an absolute and immediate necessity for a government of some kind in Nevada Territory. In the absence of all the civil officials {p.519} shall I protect persons and property by enforcing the laws of the United States?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 108.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 20, 1861.

1. Companies F and H, Fourth Infantry, and E, Ninth Infantry, will take post temporarily at the Presidio.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. O. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAM FRANCISCO, June 21, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Fort Vancouver:

Re-establish Camp Pickett.

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 21, 1861.

I. In consequence of the threatening attitude of the Indians on the waters of Puget Sound, so much of Special Orders, No. 9, current series, from these headquarters as directs the troops at Camp Pickett, on San Juan Island, to embark on the next steamer for San Francisco is hereby revoked.

II. So soon as the public property shall have been removed from Fort Townsend the commander of the Massachusetts will be directed to proceed with his ship and report to Captain Pickett or the commanding officer at Camp Pickett, on San Juan Island, to remain until further orders.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 22, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 12th instant, together with the letter of Captain Pickett of the 1st instant. I had much hesitation in the first instance about abandoning the post of San Juan Island; not that its occupancy could have the least effect on our claim to the island, as I look upon that as a point not open for discussion, but it is a salient and {p.520} commanding position on our northern frontier, admirably adapted to afford general protection to the settlements on the waters of Puget Sound. Indeed, I believe that a strong garrison on San Juan Island, with the aid of small steamer, would afford ample protection for the whole sound, and that all other posts might be dispensed with. After a careful consideration of Captain Pickett’s communication, and exercising the permission contained in yours, I have ordered the garrison at San Juan to remain there. I have also ordered the Massachusetts to proceed to the island and report to Captain Pickett, to remain there until further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, near Los Angeles, Cal., June 22, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Inclosed herewith you will find a telegraphic dispatch from Lieutenant Carr, First Dragoons, left in charge of the public stores at Fort Tejon, and having with him one corporal and one private. You will see my action in the case by my telegraphic reply to Lieutenant Carr (in pencil), inclosed herewith.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

FORT TEJON, June 21, 1861.

Major CARLETON, Commanding:

I want a sergeant and ten men here. The Indians are going to break out. The whites are giving them whisky and they charge around and make their threats publicly. We are unarmed and undefended.

M. T. CARE, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

CAMP NEAR LOS ANGELES, June 21, 1861-9.30 p.m.

Lieutenant CARR:

Sergeant Dalton and ten dragoons, with rations and forage for two days, forty rounds for Sharps carbines, and thirty-four revolvers, have left to report to you at Fort Tejon. As soon as all the public stores are removed report with them here.

J. H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army.

I think the Indians have been put up to this. No troops will ever return to Fort Tejon except on campaign to whale them. You can bet on it.

J. H. C.

{p.521}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 22, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Ninth Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon:

SIR: Your orders and communication in pursuance of the orders for the movement of troops from your district to this part of the department have been submitted to the department commander. The post on San Juan Island he regards as having a national importance, and he desires, therefore, that you will re-establish it at once under the command of a captain. With reference to calling volunteers into service, the general will approve of such action on your part whenever an emergency shall render it absolutely necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D.C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, near Los Angeles, Cal., June 23, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.

MAJOR: Until I heard a rumor that the general was negotiating for the Mission San Fernando as a post for this command I had intended to remove this camp to some position more open to the cool breezes coming from the ocean than the spot where it now is seems to be. I was induced to come here mainly for convenience to water, but I am disappointed in the ground, becoming easily pulverized into dust, and in its being a much hotter place than I at first supposed it would be. If the troops are soon to move to San Fernando I will not encounter the trouble of breaking up this camp to move into some other prior to that change. If not, then I shall order a board having the doctor upon it to select a site less hot and dusty than this, and having a view to salubrity, provided one can be found not too far removed from the depot in Los Angeles. If not an improper request, I beg to be informed as to the probability of this command going to the Mission.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Olympia, June 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Comdg. Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I notice in the public journals that by orders from the headquarters of this military department the troops are being withdrawn from many of the posts in this Territory. While the executive and the citizens of Washington Territory can readily perceive the necessity, under existing circumstances, for concentrating the Government forces at certain points, I deem it to be my duty most respectfully to suggest to the general commanding the danger to which our northern frontier will be exposed upon the withdrawal of the entire force from that quarter. For several years past the frontier settlements on Puget Sound have suffered from the periodical incursions of the northern {p.522} Indians from the British and Russian Possessions. The isolated position of these settlements invites attack from the fierce and treacherous savages of the North, and the only protection from their ravages has been the presence of the U. S. troops on San Juan Island. I am informed that there are at present upward of 2,000 of these Indians at Victoria and its vicinity, and large numbers are frequently seen in our waters. On the 3d of February last I had the honor to forward to the late commander of the department a memorial of the Legislative Assembly of this Territory requesting that a company of troops might be stationed at Bellingham Bay to protect the settlers from the Indians in that vicinity. Should the entire force be withdrawn from San Juan Island our citizens entertain great and well-grounded fear of a descent by the savages on the unprotected settlements, and I have therefore most earnestly to urge that if possible a sufficient force may be continued on the island.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor.

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CRESCENT CITY, June 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Commanding Pacific Division, U. S. Army:

DEAR SIR: In accordance with instructions we herewith transmit to you a copy of the proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of this county, held this day. A petition to the same effect has been heretofore forwarded to you, but as yet we have had no response. Pardon our importunities upon this matter, for when we tell you that the Indians are at least twice as numerous as the whites in this county, and many of them well armed, and our lives, property, and all that we have is subject to destruction at any time, you will not consider us more urgent than others would be under similar circumstances. Will you be kind enough to give us a response soon? If the Government can give us no protection, or nothing to defend ourselves with, we must make preparation at our own expense, as we do not desire a repetition of the scenes of 1855 and 1856. Hoping for a response,

We are, truly, yours,

J. P. HAYNES. BEN. F. DORRIS.

[Inclosure.]

CRESCENT CITY, June 24, 1861.

At a meeting of the citizens of Del Norte County, this day held at the court-house, in the town of Crescent City, pursuant to notice, the following preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted, to wit:

Whereas by a recent order the military force under the command of Lieut. George Crook, stationed at Fort Ter-Waw, in this county, has been removed, as we learn, with the intention of an entire abandonment of said post; and whereas we believe that the presence of said force has been effectual in awing and restraining the Indians in this and the neighboring county of Klamath, and we consider their continued presence essential to the preservation of peace and the protection of the lives and property of our citizens; Therefore we, citizens of Del Norte County, do resolve-

First. That it is the first and highest duty of Government at all times to afford adequate protection to the lives and property of its citizens.

{p.523}

Second. That we do most, respectfully and earnestly protest against the removal of said troops from our midst, thereby exposing us to the perils of a war with the numerous and treacherous race of savages by whom we are surrounded.

Third. That the commanding officer of the Pacific Division, U. S. Army, be and is hereby requested to return said company and officers, or some other instead thereof, to Fort Ter-Waw with as little delay as possible.

Fourth. If it be impracticable to return said company, or some other, as herein suggested, that we do hereby earnestly request the commanding officer to leave with us, under charge of such persons as he may designate, a sufficiency of arms and ammunition with which to defend ourselves in case of danger.

Fifth. That the secretary be instructed to forward a copy of the proceedings of this meeting to Brig. Gen. E. V. Sumner, commanding Pacific Division, U. S. Army.

J. P. HAYNES, Chairman. BEN. F. DORRIS, Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 25, 1861.

W. L. PARVIN, Esq., La Porte, Sierra County, Cal.:

SIR: Your communication of the 4th instant having been laid before the general commanding the department, he desires me to say that he filly appreciates the loyal spirit displayed in your actions and the patriotic feeling which prompts the tender of your services and those of your fellow-citizens to the General Government. There is at present no occasion for calling upon the State authorities for a volunteer force. Should the exigencies exist, however, he will not hesitate to call into requisition the citizen soldiery of this State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, June 27, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER U. S. ARMY IN UTAH TERRITORY:

Any subsistence stores in your department which have not already been disposed of you will keep for the use of troops that will be moved into Utah from California.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., June 27, 1861-9 a.m.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have this moment received your telegraphic dispatch of the 21st instant. You will perceive by my orders that I had already {p.524} accomplished the wishes of the general by retaining the garrison at Camp Pickett.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., June 28, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. JAMES H. CARLETON, Captain, First Regiment of Dragoons, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: Your letter of the 23d instant having been submitted to the general commanding the department, he instructs me to say in reply that the location and establishment of camps for your command is left optional with you. He desires, however, that in making these changes you should keep constantly in view the perfect security of the Government depot at Los Angeles.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 28, 1861.

Maj. ALBEMARLE CADY, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has been informed that a rumor is prevalent in this community and the State generally that the so-called government of the Confederate States purpose sending from the State of Texas or elsewhere, through certain States of the Mexican Republic, to this coast a military force, considerable in numbers, with the object of seizing upon and holding the port of Guaymas, in the Republic of Mexico. Whether this is merely an idle rumor or is really the purpose and intention of that people the general has no means of judging, but from the unparalleled audacity which has characterized the operations of those now in revolt against the authority of the General Government, it is well to be prepared for any movement which has for its object purposes similar to this, and for emergencies that may arise under it. The general commanding desires that you should keep him constantly informed of any indications on the part of this so-called government, or those professedly acting under it, to seize upon or occupy any part of the Mexican States on this coast, or any point within the limits of this military department. All information of a reliable character touching this subject will be promptly communicated. The general deems it scarcely necessary to remind one of your experience of the instructions regarding public posts and property contained in General Orders, No. 6, current series, from these headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.525}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, June 29, 1861.

Messrs. J. P. HAYNES and BENJAMIN F. DORRIS, Crescent City, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 24th instant, transmitting for the consideration of the general commanding the department the proceedings of a meeting of citizens of Klamath County, in this State. The general commanding is sensible of the difficulties which surround the citizens in the several localities from which the troops have been recently, and he hopes temporarily, withdrawn, and regrets exceedingly that the force at his disposal will not enable him to continue that protection to their lives and property which, until the existence of our present political necessities, he had the power to grant. You may rest assured, however, that the general will not be unmindful of your condition, but will do whatever lies in his power to remedy any inconvenience which may be experienced by your citizens in consequence of these changes. In view of the extraordinary condition of affairs existing in the country, to which I have adverted, it is but just to expect that while the States east of the mountains are generously contributing men and means for the maintenance of the General Government, the people of the Pacific Coast should furnish the necessary aid in protecting their frontiers from Indian incursions. To enable the inhabitants to accomplish this, at points where it is impracticable to station troops for their protection, the general will avail himself of the first opportunity of conferring with the Governor of your State, and pressing upon him the necessity of making arrangements for the issue of arms and ammunition to the citizens residing in those parts of the State most exposed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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[JUNE 30, 1861.– For Macwillie to Davis in regard to affairs in Arizona, and for Jones to Davis, and Jones to Walker, on the same subject, see Series IV, Vol. I, pp. 1196-1198.]

Abstract from return of the Department of the Pacific, Brig. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, U. S. Army, commanding, for the month of June, 1861.

Troops.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Pieces of artillery.
Officers.Men.Heavy.Field.
General headqnarters1811920
District of Oregon3148870197416
Troops serving in California and Nevada651,5752,0852,3677917
Total1142,0642,8053,3617933
{p.526}

Organization of troops in the Department of the Pacific, commanded by Brig. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, U. S. Army, June 30, 1861.

* Company I en route to Fort Dalles, Oreg.

** Companies D and G at Fort Breckinridge, N. Mex.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., July 2, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Captain Pickett, Ninth Infantry, having tendered his resignation as an officer of the Army, the general commanding the department desires you to withdraw the company at present on San Juan Island, substituting therefor one having a captain in command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

FORT BRAGG, July 3, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I arrived at Fort Humboldt on the morning of the 25th ultimo and inspected the post that day. I had to wait another day for means of transportation, and on the 27th started for Lieutenant Collins’ camp, about sixty miles southeast of Humboldt; thence on to Lieutenant Martin’s camp and to this post. I arrived here night before last and inspected the post yesterday. This morning I am starting back to reach Fort Gaston; thence to Ter-Waw, Crescent City, and Fort Crook, including in my route other detachments from the posts in this region of country. I find this arrangement the most convenient that I can adopt to accomplish the wishes of the general commanding the department. I shall reserve my detailed report until I have completed the tour. By that time I shall have passed through the entire region in which the Indians are said to be troublesome, and can report more advisedly on that subject. Upward of 200 Indians (men, with a few accidental exceptions), have been killed by the different detachments. Presuming that this slaughter is to stop at some point short of extermination, for the alleged depredations of the Indians would hardly justify that, I have ventured to advise the officers in command to discontinue it now until other depredations are committed, excepting, however, with reference to the band which recently killed two men (Lewis and Oliver.) at Shelter Cove, on the coast. That is a legitimate ground for severe chastisement, and I have advised the officers to direct their efforts {p.528} energetically to that object. This band of Indians has no connection with those against whom the troops have been operating. I shall report more particularly in regard to all these matters. I shall waste no time on the route, but it will unavoidedly occupy somewhat more time than I anticipated-perhaps twenty days yet. The distance is considerable, and the land travel is tedious and sometimes difficult, being in part over a country without a trail.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General and Inspector.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 3, 1861.

Hon. JOHN C. HYATT, Whatcom, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Your communication of June 18, transmitting for the consideration of the general commanding the department a copy of the memorial passed by the Legislature of Washington Territory requesting the re-occupancy of Fort Bellingham, in that Territory, has been received. The political difficulties existing in the country at this time requires the temporary withdrawal of many of the companies formerly occupying posts in Washington Territory. Until they cease, or until every apprehension of a transfer of the difficulties to this coast has passed, the general commanding will find it in his power to gratify the wishes of your people. The immediate commander of that military district will give all possible security to the citizens within its limits, and has already received discretionary power to call out the volunteers of Oregon and Washington, should it be necessary, for the protection of the lives and property of the citizens.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

CAMP SUMNER, July 4, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Department of the Pacific:

CAPTAIN: There are many rumors in circulation about the movement of troops. If Camp Sumner is to be continued, and it is compatible with the public service, I shall be glad to be retained in command of the camp. This application is only made under the supposition that the major commanding may be sent upon other duty.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. D. WALLEN, Captain, Fourth Infantry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 5, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. JAMES H. CARLETON, Captain, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department thinks it not impossible, in consequence of the withdrawal of the troops from Forts Tejon {p.529} and Mojave, that the Indians may be emboldened to make hostile incursions on the settlements near their reservations. To guard against this and at the same time afford the necessary protection to the citizens in those localities, he desires you, whenever you have reliable information of offenses having been committed, to send out a detachment from your command under a discreet commissioned officer, to gain information, and if required, to correct the Indians. Should the latter be necessary, it is the desire of the general that the Indians shall not be punished for alleged offenses, unless the evidence is of a character leaving no doubt of their guilt, and then only in proportion to the offense committed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter, July 5, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report for the information of the general commanding the department, that Shokup, the head chief and most influential man of the Shoshone tribe, from Ruby Valley, came into the garrison to-day on a visit. He represents his people peaceably disposed toward the whites, and that he will do all in his power to keep them so. He says his people are very poor, and much in want of provisions. The overland stage men say that this chief is a good friend of theirs, and is peaceably disposed toward them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 5, 1861.

Hon. HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor of Washington Territory, Olympia, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of June 24 in reference to the withdrawal of troops from Washington Territory, and desires me to say in reply that he does not contemplate the withdrawal of any portion of the force remaining within the limits of Washington Territory, and believes that under judicious management of the commander of that military district this force will be sufficient to give the necessary protection to your citizens. Should it, however, be inadequate for this purpose, Colonel Wright has authority to accept the services of such volunteer force as may secure complete protection of life and property. The general desires me to say that the order withdrawing the company of infantry from San Juan Island has been rescinded, and that the arrangement of the General-in-Chief for the occupancy of the island will continue.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.530}

LONG VALLEY, July 6, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Pacific:

SIR: I have just returned from Round Valley, where I went yesterday to inspect a detachment from Fort Bragg. I found one sergeant and twelve privates encamped at a point fourteen miles this side of the valley (they have been there about six weeks), and one corporal and one private at the valley. Several of the detachment have been on this duty two years and a half, and none less than eighteen months. Their services are of no value whatever where they are, and I recommend that they be immediately returned to their company.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General and Acting Inspector-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 6, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLARE, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs me to say that if in your judgment the company of the Sixth Regiment of Infantry which recently arrived at Fort Churchill is no longer required for the protection of that post you will order it to take post at Benicia Barracks.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 181.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 8, 1861.

...

6. Bvt. Capt. Richard C. Drum, assistant adjutant-general, will repair to Washington City and report in person to the Adjutant-General of the Army.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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CAMP ON LARRABEE CREEK, July 9,1861.

Capt. CHARLES S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: I have reported to the department commander that I have advised the commanders of detachments in the field to make no more attacks on Indians except for depredations actually committed, and I have no doubt that he will approve that course. The Shelter Cove Indians, however, have received no punishment for the murder of Lewis and Oliver, for which the whole band, according to all accounts, may fairly be held responsible. I have advised the commanding officer of Fort Bragg to take measures for the effectual punishment of that band, as it can perhaps be best undertaken by the troops from that post. {p.531} He will not, however, exercise control over Lieutenant Martin’s detachment until he hears from you, and you can best judge whether the detachment from your post shall take part in the service. If you should think it advisable Lieutenant Collins will be back in time to conduct it, as it will be best, perhaps, to allow a week or ten days to elapse, so as to allay the apprehensions of the Indians and find them together. The supposition is that at present they are scattered and on the alert in the country east of the coast hills opposite Shelter Cove. In the meantime Lieutenant Martin will, at my suggestion, change his camp to some point within striking distance of their haunts, while Lieutenant Moore will prepare a command to move up the coast to operate from that quarter. I give you this information in order that you may adopt such course as you may think proper, and because of the length of time it will require for you to concert with Lieutenant Moore. The troops can, perhaps, move against the Indians to the best advantage in about ten days. Might it not be as well to let the troops from Fort Bragg undertake the service alone? If they fail, the Indians will slacken their vigilance, and may then be more certainly reached by the detachment from your post. I only suggest the question to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, Acting Inspector-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., July 10, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of June 5, and herewith inclose a copy of my letter to the senior naval officer at Panama on the subject embraced therein.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., July 10, 1861.

Commodore J. B. MONTGOMERY, or SENIOR NAVAL OFFICER, U. S. Navy, Panama:

COMMODORE: I inclose a copy of a letter* I have recently received, and I take an early opportunity to say to you that I shall be prepared at all times to act with you in preventing the secessionists from getting a foothold on this coast. I have heard a report that Colonel Van Dorn, of the Southern Army, was seen at the head of 1,300 men on the road between San Antonio and El Paso. I cannot say whether this report is reliable or not. I would respectfully suggest whether it would not be well to have one or two small steamers cruising on the coast between this and Acapulco, for the protection of the liners.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* See Townsend to Sumner, June 5, p. 498.

{p.532}

AGENCY PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, San Francisco, July 10, 1861.

General SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Pacific Department, San Francisco:

SIR: The president of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company has directed us to make application to you for the loan of four light 32-pounder guns, to be placed on our steamers in active service between this port and Panama. They are intended as an additional defensive armament over and above their present one, which is of light caliber. With the large guns we would require a small amount of suitable ammunition for them, as none of the desired size can be procured here outside of the Government supply.

Asking a reply to this communication at your earliest convenience, we remain, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

FORBES & BABCOCK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 10, 1861.

Messrs. FORBES & BABCOCK, Agents Pacific Mail Steamship Company, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: I am directed by the general commanding the department to inform you, in reply to your letter of this date, requesting the loan of four 32-pounder guns, that instructions will be given the ordnance officer at Benicia Arsenal to furnish on application the guns and a sufficient amount of ammunition for the protection of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company’s vessels.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP ON MAD RIVER, CAL., July 10, 1861.

Sergeant HARTMAN, Fourth Infantry, Commanding Detachment:

Attack no more Indians except for depredations actually committed, and then endeavor to attack only the parties which committed the depredations. Be careful to kill no women or children. Take no women or children prisoners, but let them go. When you release Indians try to make them understand that they are punished because they molest the whites, and that if they do no mischief they will not be harmed.

By order of General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, Acting Inspector-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 11, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have received an order to act in concert with the Navy in preventing the secessionists from getting a foothold in Lower California. I have written to Commodore Montgomery on the subject, and {p.533} told him that I should be prepared to act at all times. The revenue cutter Joe Lane has been ordered to San Diego, and I think with reference to this matter-the captain informs me that the guns he has are old and unserviceable, and he wants very much a 24-pounder-I would respectfully suggest whether it might not be well to lend him a gun of this kind if you have one to spare.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 11, 1861.

IRA P. RANKIN, Esq., U. S. Collector, Port of San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I am inclined to think that it would be well just at this time to require all vessels entering or going out of the harbor to show their colors. If you think it advisable, could you not give them this order through the pilots and tide waiters? As the matter now stands, vessels are constantly passing the forts without being known at all.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., July 11, 1861.

I. Capt. T. C. English, Ninth Infantry, with his company (H) will proceed without delay to San Juan Island and relieve the garrison now at that place.

II. Capt. G. E. Pickett, Ninth Infantry, on being relieved by Captain English, will move with his company to Fort Steilacoom and turn over his command and public property to Captain Woodruff. Captain Pickett will then be permitted to avail himself of the leave of absence granted in Special Orders, No. 118, current series, from department headquarters.

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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COMMANDANT’S OFFICE, NAVY-YARD, Mare Island, July 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 11th instant, informing me of your order to act in concert with the Navy in preventing the secessionists from getting a foothold in Lower California. I am at all times ready to co-operate with the Army in any way that the means we have will afford. But as self-preservation is the first law of nature I deem it more prudent to keep for our own defense the limited means we have; but, if you advise to the contrary, I will accede to your request. Inclosed I hand you copy of a letter which I addressed to the {p.534} collector of San Francisco asking of me the same accommodation. There are, as you see by my letter, any number of iron guns of different caliber, but the brass 24-pounder is one of a smaller park, which I deem advisable to reserve for the defense of the yard.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. GARDNER, Commandant.

[Inclosure.]

COMMANDANT’S OFFICE, NAVY-YARD, Mare Island, July 10, 1861.

Hon. IRA P. RANKIN, Collector of Customs, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Your communication of July 9 has been received, and in reply would inform you that we have only one gun of the description referred to in your letter, and that is required for service at this station in the event of its use being necessary. We have several 32-pounder iron guns of 27 hundredweight; also a number of 24-pounders, iron, of 31 hundredweight, which can be furnished if required.

I am with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. H. GARDNER, Commandant.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 125.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 12, 1861.

...

IV. Lieut. Col. George Andrews, Sixth Infantry, will without delay proceed to and assume command of Fort Yuma. Upon being relieved, Major Cady, Sixth Infantry, will repair to Benicia Barracks and report to the colonel of his regiment.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 13, 1861.

Messrs. BABCOCK & FORBES, Agents Pacific Mail Steamship Company, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: Having ascertained that there are no gun carriages at the ordnance depot at Benicia suitable for vessels, the general commanding the department directs me to inform you that he will not be able to furnish the kind of carriage required. The guns and ammunition will be supplied as stated in my former letter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 13, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Commanding Navy. Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I think with you that we must take care of ourselves in the first place, but just at this time it may be well for us to extend what {p.535} assistance we can to other branches of the service, for it might be embarrassing to us to have vessels captured for the want of an armament that we could have furnished. I am going to issue guns to the liners, and if you can lend a ship carriage for a brass 24-pounder for the cutter Joe Lane, I will have the gun and ammunition furnished from Benicia. If you prefer it, Captain McAllister will exchange guns with you for a time, giving you one mounted on a field carriage.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

–––

FORT GASTON, CAL., July 13, 1861.

Capt. C. S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Humboldt:

SIR: The volunteers from Lieutenant Martin’s camp brought away with them three Indian children, whom they captured during their recent operations against the Indians, and whom, I learn, they design to retain in their service. I deem it proper to bring this matter to your notice, because I imagine it will meet with the disapprobation of the department commander, to whom I shall feel it my duty to report it, as well as other like cases which have occurred in some of the detachments now in the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, Acting Inspector-General.

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COMMANDANT’S OFFICE, NAVY-YARD, Mare Island, July 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Your communication of the 13th of July was handed to me by Captain Chaddock, of the U. S. revenue cutter Joe Lane. The gun is now in progress of being fitted, and I hope by to-morrow evening to be able to dispatch her. I will accept of your offer of a 24-pounder field piece, and will be obliged if you will give the order for its delivery to our tender, with the fixed ammunition necessary for it. I have under my control the coast-survey steamer Active and the light-house steamer Shubrick. Should the information you are in possession of induce you to think that these steamers could be of service at the point spoken of in your letter of the 11th instant, I will unhesitatingly detail them for that service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. GARDNER, Commandant.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 126.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 15, 1861.

...

II. Under an exigency of the service Capt. R. C. Drum, assistant adjutant-general, will, in addition to his other duties at these headquarters, {p.536} perform those of chief of the subsistence department, relieving Capt. M. D. L. Simpson, commissary of subsistence.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 20.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., July 15, 1861.

...

II. First Lieut. P. H. Sheridan, Fourth Infantry, will relieve Captain Archer in command of Company I, Ninth Infantry, receiving and receipting for the company and public property pertaining thereto. Lieutenant Sheridan will remain in command of Fort Hoskins until the arrival of an officer of the Ninth Infantry.

By order of Colonel Wright:

JNO. S. MASON, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT YUMA, CAL., July 15, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Headquarters Department of the Pacific:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt on the 13th instant of the communication dated June 28 from the headquarters of the department. The rumor referred to, like many others, has reached us, and of course our earnest attention has been given to the matter, Nothing as yet has come to our knowledge to indicate any likelihood of such a movement being contemplated at this time, or at a very early future. As an expedition of the kind must pass through the eastern part of the Gadsden purchase, and within about forty miles of Tucson, to get a practicable route toward Guaymas, we should be likely to obtain early information of it from the loyal citizens of that place. I shall endeavor, at any rate, by the earliest opportunity to obtain from Tucson the most prompt and reliable news. I can depend on the few people in this vicinity to keep me fully advised of all they may learn. I would most respectfully suggest, in reference to another rumor that has reached us, so vague, however, as scarcely to justify this notice of it, that an addition to this garrison is contemplated; that if so, unless there should be a paramount necessity for it, no troops should be sent to the post during the present or next month, if they are to march through the desert. Such march could not be effected without greatly impairing the efficiency of the troops, coming as they would from a comparatively cool region into one where the heat is excessive and exceedingly debilitating, and the supplies of water scanty and generally bad. For the last thirty-one days we have had a continued spell of extremely hot weather, the mean at 2 o’clock, the official hour of observation, being upward of 108 1/4°, and the hottest portion of the day is almost invariably at a later hour. No decided amelioration in this respect can be looked for until late in September.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Major Sixth Infantry, Commanding Post.

{p.537}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 16, 1861.

Lieut. Gen. WINFIELD SCOTT, Commanding the Army:

GENERAL: In consequence of the order removing the troops from the Oregon route, urgent applications have been made to the War Department to have a sufficient force stationed thereon to protect the overland mail. To aid in effecting this purpose, the Secretary of War desires, if it meet your approbation, that the paroled companies now stationed in New York Harbor be directed to take post in Utah.

I am, general, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 16, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have received your letter of yesterday. I have sent an order to Benicia to furnish you with the 24-pounder and field carriage. I am glad to learn that the Active and Shubrick are under your command, and I should think it would be very well, in order to show that we are wide awake, to let one or both of them make a cruise occasionally down the coast.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier. General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 128.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 16, 1861.

1. The detachment of Company D, Sixth Infantry, posted in Round Valley, will immediately be withdrawn by the commanding officer of Fort Bragg.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 16, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: The security of your command and the position it now occupies is of vital importance, and requires, the general commanding believes, the most watchful care on your part. It is therefore desirable that you should make such necessary preparations for the defense of your post as the means at your disposal will permit. To enable you the more certainly to procure valuable and reliable information of any hostile operations in the south or west, and to receive timely notice of the advance of any force in the direction of your post, the general desires you to make such arrangements with the tribes of friendly Indians and others favorably disposed toward our Government, as well as keep you constantly advised of the movements of armed parties in the directions {p.538} indicated. The general also wishes you to keep him advised of any movements having for their object either the invasion or seizing upon of any part of the States of the Republic of Mexico on this coast. You are expected to forward all reliable information you may receive for the information of the general commanding.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 129.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 17, 1861.

I. Lieut. Col. George A. H. Blake, First Dragoons, will, in consequence of the disability of Colonel Beall, assume command of the regiment, the headquarters of which are hereby transferred to Fort Churchill, N. T. The non-commissioned staff, band and regimental archives, will be forwarded without delay by water to San Francisco, and thence to Fort Churchill, by the usual route.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 18, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. JAMES H. CARLETON, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs that you will proceed immediately to San Bernardino, in this State, and while there and in the vicinity make inquiry into the political complexion of that district of country. While you are expected to make a close investigation into the sympathies and opinions of these people, the general nevertheless desires you to prevent as far as possible any suspicions as to the real object of your visit. The general desires you to report fully on the political feeling existing there, and whether in your opinion the Union sentiment would be strengthened by stationing two more companies of troops at that point, the troops to be drawn from Camp Sumner, near this place.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-The general thinks it possible that Captain Sherman, of San Bernardino, may be able to give you reliable information.

R. C. D.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 18, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, First Regiment of Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIB: The general commanding department desires you to inform him whether in your opinion it would be judicious to place at Fort Churchill {p.539} 200 stand of arms for the purpose of arming in an emergency those citizens in Nevada Territory favorably disposed to our Government.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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U. S. FLAG-SHIP LANCASTER, Harbor of Acapulco, July 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Comdg. the Pacific Mil. Div. of the United States, San Francisco, Cal.:

GENERAL: Your communication dated July 10 and inclosure has just been received. I scarcely need to assure you of my earnest desire and readiness to co-operate with you (to the extent of the means at my disposal) in counteracting the supposed designs of secessionists against Lower California, and for all other objects touching the honor and interests of our Government. I am now en route with the Lancaster to Panama, where I shall meet dispatches from the Navy Department, possibly, instructing me in regard to future operations. In the meantime I have directed the commanders of the steamers Wyoming and Narragansett and sloop of war Cyane, detailed for service along the coasts of California and Mexico for the protection of mail steamers, &c., to afford you all required aid and co-operation in carrying out the views of the Government (within the limits of their assigned duties) along the coasts and in the Gulf of California.

I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. MONTGOMERY, Flag-Officer, Commanding Pacific Squadron.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Bragg, Cal., July 19, 1861.

Lieut. J. P. MARTIN, Seventh Infantry, Comdg. Detachment in the Field, Camp near Spruce Grove:

SIR: Your letter dated 14th July is received, also the one Captain Lovell wrote to you dated July 12. I have received no instructions as yet from department headquarters with regard to operating against the Indians, but expect by the next mail (July 25) to receive instructions. I can only anticipate that of which you are already advised and will be ready to act promptly when authorized. Your move in locating your camp is a good one, and to reconnoiter without alarming the Indians is perhaps the most that can be done at present. When I start up the coast, which may be on the 24th instant, it will be with a very small party of men (nominally a hunting party) so as not to create alarm, so that when it is time to strike we can do it effectually. To punish the guilty and spare the innocent will be my object, and I would rather all would escape than to kill any women or children. Consequently, endeavor to ascertain the whereabouts of the Indians who were concerned in the recent murder of Oliver and Lewis, and if possible advise me upon my arrival at Shelter Cove.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ORLANDO H. MOORE, Lieutenant, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.540}

TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Olympia, July 20, 1861.

Col. G. WRIGHT, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Herewith I have the honor to transmit to you a copy of a correspondence between this office and that of the superintendent of Indian affairs relative to difficulties apprehended by the settlers in the vicinity of Gray’s Harbor with the neighboring Indians. The superintendent recommends that a small detachment of troops be stationed at Fort Chehalis, and I have respectfully to urge that this may be done at as early a day as possible.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

TERRITORY OF WASHINGTON, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Olympia, July 20, 1861.

Hon. W. W. MILLER, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Olympia, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Herewith I inclose a petition addressed to the Governor of this Territory by citizens of Gray’s Harbor and vicinity, asking that regular troops or militia be immediately ordered there for the protection of settlers from the neighboring Indians. I also inclose seven affidavits on the same subject. The petitioners and affiants state that in consequence of the withdrawal of the troops from Fort Chehalis the savages have assumed an attitude of hostility, and in some cases have caused the settlers to abandon their farms. Great fears are entertained of further violence. These papers are respectfully referred for your opinion as to the necessity for affording the protection called for. Should you believe that such necessity exists I will, on being notified, immediately make the proper requisition upon the military authorities of this department.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. MCGILL, Acting Governor.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, Olympia, Wash. Ter., July 20, 1861.

Hon. H. M. MCGILL, Acting Governor, &c., Olympia, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have to acknowledge receipt of your letter of this date, covering a petition for troops, with sundry affidavits from citizens near Gray’s Harbor, concerning the contemplated danger to them from the Indians on the north side of the Chehalis. It is the desire and intention of this office to send an agent to visit these Indians at a very early day, and to carry into effect the treaty with such of them as have been treated with, which includes all the Indians on the coast except the Chehalis bands. It is hoped that these arrangements may be the means of terminating all difficulties and dangers, both real and imaginary, but it would be advisable in the meantime to have an armed detachment of {p.541} say, ten or fifteen men from Fort Steilacoom, or Fort Vancouver, stationed at the old post, and I consequently recommend that number be sent thither.

I am, very respectfully,

W. W. MILLER, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Washington Territory.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., July 24, 1861.

Respectfully referred to department headquarters.

I have removed all the stores from Fort Chehalis, as I did not believe there would be any absolute necessity for troops there for the present. I do not think that there is any real danger of Indian outbreaks, but to allay the apprehensions on that subject perhaps it might be as well to send ten or twelve men there for a while.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter., July 22, 1861.

Maj. DON CARLOS BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Hdqrs. Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Your communication of the 18th instant is received. In reply I would state for the information of the general commanding department that Captain Moore was present and organized one company in Virginia City, and that he examined the records of the Union organization in Virginia City, Gold Hill, and Silver City, and is satisfied there are now in the Territory over 400 loyal citizens, organized as companies, who are anxious to obtain arms and ammunition for the purpose of aiding the civil authority in carrying out the laws and protecting the interests of the United States. I believe that arms could be placed in the hands of these men with the full assurance that the power thus given them would not be abused. I would also state that the arms will be secure, as they do not place them in an armory but carry them to their rooms, so that in case of an alarm they come forth ready armed without the necessity of rushing to an armory to equip. The arms could be issued to the Governor, and by him to such as he knows to be loyal, or placed in store at this post and issued on requisitions by him or the order of the general commanding department.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, July 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The colonel of ordnance has ordered 30,000 stand of arms, now in store on the Pacific, to be shipped to New York, as they are very {p.542} much needed here. The General-in-Chief directs that you give every facility for executing this order as soon as practicable.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal., July 23, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Inclosed please find the report of First Lieut. Benjamin F. Davis, First Dragoons, on the Indian troubles which were said to exist at or near Fort Tejon, Cal. Lieutenant Davis’ report confirms the impression I had as to the truth of the intelligence conveyed to me by telegraph and otherwise in relation to these troubles. The general may rely upon this-no troops are more ready than those of this command to protect the inhabitants when they are really menaced, and none, perhaps, more unwilling than those to be imposed upon by idle reports, having no foundation in fact, and which are gotten up to answer sinister ends.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal., July 23, 1861.

Brevet Major CARLETON, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, near Los Angeles:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that in compliance with your orders I left this camp on the morning of the 14th and proceeded to Fort Tejon for the purpose of ascertaining the facts concerning certain reports made by the people of that vicinity that the Indians were committing depredations and threatening to make war upon them. I arrived at that place on the 18th, and made careful inquiries of Messrs. Alexander, Barbee, Halpin, and other residents of the canon. From their statements it appears that when the troops left the fort the Indians came about in considerable numbers to pick up old rags, shoes, &c., as is usual with them in such cases, and Lieutenant Carr, the officer left in charge, seems to have had some little difficulty in getting rid of them. A few days afterward two or three of these Indians got drunk at the “Yews,” and on their way home attempted to throw a lariat over the head of a man whom they met coming up the cañon in a buggy. They also tried to break into the house of a Mrs. Welt, who lives below the fort, but she easily frightened them off by firing a pistol out of the window. This seems to have been the extent of their depredations, and since that time they have been quiet and friendly. The apprehension that the people are under from the Indians may be judged of by the fact that most every family has them employed either as house servants or laborers, and they are well aware that it is in their power to prevent all trouble in future by simply prohibiting the sale of liquor by any member of the community. I then proceeded to the settlements on the slough or South Fork of Kern River to inquire into the threatened depredations in that quarter. The story that these people {p.543} tell is that an Indian boy told a Mrs. Cottrell or Cottring that the Indians from the reservation were coming down when the corn got ripe to eat it up, and were then going to kill all the whites. This woman lives near her father, an old man named Bonny, who has also another daughter, Mrs. Greenlis, who lives eight or ten miles down the slough. The old man becoming alarmed sent for this daughter, which caused the panic to spread to two or three other families in the neighborhood. They collected at his house and remained together three or four days, when, their fears having subsided, they returned to their homes. According to their own showing this is the only foundation for the reports which they circulated and the petition which they signed praying for protection. It is possible that some idle Indian boy may have amused himself by playing upon the fears of the woman, but I believe the whole story to be a fabrication. Mr. Gale, an old mountaineer, who lives within a mile of Mr. Bonny, says he heard nothing of the matter until the people had returned to their homes, and James McKenzie, who lives near Greenlis, makes the same statement. I returned by the way of the reservation and lad an interview with Mr. Bagchart, the newly appointed agent. He says that these reports about the Indians are false; that they are contented with their condition, and that he is well satisfied with their conduct. He also stated that he wanted no troops for protection against Indians. In this connection I would respectfully refer the general to the report which this gentleman has recently made to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs on this very point. The truth is that the people in the vicinity of Fort Tejon have lived so long upon Government patronage that they now find it difficult to do without it, and they will use every means to have troops restationed at that place.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. F. DAVIS, First Lieutenant, &c.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, July 24, 1861.

GOVERNOR OF CALIFORNIA:

The War Department accepts for three years one regiment of infantry and five companies cavalry to guard the Overland Mail Route from Carson Valley to Salt Lake and Fort Lawrence. Colonel Waite will be put in command of department at Salt Lake City. General Sumner will detail mustering officer to muster in the men.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 24, 1861.

Brigadier-General SUMNER, Headquarters Department-of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

One regiment of infantry and five companies of cavalry have been accepted from California to aid in protecting Overland Mail Route via Salt Lake. Please detail officers to muster these troops into service. Blanks will be sent by steamer.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.544}

CAMP PICKETT, San Juan Island, Wash. Ter., July 24, 1861.

Lieut. JOHN S. MASON, U. S. Army, Third Artillery, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dist. of Oregon:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in compliance with Special Orders, No. 18, dated headquarters District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., July 15, 1861, I have arrived at this post with my company.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. C. ENGLISH, Captain, Ninth Infantry.

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WASHINGTON, July 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: The bearer of this, Col. J. D. Williamson, of New York, and formerly a resident of Oregon, informs me that he has raised a regiment of riflemen composed principally of citizens from that State. I trust that it will be convenient for you to receive them at once as a part of the quota from Oregon. Colonel Williamson bears the highest testimonials from some of the most distinguished citizens of New York.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. NESMITH.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, July 26, 1861.

Col. J. D. WILLIAMSON, No. 43 Courtland St., New York City:

SIR: The regiment of infantry which you offer is accepted for three years or the war, provided you have it ready for marching orders in thirty days. This acceptance is with the distinct understanding that this Department will revoke the commissions of all officers who maybe found incompetent for the proper discharge of their duties. When you have 500 men ready the Adjutant-General will issue orders to muster. You will promptly advise Adjutant-General, headquarters at Washington, the date at which your men will be ready for mustering and he will detail an officer for that purpose.

By order of the Secretary of War:

JAMES LESLEY, JR., Chief Clerk, War Department.

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FORT STEILACOOM, WASH. TER., July 26, 1861.

First Lieut. J. S. MASON, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Special Orders, No. [18], headquarters District of Oregon, Capt. T. C. English with his company (H, Ninth Infantry), on the 24th instant relieved my company (B) as the garrison of Camp Pickett, San Juan Island, and I at the same time turned over the command of the post to him. I arrived {p.545} here this morning on the Massachusetts, and have turned over to Captain Woodruff, Ninth Infantry, commanding this post, my company and company property in compliance with above-mentioned order.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. E. PICKETT, Captain, Ninth Infantry.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

Direct your quartermaster and commissary to prepare in advance the stores necessary for the regiment of infantry and five companies of cavalry accepted from California. Suggest to the Governor of California the propriety of making Major Carleton the colonel of the infantry regiment. Colonel Waite is prevented by ill health from accepting the command. It is desired that Major Carleton be placed in command. If any one else is made colonel of the Infantry regiment, he will be deprived of the command.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 26, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Captain Boggs has just shown me a letter from the Treasury Department directing the Shubrick to be laid up. The revenue cutter is also to be returned to her owners immediately, which leaves no Government steamer about this harbor. This seems to me very unsafe and will certainly encourage attempts to resist the authority of the Government. If you have the power to keep the Shubrick in commission till you can hear from Washington, I would respectfully and earnestly recommend that it be done.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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COMMANDANT’S OFFICE, NAVY-YARD, Mare island, July 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, Comdg. Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 26th instant. I perceive, as you say, that we shall be left without a Government steamer in our waters, save the Active, which vessel I am now repairing for duty on the coast survey, and shall place upon her two 12-pounder howitzers, and order her to remain in our waters. She will then be quite a formidable vessel of war, having a good supply of small arms and a complement of sixty men. I regret that I cannot interfere with the orders {p.546} of the Light-House Board, but think that by telegraphing to Washington the order might be countermanded and an order given for her to be fitted for the time being as a cruiser.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. H. GARDNER, Commandant.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 29,1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY, Washington:

I would earnestly recommend that the steamer Shubrick be kept in commission, as she may be wanted at any moment for the protection of the coast.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, July 29, 1861-6 p.m.

General E. V. SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

Retain Capt. R. C. Drum at your headquarters and order Col. D. C. Buell to this city to report to the Adjutant-General.

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant. General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 203.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 29, 1861.

...

6. Capt. R. C. Drum, assistant adjutant-general, is relieved from the operation of paragraph 6, Special Orders, No. 181, from this office, dated July 8, 1861, which directed him to report in person at this office, and will remain at the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific. Lieut. Col. D. C. Buell is relieved from duty in the Department of the Pacific and will report immediately in person to the Adjutant-General.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 29, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, U. S. Navy, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have telegraphed to-day to keep the Shubrick in commission, as she may be wanted at any moment for the protection of the coast. I think this application will be granted, and therefore I hope you will think proper to delay dismantling the ship till we get a reply.

Very truly, yours,

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.547}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 29, 1861.

Capt. JULIAN MCALLISTER, Ordnance Corps, Commanding Benicia Arsenal, Benicia, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to invoice to Lieutenant-Colonel Blake, First Dragoons, commanding Fort Churchill, Key. Ter., 200 muskets, with the necessary equipments, and 6,000 rounds of ammunition suited to the same. The muskets will be of the pattern usually issued to States and Territories. The general wishes you to forward these arms at the earliest possible moment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 29, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The ordnance officer at Benicia Arsenal has this day been directed to forward to you 200 muskets with the necessary equipments, and 6,000 rounds of ammunition suited to the same. The arms and ammunition will be invoiced to you, and the general commanding the department desires you to issue them only on the requisition of the Governor of the Territory, taking the Governor’s receipt therefor.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT DALLES, OREG., July 29, 1861.

ACTG. ASST. ADJT. GEN., DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Special Orders, No. 11, headquarters District of Oregon, I left Fort Colville, Wash. Ter., en route for this place on the 10th of July. I was delayed three days at the Spokane River, waiting for transportation, and seven days at Snake River. There being no transportation on the south side of Snake River, Captain Kirkham having made arrangements for water transportation from that place, the company was there embarked for the Des Chutes, and reached this place on the 28th, all in good health and everything in good condition. The order for the movement of the company was received on the evening of the 4th of July, and the movement was commenced as soon as the quartermaster provided the necessary transportation.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JAS. VAN VOAST, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Company K.

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FORT WALLA WALLA, WASH. TER., July 30,1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that there is danger of Indian troubles {p.548} in this vicinity before winter. A large portion of the Nez Percés refused to come into council and receive their annuities, and it is expected they will shortly join the Snakes, and unless I am re-enforced by a company of infantry and another of dragoons, I shall be unable to do anything beyond taking care of the post. There are now bat forty-eight men for guard duty at the post. The Snakes have been in the valley already within fifteen miles of the post. They ran off five horses, killed three, and wounded two more. It was not ascertained until several days afterward who committed the act, when Mr. Craigie identified the arrows as Snake arrows, and it was then too late to send out a small party. We are also in want of officers, myself and the surgeon being the only ones who belong here. The others are promoted away from the post, and only waiting to be relieved in order to join their proper companies.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

E. STEEN, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 138.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, July 31, 1861.

Forty muskets and 400 musket-ball cartridges will be loaned from the Benicia Arsenal temporarily, on proper receipts, to the Pacific Steamship Company, for the purpose of arming the steamer sailing on the 1st proximo; the arms which the company have for that purpose having been detained by the non-arrival of the steamer due on the 24th instant.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

CONFIDENTIAL.]

HEADQUARTERS CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal., July 31, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 18th instant. It seemed to have been delayed upon the road. I left for San Bernardino on the 24th, and returned thence this morning. I beg respectfully to report that I took many and various measures to learn the political sentiments of the people in that region, and also their sympathies with reference to this party or that, North and South. The population of San Bernardino is about 1,500 souls; 1,000 of these are Mormons. The rest may be made up of some few respectable Americans, of a good many Jew merchants, who control the business of the town, and go with any side that pays best for the time being; and then there follow adroit horse thieves and other unprincipled and desperate men, gathered into that point, as well from other parts of California as from Utah. There is a large sprinkling of this latter class. You can judge of a man whose character is such he could not be tolerated in Utah. Now, the Mormons, whatever their professions, hate us at heart. I append a paper in relation to this people which the general may regard as made up from reliable information. The Jews, as a rule, have no love for us. The outlaws hate, because they fear us. To these latter any change would be congenial which by hook or crook could be made profitable. All but the few respectable Americans would set us at defiance to-morrow if they dared {p.549} to do so. The Americans seem to be the only ones there who really have principle enough to feel anything like patriotism. I believe the presence there of two or more companies of U. S. troops would encourage and sustain in their loyalty to the Union all those who yet have reverence for it, would bring back the wavering, and would exercise a wholesome restraint over the treasonable and vicious. A commander there would have to contend against Mormon influences. The county judge is a Mormon, the sheriff is a Mormon, the justice of the peace is a Mormon. In all ordinary trials the most of the jurymen would be Mormons. You can foresee that the administration of civil law by these officers would continue to be, as it doubtless is now, a farce. Following this idea you can figure at times difficulties between the men of a command and the citizens, and you can figure the results. If some plan could be devised by which these civil officers could be got to perform their duties in good faith, or resign and give place to others who would, or some plan by which the military could exercise more than a negative control, all that section of country might be counted on as for the Union, whatever betide our fortunes in this battle or that, and presupposing that no sane man doubts how the scales will finally preponderate. There is a place called Agua Mansa, six or seven miles from San Bernardino. It is settled mostly by Spanish people from New Mexico. It contains 600 souls. In the mines (in Holcomb and Bear Valleys), eight hours’ ride from San Bernardino, there are 1,000 men. Of these 200 are said to be in favor of secession. The troops to be stationed at San Bernardino would doubtless exert a wholesome influence over all these. There is another thought in connection with this matter. Should it so happen that troops may be required to oppose enemies coming overland into California by the way of Arizona, those then stationed at San Bernardino would be already three marches from this point (the terminus of the telegraph) in that direction. Should they at any time be required to help fortify and to defend the harbor of San Diego (the most important on this coast after that of San Francisco, as the general well knows), they could in one day be set en route by telegraph and a dragoon express from here. Barley can be bought there at a cent a pound; beef for 5 cents, while all kinds of vegetables, fruit, poultry, &c., are cheap and abundant. The general did not wish persons to suspect the real purpose of my visit. I inclose the copy of a letter written by his Excellency Governor Downey to Mr. Sherman, at San Bernardino.* It arrived in that place before I did. Mr. Sherman may have had more reticence than most political men, for as a rule “to do good by stealth and blush to find it fame” is not their motto. What they do for the people they want the people to know, particularly when they seek the people’s suffrage. I mention this to show how these matters go. I inclose a communication from Mr. Sherman in relation to the feeling of the people in that quarter.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

JAMES H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* [Memorandum on back of letter in pencil:] Governor Downey’s letter was not with the papers handed to Major Ketchum by General Sumner.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

THE MORMONS AS A PEOPLE.

Nearly all Mormons are foreigners. Among these are Welsh, English, Norwegians, Swedes, some Germans, and a few French. They are evidently of the lowest and most ignorant grade of the people in the {p.550} several countries from whence they have come. Mixed in with these are a few low, unprincipled Americans. The most intelligent and crafty of these, commencing with Brigham Young, are the directors and rulers of the whole mass. By a misapplication of the word, for amongst them nothing is sacred, their government is solely a hierarchy, and notwithstanding, in theory, they are assumed to be a population obedient to the laws of our common country, practically they scorn and deride, and set at defiance all laws that interfere with their safety or interest, save those promulgated by the grand council of the church. This council is composed of the twelve, Brigham Young being at present the great hierophant and president of that body. This council not only fixes and determines upon all important matters pertaining to the church, and the ecclesiastical measures growing out of them, but through bishops and elders, and minor councils, called councils of seventy, and through presidents of stakes (precincts), control even the temporal and domestic affairs of every family down to the last individual. When a person becomes a Mormon he has to be initiated by what are called degrees. While proceeding step by step through these the novice is obliged to take several terrible oaths. In these he swears to uphold the faith, and to yield perfect and unqualified obedience to the orders of the council and to the orders of those appointed over him. He swears, also, never to divulge the secret pass-words and grips and signs made known to him during this initiation. This ceremony is called the endowment. No man is a true and complete Mormon who has not been endowed, and every Mormon who has been thus endowed can, either by words, grips, or signs, recognize every other Mormon. Now these being the obligations under which these ignorant, deluded foreigners are bound, the most of them men who know nothing of our Government or its laws, it is easy to imagine what a sway, what a complete and absolute control the council and the prophet have over the minds and persons and possessions of every subordinate member of the church, both at home and abroad. There are not only the oaths to bind the conscience, but there is a real power, a hand raised to strike from existence those who show the least sign of disobedience or of recusancy. That hand is secret and invisible; it strikes at an unexpected moment, but it strikes none the less a mortal blow. It is the hand of the Danites or destroying angels. These Mormons, then, being mostly from foreign lands, with no knowledge of our Government or laws, no affection for or sympathy with our people, no reverence for our institutions, no love for our country, they follow blindly, ignorantly, but implicitly, the orders of council and of their prophet, impelled by their oaths and their faith on the one hand, and forced onward by their fears upon the other. They are taught, even from the pulpits, to abhor and contemn us as the slayers of the founder of their religion, as the persecutors of their people when the church was in its infancy. So their hands, like those of Ishmael against all other men, are always and instinctively raised against us. These are truths which not even the Mormons themselves deny. Now send the civil officers of the Government amongst them, and make even an attempt to administer the laws according to the forms of procedure established throughout the rest of the land, and they laugh at you to your face. Suppose a crime-say a murder-has been committed by a Mormon upon a Gentile. Who compose the jury to find the indictment? The brethren. Who are generally the witnesses before that jury? The brethren. Who are the officers and jailers who have custody of the prisoner before and after the trial? The brethren. Who are the members of the jury {p.551} before whom the trial takes place? Still the brethren. Who are the witnesses for the prosecution, and, more particularly, who are those for the defense? The brethren. Suppose the criminal should, after all this, be convicted and sentenced, there is still a pardoning power. Thus running a gauntlet all the way between the brethren (if they do not want him out of the way), what are not his chances for his life? Even though you have twenty armies there, has, he any the less chances? It is preached from the pulpits that God sent the troops there as a blessing to the Saints. The troops scatter money broadcast throughout the land. All this in relation to Utah, but applicable to these Mormons. Such being the rulers, such the masses, such the oaths and obligations, and such the sentiments with which they regard our Government and people, what can you expect if the wholesome operation of our laws interferes with the absolute sway of the leaders, or with the interests or purposes or safety of the church, or with the liberty or life of a single member of the fraternity? What but the malignant hatred which baffled villainy must feel while it is yet impotent to strike? What but crime, when assassin-like it can strike unseen? What but open sedition and treason among the whole people wherever it has gamed strength?

JAMES H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

SAN BERNARDINO, July 27, 1861.

Maj. JAMES U. CARLETON, U. S. Army:

DEAR SIR: In response to your request in giving an account of the state of affairs in this and the adjoining counties, I herewith comply by giving in detail what has passed under my own observation, and also the information given me by responsible persons during the past three months. About the middle of May the movements of some of the Spanish population began to excite suspicion among some of the American farmers who live upon the outskirts of the settlements. A Mr. Shackelford was the first to inform me of the fact. He stated that he was continually meeting parties of armed Mexicans who appeared to be engaged in some movement of a doubtful character. They on being questioned by him would give him no satisfaction, and were very insolent, which was new and strange to the general demeanor of that class of people. The Indians appeared to be somewhat disturbed also. Mr. Shackelford lives on Doctor Edgar’s farm, in this county, and [is] a man of veracity. At the same time I was informed by Mr. James Leonard, of this city, that the American population of Santa Aña and other settlements were excited about something, and their actions were strange. Some Americans had been endeavoring to raise recruits among them for the South, among which was a man by the name of Jordan, who had been the most active. Secret meetings were being held and the indications were that some extraordinary movement was about to take place. I thought it was time that something should be done in order to distinguish friends from foes. A public meeting was called for the purpose of organizing a Union club and to bring the matter to a close test. I offered the inclosed resolutions.* After some debate those who claimed to be Union men adopted them, and others who were opposed sat in sullen silence. Simultaneously with these {p.552} proceedings the “bear flag” was raised in the Monte, and threats were made that a descent would be made upon this place. The club continued to meet about twice a week, gradually dwindling away in numbers, and finally it was impossible to get them to meet at all. An unaccountable fear or dread seemed to pervade the community. Rowdyism and drunkenness, shooting in the streets, hurrahing for Jeff. Davis, and all sorts of outrages were being continually committed, and no person was safe in the streets after dark. I received information that an attempt would shortly be made by the secessionists to destroy my press. I met a gentleman by the name of Paul R. Hunt, who had blank constitutions for Union clubs. We gathered some five or six Union men together and organized a Union club agreeable to the constitution named, said club now numbering sixteen in all, one of whom has since proved to be a traitor. Relying on this club as my only protection, we prepared ourselves for defense. I was soon informed that a dentist by the name of Dr. Shrewsbury was busy in the country, and especially in the mines, in circulating a paper and obtaining signatures of secessionists who were to act in concert with those in the Monte, pledging themselves to destroy my press. Of this I was informed by a Mason. I have been also informed by a man by the name of Baldwin that a Mr. Hathaway and some others came up from the Monte with the avowed intention of drawing me into a difficulty and forcing me to act on the defense, and then take my life. Mr. Baldwin overheard their conversation in his house, and immediately gave me friendly warning. Whether through fear or other motive they desisted from making the attempt I am unable to learn. It was said that an attempt would have been made to raise the “bear flag” and tear down the American flag here on the 4th of July. Although some of the secessionists, I am told, were present, no attempt was made. I visited Holcomb Valley on the 21st of the present month. I there learned from the best authority that the secessionists had for a long time previous to the 4th of July held a rod of terror over the Union men, threatening them in every manner possible, and it had been unsafe for Union men to express their opinions. I also learned that Mayor Marchessault, of Los Angeles, had been up there in company with Captain Ridley for the purpose of obtaining recruits for the secession forces. Both money and official position was promised, and a Doctor loge, a Mr. Hopkins, and Doctor Shrewsbury had been very busy in this matter. A difficulty took place in a disreputable house and shots were fired; one man was killed and several were wounded. Doctors Hoge and Shrewsbury were among the party. They are both very bad men. I have been informed that they have already received commissions in the rebellion army. A Mr. Hopkins and Doctor Shrewsbury met a gentleman by the name of J. L. Ware in company with another, whose name is Joseph Caldwell. Mr. Ware offered a drink of spirits to Mr. Hopkins, who offered a toast to the health of Jeff. Davis. Ware immediately snatched the bottle from his lips and dashed it against a rock and started on, when Hopkins said to Shrewsbury: “As we have got to begin somewhere pretty soon, we may as well begin with him.” They started in pursuit of Ware, who saw them coming with their revolvers drawn in a threatening manner; immediately dismounted from his horse and loaded his ride and prepared to receive them. When they saw this they turned and remarked they would let him go this time, but the next time they would have his as well as every other Union man’s scalp before long. On the {p.553} 4th of July the Union men were threatened that if they raised the American flag they would be shot down. About 100 Union men armed themselves and assembled at Don Luis Marsino’s house, raised a liberty pole and hoisted the Stars and Stripes. Several secessionists made their appearance, but seeing the determined attitude of the Union men immediately left. The Union men throughout the mines took courage, and many have come out and declared their sentiments. They fear no open attack, but every prominent Union man is in danger of a secret assassination when traveling alone on the different mountain trails. There are about 1,000 men in the mines, though widely scattered. Fully one-third are openly declared secessionists, and probably two-ninths are neutral, the balance Union men. In the valley two-fifths are secessionists, one-fifth positively declared neutral men, the balance Union men, yet nearly all leaving room for doubt.

In answer to your question as regards the political complexion of the inhabitants of this valley with regard to existing troubles, and whether the Union sentiment would be likely to be strengthened by the presence of troops here: As to the first part of the question, it is my opinion that if the matter could be fully tested, without the presence of the troops, I believe that the secession sentiment would greatly prevail, and in the present political campaign a great deal of money will be spent to purchase the Spanish vote in order to secure the election of secession candidates, both State and county. Being a candidate myself for the senate, running solely on the Union side of the issue, and in favor of using the whole power of the Government to sustain the Union, and, so far as I am able to learn, I am the only true Union candidate in the field, there Is a possibility of being elected, but it is extremely doubtful. As a criterion to judge by, out of a population in the valley of over 1,500 persons, of which there are some 500 or 600 voters, I have not over fifty subscribers, and of 1,000 miners in Holcomb Valley I have only about forty subscribers, when I publish the only paper in the county. In answer to the latter portion of your question, I would say that not only would the Union sentiment be strengthened, and if martial law could be proclaimed we would have protection to our persons, but also to our property. It is my candid opinion that if at least one company of U. S. troops were stationed here it would be of great benefit to the Union men of this section.

Having thus given you as fair a statement as I possibly can at present, I remain, yours, truly,

EDWIN A. SHERMAN, Editor of Weekly Patriot.

[Indorsement.]

We have read the above statement, and to a certain extent are generally acquainted with the facts and concur in the opinion expressed.

JOS. H. PEREAU. JAMES LEONARD.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco August [1], 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to send to these headquarters any officer of your command whose seditious {p.554} words or actions indicate a want of loyalty. You will make no mention of the cause in the order. The contents of this letter will not be made known.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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[AUGUST 1, 1861.– For proclamation issued by Lieut. Col. John H. Baylor, C. S. Army, taking possession of the Territory of Arizona, &c., in the name of the Confederate States of America, see Vol. IV, p. 20.]

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 139.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 3, 1861.

1. Capt. Frederick Myers, assistant quartermaster, will relieve Capt. Ralph W. Kirkham, assistant quartermaster, at Fort Walla Walla, and Captain Kirkham will assume the duties of chief commissary at these headquarters, relieving Captain Drum, assistant adjutant-general.

...

3. The commanding officer at Alcatraz Island will have in readiness and turn over to the commanding officer of Benicia Arsenal, when called for, 10,000 stand of muskets, without equipments.

...

6. Capt. Winfield S. Hancock, assistant quartermaster, will be relieved without delay from duty at Los Angeles by an officer to be designated by the commanding officer at Camp Fitzgerald. He will then immediately repair to these headquarters and report for duty in connection with the movement of volunteers upon the Overland Mail Route.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal., August 5, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor herewith to inclose a letter written to me by some of the leading citizens of San Bernardino, Cal., and my reply thereto.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

SAN BERNARDINO, CAL., August 6 [1], 1861.

Major CARLETON, Commanding U. S. Troops at Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: We have heard within the last few hours from, as we believe, a reliable source that a band of some forty or fifty desperadoes are now {p.555} dispersed throughout the coast range of hills south of this place, and Intending to make a sudden foray upon the merchants of San Bernardino, and after securing their plunder make good their escape across the Colorado on their way to the Confederate States of the South. We therefore hasten to make this information known to you and ask that you will in this emergency forthwith give us the protection of a company of U. S. troops.

We are respectfully, your obedient servants,

Mark Jacobs, F. H. Levy, B. Breslauer, P. Drachman & Co., Isador Cohn, S. Folks, Wolf Cohn, Jacobs & Harris, M. Calisher, Q. S. Sparks, Jacob Cohn, Charles Denzeg, Morris Wolf James Leonard, A. Wolff, Marcus Katz (county treasurer), Joseph Bridger, James W. Wilson (county clerk), L. Levy & Co., Preston Ground, Max Solomon, H. Lewerkrup, Charles Glasser, Anson Van Lewes (sheriff), Aldman Jackson, C. L. Fabur, H. C. Russell, Nathan Kinman, H. Clark, John Brown (Second), Anton Scharf, J. A. Schiller, A. D. Boren (county judge), George Yager (deputy sheriff).

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal., August 2, 1861.

Hon. A. D. BOREN, Q. S. SPARKS, Esq., and Mr. MARK JACOBS and others, San Bernardino, cal.:

GENTLEMEN: Your communication in relation to a band of desperadoes being in the coast range of hills south of your city has been received. Mr. Leonard and Mr. Goldberg, the bearers of your communication, will inform you verbally that I had already taken steps for your safety by writing to the general what I believed you needed to secure this end before they came with your letter. I have made some suggestions to them about the vigilance you should exercise in relation to the party you speak of. If they are so strong as to resist the civil officers, backed by the good citizens as a posse comitatus, send an express to me.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Brevet Major, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., August 6, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. JAMES H. CARLETON, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Los Angeles, Cal.:

Turn over your command to Captain Davidson and repair here as quickly as possible. By order of the Government you are to command the California troops on the plains, with the local rank of colonel. Captain Hancock will proceed to Washington City and report to the Quartermaster-General.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.556}

SAN BERNARDINO, CAL., August 6, 1861.

Major CARLETON:

DEAR SIR: I inclose to you a letter for General Sumner, which will give you an idea of the state of affairs here. I think two companies of troops are needed here. I think in a little while life will be unsafe here. I do not know anything more than I have written to General Sumner, but if troops do not come here this town will be in the hands of secessionists. I consulted with Judge Boren and Doctor Dickey. They agree with me. Please write at once. I am going to find out all their plans if possible, and will write to you soon.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

CLARENCE E. BENNETT.

I inclose a petition, with the request of Judge Boren to present it to Captain Hancock for his signature, and be so kind as to forward it and oblige us.*

Yours,

C. E. B.

* [Memorandum in pencil on back of letter:] Petition of Judge Boren not handed to Major Ketchum by General Sumner.

[Inclosure.]

SAN BERNARDINO, CAL., August 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding the Department of California:

DEAR SIR: I have not yet learned the name of the officer or posts of the soldiers referred to in my letter of July 29. Last night the secessionists received reports from all parts of the State, and they were considered very favorable, particularly in Sacramento and Tulare County, which is strong for secession. They are energetically at work all over this State. They now contemplate starting in two or three weeks a force of about 200 men to Utah and capture Fort Crittenden (Camp Floyd). There are many Mormons here, and they are enlisting all they can, and Mormons here have promised to raise from 300 to 500 in Utah, probably more, to join the party from here, rendezvous on the west side of Utah Lake, and go and take it in the night, take the mules, wagons, harness, and available plunder here, and then the transportation through via Texas to the Jeff. Davis Confederation, where they expect to get paid in cash (?). They are to go in squads, and when near there to travel in the night, so that the first intimation Colonel Cooke has of the attack will be his capture. As I was stationed there in Utah a long time, adjutant of the Tenth Infantry and post adjutant of Camp Floyd, have traveled from Salt Lake City here the southern route, I have had a good opportunity to ascertain the sentiments of the citizens of that Territory. As a general thing there is a deep and abiding hatred toward the Federal Government, and an expedition of this kind can confidently reckon on support in every town. Will you be kind enough to have an extract made of this and sent to Colonel Cooke? I am personally acquainted with him, and do not write to him, as there is a secession postmaster there, and I am watched now, and my letter might be opened. Last night in the secession meeting Dr. D. R. Dickey and myself were denounced in the most bitter terms, on account of our active Union operations, and we will be the first ones killed. My name must be kept secret. They are desperadoes, and are increasing daily, getting more confident of their ability. I to-day got their papers, except the paper that has the signatures of these traitors.

{p.557}

PREAMBLE.

Whereas, a crisis has arrived in our political affairs which demands the closest scrutiny and strictest vigilance of every true patriot as an American citizen; and whereas, we view with regret and heartfelt sorrow the existence of a civil war now waged by one portion of the American people against another; and whereas, also, we believe that this war has been called into requisition by the present Executive of the United States without the guarantee of the Constitution and without the assent of either branch of the American Congress in their legislative capacity; and believing this as an unjust, unholy, iniquitous, and unconstitutional war; therefore

Be it resolved, first, That we, as a portion of the citizens of the United States, will support the Constitution as it now stands, together with the amendments thereunto appended, and that we will strictly adhere to the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States made under said Constitution where a collision or difference of opinion has heretofore or may hereafter occur between citizens of one State and those of another or between States and the Federal Government, foreign citizens, subjects, &c.

Second. Be it further resolved, That, in our opinion, the President has violated the most sacred palladium of American liberty by the suspension of the writ, of habeas corpus, and thus depriving an American citizen of having the cause of his imprisonment inquired into by the proper tribunal.

Third. Be it further resolved, That we are in favor of sustaining the Southern States, of the American Confederacy in all their constitutional rights; that we believe an unconstitutional war is now being waged against them to subject them to a taxation enormous and unequal and to deprive them in the end of their species of property called slaves.

Fourth. And be it lastly resolved, That we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our property, and our sacred honor to sustain our brethren of the Southern States in the just defense of all their constitutional rights, whether invaded by the present Executive or by a foreign foe.

OBLIGATION.

I (A. B.), here in the presence of these witnesses, before Almighty God, I promise and swear that I will not divulge or reveal any of the secrets of this institution to anyone except I know to be a brother (or to instruct candidates). I furthermore swear that I will obey the proper authorities when ordered to do so, and that I will assist a brother of this institution in his rights, individually or constitutionally, when required of me by him, if need be, with my life. All this I solemnly swear to obey, under the penalty of being shot.

J. J. Willis, H. C. Minor, W. W. Y. Gall, William Kilgore, J. S. Banks, J. S. Seale, Charles Seale, John Hambleton, W. Foreman, Hamilton Foreman, Samuel Kelsey, James H. Wilson, R Gaines, C. Bogert (candidate for senator).

The list of names I did not see. These were at the bottom of the obligation. I think there are many who are participators who have not signed, and I am assured there is a long list of those who have. The painter, one of the gang, is now employed in making the flag. I copied this instrument of treason accurately. The headquarters of the traitors is in Holcomb Valley, and there is a strong organization. I think two companies of U. S. troops better be sent here at once. One of the members says he thinks in two weeks fighting will commence in this town if there are no U. S. troops here. The rumored defeat of the Federal troops has strengthened them considerably. The oath is administered while kneeling, with the left hand on the heart, the right hand upheld. Every Southerner has joined. Many, I think, join for plunder. There are additions every day. I think it best, as soon as the troops get here, to commence arresting and securing them. You see they have provided for that. As soon as one is arrested they are bound to release him. I will write soon if nothing happens to me.

In haste, very respectfully,

CLARENCE E. BENNETT.

P. S.-The grip: In taking hands pass your little finger between his little finger and third finger. Pass words: I say, Are you on it? You {p.558} reply, I am on it, at the same time carry your right hand to your right side to the pistol butt, as if to draw your revolver. Then I say, What’s your name? You say, R-A-B-E. Use the letters to spell bear-bear flag.

C. E. B.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 6, 1861.

Second Lieut. C. D. EMORY, Ninth Infantry, Comdg. Detachment under orders for Camp Chehalis, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: On reaching Camp Chehalis with your command, you will assume charge of the public buildings, together with all Government property you may find at that place. I am advised by the superintendent of Indian affairs that his agent will be at Camp Chehalis about the 15th instant for the purpose of proceeding to the agency established a few miles north of that place and erecting the necessary buildings. My object in sending yourself and command to Chehalis is to restore confidence to the settlers in that quarter and to afford protection to the Indian agent and his party in establishing themselves at the agency. In the execution of this duty it will probably be necessary and proper for you to move up the coast and establish a temporary camp at the agency. You will obtain the most reliable information possible of the number, character, and habits of the Indians in that region. I also wish you to make a topographical sketch, accompanied by a brief memoir, of the country you may pass over. Keep your men under strict discipline and well in hand to meet any emergency, always having a sentinel on post by night and day. Look carefully after the provisions of your men; see that they are used economically and made to last at least until the 20th proximo. As you will have no medical officer with you, the surgeon at Fort Vancouver will prepare for you a small package of simple medicines, with directions for use in case of necessity. Your men should be prepared to bake their own bread. Take with you the necessary camp equipage, including about two tents, two axes, and hatchets, &c. Report to me by letter to the assistant adjutant-general as often as opportunity offers, and in case of necessity send a special messenger with your dispatches.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth infantry, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 142.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 8, 1861.

I. Captain Hunt’s company (C), Fourth Infantry, will immediately occupy Fort Ter-Waw.

II. A military post to be known as Fort Seward and garrisoned by Company B, Sixth Infantry, will immediately be established either on Van Dusen or Larrabee Creek, not nearer to Fort Humboldt than the camp occupied as late as the 10th ultimo by the detachment from that post. Assistant Surgeon Shorb is assigned to duty at the new post. The particular site will be selected by Captain Lovell, or under his directions. It must possess the requisites of water and grass, and wood both for fuel and building, and must be unencumbered by any private claim. A reservation equivalent to a square mile in area will {p.559} be marked off, and no encroachment on it permitted. The erection of the necessary buildings, to be of rough logs and put up by the troops, will be commenced immediately and pushed forward as rapidly as possible.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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OFFICE U. S. ATTORNEY, SOUTHERN DIST. OF CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, August 8, 1861.

General E. V. SUMNER, Commanding, &c.:

SIR: Doctor Haywood has just shown me some papers written by one Boyd, deceased, containing charges against Lieutenant Haller, of which he has written to you, The documents contain nothing against the loyalty of Lieutenant Haller, only charging him of some small peculations for his private purse. The papers might be of service should the lieutenant prove untrue. I am informed that an expedition is being organized to leave here for Arizona or Sonora under Col. Jack Hays. About three weeks past a Mr. Brown, formerly police officer in Sacramento City, came to this place through Mariposa and Tulare Counties. After a week here he went to San Bernardino and to Holcomb Valley mine, and there holding several meetings secretly with the faithful to Dixie. A Mr. Kelsey, lately from Sonoma, and Major Rollins are to be officers, who are now in San Bernardino. I am informed that about 100 men are enrolled by them. Brown came back here about one week past, and will be up to San Francisco on the next steamer. Of the extent of Jack Hays’ movements I am not informed. I shall keep myself informed of the movement here through their confidants, and will inform you of what may occur in their secret meetings. Captain Hancock can inform you more particularly in reference to matters here than I can write. Secessionists are getting more noisy here. We may have to fight them yet. Every county officer is with them. We shall make a strong effort to overthrow them at the election. Union men and Republicans are all united upon one county ticket. We very much regret the removal of Captain Hancock. We regard him as one of the substantial men of the Army, and know he will be right.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

K. H.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 8, 1861.

Capt. CHARLES S. LOVELL, Sixth Infantry, U. S. Army, Commanding Fort Humboldt, Cal.:

SIR: The buildings to be erected at Fort Seward will consist of quarters for one company, one medical officer, the company officers actually present, laundresses’ quarters, hospital, guard-house, storehouse, and stable. The plans for these buildings, as well as a plan for the garrison, will be furnished in two or three days. In the meantime the work of getting out logs will be proceeded with immediately and energetically. The logs should be of the dimensions of 20, 22, 25, 31, and 34 feet, and besides an additional number as much greater in length as can be found and handled conveniently. The window sash, {p.560} locks, hinges, and such other materials for the new buildings as can be conveniently transported will be taken from the buildings at Fort Humboldt. As soon as the buildings at the new post are somewhat advanced, orders will be given for the abandonment of Fort Humboldt. In the meantime the hospital and a small detachment, six or eight men, will be kept there. Of course the supplies at Humboldt are to be transferred to the new post.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter., August 8, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that with an escort of dragoons I accompanied Governor Nye, of this Territory, on his visit to the Indians about the vicinity of Pyramid Lake. Found them all peaceably disposed, and have no doubt but that they will remain so if they are not disturbed by the white settlers. The Governor made them some presents, and they appeared to be very well satisfied.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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NEW YORK, August 8, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

Has the order for the formation of the First Regiment of Oregon Rifles, Oregon quota, accepted for the war by the Department, been revoked, as reported by the papers to-day? If so, must I disband my companies?

J. DAN’L WILLIAMSON.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, August 8, 1861.

J. D. WILLIAMSON, First Regiment Oregon Rifles:

For reasons satisfactory to the Department, the acceptance given you has been revoked. It is preferred that the men enlisted should come into the U. S. service under another command. Letter of revocation forwarded yesterday.

J. LESLEY, JR., Chief Clerk.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 143.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 9, 1861.

In compliance with instructions from the War Department, Lieut. Col. D. C. Buell, assistant adjutant-general, is relieved from duty at {p.561} these headquarters, and will proceed to Washington City and report to the Adjutant-General.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 9, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: At the request of the superintendent of Indian affairs, I have ordered a small detachment, under the command of Lieutenant Emory, of the Ninth Infantry, to proceed to Camp Chehalis, Gray’s Harbor, and temporarily to establish his camp a few miles north of that place, at the reservation where the agent is erecting buildings. I have provisioned Lieutenant Emory’s party until the 20th of September, after which time it is supposed now that the presence of the troops in that quarter may be dispensed with. There is much uneasiness in the community on the subject of our Indian affairs in the Colville and Nez Percé country. In the Nez Percé country there are several thousand miners, and the number is daily increasing. It is impossible to confine them to the region north of the Clearwater. An arrangement was made early in the spring by the superintendent with the Nez Percés. They agreed that the miners should be allowed in the country north of the Clearwater, but since then prospecting and rich mines have been discovered south of that river, hence the whole country will inevitably be overrun. The Nez Percé nation is large and powerful; they have always been our friends. On my campaign in 1858 they raised a mounted company, went with me, and rendered the most important services. Neither the commander of Colville nor Walla Walla have intimated to me that they apprehend any immediate outbreak, but it is necessary to be on our guard. I cannot spare any of the troops west of the Cascades, but the dragoon company at The Dalles might be concentrated and sent to Walla Walla, and a small infantry detachment sent from The Dalles to the Warm Springs Reservation, if necessary. I should be very glad to have the company of my regiment now at San Francisco sent up here, if the general can spare it.-I have permitted Captain Gregg, Third Cavalry, to obey the orders he has received from the War Department. A reliable sergeant is left in charge of the detachment at the Warm Springs. Captain Sheridan, Thirteenth Infantry, will be relieved from his duties at Yamhill in a few days, as soon as an officer is available.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 10, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, U. S. Navy, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have received several intimations about the exposed situation of your magazine, such as schemes talked about for blowing {p.562} it up, &c. I do not know that these stories are worth heeding, but I think it proper to apprise you of them, as you may think it necessary to place a guard there or take some other necessary means to insure its safety.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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FORT HUMBOLDT, CAL., August 10, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the information and action of the commanding general of the department, a petition signed by citizens in this vicinity, asking the removal of the Indians on Lower Eel River to some reservation. The Indians referred to were sent to the Klamath Reservation from this post in April, 1860, as reported to department headquarters by Major Rains in a letter dated May 3, 1860. In September, same year, some forty or fifty of them returned to this vicinity. I wrote to department headquarters on the subject October 3, and again October 20, asking some definite instructions. To the latter the reply dated October 26 was that no authority for the issue of provisions to the Indians could be given. Not having been called on by the Indian agent in this instance, I declined attempting to remove the Indians to the Klamath Reservation unless directed to do so by the commanding general.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. LOVELL, Captain, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

EEL RIVER, August 6, 1861.

Capt. CHARLES S. LOVELL, Sixth U. S. Infantry, Commanding Fort Humboldt:

We, the undersigned, most respectfully petition that you take under your protection the Indians of Lower Eel River (which are and have been peaceable, as far as we know) until they can be removed to some reservation. For the sake of humanity, for the sake of our reputation abroad, and many other obvious reasons we hope that the people of Humboldt County will not be placed under the odium of a second Indian massacre, which we believe will be the case if they are not immediately removed from amongst us. If you will please send a small detachment of men to guard the Indians to Fort Humboldt, we will turn out and collect them together, which we assure you will be a short job, as they will willingly accept any terms we may propose.

J. H. DUNGAN, RANSOM ARNOLD, E. W. MYERS, [AND 69 OTHERS.]

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 10, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific:

MAJOR: I have the honor to inclose the within communications just put in my hands by Major Carleton. I have proposed to the prominent {p.563} Union men here (General Drown, Abel Stearns, and others) the formation of a home guard for the town and county of Los Angeles. They respond to the suggestion promptly, and I have promised as soon as they have 100 names enrolled to write to the general and ask for as many stand of arms and ammunition as there are sound Union men. I think the move will have a beneficial effect. I would to God the Union men would hold up their heads more here. I beg the general to believe that with regard to the inclosed subject I will be wary and circumspect, and if prompt action is required on overt acts I will be quick as the occasion. As the camp is three-quarters of a mile from where the depot is, I have ordered an officer and twenty-five men to guard the latter nightly, particularly from fire. Should one or two companies be required to lend aid to those companies probably to be sent to San Bernardino, the home guard could be relied upon to take their places in event of difficulty.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

Los ANGELES, August 10, 1861.

General E. V. SUMNER, Commanding Pacific Division, San Francisco:

SIR: I feel it my duty as an old resident of this place to apprise you that all of us who are loyal and devoted to the Stars and Stripes, and that have something to lose in this section of the country, feel that we are in the greatest insecurity as to the public interest as well as to our own lives and property. No part of your command is composed of such discordant and menacing elements as it. Within we have open and avowed secessionists and Southern sympathizers, and I am sorry to say that they are chiefly composed of those who exercise most political influence with the native population, and already they have not failed to poison their minds against the Puritan fanatics of the North. We are threatened with rebellion across the plains by people of the Van Dorn stripe, if we are to credit the repeated reports of the Texan emigration, and in these disordered times it is not well to discredit them. Lower California, the asylum of cut throats and robbers, is on our immediate border. We are surrounded to a great extent by barbarous and hostile Indian tribes, that may at any moment be excited against us and the Government by rebels or marauding Mormons. I not only consider it necessary, but the part of prudence and timely vigilance, to station a lookout cavalry force at the Cajon Pass, or at some point close thereto. Please to receive my suggestions with indulgence, being made in a spirit to subserve public and private interests.

Your most obedient servant,

MATTHEW KELLER.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

LOS ANGELES, August 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. V. SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

DEAR SIR: I am constrained by the aspect of political affairs in this quarter to bring the matter personally to your knowledge in the hope that you will deem it prudent to add to the United States command in this section at least two companies. You are probably aware that our {p.564} community is composed largely of Californians and Mexicans, and among them some very dangerous characters, who are easily diverted from what is right and proper into any course which promises excitement and reward, either by theft or murder, or both. As there also exists in our community a class of persons who are endeavoring to work this element into shape for evil purposes, and as not very remote from here there is a Mormon settlement of about 1,000 persons, whose hostility to our Government is well known, and who at any time may join the secessionists in our midst, I am constrained to urge that you will kindly make further disposition of troops in this quarter and by their presence overrule any movement which may be made by disaffected persons to kindle the fire of domestic strife in this State. In thus addressing you I represent the sentiments of a large number of respectable residents, whose position and pursuits are of that character as would prevent their becoming active participants in case trouble should ensue.

Trusting that you will lend ear to my solicitation, I remain, dear sir, with much respect, your very obedient servant,

ABEL STEARNS.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, August 10, 1861.

[Maj. D. C. BUELL:]

MAJOR: I have the honor to inclose the accompanying letter from Mr. Willis, of San Bernardino, which will be found to bear directly upon the subject-matter of the general’s letter of July 18, 1861, to Major Carleton and the latter’s reply, which I have seen. Mr. Willis appears to be of good standing, though I think he overrates Samuel Kelsey’s character and influence. Brown will be watched here by our Union friends. I have nothing more to say, as I infer the general has already taken steps consequent upon Carleton’s reply.

I am, major, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

SAN BERNARDINO, August 5, 1861.

Major CARLETON, Commandant of U. S. Forces at Los Angeles:

SIR: For some time past I have desired to communicate to you certain facts respecting the secession sympathizers of this county important for you to know, but being a candidate for the office of senator, and busily engaged in traveling about the county, I have not had the time so to do. From certain events now known to me I feel it doubly my duty as a lover of the old flag and Constitution, and the peace and harmony of this section of the State, to make known to you what I know. On my visiting Bear and Holcomb Valleys, electioneering, or rather soon after while I was there, a man by the name of Brown, a large man, with whiskers, wearing a blue flannel coat, who a few days ago left for your city, and whom it would be well to watch, arrived in the mines from Sacramento. On the night after his arrival a meeting was called of men known as secessionists at the store of Samuel Kelsey. Major Rollins was sent for on the Mojave and attended the meeting as the leader and moving spirit, assisted by Samuel Kelsey. On the first night they mustered seventeen or twenty. Supposing it to be a meeting for political purposes, a friend of mine attended as a spy. All {p.565} present were sworn to secrecy. This man Brown and Judge Campbell, candidate for senator on the secession ticket, addressed the meeting. The object of the meeting was to concentrate and ascertain the fighting strength of the seceders in the county, and enroll them as a force to act in connection with other forces throughout the State, having for their object the seizure of the public property here and in Utah, and to raise the standard of rebellion in California, and thus bring on civil war amongst us in this State. On the night subsequent another meeting was held, when more attended. Some of the leading secessionists (Major Rollins and Beall) have disposed of their effects in order to be at liberty to engage in the movement. The secessionists are not numerous, but active, energetic, and persevering and fighting men, while the Union men are the hard working and quiet citizens, unorganized and unsuspecting. Shortly after the second meeting I returned to this city. Brown and Kelsey came down on the same day, and two nights after a meeting was held in this city. Not being aware of the meeting, which was kept secret, being called until late in the evening, I could not find a friend to play secessionist and get invited. I since find, however, that a friend was there. The object of the meeting was the same as that of Holcomb. This man Kelsey is enterprising, cautious, and brave, and instills with the subtlety of the devil treason into the minds of the youth of the county who have the slightest sympathy with the South, and infuses into them his own ardor. I watch him close. Another enemy of no less formidable character is Mrs. Bettis; bold, determined, and unscrupulous, she combines all the qualities which make a woman one of the most dangerous of enemies and one of the best of friends. Her father, Mr. Rubottom, and brother and nephew, and brother and son, James M. Greenwade, at Temescal, all secessionists, she inspires with her own enthusiasm in the cause. John Rains, at Cucamonga, is another, but lacking all the qualities of the rest, and having but money and the reputation of being wealthy. Such is the state of the county at present. Disregard the reports you read in the Los Angeles Star about the Mormons and Whisky Point. They and the men who reside there are Union men, and in this matter are unjustly libeled by a secessionist paper and by a friend of Joseph Bridger, another of the secession candidates. It seems to me that if a company of soldiers were sent here as a nucleus for the Union men to rally around in case of difficulty, it would have a tendency to prevent, perhaps to keep subdued, the secession spirit, and infuse spirit into the Union men. In case of difficulty my life and fortune are for the cause, and I shall organize a company and place myself under your command. But God forbid the necessity.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

HENRY M. WILLIS.

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LOS ANGELES, August 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. Y. SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

DEAR SIR: Since addressing you under yesterday’s date information has reached me of an organization among the secessionists at San Bernardino and the mines of Bear Valley (in the vicinity of this latter place) which has confirmed my belief, and increased my alarm with regard to our condition in this section of the State. It would appear from the information received that not only does a good understanding, {p.566} but nearly complete organization, exist through all the southern counties from Stockton to the Mexico line, and the formation only awaits a head to develop the outrage in all its enormity. From the open condition of our country here running herds of animals are exposed to be turned into cavalry at any moment, and the option of Texas or Utah as the base of operations simply remains for determination among those who would carry the plan into effect. If upon the Northern side they can rely upon the Mormons, and if upon the Southern, then the Mexican element becomes powerful. In either event, there are always enough of this latter class to assist in procuring horses. Thus stands the case. The secessionists from the northern part of the State are continually arriving here in our midst. We have a disturbed and uncertain number of natives who are sympathizers, and to the east, the Mormons and vagabond miners, who are already enrolled to a great extent in opposition to the Government. These facts, combined with the lukewarm Union spirit of the place, give just cause for alarm. I sincerely trust, therefore, that you may deem it of sufficient importance to augment the number of troops suggested in mine of yesterday, firmly believing that a show of force, involving that respect for the laws which all good people should observe, is preferable to that extreme which invokes the necessity of its use, as is lamentably shown in the present condition of our country. I regret exceedingly the departure of Major Carleton and Captain Hancock, both of whom in these trying times have been equal to the emergency, and whose activity and energy have inspired the confidence of the community. In their absence I believe the command to fall upon Captain Davidson, whose long acquaintance with this country and the people I trust may be the means of retaining him amongst us in this position, apart from feelings of friendship for him based upon years of acquaintance.

Trusting that you will pardon this lengthy trespass upon your time, and incessant occupation, I remain, dear sir, with very much respect, your very obedient servant,

ABEL STEARNS.

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COLUMBIA, August 11, 1861.

President DAVIS:

General A. S. Johnston crossed the Colorado, at Yuma, July 1, accompanied by Armistead, Shaaff, Brewer, Mallory, Riley, Wickliffe, and Hardcastle-all resigned-with civilians, about thirty. They will probably reach San Antonio on the 1st of September. Perhaps you may have been informed of this, but I know it was important to you, and as I have it certain, I thought I would let you know. The Smith recently sent to a fortress in New York, and seized from an Aspinwall steamer, is a son of the Hon. William Smith, of Virginia, and was sent to the fortress, expressly by order of Lincoln, as a political prisoner.

F. W. PICKENS.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 145.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 13, 1861.

...

2. Two of the field guns at the Presidio of San Francisco will be turned over to the commanding officer at Fort Point. The customary receipts will be given.

...

{p.561}

4. Maj. William S. Ketchum, with Companies A, D, F, and G, Fourth Regiment of Infantry, will proceed to and take post at San Bernardino, Cal. The quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 13, 1861.

Maj. D. C. BUELL, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army:

MAJOR: After careful thought I have determined, as an officer intrusted with an important command here, to give my views with regard to the dispositions to be made to preserve good order and obedience to the laws in this section of the country. With due deference to older and wiser heads than mine, I believe the arrangement proposed would crush the egg of treason already laid in the counties of San Bernardino and Los Angeles, give the really good time to awake to their true interests and to listen to the promptings of that patriotism which, however it may be swayed by the passions of the hour, is yet deeply planted in every American heart. Therefore,

I. The depot of supplies for the troops to be at San Pedro, near the mouth of San Gabriel River; a company of infantry stationed there, with temporary work thrown up, and two or more pieces of artillery.

II. Two companies of infantry at Los Angeles, either in the town, or at least six miles from it. One month’s subsistence always on hand.

III. Four companies, two of dragoons and two of infantry, at San Bernardino. I believe if any trouble arises it will begin there, because of the character of the surrounding population, and the fact that the outlets toward Utah by the Mojave, and toward Texas by the Colorado, invite and tempt by their facilities for escape. By all means keep this squadron of dragoons intact at one point. It is the only body of cavalry in the country and, with the drill Carleton and I have given it, is really efficient and can be relied on for 100 men in the saddle at need. An outpost from the San Bernardino command to be at Martin’s ranch, in the Cajon Pass, to consist of an officer and, say, twelve men. Another at Temecula, on the route to Warner’s ranch, same number. Both posts to report constantly to San Bernardino. The officer at San Bernardino to have district powers over Los Angeles troops, but not to touch San Pedro. A section of field pieces at Los Angeles and one at San Bernardino. An enterprising officer ought to be able to control at least open acts with these facilities placed at his command. If this arrangement cannot be made, then I respectfully ask authority to move this camp to San Pedro, and in the advantages of this step all my officers concur with me.

The men are being demoralized here, and I suspect are tampered with. The vitality they expend in debauch would be spent in fishing, hunting, boating, and manly exercises. From this point we could mainly control this section of country. There is a brass field piece here in town (6-pounder) belonging I am told to the State, now in the hands of the sheriff; Tomas Sanchez, a noted secessionist, which ought, I {p.568} think, to be in my keeping. Can I get the order of the Governor to deliver it to me, through the general? The home guard about whom I wrote to the general of the date of August 10 have enrolled 100 members, under the accompanying pledge, and expect to have 100 more within a few days, when their returns come in. Can I have 150 stand of rifles or muskets sent me from the arsenal for issue to them? I will be responsible myself for their safe-keeping, and I think these people would be gratified by this mark of the general’s confidence. Besides, they really need them. There are no arms worth mentioning in the hands of Union men. The fall election comes off September 5, at which time Dimmick, U. S. district attorney, and others fear an outbreak. It would be well if the San Bernardino command could be in position by then.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

If the general will grant my suggestion about the arms, it is important they should be here before the election comes off on the 5th September.

J. W. D.

[Inclosure.]

Los ANGELES, August 12, 1861.

The undersigned, citizens of Los Angeles County, do hereby form and constitute ourselves into a defensive organization or home guard, and we pledge ourselves to support the Constitution and authorities of the United States, and to act in concert with the U. S. troops stationed in our vicinity, in the preservation of order and of the supremacy of the laws of the land.

T. G. Barker, James Edwards, Abel Stearns, F. Baker, David Lewis, Alexander Bell, K. H. Dimmick, John Trafforer, J. H. Jones, F. P. F. Temple, J. M. Wallace, W. W. Stetson, Win. Moore, Dr. A. B. Hayward, John O. Wheeler, M. W. Childs, V. A. Hoover, Chas. R Conway, Alonzo Waite, W. H. Perterson, J. J. Warner, Chas. W. Moeller, Thomas Cox, E. Drown, W. H. Perry, H. D. Barrows, J. G. Scott, H. M. Forbes, E. Stone, F. W. Koll, R. A. Snow, John A. Smith, J. S. Rhoads, S. B. Cox, B. McLaughlin, J. S. Mallard, Gardner Green, J. E. Pleasants, W. C. Warren, Henry Burgess, Ed. G. Blodgett, Robt. S. Baker, R. Z. Hester, A. Dickenson, Thomas Trafford, J. W. Jenkins, George B. Richart, Ygnacio Garcia, Peter Banta, Reuben Cross, David Schramling, Louis Frohling, Oliver Stearns, Manuel Requerra, M. McKenna, Win. Pickett, A. F. Hinchman, John Wilson, Win. G. Still, Charles Chapman, Geo. Thatcher, Charles P. Chapman, Geo. F. Lamson, Samuel Arbuckle, J. Jones, Isaac Mayberry, A. W. Baker, A. Holmes, Chas. A. Beebe, Ralph Emerson, James Mahan, Robert W. Smith, W. H. Leighton, O. B. Fisher, John G. Nichols, H. Van Valkingburg, C. P. Britton, A. Ulynan, Robert Owens, A. B. Brady, C. P. McNulty, J. F. Meekham, Win. Abbott, David Anderson, L. Joszynsky, J. Newell, Patrick Larkins, D. M. Laren, H. B. Stafford, Lamb Robinson, J. H. Karr, John Sheffield, J. W. Metzker, M. Luce Black, J. C. Baldwin, R. Mack, G. F. Leonard, N. A. Potter, O. M. Potter.

{p.569}

[Indorsement.]

Los ANGELES, August 13, 1861.

I hereby certify that the foregoing names are copies of bona fide signatures of citizens and residents of Los Angeles County.

HENRY D. BARROWS U. S. Marshal for the Southern District of California.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 14, 1861.

Hon. JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

Please organize, equip, and have mustered into service, at the earliest date possible, four regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, to be placed at the disposal of General Sumner.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(By telegraph to Fort Kearny, and thence by pony express and telegraph.)

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 14, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of the State of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

SIR: I have this day addressed you a dispatch requesting you to organize, equip, and have mustered into service, at the earliest date possible, four regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, to be placed at the disposal of General Sumner.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 146.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 14, 1861.

...

3. Maj. William S. Ketchum, Fourth Infantry, is authorized on an emergency to direct the movements and concentration of the troops stationed at New San Diego, Camp Fitzgerald, and those under his immediate command at San Bernardino on such points as he may deem necessary.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 14, 1861.

Maj. WILLIAM S. KETCHUM, Fourth Regiment of Infantry, Camp Sumner, Cal.:

MAJOR: It is reported from authentic sources that there is much disaffection toward the Government in the southern part of this State, and the object of placing you with your command at San Bernardino {p.570} is to repress with a strong hand any organization to resist or impede the measures of the Government. You will consider yourself charged with all the supervision of Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Santa Barbara Counties, and you will endeavor to keep yourself well informed of all scheming against the Government, and interpose at once if any overt act of treason is committed. You will have authority to concentrate the troops from Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and San Diego, if any emergency should make it necessary. Communicate with Colonel Andrews, at Fort Yuma, and if that post should be threatened by any hostile movement from Texas or Arizona, march instantly to its support with your whole available force.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, August 15, 1861.

Hon. JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

In filling the requisition given you August 14 for five regiments, please make General J. H. Carleton, of San Francisco, colonel of a cavalry regiment, and give him proper authority to organize as promptly as possible.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

(Telegraph and pony express and telegraph.)

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 147.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 15, 1861.

Capt. Henry S. Burton, Third Artillery, will turn over to the commanding officer of Benicia Arsenal 1,000 sets of infantry equipments.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOS ANGELES, August 15, 1861-12.40 p.m.

R. C. DRUM:

My men are being demoralized and tampered with. Shall I move nearer San Pedro? All my officers urge the move.

J. W. DAVIDSON, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, August 15, 1861.

Capt. J. W. DAVIDSON, First Dragoons, Los Angeles:

Your dispatch of this date received. Read second paragraph of General Orders, No. 6, from these headquarters.*

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See May 15, p. 486.

{p.571}

EUGENE CITY, LANE COUNTY, GREG., August 15, 1861.

General E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Pacific Division, San Francisco, Cal.:

DEAR SIR: There is a rumor here that it is among the possibilities that Fort Umpqua, at the mouth of the Umpqua River, maybe abandoned by your order. I hardly know what apology to make for saying a word upon such a subject, and I should not, if I was not fully assured that you feel as deep a solicitude for every interest of our common country as any man can. With this kind of feeling and assurance I beg leave to submit to you a few facts and suggestions. Perhaps I ought to say in advance that my official duties as a justice of the supreme court of this State, and judge of the second judicial district, make me very familiar with the country embracing Fort Umpqua, much of the Indian reservation, and a large portion of the country from which the Indians were removed being within my judicial circuit, and also somewhat familiar with the facts which I shall state.

First. Fort Umpqua commands the southerly and only point of egress in that direction. The Rogue River and Coast Indians, the only ones on this reservation who have ever proved troublesome to the whites, could find their way back only by this route along the coast without great difficulty. I am quite satisfied that it is the only one they would attempt.

Second. I am informed that the Indians are as anxious to return to their old haunts as ever, but about this I cannot speak so certainly, but from personal conversations with a few of them I am inclined to think it true.

My judicial district extends from the reservation to the California line, and embraces the country from which a large number of the Indians were removed, and from personal knowledge of the temper and feeling of the inhabitants I think I may safely say that if the Indians were permitted to return that their presence would occasion immediate trouble. The presence of a very small force at Fort Umpqua would effectually prevent it. But I am sorry to say that I think there are other reasons why this post should be held by a small force and subject to your order. It is not to be doubted that the Governor of this State strongly sympathizes with the rebels, and there are many who believe that under the influence of General Lane he would seize any convenient opportunity to give Union men trouble. It is understood and believed that the withdrawal of U. S. forces from this and other posts would offer an occasion of which the Governor would avail himself to call out troops to occupy them. It would be an easy matter to obtain such only as he could rely upon. A few men of desperate fortunes with arms in their hands might give us infinite trouble. Oregon has a large faction of her population who are as devoted to the rebels as any men to be found in the South. It is true they are in a minority, and we desire to keep them there and to give them no advantage beyond their numbers. I hope that, if possible and consistent with your duties, that this fort will not be abandoned-at least until Colonel Baker and Nesmith, our Senators in Washington, can be advised and opportunity given to represent the matter at headquarters.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. STRATTON.

{p.572}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, U. S. Army, Washington, August 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, San Francisco, Cal.:

You are to command an expedition into Texas, via Mazatlan, to be composed of two batteries and ten foot companies of regulars, one regiment of volunteer cavalry, and four regiments volunteer infantry. Brig. Gen. J. W. Denver will be associated with you, and take with you Capt. R. L. Ogden, assistant quartermaster. A requisition has been made on the Governor for the volunteers. Communicate with him. Particulars by mail.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

(Telegraph to outer station, thence by pony express and telegraph.)

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, August 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding, &c., San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: A telegram was sent you this day in relation to an expedition to Texas, and the General-in-Chief directs me to write you more fully in regard to it, as follows: You are to fit out an expedition in San Francisco, preparing for embarkation thence the necessary supplies and land transportation, to land at Mazatlan and march thence to Western Texas to regain the public property in that State and draw off insurgent troops from Arkansas, Missouri, &c, J. W. Denver, esq., of California, has been appointed brigadier-general, U. S. volunteer service, and will be under your command. Capt. R. L. Ogden, appointed assistant quartermaster, and now in San Francisco, will also be subject to your orders. A requisition has been made on the Governor of California for one regiment volunteer cavalry and four regiments volunteer infantry; and he has been requested to report them to you when ready. You will please confer with him in relation to them. You will add to this force two batteries regular artillery and ten companies regular foot, to be collected from such points as may be most advisable. Orders will no doubt go to you from the War Department concerning the contract to be made with the steamship company. The general will only say on this subject that it will be advisable to make provision as early as possible for having coal for the transports placed in depot at Mazatlan. On leaving the Department of the Pacific, turn over the command to Colonel Wright, Ninth Infantry.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 16, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon:

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 9th instant the general commanding the department instructs me to say that the propriety and {p.573} necessity for the movement of troops within your district, whether of a temporary or permanent character, is left discretionary with yourself. The general wishes you to make such disposition of the force under your command as will best secure protection to the inhabitants against Indian incursions. While he hopes that this force will enable you to accomplish the purpose desired, yet, should you find it insufficient you will avail yourself of the authority granted in a former letter to call into service volunteers, either from Oregon or the Territory of Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP CHEHALIS, WASH. TER., August 16, 1861.

ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, District of Oregon:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you by the first opportunity that offers itself of the safe arrival of my command at this post yesterday, the 15th instant, at 12.30 p.m. Up to the time of writing (9 a.m.) the Indian agent has not arrived. I will await his arrival here and learn his wishes about the disposal of my command, and will report to you accordingly. Until the arrival of the Indian agent I cannot furnish any reliable information of the number and character of the Indians on the reservation, which is on the north side of Gray’s Harbor. The Indians in the immediate vicinity of Camp Chehalis do not number more than thirty-men, women, and children. The rest of the tribe are at Chinook and Shoal Water Bay, about fifty more. They are peaceable in character. The place selected for the establishment of the agency is about thirty-five miles north of this post. The Indians there are more numerous.

I am, sir, your very obedient servant,

C. D. EMORY, Second Lieutenant, Ninth Infty., Comdg. Detachment at Chehalis.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, August 17, 1861.

Capt. R. L. OGDEN, Quartermaster, San Francisco, Cal.:

Make all proper arrangements, including transportation, for the expedition. Be ready in time for the movement of forces.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., August 17, 1861.

Capt. R. L. OGDEN, Quartermaster, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have this day forwarded you a dispatch by telegraph and by pony express, requesting that you will make all proper arrangements, {p.574} including transportation, for the expedition to be commanded by General Sumner, and that you will be ready in time for the movement of forces.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 19, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have received your letter of the 23d ultimo in relation to the arms. They had been privately shipped a week before I got your letter. I sent a detachment of a captain and thirty men with them as far as Panama, and I confided them particularly to the naval officer at Aspinwall. I inclose a copy of my letter to him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 8, 1861.

Capt. EDWARD W. CARPENDER, Commanding U. S. Ship Falmouth, Aspinwall:

SIR: Captain Wallen with his company leaves in the Sonora to-morrow in charge of 30,000 stand of arms, which have been ordered to be sent from this department to New York immediately. As these arms would be a double loss to the Government if they should be captured, I would respectfully and earnestly ask your co-operation in this affair. Although it is highly important that no time should be lost in the transmission of these arms, it is still more important that they should go safely. I am not sure that in the absence of orders you may not think it advisable to send them in a Government ship or immediately under convoy. The security of these arms is so vitally important that I am confident the Government will approve of any measures you may think proper to take to insure it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 19, 1861.

Capt. JOHN W. DAVIDSON, First Regiment of Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, near Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: In compliance with the recommendation contained in your letter of the 13th instant, the general commanding the department has this day directed the ordnance officer at Benicia Arsenal to invoice to you 150 muskets with 6,000 rounds of ball ammunition. The general desires you to be particularly careful into whose hands these arms are {p.575} placed. Unless the parties are unconditionally committed to the support of the General Government great injury might be done in thus arming them. He accepts your proffered responsibility, and hopes you may be able to strengthen your position.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., August 19, 1861.

Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the communication of the colonel commanding the district, dated August 9, relating to our Indian affairs. A large number of the Nez Percés are inclined to be hostile, and from the best information I can gain it appears that at least one-half of them have seceded and have gone, or are going, to join the Snakes. I have it from Mr. Smith, Indian sutler, who has just come down from the reserve. It is feared by the agent, and in fact by all who are competent to judge, that there will be an outbreak probably on Salmon River and the South Branch of Clearwater. The presence of another company of dragoons on the reservation at Captain Smith’s disposal would keep the disturbance away from the settlements, most likely on the extreme southern boundary, but as for protecting those reckless men who have pushed on out of all reach it would be impossible. They are roving all over the country in defiance of treaty, law, or remonstrance, and must take care of themselves. I would send Lieutenant Reno with his company at once to re-enforce Captain Smith, if I only had Company H here to render my garrison sufficiently strong, and I would respectfully urge that it be ordered here immediately. The emergency requiring its presence might arise while it is yet too far from the scene of action to be of any service. I will keep the troops in the reservation for some time yet, although I expect they will be obliged to come in by the end of September on account of their horses. There has been no news from the emigrant road, no parties having come in yet, but that there will be trouble if the emigrants break up into small parties there can be no doubt. They must be keeping together, and perhaps have an escort, or we should have heard from them before this.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. STEEN, Major, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 20, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Your two telegraphic dispatches of the 15th instant I have this day received. The articles required will be sent to San Francisco by next steamer. We have but fourteen saddles and twenty bridles. I have telegraphed the number of saddles. We have an alarm again of Indian disturbances at the Cascades. Captain Black will go up to-morrow with a detachment of thirty-four men, and I have ordered Captain {p.576} Van Voast, with his company, to proceed from Fort Dalles to the Cascades. By prompt action and summary punishment of the evil-disposed I believe that peace can be maintained, but there is manifestly a hostile feeling and restlessness amongst the Indians which demands attention.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal, August 20, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Regiment Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon:

SIR: From information which has reached the general commanding the department, he is apprehensive that an outbreak is contemplated by the Indians within the limits of the District of Oregon. Being too remote from the scene of these threatened disturbances to procure accurate information on the subject, the general desires you to carefully investigate the condition of Indian affairs in the district where the greatest danger is to be apprehended. If in your opinion, the difficulties are of such a serious nature as to require it, the general wishes you to muster in immediately a sufficient volunteer force to suppress any hostile demonstration on the part of the tribes that are dissatisfied. This force must be commanded by an officer of the Regular Army, to be selected by yourself.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 28.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 20, 1861.

I. Capt. H. M. Black, Ninth Infantry, with three non-commissioned officers and thirty privates of the garrison of Fort Vancouver, will proceed by the steamer to-morrow morning to Fort Cascades. The detachment will be provisioned to the end of the month. Captain Black will receive written instructions from the colonel commanding.

II. Immediately on receipt of this order Capt. J. Van Voast, with Company K, Ninth Infantry, will proceed to the Cascades and report to Captain Black. Captain Van Voast will take with him rations to the end of the month, leaving a non-commissioned officer and ten men at Fort Dalles

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 20, 1861.

Capt. H. M. BLACK, Ninth Infantry, Comdg. Detach. of troops under orders for Fort Cascades, Wash. Ter., Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: The report which I have received from the Cascades renders it highly probable that an attempt is being made by some of the {p.577} Indian chiefs at that place to engage in hostilities against the whites. The chiefs Blau-a-har and Tim-e-tos are said to be the prime movers. The first-named should properly have been executed in ’56. On reaching the Cascades acquaint yourself with the condition of affairs and exercise your judgment how to act. If you are satisfied that these chiefs or any Indians in that quarter have already committed any hostile acts, or have by word or deed been endeavoring to persuade the Indians to commit aggressions, seize them all, and execute summary punishment on the guilty. Captain Van Voast will be at the Cascades on Friday morning and act under your orders. Let me know by every steamer the state of affairs at the Cascades. It is probable that before the end of the month I shall withdraw yourself and command, leaving Captain Van Voast in charge. Lieutenant Wildrick will turn over to you a box of 15 rifles and 500 cartridges, which you can place in the hands of Colonel Ruckel and Mr. Olmstead for defense of the depot of the Oregon Steam Navigation Company, those gentlemen receipting for the same.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, August 21, 1861.

Brigadier-General SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 24th July, the General-in-Chief directs me to say let Captain English remain in command of San Juan Island for the present.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP FITZGERALD, CAL., August 21, 1861.

Capt. RICHARD C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Yesterday it became known through this camp that I was to be relieved in command here by Captain Smith, First Dragoons. This information was written here by Major Carleton. It was calculated to do harm in three ways. First. That troops are apt to relax in their attention to duties pending a change of commanders. Second. That if I was disposed to yield to a feeling of mortification, consequent upon getting information of the change in this way, it might discourage me in the ready prosecution of my own duties. Third. That our Union citizens here, with whom I have established harmonious and intelligible relations, might lose confidence in me from this report, not knowing the general’s good reasons. My own self-respect teaches me that it would be better if the general’s intentions with regard to this command became known through his orders, and that every officer becoming possessed of the designs of his superiors should have reticence enough (particularly now) to keep them to himself and not make them the subject of gossip. I shall work, captain, even under this rumor, with the {p.578} same hearty good will, to be able to turn over to Captain Smith a command that he may find efficient, and I have no feeling about the proposed change, only about its mode of communication.

With high respect, I am, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: In raising the volunteers from this State I found it indispensably necessary, for economy as well as efficiency, to have a cavalry officer of experience and ability to command the five companies of cavalry. There was no suitable man to be found out of the Army, and at my request the Governor has given the commission of lieutenant-colonel of cavalry to Lieut. B. F. Davis, of the First Dragoons. I have known this young officer since he entered the Army, and I know him to be one of the best officers in it. He is from the South, but a firm loyalist to the Government. 1 would respectfully ask the sanction of the War Department to this appointment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 152.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 22, 1861.

The companies of California Volunteer Infantry already mustered into service will on Saturday, the 24th instant, be moved into camp at such point near San Antonio Landing, Contra Costa, as may be selected by Captain Kirkham, assistant quartermaster. The other companies will, as they are mustered in, be moved to this camp. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 22, 1861.

Hon. B. E. STRATTON, Eugene City, Lane County, Oreg.:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 15th instant I am instructed by the general commanding the department to inform you that the detachment of troops now at Umpqua will not be removed. In consequence of our national difficulties, the general has been compelled to draw from the District of Oregon a large portion of the regular force. In doing this he was not unmindful of the exposed condition of the remote settlements in California, Oregon, and Washington, and to secure their complete protection delegated to Colonel Wright authority to call out a sufficient volunteer force to suppress any outbreak on the part of {p.579} the Indians. Should the threatened disturbances in the north warrant it, he has been directed to muster into service a volunteer force immediately.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 23, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Headquarters of the Army, Washington:

SIR: I have the honor to inform the General-in-Chief that, in consequence of threatened disturbances among several Indian tribes in the District of Oregon, I have Directed Colonel Wright, the commander thereof, whenever in his opinion it is necessary, to muster into service a sufficient volunteer force for the suppression of any outbreak. This force I have directed shall be placed under the command of an officer of the Regular Army, to be selected by Colonel Wright. It would be hazardous at this time to reduce the regular force in this State, and I am therefore compelled to rely upon State troops to give the necessary protection to our frontier settlements.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 153.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 23, 1861.

1. The camp directed to be established near San Antonio, Contra Costa, will be known as Camp Downey.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., August 23, 1861.

Lieut. A. O. WILDRICK, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Special Orders, No. 28, from headquarters District of Oregon, of August 21, 1861, and in accordance with instructions from same source and date, I arrived at this post with my command about 4 p.m. on the 21st instant. I immediately took steps to acquaint myself with the condition of affairs in this vicinity. I’ve seen all the white settlers in the immediate vicinity of this post, and have had a conversation on the subject separately with them; have been unable to find out anything of a definite character. All seemed to be rumor, and to come from a friendly Indian or Indians who were under the influence of liquor, and stated that Indians were going to war again; that they expected the Cascades would be attacked. All this about a week ago, and as they {p.580} had been here in the difficulty of 1856, they had no desire or wish to be again if the place was attacked, so they intended to leave and go down the river near Vancouver. The people were evidently alarmed, and from what I can gather were much more so about a week ago than at the time of my arrival. The general impression here, as far as I am able to learn, is that propositions have been made to the Cascade Indians to join in a war against the whites and attack the Cascades. The proposition, I am told, was made by Tim-e-tos whilst under the influence of liquor and on a visit to the Portage (Oregon side). He then returned to the Klickitat country without going to Oregon City, as was reported. Blau-a-har denies all knowledge of such propositions or that an attack is to be made, and says he will give information of anything of the kind as soon as he hears it; that he has not forgotten the good advice given him by Colonel Wright several years ago. The impression seems to have been that an attack would have been made had not their plans become known and from the fact that Colonel Wright acted so promptly in the matter. The arrival of may command has evidently had a very good effect upon the Indians and allayed the excitement amongst the whites. I have seen but two persons who reside at the Upper Cascades, and they tell me an attack was apprehended up there about a week ago, but now there seemed to be little or no fear of it, at least for the present. I can hear of no strange or other Indians in the mountains on this side of the river nearer than the berry patch in the Klickitat country, about twenty-five miles up Wind River, where many Indians usually resort for berries about this season of the year. I hear of some Indians at the berry patch on the mountains opposite here, but the report received was not very definite. Upon the arrival of Captain Van Voast with his company I hope to be able to find out something more definite. I expect two Indians from the Oregon side of the Portage this morning and hope to get some information by which I can act promptly and with effect.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. BLACK, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Detachment.

[Inclosure.]

AUGUST 23, 1861-12.45 p.m.

Colonel WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Commanding District of Oregon:

Mr. Attwell informs me that certain rumors have been afloat that the upper country Indians were in the huckleberry patch, ready at short notice to make an attack on the settlers of the Cascades. This report was gotten up by Indians who were intoxicated, and he believes that it is not so, although he has no doubt but that Indian spies often come here to get these Indians to join them; but the Cascade tribe say that they are not willing to join them for fear that the soldiers will hang them as they did before in the year of 1856. Also that the excitement had been very great here, causing families to leave for Portland and The Dalles for protection, but that he believes that at present there is but little or no danger.

AUGUST 23, 1861-1 p.m.

The steamer is in sight, and having seen Mr. Attwell from the Oregon side-Upper Cascades-he has written the above, which I hasten to send over to the steamer that the colonel may receive it with my report {p.581} of to-day. Mr. Attwell has lived here since 1852. I send this report to the colonel in this irregular way as I have no time to copy it before the steamer leaves and am anxious that it should be received to-day.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. BLACK, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding Detachment.

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FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., August 23, 1861.

Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that Captain Van Voast, Ninth Infantry, with his company (K), forty enlisted men, joined me at this post about 2.30 o’clock to-day. He reports to me that more than “one non-commissioned officer and ten men” were kept back at Fort Dalles, Oreg., by Bvt. Lieut. Col. R. C. Buchanan, major Fourth Infantry, commanding that post. For the information of the colonel commanding I inclose herewith a copy of the order keeping these men at Fort Dalles, Oreg.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. BLACK, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Comdg. U. S. Troops at Cascades.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

FORT DALLES, OREG., August 22, 1861.

I. In obedience to Special Orders, No. 28, from headquarters District of Oregon, August 20, 1861, Capt. James Van Voast, Ninth Infantry, will immediately proceed with his company to the Cascades and report to Capt. H. M. Black, Ninth Infantry.

II. Captain Van Voast will leave a non-commissioned officer and ten men at this post in addition to the sick, hospital cook, and general prisoners undergoing sentence.

III. The assistant quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan:

ROBT. N. SCOTT, Second Lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, Post Adjutant.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 24, 1861.

Capt. B. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Your letter of August 19, stating that 150 stand of arms have been ordered to be shipped to me, has just been received. No man will get a musket from me except he be a member of the home guard, and takes the oath of allegiance to the United States. The invitation inclosed shows the willingness to take the oath.

I am, captain, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain of First Dragoons, Commanding.

{p.582}

[Inclosure.]

LOS ANGELES, August 24, 1861.

Capt. J. W. DAVIDSON, First Dragoons, U. S. Army:

CAPTAIN: The members of the home guard will convene at their armory this evening at 8 o’clock for the purpose of taking the oath, &c. If convenient we would be pleased to have your presence upon the occasion.

Very respectfully, yours,

A. B. HAYWARD, Chairman of Committee.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 24, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco:

CAPTAIN: I report that I have changed the position of my camp (no farther from Los Angeles, however), to better ground and nearer the water, the advantages beside of having less dust to annoy men and horses, and change of scene. The camp is also in more compact shape. The horses of the squadron since being in camp have deteriorated at least 20 per cent, in spirit, flesh, and general fitness for service, owing to their being fed in nose-bags and tied to the picket-lines during the day, exposed to the scorching sun. I have had troughs built at the lines and the spare paulins in the quartermaster’s department stretched on frames over the horses, and expect to show a marked change in then for the better. Dispensing with drills now and then and encouraging the men to play at football and to bathe at those times has had good effect. They seem to wear a more cheerful air, and the number of desertions has diminished. Arrangements have been made with the Catholic bishop of this diocese to hold divine service in camp every alternate Sunday. This will have effect with the native Californians and show them that they and the troops have a common sympathy upon this ground. The vicar-general (Father Rabo) assures me and authorizes me to use his name to the general, that the greater proportion of the Californians are friendly to the Government, and that the ideas to the contrary which have been entertained about those of this county are groundless.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 21, 1861.

Capt. H. M. BLACK, Ninth infantry, Comdg. U. S. Troops at Cascades, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: I have received your reports of yesterday. Make a thorough examination of the country and the Indians at and about the Cascades. Unless there should be a necessity for your remaining at the Cascades I shall order you down the latter part of next week, and in that event Captain Van Voast will remain for the present with his company, garrisoning both extremes of the line. Captain Van Voast {p.583} will send a provision return for his company for the month of September to Major Babbitt. The rations can be sent up on the 30th instant. Fresh beef can be sent up three times a week by the boat.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Bridger, Utah Ter., August 25, 1861.

Maj. J. H. CARLETON, First Dragoons, U. S. Army, Commanding Volunteers:

MAJOR: Having learned that a number of volunteers under your command are about to leave California to take post along the Overland Mail Route, I consider it my duty to give you information with regard to the facilities afforded by this post for occupation by a portion of your command should it be desirable to occupy it. The post, as you may be aware, is pleasantly situated on Black’s Fork of Green River, having several branches with fine running water through and near the post. Four companies could immediately find pleasant quarters and in a short time a number of other buildings sufficient to accommodate an equal number could be repaired. There are six sets of officers’ quarters with four rooms each, two of them having kitchens detached. There is one stable fit for immediate use which will accommodate ninety horses, and another which will require considerable repairs before being fit for use. It would hold about fifty animals. The material for repairing could be obtained at the post. There are 200 head of commissary beef-cattle here. There are 400 bales and 300 boxes of clothing, camp, and garrison equipage, stationery and medical stores at the post. Most of this was removed from Fort Crittenden when that post was abandoned and stored here for the use of the volunteers. The subsistence stores here are quite limited in quantity. I have 6,000 pounds flour, 3,500 pounds bacon, 1,000 pounds sugar, 200 pounds coffee, 150 pounds rice, and 30 bushels beans, and but a small quantity of other stores. The post sutler here has a quantity of subsistence stores purchased at the late sale, which he has made me a written promise to retain until September 20, and sell at reasonable rates should it be necessary to purchase, provided the post should be garrisoned. He has 20,000 pounds States flour, 10,000 pounds bacon, 60 bushels beans, 10 barrels vinegar, 5 barrels molasses, 2,000 pounds sugar, 15 cases desiccated vegetables, 1,000 pounds tea, 400 gallons vinegar. Stock can be wintered near the post. There is a good sutler’s store here, a post-office, and a telegraph station is expected to be established here by November.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. CLARK, Captain, Fourth Artillery, Commanding Post.

P. S.-The post sutler, Judge Carter, has contracted to furnish for the post, if needed, 3,000 bushels oats, 90 tons hay, 15 tons straw, and 1,000 cords wood, and states that he is willing to increase the amounts of the several articles to the requirements of the post. Will you please reply early for the information of the sutler?

J. C. C.

{p.584}

FORT HUMBOLDT, CAL., August 25, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by mail of the 21st instant of Department Special Orders, Nos. 142, 143, and 145, and a letter of the 8th instant relative to establishing a new post to be called Fort Seward. The means of transportation at this post are not sufficient to pack out the supplies now here for Fort Gaston and to get out the supplies necessary for the new post to last until the trails are practicable again in the spring. The rainy season (snow in the mountains) usually commences about the middle of October, after which packing over the mountain will be impracticable. The train belonging here is now packing to Fort Gaston. I have, therefore, to ask of the commanding general authority to hire the packing to Fort Gaston to be done by private trains. The cost will be about 4 cents per pound. The Indians referred to in my letter of the 1st instant, numbering about 130, have been camped here under the protection of the troops for a week past, the citizens furnishing them with scanty supplies of provisions. I have written to the Indian agent at the Klamath Reservation in regard to them, but have not received a reply. Quite a number of them are decrepit and not able to walk that distance. The steam-tug will take them all to the reservation for about $300, but of course I could not go to that expense without authority from department headquarters. I do not like to make any remarks relative to abandoning this post, but I think it my duty to say that I do not doubt that it will be found necessary to re-occupy it again in less than six months.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. LOVELL, Captain, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Post.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 155.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 26, 1861.

...

2. Lieut. Col. Robert C. Buchanan with the regimental and non-commissioned staff and band of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry will immediately take post at the Presidio of San Francisco.

3. Col. Benjamin L. Beall, First Dragoons, will immediately relieve Col. George Wright, Ninth Infantry, in command of the District of Oregon. When relieved Colonel Wright will report at these headquarters without delay.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 26, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, U. S. Navy, Commanding Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have been informed that there are several violent secessionists in the Government employ at Mare Island Navy-Yard. I would respectfully and earnestly represent to you the danger of keeping these {p.585} men in your command. It is not right that any man should draw his bread from a Government that he is denouncing, and no man with any pride would do it. I am no alarmist, but at this moment there is a high responsibility resting upon you and myself, and I wish to inform you that I have the means of making all Government property in this State perfectly safe, and I am ready and willing at all times to give you any assistance that you may require.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, San Bernardino, Cal., August 26, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Pacific Department, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Companies D and G reached this place yesterday. Companies A and F encamped at the Old Mission, about twenty-five miles from New San Pedro, on the 24th instant, and should reach this place on the 28th instant, if nothing happens to prevent. There are no vacant buildings to be rented for quarters for either officers or soldiers in this town. This command is very much in want of a physician, as well as company officers. Please furnish both as soon as practicable.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 26, 1861-3.40 p.m.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Commanding District of Oregon:

On the arrival of Col. B. L. Beall, turn over your command to him and repair to this place as soon as possible. You will probably be here for some time. Colonel Beall goes up in the boat to-morrow. Order Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan with the headquarters of his regiment to repair here immediately.

E. Y. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., August 26, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you, in turning over the command of the District of Oregon to Colonel Beall, to inform him very generally regarding Indian affairs within the district, and particularly with regard to all matters pertaining to the occupancy of San Juan Island.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.586}

FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., August 26, 1861.

Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that since my letter of the 23d instant I have used my best endeavors to find out something of a more definite character to report to the colonel commanding. The Indians on the Oregon side of the river, of whom I spoke in my last, I was not able to see that day. So the next day I sent Captain Van Voast over to Oregon side of the Cascades with orders to make a thorough investigation into the condition of affairs on that side. Inclosed herewith you will please find his report, which goes to corroborate principally what I found out on this side of the river in my examination from the Lower to the Upper Cascades. It was reported to me that quite a number of strange Indians were at the berry patch on the south side of the river; so to satisfy myself I told Blau-a-har that I wanted him to go up to that patch and see if there were any Indians there or in the vicinity; if so, to find out their number, to what tribes they belonged, and to bring in to me the heads of each tribe. If he saw no Indians, to examine the ground closely for signs, either fresh or old, and that I wanted him to be back last night and let me know the result. He returned last night about 9 p.m. according to promise, and reported that there were no Indians to be found or seen, nor could any signs of any be seen, and that he does not think the Indians have been there this season; that the berries are about half ripe. I told him before I sent him out that if he deceived me in any way I would hang him, and I also told him the same thing on his return and before he made his report. From all I can learn I am convinced that the matter of an attack was talked over by some strange Indians and those of the Cascades, or at least some of the latter, and that the arrival of troops at this point has evidently frustrated their plans for the present at least, if they had any fixed ones.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. BLACK, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding U. S. Troops at Cascades.

[Inclosure.]

FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., August 25, 1861.

Capt. H. M. BLACK, Commanding Troops, Fort Cascades, Wash. Ter.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that in accordance with your instructions I visited the Upper and Lower Cascades, on the Oregon side, and by inquiry endeavored to ascertain upon what foundation were based the rumors of an apprehended Indian attack. It appears that an old Indian woman some eight or ten days since told Mrs. Attwell, living at the Upper Cascades, that strange Indians had been talking to the Cascade Indians of an attack, but that the latter would not join them. She added that in case of danger she would give timely warning to Mrs. Attwell. About this same time an Indian called Jim, under the influence of liquor, and just at dark, came to Mr. Attwell’s house, and told Mr. and Mrs. Attwell that they must be careful; that strange Indians were in the mountains; that they might attack the Cascades; stating also that he would inform them in time of the danger. I visited the house of an Indian called Gabriel, at which place I saw {p.587} the old Indian woman referred to above, but I was unable to elicit any information in confirmation of the story attributed to her; neither could I learn from them anything in relation to strange Indians or an apprehended attack. It appears that Gabriel had been told, or imagined, that you were thinking of hanging him, and seemed to be very much frightened. Indian Jim, referred to above, is absent now from the Cascades, and I therefore could not see him, but I am informed that he has since been questioned in relation to his first story, and that now he denies having told it. Mrs. Attwell is also absent from the Cascades, and I therefore could not see her. I will also here add that some alarm has been caused by the unusually large number of strange Indians reported as passing up and down, and as having much powder and lead. The arrival of troops has quieted entirely the fears of all.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JAMES VAN VOAST, Captain, Ninth Infantry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 27, 1861.

His Excellency J. G. DOWNEY, Governor of California, Sacramento:

GOVERNOR: I regret very much that you do not find it convenient to come to this city. From the orders that I have received no time can be lost in raising the 5,000 volunteers required from this State. I wish much to confer with you about this matter. I deem it very important that officers of the Army should be selected to command the regiments; the other field officers can, be selected from civil life, and no man, officer or soldier, will be mustered into service about whose loyalty to the National Government there is the slightest doubt.

I am, Governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 156.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 27, 1861.

...

2. The companies raised for the regiment of infantry and battalion of cavalry California volunteers, for the service on the Overland route, will hereafter be mustered into service at Camp Downey, Contra Costa.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT YUMA, CAL., August 27, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, U. S. Army, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: You will please telegraph the substance of the inclosed communication to the commanding general of the department and request him to send at least two companies of infantry to strengthen this point {p.588} as soon as practicable. I would respectfully suggest they be sent by steamer to the mouth of the Colorado River, on account of it being the most expeditious, besides there being a scarcity of water on the desert. You will please forward the inclosed communication to department headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. ANDREWS, Lieutenant-Colonel Sixth Infantry, Commanding Post.

[Inclosure.]

PIMA VILLAGES, August 23, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma:

SIR: Inclosed please find Mesilla papers, containing full accounts of the proceedings of the rebels in Eastern Arizona. You will see that they have possession of the entire Territory. Twenty of their troops are at Tucson now and 100 more expected in a very few days. The following is an extract from a letter received from the mail agent at Tucson:

The mail between Tucson and Mesilla will stop for the present, as the country is under martial law.

In case of any demonstration in this direction I will promptly forward the earliest information.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. WHITE.

We are out of postage stamps, or I should send in the mail.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 27, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Infty., Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires that fifteen wagon mules and all the clothing and camp equipage on hand at Fort Steilacoom, after deducting a supply for six-months for the troops on Puget Sound, to be sent down on the Massachusetts. The Massachusetts will be sent to Fort Vancouver in time to meet the mules ordered down from Walla Walla, which she will take on board and come to this city. All the wagons, wagon mules, and harness at Fort Vancouver not required at the post, and all the clothing and camp equipage not required for the troops at that post and Forts Hoskins and Yamhill, after deducting a supply at each place for six months, to be sent down in the Massachusetts. All the wagons, wagon mules, and harness at Fort Dalles not required for the post, and all the clothing and camp equipage on hand, after deducting a six months’ supply for the troops at that post, will be sent to Vancouver to be forwarded to this city in the Massachusetts. The general hopes to see you here by the return steamer.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.589}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 31.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 27, 1861.

I. Capt. H. M. Black, Ninth Infantry, with the detachment of U. S. troops under his command stationed at Fort Cascades, will proceed to Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., by the steamer thence on Friday, the 30th instant.

II. Capt. J. Van Voast, Ninth Infantry, with his company (K), will take post at Fort Cascades, garrisoning both extremities of the line.

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant. General.

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, August 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army:

GENERAL: Your letter of yesterday is received. I regret exceedingly that I have been unable to visit San Francisco during the last week, as I have been most anxious to confer with you in regard to the recent requisition. You will see that I have lost no time in making the call. I am satisfied, from the assurances received from the most populous counties of the State, that in two weeks we will have the requisite number of men to fill the requisition. Enlisting is going on rapidly, and the fife and drum are heard in every village. I have repeatedly assured you that none other than those loyal to the General Government would be offered bearing commissions of the State. And surely none entertaining disloyal sentiments to the Federal Government would desire to place themselves in a position at once false and dishonorable. As I have repeatedly assured you, there will be no clashing of sentiment on this head. The volunteer soldiery of this State desire to be commanded by their own distinguished citizens as far as possible, and I assure you with all candor that if it were differently understood, we would find it exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to fill the demand of the President. Notwithstanding the pressure of business now pouring in upon me, I will on to-morrow visit San Francisco for the purpose of having a free and frank interview with you on this subject.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., August 28, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Since the arrival of the pony express, with Washington dates of August 16, a rumor has been in circulation that an enlistment of 5,000 additional men from this State has been ordered for service in Texas, to which State they were to proceed with all convenient dispatch, under command of General Sumner. This report has caused the most lively apprehensions of danger in our midst, and so deeply are we impressed that your Department is not sensible of the true condition of {p.590} affairs upon this coast that we most respectfully ask the rescinding of so much of the order as calls for the withdrawal of the troops to be raised, and that transfers General Sumner to another field of duty, and thereto we present the following reasons: A majority of our present State officers are undisguised and avowed secessionists, and the balance, being bitterly hostile to the Administration, are advocates of a peace policy at any sacrifice, upon terms that would not be rejected even by South Carolina. Every appointment made by our Governor within the past three months unmistakably indicates his entire sympathy and co-operation with those plotting to sever California from her allegiance to the Union, and that, too, at the hazard of civil war. About three-eighths of our citizens are natives of slaveholding States, and almost a unit in this crisis. The hatred and bitterness toward the Union and Union men, manifested so pointedly in the South and so strongly evinced on the field of battle, is no more intense there than here. These men are never without arms, have wholly laid aside their business, and are devoting their time to plotting, scheming, and organizing. Our advices obtained with great prudence and care, show us that there are upward of 16,000 “Knights of the Golden Circle” in this State, and that they are still organizing even in our most loyal districts. The fruits of so much devotion to the cause of secession and intriguing for its promotion are manifested in the securing of certain timid and ease-loving classes, hailing from free States, styling themselves Union men, but opposed to the war. Thus is secession consummated. Another class, by no means small, powerful through its wealth, has affiliated with the disunionists to avoid and oppose paying a pittance toward maintaining the integrity of the Government in its hour of trial. The native Spanish race have been persuaded that all real-estate complications will meet with prompt adjustment at the hands of another organization, and the unwarranted doubts, difficulties, and delays that have characterized the action of the administrative branch of the Government in the final adjustment of titles under Mexican grants furnish an argument to ignorant men that human ingenuity cannot answer. The squatter and lawless trespasser, having litigated with the landed proprietor for years in his own name and that of his Government, is made to believe that no change can result to his disadvantage; that principles established by the Federal courts will be overturned, and Mexican grants only known in history. Upon these several subjects, which comprise the prominent points of our present position, electioneering pamphlets, resolutions, platforms, speeches, and circulars are distributed with an unflagging industry, and are placed in the hands of every voter in the State. The special object of this extraordinary effort is to carry the State election, which takes place one week from to-day, September the 4th. In this campaign the Union voters are unfortunately divided, and the best-devised plans have failed to unite them. The secessionists, the Douglas party, and the Republicans have each a full ticket in the field, and we are overwhelmed with apprehensions lest the enemies of the country may triumph. Should such be the case, civil strife would be forced upon our loyal population, and the most prosperous State in the Union would be desolated and destroyed. The frightful scenes now transpiring in Missouri would be rivaled by the atrocities enacted upon the Pacific Coast. Loyalty and patriotism embrace within their firm grasp the body of the wealth and intelligence of California, and an attempt at a severance will be contested with inflexible determination. We need not remind you of the vast importance of preserving California to the Union. Its great geographical extent, its mineral and agricultural wealth, the fact that it is our chief seat of empire upon the {p.591} Pacific, and that its political action will exercise a powerful, if not controlling, influence upon its neighbors at the North, imperatively demand that no precaution should be neglected to insure its fidelity. We need only appeal to the examples furnished by Missouri, and even Virginia, to show that the efforts of a comparatively small number of audacious and unscrupulous men are sufficient to precipitate an unwilling population into disunion, or at least to inaugurate civil war. If, unfortunately, from the causes we have mentioned, the secession minority in this State should obtain control, you will at once perceive with what power for mischief it would be armed, and how imminent is our danger. To retain a State in its allegiance is a thousandfold more easy than to overcome disloyalty affecting to act under State authority.

Nothing will more certainly check treasonable attempts than a conviction of their hopelessness. To deprive us of the military support of the Government at this time is to hold out a direct encouragement to traitors. We beg most earnestly to remind you that in our case an “ounce of preventive is worth a pound of cure.”

Very respectfully yours,

Robt. C. Rogers, Macondray & Co., Jno. Sime & Co., J. B. Thomas, W. W. Stow, Horace P. James, Geo. F. Bragg & Co., Flint, Peabody & Co., Win. B. Johnston D. O. Mills, H. M. Newhall & Co., Henry Schmildell, Murphy, Grant & Co., Win, T. Coleman & Co., De Witt Kittle & Co., Richard M. Jessup, Graves, Williams & Buckley, Donohoe, Ralston & Co., H. M. Nuzlee, Geo. C. Shreve & Co., Peter Danahue, Kellogg, Hewston & Co., Moses Ellis & Co., R. D. W. Davis & Co., L. B. Benchley & Co., Win. A. Dana, Jones, Dixon & Co., J. Y. Halleck & Co., Forbes & Babcock, A. T. Lawton, Geo. J. Brooks & Co., Jno. B. Newton & Co., Chas. W. Brooks & Co., James Patrick & Co., Locke & Montague, Janson, Bond & Co., Jennings & Brewster, Treadwell & Co., William Alvord & Co., Shattuck & Hendley, Randell & Jones, J. B. Weir & Co., B. C. Hand & Co., O. H. Giffin & Bro., Dodge & Shaw, Tubbs & Co., J. Whitney, jr., C. Adolphe Low & Co., Haynes & Lawton, J. D. Farrell, C. E. Hitchcock, Geo. Howes & Co., Sam. Merritt, Jacob Underhill & Co., Morgan, Stone & Co., J. W. Brittan, T. H. & J. S. Bacon, R. B. Swain & Co., Fargo & Co., Nathaniel Page, Stevens, Baker & Co., R. E. Brewster & Co., Tay, Brooks & Backus, Win. Norris, E. H. Parker.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 28, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Commanding Navy-Yard, Mare Island, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have received your letter of yesterday.* You are altogether mistaken in supposing that I wish to dictate to you in anything. I have an impression that you asked me in one of your letters some time since to give you any information I might receive that would be interesting to you. I did receive information, and from what I considered a reliable source, that there were several secessionists in Government employ at the navy-yard, and I certainly thought it was very {p.592} important that you should know of this report; for if it was true, I did not believe you would keep such people for an hour. You misunderstand me entirely. I have not the slightest apprehension that the Government will sustain any loss of property in California.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 28, 1861.

Col. WASHINGTON SEAWELL, Sixth Regiment of Infantry, Comdg. Benicia Barracks, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to move the company of infantry commanded by Lieutenant Upham, Sixth Infantry, from the ordnance building it now occupies, and place them in camp sufficiently near the arsenal building to give the necessary protection.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., August 28, 1861.

Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

LIEUTENANT: Since my last report on the 26th instant I sent Captain Van Voast with a party to examine an old trail which comes into the river (Oregon side) at Eagle Creek. He started early in the morning, and followed said trail until all signs and traces of it disappeared, when he continued on until it became dangerous for himself and command to climb over the rocks, &c. He reports that he saw no signs of Indians, and thinks that neither white man nor Indian had ever been to the point he reached. I also started with a party the same morning and at the same time to examine the country lying to the north of this post and back of the Portage, on this side of the river. Mr. Jones, late sutler’s agent at this post, and Mr. Hamilton kindly volunteered to accompany me, and I found them of great assistance. We followed the military road as far as the bridge; then turned to the left into the woods; followed an old wood road for about a mile, then struck into the woods without a trail, but by the compass nearly north, to strike a lake which lies back of the Upper Cascades, and after a very tiresome march over very high hills, covered with rocks, and through very thick underbrush, we succeeded in our object of reaching this Blue Lake. Saw no Indian signs whatever, and I think I may safely say that we were the first whites who had ever reached that lake, or chain of lakes, so high up from this side or end of the Portage, and it is a question if many, or any, Indians had ever done so. We then struck a trail and came to the river a short distance above Mr. Bradford’s store, at the Upper Cascades and got upon the military road at a lake near the Upper Cascades, thence back to this post. I have nothing further to add to my previous reports.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. BLACK, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding U. S. Troops at Cascades.

{p.593}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 29, 1861.

Col. W. SEAWELL, Commanding Benicia Barracks, Cal.:

I wish you to encamp a company close to the new ordnance building and put a strong guard at the magazine.

E. V. SUMNER.

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HEADQUARTERS, Benicia Barracks, Cal., August 29, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: In compliance with your order of yesterday and that of to-day from the commanding general by telegraph, I have ordered in camp two of the companies of the Sixth Infantry at this post-E, the company mentioned by you, and K, Captain Hendrickson’s. The former company will occupy close to the new arsenal, and the latter near the old ordnance buildings. If in thus disposing of these companies I have not comprehended the general’s wishes, please inform me.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SEAWELL, Colonel Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

P. S.-A guard of two non-commissioned officers and sixteen privates will be placed over the magazine,

W. S.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 29, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have received your communication of the 20th instant. The excitement in relation to our Indian affairs at the Cascades has subsided. The whole country in that region on both sides of the river has been thoroughly examined by Captains Black and Van Voast, and no indications of any hostile Indians discovered. As yet I have not deemed it necessary to ask for any volunteers, and if the company of the Ninth Infantry now at San Francisco could be returned to this district, I hope to be able to get along for the present.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., August 30, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have received the General-in-Chief’s dispatch, informing me that I am to command an expedition to Texas. While I feel flattered by this selection, and willing to undertake it, especially on account of the almost insuperable difficulties that will attend it, I feel {p.594} it to be a duty to the general to let him know precisely the state of things on this coast. Up to the time of the reverse in Virginia everything was perfectly safe here. There has always been a strong secession party in this State, but it was overawed and kept quiet. Since that news was received these people have been getting much bolder, and I have found it necessary to take strong measures to repress any attempt on their part to thwart the Government. I think I can do it; but if they should succeed in electing their candidate for Governor, of which they are very confident, I shall not be able to do it without the most stringent measures. The Union party here is divided, and neither portion of it will sacrifice their trifling local interests for the public good; and as the disunionists are very active and zealous I am by no means certain that they will not carry the election. Their numbers are variously estimated from 25,000 to 45,000 voters. I shall get the force authorized to be raised here into my hands as soon as possible; but it will take some time to do this. It is a very different thing to raise volunteers in a State where there is a strong party opposed to the Government from what it is where all are loyal. I shall lose no time in organizing this force and getting it ready for any emergency.

In marching to Texas I would respectfully represent that Guaymas will be a much better point of departure than Mazatlan. The roads and country from the former are much better than from the latter, and the distance is but little more. I suppose, however, that the route must depend upon the one taken by the secessionists, if they-should move in this direction. If they should make no movement hitherward, and the object of my expedition should be to recover and hold Texas, I would respectfully suggest whether it would not be a more feasible plan to take my command by sea to some point in Texas, there to meet such an additional force from the North as the commanding general might think necessary. This plan would give me the necessary munitions, which it would be impossible for me to carry across the continent; besides this, a march at the usual rate across those deserts would unevitably unfit volunteers for some time for efficient service in the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., August 30, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: From information this day received I have thought it advisable to order the two companies of dragoons from Los Angeles to this place. Although authorized to withdraw more, if necessary, I am in hopes that the mounted troops will suffice. I have been informed that the secessionists contemplated attacking my command while en route to this place, but as we were here much sooner than expected the secessionists were not prepared. I have also been notified that in secret meetings it has been determined to attack my camp on or before Wednesday next, but I hope nothing of the kind will happen. If General Sumner has any instructions to give me please send them by telegraph without delay.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.595}

HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., August 30, 1861-10.30 p.m.

Capt. J. W. DAVIDSON, or COMMANDING OFFICER CAMP FITZGERALD, Near Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: It has been reported to me that forty dragoons are to join the secessionists from your command, and that it has been arranged that they shall leave their companies while watering their horses. I feel it my duty to warn you, in order that none but Union men should be brought to this section of the country, if it can be avoided. When I sent my express to-day I of course knew nothing of the report now communicated to you. The watering place referred to is at or near your camp in Los Angeles. The reported officers your men are to unite with are Captain Kelsey, First Lieutenant Taylor or Major Rollins, and Second Lieut. William Ferguson.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 30, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco:

CAPTAIN: My letter of August 24 will explain what kind of sheds have been erected over the horses. They are paulin sheds stretched on scantling frames. The canvas was to spare in the quartermaster’s department. I shall, however, be more careful in future with regard to any expense, in obedience to the general’s directions. I leave here to-morrow morning accompanied by the U. S. marshal with sixty dragoons for Bear and Holcomb Valleys. I shall turn over the command of this camp to First Lieut. Montgomery Bryant, Sixth Infantry, during my absence, with directions to keep his men in hand pending the election, and in their camp. I shall advise Major Ketchum of where I am going and for what object.

I am, sir, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 31, 1861.

IRA P. RANKIN, Esq., Collector of the Port, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires me to request that you would detain any arms shipped either to ports in the southern part of this State or in the Republic of Mexico on this coast.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant. General.

{p.596}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 31, 1861.

IRA P. RANKIN, Esq., Collector of the Port, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: In addition to the requests contained in former letters the general commanding the department desires you to detain until further notice all powder now in bond, or hereafter arriving at this port, as well as shot, shells, and other munitions of war.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. O. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 31, 1861.

D. W. WELTY, Sacramento:

SIR: The general desires me to say, in answer to your letter of the 30th instant, that the proper course for the Union men to pursue would be to organize into companies of from 80 to 100, select officers, and have a place of general rendezvous, and thus in case of an emergency to assist the Federal officers in sustaining the laws. Should it become necessary to call upon the citizens to aid in thus supporting the General Government, arms can readily be supplied these companies for this purpose. The company should be drilled in conformity with infantry tactics in our service, so that it can act in concert with other organized companies.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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BENICIA ARSENAL, August 31, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Headquarters California Volunteers, San Francisco:

SIR: Your telegraph of the 26th instant has been complied with. The ammunition for your command is nearly ready. Any change in the arm with which you are furnished would render it necessary to commence the manufacture of it ab initio. You wrote me under date of 26th instant to send down the arms, &c., for cavalry, invoicing the same to Lieutenant-Colonel Davis, which, as far as the stores at this arsenal would allow, has been also complied with. I would respectfully recommend that this arrangement be continued, and that Colonel Davis take a receipt in form from the captain of each company for the arms and equipments he receives for his entire company. We will then charge the stores to the company commanders. These company receipts are to be made out to Theodore J. Eckerson, military store-keeper of ordinance. Colonel West has adopted this plan, and it is much the simplest. I sent down to Colonel Davis a traveling forge and a set of saddler’s tools on Saturday with some horse equipments. I send down to-night twenty carbines (new pattern), ten for each company, with their equipments and accouterments. When we receive the stores from Vancouver we can issue the remainder. I can forward the {p.597} Colt pistols, navy pattern, if they are desired. The rifles are on hand at this arsenal.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MCALLISTER, Captain of Ordnance, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., August 31, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco:

CAPTAIN: As stated in my letter of the 30th instant, I left here this morning, in company with the U. S. marshal, with sixty dragoons. The inclosed letter overtook me on the road, with orders to go to San Bernardino with my squadron.* I shall leave in obedience to this at 1 o’clock, and by judicious riding be in San Bernardino to-morrow. I shall take with me a howitzer, covered in a wagon, to leave with Major Ketchum, should he desire it. As I am well advised through the Union Club here, and through spies, of all moves of the secessionists, and would know at least some days beforehand of a contemplated attack either here or at San Bernardino, I place no reliance upon the report. I shall leave my tents standing in my camp, but in obedience to the major’s orders report to him, taking with me 1 officer, 90 men and horses, 1 gun, 10 days’ provisions, and 6,000 rounds of ammunition. The depot quartermaster has gone over to San Bernardino, which cripples nine a little, but I can get two public wagons. These will be enough, and there is not, I understand, a month’s supply of subsistence at the depot to take with me, though the major wishes me to do so. I pray the secessionists may attack me on the road, if they are after anybody. I think my ninety dragoons can give a good account of themselves, as we were going into Holcomb with sixty. I shall still have the marshal with me, and urge the major to permit me to execute the general’s directions about the deserters in Holcomb. Bryant is left in command here. He is a good officer, clear head, and will keep matters straight on election day.

I am, captain, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

* Not found as an inclosure.

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FORT TER-WAW, CAL., August 31, 1861.

Maj. RICHARD C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: In accordance with the direction of the general commanding, I have the honor to report my arrival at this post on the 28th ultimo [instant], and its occupation by Company C, Fourth Infantry. I found upon my arrival at Crescent City that the stock of barley (11,000 pounds) left by Lieutenant Turner in charge of Mr. Snider had been sold and transported to Crescent City; also two wagons. I have re-purchased one of the wagons and contracted for a supply of grain to be delivered here (10,000 pounds). I found nothing worth taking up on my returns of the property left by Lieutenant Turner except two {p.598} stoves and two pairs of andirons and a whale-boat, which will serve our purposes for a time. Apart from the item of transportation ($25 to $30 per ton from Crescent City), this post is not an expensive one to keep up. Half the forage allowance will be sufficient, and fine beef-cattle can be purchased on the hoof from responsible parties for 5 cents or less. The Indian population are quiet and well disposed. Mr. Snider found no difficulty, I believe, in preserving and turning over to me in good order the buildings, garden, &c. There are no post records left behind.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. C. HUNT, Captain, Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., August 31, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Circumstances may render it necessary for me to call for a few volunteers, and in order to be prepared to muster them in properly I will thank you for muster-rolls, &c., or any instructions on the subject which will enable me to act knowingly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., August 31, 1861.

Col. B. L. BEALL, First Dragoons, Commanding District of Oregon:

SIR: The general commanding the department has reason to fear that in the event of volunteers being called for from the State of Oregon, agreeably to the authority granted from these headquarters, the officers selected may not possess that character for loyalty to the General Government essentially necessary in those occupying so important a position. Should you think it necessary to call into service a force for the object indicated in former letters from any portion of your district, the general is particularly desirous that no one should be mustered into service “about whose loyalty to the National Government there is the shadow of a doubt.”

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, August 31, 1861.

Messrs. B. J. PINGREE, GEORGE H. BELDEN, and others, Eugene City, Lane County, Oreg.:

GENTLEMEN: I am directed by the general commanding the department to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 22d instant, and to say in reply that the commander of the District of Oregon has been authorized, should there exist a necessity for so doing, to muster into service a sufficient volunteer force for the protection of the {p.599} remote settlements therein against incursions of hostile Indians. By this day’s mail he will receive further instructions to exercise great caution in the examination of the persons selected as officers for this force and under no circumstances to accept the services of anyone “about whose loyalty to the National Government there is the shadow of a doubt.” This, the general thinks, will frustrate any plans on the part of the secessionists to place their friends in positions dangerous to the State. The general highly approves of the position for the formation of companies of home guards, and would suggest that in every community an organization of this character should be formed, consisting of from 80 to 100 men, select their officers, have a general place of rendezvous, and drill at such times most convenient to the citizens. Should an emergency arise making it necessary to call upon the citizens on this coast to thus assist in maintaining the authority of our Government, these companies would possess sufficient instruction to act in concert with the regular or volunteer forces. There will be no difficulty in supplying arms to the loyal citizens, and when the time arrives they will be promptly furnished. As no copy of the laws passed at the recent session of Congress has been received here, there is consequently no knowledge of how far they may strengthen the hands of the civil or military officers. The general would suggest that a strict watch be kept upon the individuals most suspected and to ascertain where the arms alluded to are kept, so that at the proper time possession can be taken of them. Your suggestions with reference to the disposition of the regular force in the District of Oregon will be properly considered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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PLEASANT HILL, GREG., September 1, 1861.

Col. G. WRIGHT, Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: From reports from persons residing east of the Cascade Mountains it would seem there are fears of a general outbreak of the Indians inhabiting that section of country. A combination of these Indians for the purpose of a war upon the whites would at this time be very disastrous to both Oregon and Washington Territory. I, of course, feel much solicitude in this matter, and have proposed to visit The Dalles at an early day and obtain such information touching the hostile sentiments of the Indians as may be elicited at that place. I have, however, thought it proper to address you this note and respectfully inquire whether the forces under your command are sufficient to force these Indians to keep the peace, and if the country may rely upon your action for protection.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

JOHN WHITEAKER.

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FORT CASCADES, WASH. TER., September 1, 1861.

First Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: For the information of the colonel commanding the district I have the honor to report that I have caused the Cascade Indians to {p.600} move from the Upper to the Lower Cascade, in order that I might keep a more strict surveillance over their movements and actions, and also over the movements of any strange Indians who might visit them. I have established one non-commissioned officer and ten men at the Upper Cascades, on the south side. All public as well as private stores now pass over the road on the south side, which has therefore now become the most important. The works on this side are of such magnitude that the railroad on the north side will seldom, if ever, be used again. I am informed that the citizens on the north side are quite well supplied with arms and ammunition, and as they have the block-house near at hand I consider them perfectly safe. If there is any danger to be apprehended, I should look for it on the south side, and particularly should I look for it there if no troops were present. These considerations have induced me to establish my party on this side. By means of boats I shall have easy access to the Oregon side at all times, and constant communication will be kept up between the commands.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JAS. VAN VOAST, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 2, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Los Angeles, Cal.:

Two companies of the Sixth Infantry at Los Angeles will proceed without delay to Fort Yuma.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 2, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to inform you that telegraphic orders have this day been sent to Los Angeles directing the two companies of infantry at that point to proceed immediately to Fort Yuma. In thus complying with your request the general considers that your command will be sufficiently strong to resist successfully any attack that may be made. At all events, under no circumstances whatever will any regular force in this military department surrender to the rebels. The position of the force sent you (being the only available one) made it necessary to send it overland to save time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, Cal., September 2, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: The first requisition made upon this State for 1,500 volunteers has been filled and the command given to Colonel Carleton. It having {p.601} been intimated by the War Department that it was your desire that this officer should have the command, I cheerfully complied, as I had every confidence in his experience, patriotism, and gallantry. I would now represent to your Excellency that the command of this expedition to Utah is a most important one, and will embrace a jurisdiction of some 1,500 miles. As colonel, he will have command of the First California Infantry and the First California Cavalry, being more than a colonel’s command and less than that of a brigadier. I would respectfully ask, on behalf of the State, that this be created a separate department, and that Colonel Carleton be appointed brigadier-general of this brigade. I trust you will at once see the benefits that will result from this course. As it is remote from headquarters on the Pacific, and being subject to have all communications cut off for four months in the year by snows, the officer in command of this department should be invested with ample power to act as circumstances might require. Besides, California has not yet been honored with a military appointment of this rank, and should your Excellency deem it advisable to accede to this request, I know of no man more deserving than Colonel Carleton, nor one who would reflect more credit upon the State, or give more satisfaction to the General Government.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 2, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor State of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

GOVERNOR: I would respectfully and earnestly request that you will push forward as rapidly as possible the raising of the five regiments called for by the Government.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 2, 1861.

Maj. WILLIAM S. KETCHUM, Fourth Infantry, Commanding at San Bernardino, Cal.:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to inform you that necessity has compelled the withdrawal of two companies of infantry at Los Angeles for service at Fort Yuma. The squadron of dragoons still at that point will, the general hopes, enable you to sustain the authority of the Government and protect the public property.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 2, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Captain Davidson’s command of dragoons reached this place this day. In my opinion circumstances require that I should detain {p.602} him at this place until after the election, when, unless disappointed in my expectations, he can carry out such instructions as he may have received from department headquarters. I am much in want of a good physician, company officers, and recruits.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, September 2, 1861-3.45 p.m.

Col. B. L. BEALL, First Cavalry, Fort Vancouver: (Via Yreka.)

The horses and horse equipments pertaining to Whittlesey’s company will be turned over to the company of Oregon volunteers. The dragoon horses and horse equipments belonging to the company at Walla Walla will be brought to the city. Recall the detachment at Warm Springs.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, Cal., September 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge your telegraph dispatches of August 14 and 15, the former being a requisition for four regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, and the latter recommending General D. D. Colton as colonel of cavalry. I received the above dispatches on August 23, and on the 24th issued my proclamation, as you will see above [following]. The first requisition for one regiment of infantry and five companies of cavalry is now complete, and I have no doubt that after the election (September 4) the last requisition will also be filled. I have tendered the colonelcy of the second regiment of cavalry to General D. D. Colton, as you desired, and he has accepted the same and will soon be on active duty. I have also the honor to acknowledge the receipt this day of your letter by pony express, being a duplicate of the requisition sent by telegraph.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor.

[Inclosure.]

PROCLAMATION.

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, Executive Department:

Whereas, by an additional communication from the Secretary of War, bearing date August 14, A. D. 1861, to the Executive of this State directed, the President of the United States has called for four regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry, to be placed at the disposal of Brig. Gen. E. V. Sumner, U. S. Army, “organized, equipped, and mustered into service by the State of California, such call being made in pursuance of the act of Congress passed July 19, 1861, entitled ‘An act to authorize the employment of volunteers to aid in enforcing the laws and protecting public property:’”

Now, therefore, I, John G. Downey, Governor of the State of California, and commander-in-chief of the militia, &c., of the same, do {p.603} hereby authorize and call upon the citizens, as many as shall be necessary to fill up the preceding requisition, to immediately forum and organize themselves into “volunteer companies,” in accordance with the directions and requirements stated in sections 17, 18, and 19 of the statutes of this State, entitled “An act in relation to the militia of the State,” approved May 9, 1861. Said companies will be accepted and mustered into service according to the priority of the receipt by the adjutant-general of the State of the certificate of organization mentioned in section 18 of said act and reported by that officer to the commander-in-chief; the infantry companies to consist of any number between 88 and 101, and the cavalry companies of any number between 79 and 95, officers inclusive; the commissioned officers of each company to consist of one captain, one first lieutenant, and one second lieutenant. The commander-in-chief will proceed forthwith to organize the regiments aforesaid out of said companies according to their priority and in conformity to law.

While the act of Congress aforesaid requires “the governors of States furnishing volunteers to commission the field, staff and company officers requisite,” the commander-in-chief will in all cases give preference to the officers elected by the respective companies, provided that they are competent and pass examination before the military board already appointed by the United States officer commanding Pacific Division, San Francisco. Volunteer companies already organized and commissioned are expected to report forthwith to the adjutant-general, tendering their services to meet the requirements of this proclamation. Companies tendering their services will expressly state whether they are infantry or cavalry.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the great seal of State to be affixed. Done at Sacramento, Cal., this 23d day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one.

[SEAL.]

JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor.

Attest:

JOHNSON PRICE, Secretary of State.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 20.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 3, 1861.

No Federal troops in the Department of the Pacific will ever surrender to rebels.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 3, 1861.

Lieut. MONTGOMERY BRYANT, Los Angeles, Cal.:

The camp will not be abandoned. If Company K is without an officer, direct Lieutenant McKee to assume command of camp until Davidson returns. Report the time of your departure for Yuma.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.604}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 3, 1861.

Capt. R. O. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: Colonel Beall is here, but I have not yet transferred to him my command. He is totally unacquainted with affairs in this district, and it is of importance that before relinquishing the command I should put in a train of execution all the recent orders and instructions from department headquarters. Nothing of interest in relation to our Indian affairs has transpired since I last addressed you. The disposition I have made of the troops will, I think, check the disaffected and preserve peace. I have been quite indisposed for several days, and had it not been a military necessity for me to defer my departure for San Francisco [sic]; yet I have not been well enough to travel under any circumstances. I am now better, and hope to report at department headquarters on the return of the steamer which succeeds the Cortez.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, September 4, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army:

GENERAL: Your favor of yesterday is received. It will afford me much gratification to commission your son, E. V. Sumner, jr. You will please indicate what regiment you desire him to be attached to. The companies for the new cavalry regiment are filling up and will begin to report at headquarters next week. As soon as Colonel Carleton’s command is full they should move off and make room for the new regiment that will be coming in. I wish that you would see that the companies now filled (both infantry and cavalry) would be named in the order they are to stand in their regiments. I desire this, that the commissions may issue to the officers, and that we can keep our record in this office as the commissions issue. For instance, the first company filled let it be called Company A, First Regiment California Volunteers. So with the cavalry. In this way we will avoid giving floating commissions to captains and lieutenants who may never fill their companies or take any interest in so doing. Even if this course indicated should be a departure from the usual army regulation, it will work well in this instance and prevent confusion; besides, it will create a competition among the several officers insuring that their companies are first filled. I would suggest, general, that among all the colonelcies that are spoken of there will be none who will need the experience of an army officer for second in command, as that of Lippitt’s. You will find this out before you are many days in the field. I got my information from those who served with him before, and am, I assure you, entirely unprejudiced in the matter; but as you will have control of the expedition I suppose you will be particular in inquiring into the capacity of those under your command.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

Please inform me if Colonel Carleton’s command will accompany you.

J. G. D.

{p.605}

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., September 4, 1861.

Governor JOHN G. DOWNEY, Sacramento City:

Cavalry company organized and reported at Yreka September 4. Signed Charles McDermit. This company had better be ordered to report to Colonel Colton, in this city, immediately.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, September 5, 1861.

[Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER:]

GENERAL: In reply to your interrogatories of yesterday concerning the roads by which a force could be marched through Mexico to Texas, I have to reply that the only practicable one within my knowledge is that from San Blas by Tepic, Guadalajara, and Queretaro. The road from Mazatlan northward by Durango is impassable for wheeled vehicles. That from Guaymas might be traveled, though the scarcity of water would present an almost insurmountable difficulty to an army. By Guaymas, admitting its practicability, you would reach El Paso, but from that point to the settlements of Texas-say San Antonio-you would meet with very great difficulties with a large command, and an insignificant force would easily cut off your supplies, which could only be kept up by trains traveling over an inhospitable desert infested with hostile Indians and at incalculable expenditure of money. In fact, I see no way, if Texas is to be attacked from this side, except that of passing through the most thickly settled portion of Mexico, if she will permit it, where supplies could be obtained with ease and at reasonable rates, and entering Texas from the Mexican territory near some safe harbor in the Gulf, where a fleet of steamers would co-operate with you from the Northern States. My knowledge of the country enables me to assert with confidence that a large force-say 5,000 men-cannot march from here by the Gila on Texas and keep up its supplies, nor by Guaymas and El Paso, nor by Mazatlan and Durango. Either of these roads would bring you to New Mexico, and between that and the Gulf it would be impossible, except at an enormous expense, to keep your supplies up or your communications open.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. F. BEALE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 165.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 5, 1861.

1. On the authority of the General-in-Chief, Company L, Third Artillery (Captain Judd’s) will be mounted and equipped as a field battery of artillery. Captain Judd will immediately make out and send to these headquarters the necessary requisitions on the quartermaster’s and ordinance departments.

2. The detachment of Company L, Third Artillery, under command of Lieut. M. D. Hardin, at Fort Umpqua, will be relieved without delay by a detachment to consist of ten privates and two non-commissioned officers, under the command of a subaltern to be selected by Colonel Seawell from the companies of the Sixth Regiment of Infantry at Benicia Barracks. When relieved Lieutenant Hardin will proceed with this {p.606} detachment to join their company at Benicia. The quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 5, 1861.

Maj. W. S. KETCHUM, Commanding San Bernardino, Cal.:

An exigency has made it necessary to send the two infantry companies from Los Angeles to Fort Yuma. If you think it necessary send a part of your command to replace them.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 5, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Yesterday was election day, which passed off at San Bernardino with one or two displays of secession sentiments, which were promptly checked by the show of a portion of the dragoons under Captain Davidson. The citizens of San Bernardino have expressed the belief that the measures taken by the general and the arrangements made by myself prevented great trouble, if not much bloodshed. Bogart, the secession candidate for the State senate, is without doubt elected; also other secessionists for various offices. Captain Davidson left this day at 3 p.m., strengthened by Company F, Fourth Infantry, to execute your instructions, which being executed he will return via this place to his station at Los Angeles. I directed the captain not to divide his command, and be on his guard so as not to be taken by surprise by the disaffected people of this section of the country. The secessionists are much more numerous than the Union men in this section of the country, and have talked so much and made so many threats that the Union men were most of them afraid to make known their sentiments. I have been informed that my command arrived about two weeks too soon for the secessionists, and I am satisfied that the sudden and unexpected appearance of the dragoons had a very beneficial effect. I sent to department headquarters the last of the papers placed in my hands for perusal by General Sumner by express to Los Angeles through the commander of said post, who has reported that he forwarded them through the express office. I hope they reached department headquarters safely. Said papers were inclosed in a sealed envelope addressed to yourself; hence I presume that their contents were unknown to any person in this section of the country except myself and the writer thereof. The residue of the papers were returned by Captain Sands, of the Active.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.607}

SEPTEMBER 6, 1861.-The telegraphic dispatch of yesterday was received to-day. Unless circumstances should prevent, the dragoons will return to Los Angeles after visiting Bear and Holcomb Valleys.

W. S. K.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 5, 1861.

Capt. JOHN W. DAVIDSON, First Regiment Dragoons, Commanding Camp Fitzgerald, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has learned with astonishment that you departed from the instructions contained in the letter from these headquarters on the 23d ultimo, wherein you were specially directed to take with you on the expedition authorized one strong company of dragoons. Subsequent to that date an important movement was ordered, and knowing that one of the dragoon companies was still at that point, the two companies of infantry were ordered to Fort Yuma on very important service, thus leaving a sufficient force to protect the public property in camp and at the depot. The strict observance of all instructions and orders is at all times absolutely necessary. Now more than ever is the necessity of this impressed upon you. Should any evil results attend the noncompliance with orders you have received, you of course perceive that you will be accountable.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, HEADQUARTERS MILITIA, OFFICE ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Sacramento, September 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: A report having reached hear that James W. Denver, of California, has been appointed and commissioned as a brigadier-general, U. S. Army, to command the troops to be raised in this State, I deem it my duty as a Union man to give you the status occupied by him in the estimation of all true Union men in this State, and especially of those who have manifested their patriotism and loyalty by volunteering their services for the war. Many of the officers who have been mustered into the service openly declare that if General Denver assumes the command over them that they will at once resign; that they have not only no confidence in his loyalty, but on the contrary they believe him to be at least a sympathizer with the rebel cause and opposed to the war, and also that he is totally unfitted in point of military skill or experience to command a brigade. One of their reasons for doubting his loyalty is founded upon a letter of his recently published in a secession paper in this State (the Marysville Express), an extract of which is herewith inclosed, and to which I call your attention. Its authenticity is undoubted. The Union men of this State, who to the number of 90,000 did on the 4th instant pledge the State of California to the support of the Union and the Administration, are surprised and pained beyond measure by the report that this man has been commissioned a brigadier-general. They are utterly at a loss to know why this appointment was conferred upon him, and I know it is {p.608} indeed quite unacceptable to them. We are endeavoring to fill up the six regiments called for from this State, and I assure you that this report has proved our greatest obstacle. This letter is written in haste and only in pursuance of a duty I owe to our common cause and country, and of course not intended to be made public, but only to call your attention and that of the President to a fatal mistake which has been made, i.e., if it is intended that General Denver shall command California Volunteers.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

WM. C. KIBBE, Adjutant-General, State of California.

[Inclosure.]

THE WAYS OF THE POLITICIANS.

General Denver is a lucky man. Something is always turning up for his benefit. Wherever he goes he finds office. He was secretary of state under John Bigler for a long time. He was then sent to Congress by the wing of the Democratic party that was opposed to Bigler and his followers. After serving his term in Congress he was appointed Commissioner of something-of the Interior, we believe-but subsequently gave it up for the governorship of Kansas. In 1859 he returned to this State and at once became a candidate for the Senate, but was beaten by Latham. In 1860 he espoused the cause of Douglas, and wrote a letter for the purpose of proving that he was the regular nominee. In 1861 he was the candidate for a time of the Breckinridge party for the Senate of the United States, but was finally beaten by McDougall. Nothing daunted however, the general pressed forward, and was elected a commissioner to settle our new Indian war debt; wrote a strong Union letter to do away with the effects of his affiliation with the Breckinridgers, and proceeded to Washington. From that point he wrote a letter to his brother in Sacramento, of which the following is a copy:

ABINGDON, OHIO, July 30, 1861.

DEAR FRANK: I wrote to Arthur several days ago, and expected to have been in Washington by this time and to have written you thence, but the news from there deterred me from making too much haste where nothing was to be gained by it. Ere you receive this you will have heard of the battles of Bull Run and Manassas Junction. The U. S. troops under McDowell, from some cause, took a stampede, seemingly at the very moment victory was in their hands. The Confederate loss has been, according to their own account, quite as heavy as the Federal; but no matter what may have been said, they have won a great victory. The war engrosses the attention of everybody here. Business of every kind is at a standstill; mechanics have little or nothing to do; farmers can find no market for their produce; horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs are a drug at half last year’s prices, while all articles of import and manufactures of wool and cotton are greatly increased in value. The necessaries of life, or such as have become necessary by common use, such as coffee, tea, and sugar, have had the new tariff put upon them, while there is a positive certainty that the taxes will be doubled for the ensuing year. How the people are to meet these extraordinary demands, God only knows, for they have not been able to pay up all the taxes for the current year. Before the end of the present year the interest on the national debt alone will be very little, if anything, short of $50,000,000. The necessary expenses aside from the Army will be as much more. These must be met by duties on imports, by direct taxation, and by the thousand other modes resorted to in Europe, but never before known in this country, to squeeze money out of the people. From present appearances we are to be as tax-ridden a people as the subjects of Britain. If we succeed in getting out of our present difficulties, indeed, with as much freedom as is enjoyed by English subjects, we may deem ourselves happy. On every side disaster stares us in the face; a most formidable rebellion, an executive usurpation of power, a venal and subservient Congress; a bankrupt Treasury; an enormous debt, pecuniary ruin among the people, and great danger of the free Government given us by our fathers being turned into a military despotism.

{p.609}

Following upon the heels of this letter we have news of his appointment as brigadier-general in the Army of the United States. It is not yet known whether he will accept the position or not, but after the language above used, we do not see how he can. If he enters the Army he will have to uphold the “executive usurpation of power,” of which he complains, and carry out, without question, the behests of that Congress which he has pronounced “venal and subservient.” We do not hazard much when we say that if the Government was aware of the sentiments expressed in the above letter the appointment would never have been tendered to him. The general has heretofore been very expert at letter writing, but we are afraid that in this one he has used himself up. His fate is only that of thousands which have preceded him. Before this, letter writing has laid many a politician on the shelf.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

ANOTHER DOUGLAS DEMOCRAT SHOWING HIS HAND.

General Denver, an aspirant for the U. S. senatorship on the Douglas ticket, who a short time ago wrote a letter in California in favor of the forcible suppression of the rebellion, now writes from Ohio, according to a letter to his brother which the Marysville Express publishes, bewailing the war, calling Lincoln a usurper of power, the Congress venal and subservient, and free government in danger of being converted into a military despotism. There’s another nice Douglas Democrat for you! (Columbia Weekly Times, August 29, 1861.)

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, September 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army:

GENERAL: Your letter of yesterday is received. I should have immediately acceded to your request in regard to Maj. A. J. Smith, but on the receipt of General Carleton’s telegram I wrote Lieut. John Kellogg, inasmuch as he had been favorably mentioned by yourself and General Carleton. From the moment you informed me that you were going to take command in person of this expedition I have been animated but with one desire, and that to give you officers of your own choice. It I have varied at all from this, it was for the purpose of facilitating the prompt raising of the men and to prevent any dissatisfaction on the part of the militia officers who were anxious to enter upon active service. Your suggestions in regard to fixing the different rendezvous is excellent, and will be carried out. I am preparing an order to that effect, and only await your determination in regard to the cavalry regiment. You can rest assured I will render you every aid in my power to make the California troops creditable to the State and pleasing to the general commanding.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., September 6, 1861.

Governor J. G. DOWNEY, Sacramento City, Cal.:

The appointment of Maj. A. J. Smith, of the First Dragoons, as colonel of cavalry would be much the best one for the service. Lieutenant {p.610} Kellogg is not a cavalry officer; he would make an excellent lieutenant-colonel of infantry. The other two appointments I should be well satisfied with.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 7, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: Since my letter to you of the 30th ultimo the Union party has triumphed in the election, which makes things much safer here. There are about 20,000 secession voters in this State, and the dissolute and loose portion of this party are congregating in some force in the southern counties, in the hope of receiving support from Texas. I am re-enforcing the regular troops in that quarter as speedily as possible, in order to check this movement. The great and unaccountable success in Arizona and New Mexico will no doubt embolden them, and it is by no means certain that they will not make some attempt in this direction, and if they should ever get an organized force into this State as a rallying point for all the secession element, it would inevitably inaugurate a civil war here immediately. I stated to you that I thought Guaymas would be a better point of departure from this coast than Mazatlan. This was on the supposition that I was to enter Texas on the northwestern border. I find on further inquiry that this route would be next to impracticable with a large force for the want of water, grass, &c. I fitted out General Kearny’s command of 100 men on the Rio Grande in the fall of 1846. I gave him the best of everything in the regiment, and yet when he arrived on this coast this small force was completely broken down and unable to contend successfully with the Californians who attacked him. If the object of the march is to move through Mexico and reach Texas low down on the Rio Grande, the best point of departure would be San Blas. I inclose a letter from Mr. Beale, the surveyor-general of this State.* His knowledge of Mexico is founded on his having actually traveled over it, and he is a sensible and reliable man. From Guadalajara I could make my way north, but it would be a very long and severe march, and with all the care I could take I could not feel sure of having an army of volunteers in fighting order when I reached Texas. I am, however, prepared to undertake it, and if it is not impossible the object of the expedition will be attained. I took the liberty in my last letter of suggesting whether it would not be better to take my command by sea to some point in Texas, there to be joined by a force from the North with all the necessary munitions, &c. If the main object of the expedition is to recover Texas, I would respectfully ask the General-in-Chief to reconsider this matter for a moment. I should feel great confidence in such an expedition, and I believe, with the additional force the general would give me, that I could recover and hold Texas, and thus make an important diversion in favor of the operations on the Mississippi. This plan would also have another great advantage. It would keep the troops here for some time while undergoing the necessary discipline, and still I should reach Texas much sooner than by the overland route. I think the presence of these troops {p.611} here for a time would put down this restless and unscrupulous secession party, and prevent any attempt from Texas.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* See Beale to Sumner, September 5, p. 605.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 7, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth Regiment Infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires me to say, in reply to your letter of the 25th ultimo, that Company C, of the Sixth, cannot for the present be relieved from duty at Fort Yuma. The general desires you to use every precaution to secure the safety of your command, and particularly the reliability of the troops. To assist you in the accomplishment of the latter, the general directs me to say that you will be sustained in any stringent measures you may think it necessary to take.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter., September 7, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that information was telegraphed me yesterday from Virginia City that a party of seventy emigrants had been robbed by the Indians somewhere this side of Salt Lake and were left entirely destitute and starving. I immediately sent out a party of dragoons under the command of Lieutenant Baker, First Dragoons, with a supply of provisions to assist them and enable them to reach the settlements, and would respectfully ask the approval of the general commanding the department to the issues made them, as well as what more may be necessary for their immediate wants. A further report will be made on the return of Lieutenant Baker. I learn that the citizens of Virginia City have also sent out provisions and clothing, as they were expected to reach the sink of the Humboldt last evening.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 8, 1861.

Capt. DAVID A. RUSSELL, Fourth Infantry, Presidio, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I wish you to have all your command and baggage on the wharf at the Point at 9 o’clock precisely to-morrow morning to embark on the Active. On your arrival at San Pedro procure the necessary {p.612} transportation, and proceed without delay to San Bernardino and report to Major Ketchum.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 8, 1861.

Maj. WILLIAM SCOTT KETCHUM, Fourth infantry, Commanding San Bernardino, Cal.:

MAJOR: I send Captain Russell down with the remainder of your regiment. Make such disposition of these troops as you think best to make everything secure. If we find they are advancing from Arizona I shall send down a large force at once. You may think it necessary to send one or two companies to Los Angeles to replace those sent to Fort Yuma.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 8, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Captain Davidson returned to this place yesterday with his entire command, and leaving Company F, Fourth Infantry, here, proceeded to Los Angeles without visiting Bear and Holcomb Valleys. As I was not advised by department headquarters of the nature of the instructions under which Captain Davidson acted, I cannot of course say whether he carried them out or not. Captain Davidson left my camp with his dragoons and Company F, Fourth Infantry, on the 5th instant with six days’ provisions, and, much to my surprise, returned on the 7th instant, on which latter-mentioned date, I have been informed, some disguised persons fired upon a party en route to the mines in Santa Aña Cañon, killing one man named Stemper, and wounding another named Bogan. A man by the name of Green, a clerk for Sylvester, at Holcomb Valley, and another man named John Fuller, an expressman, are reported as missing. I have been told that Stemper had $1,300 or more in gold dust about his person. The horse of the expressman, Mr. Mogo, of Holcomb Valley, says, has been seen, but Fuller and Green have not yet been heard of. Mr. Mogo is also of the opinion that had Captain Davidson proceeded on to Holcomb Valley he would not have been far from the place where the party was attacked. The depredation is represented to have been committed between 9 and 10 a.m. on the 7th instant between Deer Creek and Trip’s Station, about five miles this side of Deer Creek and seven miles the other side of Trip’s. As Captain Davidson started for Bear and Holcomb Valleys, I regret that he did not visit them, as his party was 125 strong. The mere show of such a force in such places would, in my opinion, have had a beneficial effect.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.613}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Lieutenant-General Scott with the assent of the Secretary of War, directs that you suspend preparations for the expedition against Western Texas, via Mazatlan. Instructions will be sent you by the next mail for other purposes. Prepare the regular troops, except four companies of artillery, to come by steam to New York. Two regiments of volunteers will replace the regulars.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 9, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: The Governor of California has given the following appointments to officers of the Army, and as their services will be of the utmost importance in the volunteers, I would respectfully ask the sanction of the General-in-Chief: Maj. A. J. Smith, First U. S. Cavalry, to be colonel of the Second Regiment of Cavalry; Capt. H. M. Judah, Fourth Infantry, to be colonel Second Regiment of Infantry; First Lieut. Benjamin F. Davis, First U. S. Cavalry, to be lieutenant-colonel (Battalion) First Regiment Cavalry; First Lieut. John Kellogg, Third Artillery, to be lieutenant-colonel Regiment of Infantry; Second Lieut. E. V. Sumner, jr., First U. S. Cavalry, to be major Second Regiment of Cavalry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

P. S.-Bvt. Maj. J. H. Carleton, First Cavalry, was appointed colonel at the request of the Secretary of War.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY, September 28, 1861.

Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant-General, by direction of the General-in-Chief.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Second indorsement.]

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, September 30, 1861.

Respectfully forwarded to the Honorable Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 9, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor of the State of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

GOVERNOR: I have received your letter of the 6th instant in relation to the Indians in Trinity County. I doubt very much these Indian {p.614} reports. If twenty-five men would be a sufficient protection, it certainly would seem that those people should take care of themselves just at this time when we have so much on our hands. It is impossible to send regular troops there now, as I am obliged to re-enforce the troops in the southern part of the State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., September 9, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: After executing Major Ketchum’s instructions, reported to you in my letter of the 31st ultimo, I started for Holcomb Valley on the evening of the 5th instant, with a company of infantry in addition to my force, but the information which I received during the night of the 5th and morning of the 6th determined me to retrace my steps and move in all haste to Los Angeles. The deserters had gotten news of my march. My examination of the road proved it to be far more difficult for troops than had been reported, and the prosecution of the trip would have involved some eight more days’ absence from Los Angeles than I anticipated. Both the marshal and myself agreed that more important interests might be periled at Los Angeles during such absence than good could possibly be done. The information was to the effect that the secessionists had been leaving Holcomb Valley in small parties-where to was unknown; that the design was to concentrate and rob the valleys of San Bernardino and Los Angeles; that the point of concentration was on the Mojave, where some had already arrived; that these parties after concentrating were to move into Sonora; that they were in correspondence with one Ramirez, formerly editor of the Clamor Publico, in this county, and who now edits a paper either in Hermosillo or Guaymas; that provisions were being put on the road to Warner’s ranch for them, and that one of their expressmen had stated at a station on the road to Holcomb that matters were getting ripe in Los Angeles; that the commanding officer there was all right. (To whom this referred I do not know, but the report would do them as much good as the fact.) These things, weighed with the withdrawal of the two infantry companies from Los Angeles, determined me to return at once, and I sincerely hope the general will approve the step. I arrived here on the 8th. Bryant left on the 9th. The day of the election at San Bernardino I was directed by Major Ketchum to keep my squadron in hand near town to repress disorder, and not to leave until after the polls were closed. At sundown I drove up alone to the polls in a buggy, having been ill all day, and asked the inspector if they were closed. He replied that in a few minutes he would announce it. Meantime many persons gathered around my buggy (there were 200 or 300 people still near the polls), having sticks in their hands, and commenced shouting: “Hurrah for Jeff. Davis! Hurrah for the Southern Confederacy!” Most of the persons had revolvers. One of them said that if the Union men felt themselves stronger there that day, they could beat them robbing and burning any day. I rose up in my buggy and called the attention of the people to the fact that there were men in their midst who openly avowed them selves robbers and house-burners, and gave comfort and heart to the enemies of the country by their shouts, and then turning through the {p.615} crowd I drove over one man I believe, went down to my camp about 300 yards off, where the squadron was standing to horse, and brought up a platoon of dragoons, and riding into the crowd, stated that I would seize any one who uttered the same cry named above. I told them that free discussion was one thing, and the utterance of treasonable language another; that these men had expressed their opinions in the ballot-box that day, but that openly hurrahing for the Southern Confederacy was seditious, and I, as a Federal officer, was bound to put it down. The Union men, who up to this time had not opened their months, then cheered the Federal Government, the Jeff. Davis men slunk away from the crowd, and during the revulsion of feeling I marched my men away. It was a novel position. I hope it will be approved, but I felt I must submit to the defiance and dishearten the Union men, or take the bull by the horns and show them that such conduct will not be, I trust, tolerated in this State. Please write me if I am correct. I am sadly off for at least one intelligent, earnest officer in this squadron. Cannot one be sent down? It is my bounden duty to inform the general that, if anything should occur to me, the squadron would fall into indifferent hands.

I am, captain, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Dragoons, Commanding.

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, September 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army:

GENERAL: I have organized the regiments as follows in annexed schedule,* and fixed their regimental headquarters. I trust it will meet your approval, as I am sure the appointments and localities to which they are assigned will promote the speedy completion of the force called for by the Department. If the field officers can be authorized to examine the officers of the companies it would greatly facilitate matters, as captains and lieutenants cannot well afford to visit San Francisco upon a contingency of their passing the board. The regiments are now arranged as you desired, with the exception of Lieut. John Kellogg, and I had to make this change in the programme on account of your desiring the appointment of Capt. A. J. Smith to command the Second Cavalry Regiment. It has taken some time to make the selection, but there is nothing lost by it, and I doubt exceedingly if there be in the service of the United States, among the volunteers called into active duty, a better officered expedition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 168.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 10, 1861.

1. The regiment of infantry and battalion of cavalry organized for the protection of the overland route will take up their line of march for the plains, under the command of Col. James H. Carleton, on the 20th instant.

2. Col. Thomas Swords, assistant quartermaster, is relieved from duty at these headquarters, and will comply with instructions received from the War Department.

{p.616}

3. Capt. Ralph W. Kirkham, assistant quartermaster, will relieve Colonel Swords as chief quartermaster at these headquarters, and act in that capacity until the arrival of Maj. E. B. Babbitt, same department.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found as an inclosure.

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BENICIA ARSENAL, September 10, 1861.

Colonel CARLETON, First Regiment California Volunteers, San Francisco:

SIR: When I was ordered to equip your cavalry by the 1st of September it would have been impossible to have done so without using the old dragoon saddles. I could not have obtained Mexican saddles for all the men in the short time allowed. I explained to you and the general commanding that these saddles had to be repaired, and was ordered to buy Mexican saddles for the California company alone. Major Grier’s statement that we could not get the old saddles from Oregon in time rendered it necessary to buy another set of Mexican saddles. Thus you have two companies with Mexican saddles and three with Grimsley’s. To fill this requisition I have had to collect everything I had and repair extensively. I expected that the fact of two companies having new saddles and the other three old ones would create discontent, but did not see how to avoid it for want of time allowed me and want of money. The saddles for the Second Regiment of California Volunteers will be ready by the 1st proximo, and if the general sees fit to condemn these saddles because the men would prefer new ones, why, I could issue from that lot. But you must wait until their completion. Now, about the bayonet scabbards. I knew that they were too short for the bayonets, but I believe I told you that all our accouterments on this coast, except those in use by regular troops, were of the old pattern. Mr. Floyd in sending out 10,000 new arms did not see fit to send accouterments, as the former transaction accomplished his object. Among the 10,000 bayonet scabbards on hand at Alcatraz Island some are long and some short. I will try and see what I can do for your command, but some of these very scabbards are being used in the East with this very bayonet in actual warfare, and some of these saddles of which your command complain are bearing soldiers in battle. In times like these the arms and strength should be consulted, and not merely the looks. The Ordnance Department ordered sent home for use 30,000 of the very muskets your troops complained of the other day. If you want the blank cartridges you must get a requisition approved by the general for them, as my supply of musket powder is reduced to a few barrels. All the requisitions forwarded to this arsenal contain a full complement of pistols, from eighty-five to ninety-two for each company. I have only issued sixty, in accordance with the requisition made by you and approved by the general. If you want new saddles you will have to defer leaving until they are ready, which will be about the 1st proximo. When shall I forward the ammunition directed to you at Fort Churchill and Ruby Valley? I believe in the above you will find answers to all your inquiries contained in your three letters.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. MCALLISTER, Captain of Ordnance, Commanding.

{p.617}

HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 10, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: On the 8th instant I informed you what reports had been made to me respecting a party which was attacked while en route to the mines in Holcomb Valley. Mr. Stemper, who was reported killed, was wounded; jumped off his horse and fired four times at his assailants, two in number, who ran off and left him. Mr. Stemper was shot in the thigh through the flesh, and the ball lodged in his wallet in his trousers’ pocket, which saved his life undoubtedly. Mr. Bogan was shot in the shoulder. He is now in San Bernardino and will no doubt recover, as his is a flesh wound only. Mr. Fuller, the expressman, is safe. He jumped off his horse and ran. He thinks those who attacked him secured-his horse. Of this, however, he has no knowledge. Fuller, who returned to San Bernardino, says he saw nine persons in the attacking party, and he thinks there were more from the noises heard by him. Mr. Green, the clerk, is also safe, and is now in Holcomb Valley. He reports that he fought his way through to Deer Creek Station; hence nobody was killed and only two wounded. Constable Saint John took a posse and went in search of the depredators, so I have been informed, but he has not made any arrests yet, although he suspects who were concerned.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 169.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 11, 1861.

The volunteer camp to be established in the vicinity of the Pioneer Race Course will be known as Camp Alert.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 170.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 12, 1861.

1. Major Pollock, California volunteers, having been transferred by the Governor from the First to the Third Regiment California Volunteer Infantry, will proceed to Stockton and report in person to Colonel Connor.

...

5. Capt. John Kellogg, Third Artillery, having been appointed by the Governor of this State colonel of the Fifth Regiment of California Infantry, will be relieved from duty at the Presidio of San Francisco and proceed to organize his regiment at such point as the Governor may designate.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.618}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 12, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have just returned from Fort Dalles. Much alarm existing in the border settlements in consequence of the threatening aspect of our Indian affairs, I have deemed it proper to call on the Governor of Oregon for a company of volunteer cavalry. A copy of my communication to the Governor is herewith inclosed. Not having received any of the recent laws relating to the organization of volunteer forces, I have adhered to the old organization authorized for this country. I have called for the company for three years, unless sooner discharged. My latest advices from Fort Colville, and also from the Nez Percé country, represent everything as quiet. I keep Captain Whittlesey at Fort Dalles. His services are important there to muster in and take charge of the company I have called for. With the company I have called for I think we shall get along very well. It is barely possible that I may have to call on the Governor of Washington Territory for a company for service north of the Columbia River. All is quiet at the Cascades. Captain Van Voast is at that point with his company, occupying both sides of the river.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 12, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN WHITEAKER Governor of the State of Oregon:

SIR: The threatening attitude of the Indian tribes in the country east of the Cascade Mountains having produced much alarm amongst the settlers, causing many of them to abandon their claims, and the regular force under my command having been reduced during the past year by the withdrawal of fourteen companies for service in California, leaving an inadequate number of troops necessary for the protection of the settlements, I have the honor to request that your Excellency will call for one company of volunteer cavalry to be mustered into the service of the United States at Fort Dalles, Oreg., for the period of three years unless sooner discharged. The organization of the company will be one captain, one first lieutenant, one second lieutenant, four sergeants, four corporals, two buglers, one farrier and blacksmith, and seventy-four privates. Every member of the company will be required to furnish his own horse and horse equipments, and will be paid for their use and risk such allowances as are now or may hereafter be established by law. The Government will furnish arms and subsistence when the organization of the company shall have been completed and the company accepted. When fully organized, I request that your Excellency will direct the captain of the company to report to Capt. Joseph H. Whittlesey, of the U. S. Army, at Fort Dalles, who has been ordered to inspect and, if accepted, to administer the oath of allegiance and muster the company into the service of the United States.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, your Excellency’s most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.619}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 12, 1861.

Col. B. L. BEALL, First Dragoons, Fort Vancouver:

COLONEL: I will give you a brief statement of the situation of affairs in this district. Two companies of the Ninth Infantry are posted at Fort Colville, under command of Brevet Major Lugenbeel. Twenty men from each of those companies are with Lieutenant Mullan. At Fort Walla Walla there are three companies of the First Dragoons, under command of Major Steen. One of those companies is temporarily detached in the Nez Percé country. At Fort Dalles is one company of First Dragoons, under Captain Whittlesey, having twenty men detached at the Warm Springs Reservation. At Fort Cascades is one company of the Ninth Infantry, under Captain Van Voast, having twenty men detached under Lieutenant Mullan, and twelve at Fort Dalles. At Fort Vancouver are two companies under Captain Black-twelve men detached at Camp Chehalis. At Fort Hoskins one company under Captain Dent-eleven men detached under Lieutenant Mullan. At Fort Steilacoom two companies under Captain Woodruff-not half full either of them. At San Juan Island one company under Captain English-half full. The present disposition of the troops is believed to be the best that can be made. The companies at the reservations are small and cannot be dispensed with. The companies are generally much reduced and have many men detached. I have called for a company of volunteer cavalry to be mustered in by Captain Whittlesey at Fort Dalles. Captain Whittlesey cannot be removed from Fort Dalles, as he has to muster in and take charge of the volunteer cavalry. There is much alarm beyond The Dalles, but I apprehend that no real danger exists. At all events, Captain Whittlesey with his own volunteer force will manage to keep everything quiet. The large bodies of Indians at Yamhill and Hoskins, some of them rather disaffected, render it prudent to keep a small company at each place. I invite your careful attention to my order and letter books and to the orders and instructions from department headquarters.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 13, 1861.

I. First Lieut. A. C. Wildrick, Third Artillery, will immediately relieve Maj. E. B. Babbitt, quartermaster, U. S. Army, in his duties as chief quartermaster and commissary at the Vancouver depot.

II. After being relieved, Major Babbitt will repair immediately to San Francisco to relieve Lieutenant-Colonel Swords.

...

IV. The command of the District of Oregon is hereby transferred to Col. B. L. Beall, First Dragoons.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.620}

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 13, 1861.

The undersigned hereby assumes command of this district in conformity to department Special Orders, No. 155, dated headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, August 26, 1861.

B. L. BEALL, Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 172.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 14, 1861.

1. Paragraph 1, Special Orders, No. 168, is revoked.

2. Colonel Carleton will proceed with his command of California infantry and cavalry to Los Angeles, where he will receive further instructions.

3. The horses of the battalion of cavalry will be turned over to the quartermaster in this city for the Second Regiment of California Cavalry. The battalion of cavalry will be furnished with a remount at Los Angeles.

4. The quartermaster will procure the necessary transportation by water to San Pedro for Colonel Carleton’s command.

S. Col. George Wright will proceed to Los Angeles and assume command of all the troops serving in the southern part of this State, embracing the posts of Fort Yuma New San Diego, Los Angeles, San Bernardino.

6. Capt. Henry D. Wallen, Fourth Infantry, will, with the detachment of his company at the Presidio, proceed to join that portion of his company now at Los Angeles. The quartermaster will furnish the necessary transportation.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 16, 1861-11.30 a.m.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

Besides the volunteer force called for from California to guard the Overland Mail Route, the five regiments (one of cavalry and four of infantry) originally ordered, will be organized and held ready for service on the Pacific Coast and elsewhere, according to future orders to be given. Send a copy of this to the Governor of California.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

SIR: A dispatch was sent you by the pony express the 10th [9th] instant, and a duplicate the 14th, directing you to suspend the expedition via Mazatlan to Western Texas, and to prepare to send all the regular troops, except four companies of artillery, by steamer to New York. The General-in-Chief directs that you accordingly leave one company Third Artillery at Fort Vancouver and three companies in the harbor {p.621} of San Francisco. The remainder of the regulars you will send forward by steamer to New York as fast as they can be collected for embarkation. The cavalry and artillery horses will be disposed of in such manner as may be deemed best for the public interest. The arms and equipments of the troops will be brought with them; also 10,000 of the muskets remaining in store. The field batteries and their equipments will be left behind. You will send orders to Colonel Wright to repair to San Francisco to relieve you in command of the department, and after his arrival you will proceed to the headquarters of the Army and report in person. Brig. Gen. J. W. Denver, U. S. Volunteer service, will be ordered to California to relieve Colonel Wright, who will then proceed to report in person at Army headquarters. The following dispatch was sent you this day, by pony express, and also by telegraph.*

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., September 16, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Company E, Ninth Infantry, also Company K, Fourth Infantry, and a portion of Company H, Fourth Infantry, joined my command this day from Camp Sumner, Cal., in obedience to instructions from department headquarters. Aggregate, 120. Having received no blanks, I cannot furnish a field return. For the present my command at this place will be kept entire for the purpose of instruction and discipline. My command is sadly in want of company officers.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., September 16, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that on the 13th instant I relieved Col. George Wright, Ninth Infantry, from the command of this district, agreeably to Special Orders, No. 155, dated headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal., August 26, 1861.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. L. BEALL, Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp Fitzgerald, Cal., September 16, 1861.

Capt. RICHARD C. DRUM Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

CAPTAIN: The information given you in my letter of the 9th instant has received much corroboration within the last few days. Judge Terry {p.622} is said to be at the head of the organization. Secret nightly meetings are reported to me to be held by armed men at the Monte (twelve miles from Los Angeles). With regard to the last I have sent out (and will continue to do so until something most positive is learned by me) nightly patrols of intelligent non-commissioned officers and one or two men, for the purpose of ascertaining where and by whom these meetings are held, and if possible their object. It is almost impossible to convey to the general the state of affairs down here. My ears are stuffed with all sorts of rumors and reports, and I have work to sift out what should be attended to and what not. You know I have not been an alarmist in my letters, nor have they ever stampeded me, but I think now that the depot of our supplies should be removed to a more secure position. At present it consists of a corral with a wooden fence and the stores are placed in one large wooden shed and four hospital tents. It should be within brick or adobe walls, and in defensive buildings. I don’t know, also, what the general’s intentions are with regard to more troops at this particular point, but I think at least one company of infantry should be here. This would enable me to detach parts of the squadron through the country, never absent long, nor going far, which would tend to break up or discover these nests of disaffected and marauding parties. I inclose the within protest to the general. I am inclined to believe those who sign it to be correct. I thought while in San Bernardino that it had been the design of the Mormons there to cloak themselves as Union men for the purpose of splitting the Union vote. The insidious documents with regard to the income and other taxes circulated by the McConnell men among the Californians but a few days prior to the election, and the personal popularity of Tomas Sanchez were the influencing causes of the Spanish vote in this county. Rumor says that I am to go with the general. Will he pardon me for saying that, if so, I think this squadron should be filled up, even if it requires a company up north to be broken up, and the main object being to get one or more efficient officers with it.

I am, captain, your most obedient servant,

JNO. W. DAVIDSON, Captain, First Cavalry, Commanding.

* See next, ante.

[Inclosure.]

SAN BERNARDINO, September 14, 1861.

Capt. JOHN W. DAVIDSON, Commanding U. S. Dragoons, Camp Fitzgerald, Los Angeles:

SIR: We, the undersigned, members of the Union Club of San Bernardino, would most respectfully state that a company of cavalry has been organized by Mormons in this place under the name of the home guard; they pretend to be Union men while we have every reason to doubt their sincerity and loyalty. They are commanded by Mr. Clarence E. Bennett, late a lieutenant in the U. S. Army, stationed in Utah Territory, who resigned his commission and married the daughter of a Mormon high in that church of a damnable heresy and imposture, she being an actress on the stage. His sympathies being necessarily with that class of people who are sworn foes to the United States Government, and the present indications being of such a nature as lead us to believe that hostilities will break out between them and the Government ere long, we would most solemnly protest, as Union men who hold our country dearer than life, against any arms whatever being issued {p.623} to these men. We believe it to be unsafe and injudicious, and we do [know] that some of these same men, when your command arrived here, insulted you by cheering for Jeff. Davis in your presence.

Hoping that this protest of ours may have due weight with you, and that the contents of this letter may be made known to General Sumner and Governor Downey, we subscribe ourselves,

Your respectful and obedient servants,

EDWIN A. SHERMAN, President of the Club. JOS. H. PEREAU. JAMES LEONARD. Z. G. AYERS. CHAS. MOGO.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 17, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I am compelled to assume the high responsibility of changing the destination of the troops ordered to the plains. The disaffection in the southern part of this State is increasing and becoming dangerous, and it is indispensably necessary to throw re-enforcements into that section immediately. The rebels are organizing, collecting supplies, and evidently preparing to receive a force from Texas, and the worst feature of the affair is this: They have managed to seduce the native Californians by telling them that they will be ruined by taxes to maintain the war. I shall establish a strong camp at Warner’s ranch on the road to Fort Yuma, which will support that post, prevent the gathering of rebels in that vicinity, and be prepared to repel any force advancing through Arizona.

The only available troops I have at this moment are those raised for the Overland Mail Route. These troops are now ready, whereas I could not get any of the last requisition ready before a month. Another consideration is this: The Fourth Infantry, now in the southern part of this State, are the only available regulars for my expedition. I cannot withdraw another man from Oregon or from any post in California, and it would be madness to withdraw this regiment from its present duty without replacing it with other troops. No evil will result from this change, as no protection from the Indians is necessary for the mail. Some of the principal agents have said to me that they did not need any protection; nevertheless I have ordered a company of dragoons at Fort Churchill to make a march as far out on the mail route as Ruby Valley, which is beyond all the Indians from whom there is anything to apprehend. I inclose a copy of my instructions for this movement. I shall place Colonel Wright in command of all the troops in the disaffected district till I am ready to leave with the southern expedition. I would respectfully ask an early reply to my letters of the 30th ultimo and 7th instant, in which I took the liberty of asking the General-in-Chief to let me proceed by sea, via the isthmus, to Brazos Santiago.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.624}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. W. DENVER, 15. S. Army, Wilmington, Ohio:

Repair to this city and report for orders preparatory to going to California.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

–––

[WASHINGTON, D. C.,] Tuesday, September 17, 1861.

[General E. V. SUMNER:]

DEAR GENERAL: I only found out this morning that you were ordered here with the regulars, and that only two regiments of volunteers were ordered for home service in California. I have got the first order restored, to wit, one regiment cavalry (Colton, colonel), and four of infantry. Five regiments of California volunteers to be organized, armed, &c., and hold themselves in readiness for future command. The expedition to Texas is suspended for the present, at least. It will be renewed in due time, but for the present it is discontinued. I will explain all when we meet.

Your friend,

M. S. LATHAM.

N. B.-I will tell you, when we meet, who it was that secretly got the expedition to Texas countermanded.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 174.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 17, 1861.

The volunteer camp to be established in the vicinity of Placerville in this State will be known as Camp McClellan.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 17, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to prepare the company of dragoons at your post to make a march to Ruby Valley and back on the Overland Mail Route. He wishes you to get this company off as soon as possible, direct it to march about twenty miles a day, which will bring it home before the cold weather sets in. Let them take some barley, and deposit a part of it on their way out for the march back. Instruct the commanding officer to see as many of the Indian chiefs as possible and say to them expressly that if they wish to retain the good will of the Government they must prevent their people from all interference with the mail stages or the stations, or the iron wire that passes through their country.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.625}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 17, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, First Dragoons, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires me to say that should the officer in command of the company of dragoons find upon his arrival at Ruby Valley that there are any Indians in that vicinity at the distance of forty or fifty miles, that it would be necessary to visit, I wish him to do so.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

RED BLUFF, September 17, 1861-12.40 p.m.

General SUMNER:

First Company Siskiyou Cavalry leaves here Friday. Any orders?

GEO. F. PRICE, First Lieutenant.

–––

NEW YORK, September 19, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington City:

SIR: The inclosed document was received by us to-day through the pony express.* The signers requested us to present same in person, but on consultation with Mr. Cisco, assistant treasurer United States, we feel satisfied that the objects of the signers will be accomplished by forwarding it by mail. We deem it of great importance that the information embraced in this document shall be placed before you without delay, and therefore respectfully ask your immediate consideration to the requests of the loyal people of California.

Very respectfully, your obedient servants,

EUGENE KELLY & CO. ALFRED DE WITT.

[Indorsement.]

NEW YORK, September 19, 1861.

The signers to the above are gentlemen of the highest respectability, doing business here and in California.

Respectfully,

JOHN J. CISCO, Assistant Treasurer United States.

* See Rogers, et al., to Cameron, August 28, p. 589,

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HDQRS. BATTALION FIRST INFANTRY CALIFORNIA VOLS., Camp San Pedro, September 19, 1861.

Lieut. BEN. C. CUTLER, Adjutant First Infantry California Vols., San Francisco:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders from Col. James H. Carleton, commanding California volunteers, Companies A, B, C, E, G, and H, First Infantry California Volunteers, are now located at this point; having arrived during yesterday and to-day {p.626} from San Francisco per steamers Senator, Shubrick, and Active. Their transportation to this place has been successfully accomplished without accident, but the command in disembarking at this landing is most particularly indebted for its comfort and safety to Mr. Banning, who has been untiring in his exertions to fulfill not only his contract obligations, but to render every facility at his disposal for the comfort of the men and officers. I have found him prompt, efficient, and thorough, and deem it within my province to call the attention of the colonel commanding to the value of his services. To-morrow morning at 5 o’clock the command will move toward its destination as ordered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, September 20, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose an extract from a dispatch of the 28th ultimo, received from Mr. Corwin, relative to an apprehended invasion of Sonora by the insurgents of the United States, and to recommend that the subject be submitted to the General in Chief commanding the armies of the United States for such directions as may be deemed most proper, asking at the same time whether a force of 10,000 men would not be a reasonable one for the service to be performed.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY, Washington, October 5, 1861.

The General-in-Chief directs me to say in reply to the question of the Honorable Secretary of State that he deems the force named by the Secretary a propel one.

Respectfully submitted:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

U. S. LEGATION, Mexico, August 28, 1861.

Mr. SEWARD:

...

Mr. Pickett, commissioner from what he denominates the Confederate States, is still here. He and three Southern persons sojourning in this city were engaged last night in rejoicing over the victory at Bull Run and Manassas Gap. The sketch of that battle in the New York Herald of the 23d July reached here yesterday. The paper came here from Havana by private conveyance. Mr. Pickett has learned that Mexico had granted the United States the privilege of marching troops through Mexican territory to Arizona. He has informed the Government here that this will be considered as offensive to the Confederate States, as New Mexico had placed herself under the protection of those States. He had said in private conversation that if this decree is not {p.627} annulled Mexico will lose the State of Tamaulipas in sixty days. By looking on any map of Mexico it will be seen that Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Chihuahua, and Sonora all adjoin Texas or New Mexico, Tamaulipas is easily approached by her port Tampico, on the Mexican Gulf, and also by land from Texas. All the others of these States can be reached by land from Texas or New Mexico, Guaymas is the great port on the Gulf of California, from and to which shipments are made for the States of Sonora and Chihuahua and also to our Territory of New Mexico, including Arizona. It is therefore reasonable enough to conclude that U. S. troops from California could be landed at Guaymas in seven days by steamers, and with a safe passage through Sonora could confront any rebel force operating in Arizona or New Mexico proper, and also be in position to act against any filibustering enemy which might attack any of the Mexican States bordering on Texas. It is no doubt the design of the Southern Confederation, whenever it can, to seize all of these States-indeed, to possess itself of the entire Tierra Caliente of Mexico, that being well adapted to slave labor. If Mexico should be attacked under the pretense that she had justly offended the Confederate States by the grant of passage through Sonora, every obligation of honor would seem to require that our troops should be ready to enforce our laws against filibustering expeditions from our Territories against the territories of a nation with whom we are at peace. Such troops would at the same time be efficient to restore our lawful dominion in Texas and New Mexico. Upper California, Oregon, and Washington Territory could furnish a respectable force for all these purposes, which could be conveyed by water to Guaymas and from thence by land over good roads to their proper points of operation. The States bordering on Texas and our New Mexico frontier are very weak in population and wealth, and could be conquered by a comparatively small force. Tamaulipas has only 108,000, of all ages, races, and sexes. The entire population of the five Mexican States above named is stated in the most reliable census to be 628,000, of all ages, sexes, and races, covering an area of 67,563 square miles. I am informed that recent discoveries of mineral wealth in Sonora and Chihuahua have invited large bodies of men from California to those two States. It is suspected that they are of a class easily induced to unite with the Southern rebels in an attack on these and their neighboring Mexican States, as well as to promote Southern pretensions in New Mexico and Texas. I suggest whether a prudent forecast would not invite our Government to raise in California and Oregon a force which should pass from Guaymas through Sonora to our possessions in New Mexico and Arizona for the purposes suggested above.

...

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. MONTGOMERY C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: There are some things that are next to impossible and among them is to raise an army without money. We have received no money for your department since the estimate for March last, and the expenses of the Government have been greatly increased thereby (at least 20 per cent). I would beg you to comply with my estimates as {p.628} early as possible. I hope you will make no contracts at Washington for transportation or anything else for my command. I can control these matters much better here than you can there. If I should find any collusion against the Government I can throw these people off altogether and resort to some other expedient. If the steamship companies should be at all unreasonable I can hire sailing ships for transports, and there would be but little difference in time in running south, as the prevailing winds are northerly on this coast at this season of the year.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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NAVY DEPARTMENT, September 21, 1861

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: In view of the exposed and defenseless condition of the powder magazine at the navy-yard, Mare Island, Cal. (being guarded only by two watchmen and a small steamer, the latter being now and most of the time off on duty connected with the War Department), and the easiness with which it could be taken by any considerable force, without even alarming the men at the yard, I would most earnestly request that General Sumner may be instructed to locate a company of soldiers there, in the absence of marines. The importance of this request will be seen immediately, as there is at present a large quantity of powder and ammunition in the magazine.

I remain, sir, very respectfully,

GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, September 21, 1861.

Brigadier-General SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal:

DEAR SIR: Inclosed you will please find a letter from C. E. Bennett, of San Bernardino, Cal., addressed to Secretary of State, and by him referred to this Department, giving information in regard to the movements of secessionists in that section of country. You will please take such action in the matter as in your judgment may best subserve the public interests.

Very respectfully,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

SAN BERNARDINO CAL., July 29, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

Believing it to be the duty of every loyal citizen to aid the Federal Government to the extent of his ability, I will endeavor to make you acquainted with all movements or operations that I think will be beneficial to the Chief Executive to know concerning this section of the country, and particularly the lower portion of California, Arizona, and Sonora. Some months ago, I think in December or January last, a {p.629} gentleman of this place, of high standing, of Southern birth and sympathies, conversing with me about the probability of a division of the United States, said if there was any difficulty in the Atlantic States an expedition would go from California and capture Sonora and annex it to this State, and asked me how I would like such a trip. I replied it suited me. He said it was more than likely that I would be tendered a command; that it was deemed very desirable to secure my services, &c. (all of which I thought mere flattery at the time), and that the chief directors of the expedition were at San Francisco (General Johnston & Co.). At the time I considered nothing of this kind would be done. Last week, having occasion to go to Holcomb Valley mines, I learned the following facts: That there were a large number of secessionists congregated there from different parts of the State, when that place was designated as a rendezvous. It was for the departure of 250 secessionists from there for Sonora to attack and capture Fort Yuma; that there are a large number of soldiers at that post who belong to this secession combination and will turn upon their officers the moment the attack is made. There they will provide themselves with all that the fort contains that is of value or use to them; all property that can be made available will be taken, the remainder destroyed. There is a lieutenant now in the Army-I could not learn positively whether he was in Benicia, Los Angeles, or Yuma; my impression is that he is somewhere in California, because at their meetings last Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights they spoke of General A. S. Johnston, who lately left here with a party of fifty men for Texas to join the Southern Army, as their adviser and director, whose advice was law, and in a speech regarded him as a very superior officer and manager, and said the command of the party to capture Yuma and Sonora was urged on him months ago. He said his reputation and standing were so high he would proceed at once to the South, as his enemies would denounce the expedition as a thieving one, &c., and he laid all the plans for this lieutenant to follow as soon as the expedition could be got ready. This expedition, a greater portion of which rendezvoused at Holcomb Valley within the last ten days, it seems was countermanded until a few weeks hence. They were sent to different portions of the State to raise men and money, to capture the lower portion of this State (Arizona is with them) and Sonora, and proclaim Jefferson Davis as their President and hoist the Confederate flag. They are bound together by the most binding oaths. The penalty for divulging anything connected with their operations, any of their traitorous plans, is death, and they swear to kill anyone so offending. Every one belonging to this traitor band after the capture of this State and southward is to have three leagues of land; in other words, to share equally the plunder. In their convention they concluded that 1,000 men-effective, well-armed men-true to the secession cause, would be amply sufficient to capture and hold the counties of San Bernardino, San Diego, and Los Angeles. The inhabitants living mostly on large ranches several miles apart, taken by surprise with no time to rally, that force is regarded by them as sufficiently large. They designated men to go to different towns to forward this plan to raise men and money. Two came here, two to Los Angeles, and to other places I will find out in a day or so. They expect to have these missionaries of piracy come to Holcomb Valley in about six weeks and report a state of readiness, and then, in their language, “they will cut loose.” As soon as possible I will ascertain the whereabouts and, if possible, the names of these disloyal soldiers and officer. Most ,if not all, the soldiers are at Fort Yuma, I think. This officer was in communication {p.630} with General Johnston all the time he was in command of this department. That there is going to be an effort to capture a portion, if not all, of this State, Arizona, Sonora, I know, and Fort Yuma is going to be taken on the route to Sonora. I consulted with a friend of mine here, Doctor D. R. Dickey. He will go on down to Los Angeles and take a letter from me to General Sumner through Major Carleton. The moment I ascertain the name of the officer and the certain disaffection of troops I will telegraph to General Sumner in time to express to Yuma. About six weeks is the time calculated it will take to raise men and means. I became assured that it was dangerous to believe anyone in this particular locality on this great question when I saw the number of hypocrites and traitors at Holcomb. If the civil appointments for this State are true to the Government they could do a great deal. As special agent, special mail agent, their expenses being paid by Government, they could organize in every town a Union party that could be prepared for emergencies like the coming one. I would respectfully recommend that Moses Martin be appointed postmaster at San Bernardino. I mail this to my father, Harmon Bennett, in order that it may reach you. Mr. Martin is a supporter of the present Administration. He voted for Mr. Lincoln, canvassed the county to aid his election, and he is a reliable man-Union man. This must be kept secret until we have success on the Union side, and I trust it will not be long. If there is anything I can do to forward the interest of the Government I pledge myself to do it. I have penned this hurriedly and with many interruptions. I will use my utmost ability to have these traitors captured and brought to justice. I especially request care to be taken that my name does not appear in connection with this until we have caught these traitors.

Hoping and trusting that success will crown your efforts for the restoration of peace to our country,

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CLARENCE B. BENNETT.

[Indorsement.]

NORWICH N. Y., August 23, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: I received this day the inclosed from my son and have no doubt of the correctness of his statements or the conclusions he arrives at. He graduated at West Point in 1854; served five years under Colonel Alexander and General Johnston; left the Army about one year since; is now farming and mining at San Bernardino, Cal.

Very respectfully, yours,

HARMON BENNETT.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter., September 22, 1861.

Capt. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to state for the information of the general commanding the department that forty men, all that were disposable of Company A, First Dragoons, under the command of Second Lieut. B. M. Baker, First Dragoons, this day left this post en route for Ruby Valley, according to instructions from department headquarters of September 17, 1861. I would also state that I have been compelled to relieve a number of the men from extra duty in the quartermaster’s {p.631} department, for the purpose of guard duty, which will seriously impede the work on the soldiers’ quarters and the shelter for the animals, and will render it almost impossible to get the work of building finished before the winter sets in with the force under my command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Dragoons, Commanding Post.

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[SEPTEMBER, 1861.] (Received 27th.)

COMMANDING GENERAL OF THE PACIFIC DIVISION, U. S. Army:

SIR: We, the undersigned citizens of Pitt River Valley, respectfully represent to you the following reasons for an additional force to be stationed at Fort Crook: First. There is an extent of some 300 square miles to be protected by the troops at Fort Crook. The country around the valley is filled with Indians, who are continually committing depredations on the lives and property of the citizens of the valley. They do so with impunity from their knowledge of the smallness of the force at this place. Second. If there was a sufficient force at this place the valley would soon fill up, when we would be able to protect ourselves. There have already been several emigrant trains passed through this place that would have located here were they not deterred from so doing by the inadequacy of the protection from the Government force at this place. Third. By re-enforcing the garrison, so that a sufficient number could be kept scouting, all hostilities on the part of the Indians would cease, and in one year from this time it would take but a small force to protect us. Should you be able to send us one company without detriment to the public service your petitioners will take it as a great favor, and as in duty bound will do all they can to assist the Government force.

L. L. Y. HASTINGS, WILLIAM NARY, L. H. STEVENS, [AND 24 OTHERS.]

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PEEKSKILL, N. Y., September 23, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

The writer of the inclosed letter, John B. Mills, esq., is a highly respectable and intelligent gentleman, residing near this place; any suggestion coming from him I think is worthy of respectful consideration. I know of no way in which, as it seems to me, I could more appropriately dispose of his letter than by inclosing it to your Excellency, to the end that it might receive such a direction as the subject-matter of it might seem to require.

Most respectfully, your Excellency’s obedient servant,

WM. NELSON.

[Inclosure.]

SEPTEMBER 21, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM NELSON:

SIR: In view of your personal acquaintance with the President of the United States, I beg to present a subject to your consideration, and if when well turned in your mind you deem it pertinent and of sufficient importance to address the President, you will please do so. {p.632} The subject, in gross, is involved in the general question of the policy of the Government withdrawing or removing their troops from Arizona, the southern part of New Mexico. You are well aware that the inhabitants of that Territory are comparatively few and greatly scattered, and therefore in existing circumstances are dependent upon the Government of the United States for protection. The later intelligence that we have here from Arizona is that the Apaches and other tribes of Indians are very troublesome, and together with secessionists from Texas, with whom the Indians seem to be in league, are becoming more and more hostile and are committing great depredations. Robbery and murder upon an extensive scale seem to be the order of the day. It is understood, and I conclude correctly, that some of the Government forts are already abandoned, and if the same policy is continued the Territory will be overrun with Indians and secessionists; consequently all of the better class of people and settlers will be driven out of the country. There are individual cases, with which I have some acquaintance (among which is a son of mine) and from which cases comes the urgent request to pray the Government that the garrisons be not broken up and the troops not removed. If they are withdrawn we shall have to follow. True, these are individual cases, but the circumstance applies to all the better class of settlers in the whole Territory. Therefore it becomes a question whether the Government will permit this state of things to proceed. Surely it would seem, in view of the small number of troops now in the Territory, that rather more should be sent there than that those there should be called away.

I have the honor to remain, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN B. MILLS.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, September 24, 1861.

Col. THOMAS R. CORNELIUS, Hon. B. F. HARDING, and R. F. MAURY, Esq., Of Oregon:

GENTLEMEN: The War Department being convinced of the necessity of raising a body of troops in Oregon to meet all exigencies which may exist there, and with a particular view to the defense of the frontier, I am directed to authorize you to raise for the service of the United States one regiment of mounted troops, to consist of ten companies, with Thomas R. Cornelius as colonel and R. F. Maury as lieutenant-colonel thereof. The two majors will be selected hereafter. B. F. Harding is appointed quartermaster of the regiment, and will be mustered into the service immediately upon the receipt of this letter by any Army officer in his vicinity. If no Army officer be near him, Mr. Harding will muster himself into service, taking the oath of allegiance before a civil magistrate. As soon as mustered into service Quartermaster Harding will act as mustering officer for the remainder of the regiment. The organization of the regiment will be in strict accordance with that prescribed for ten companies of cavalry in General Orders, No. 16, of 1861, from this office, a copy of which is herewith inclosed.* The medical officers of the regiment will be one surgeon and one assistant surgeon, to be competent men, appointed by the colonel. The company officers of the regiment will be appointed by you from men deemed competent for the positions. Every man will be required to furnish his own horse and {p.633} horse equipments, as prescribed in General Orders, No. 15, of 1861, from this office, a copy of which is also herewith inclosed.* The colonel will be mustered in upon the receipt of this order, and is authorized to make all necessary requisitions upon any U. S. quartermaster or commissary for the supply and support of his command. The quartermaster and mustering officer hereby appointed is also authorized to contract for supplies for the regiment at the lowest market price, and to furnish them upon the requisition of the colonel as fast as the companies are mustered into service, provided the supplies cannot be obtained by requisitions upon the U. S. officers, as hereinbefore specified. In all accounts for such expenditures or contracts, the fact must be stated that the supplies could not otherwise be procured, and that the price paid was the lowest market price. The clothing, arms, and equipments, other than horse equipments, for the regiment will be procured by requisition upon the commanding officer of the District of Oregon or the Department of the Pacific. Owing to the great distance between Washington and Oregon these instructions must necessarily be general, but the Department, acting upon the strong recommendation of the Hon. B. D. Baker, Senator from Oregon, relies confidently upon the prudence, patriotism, and economy with which you will execute this trust. Unless otherwise ordered you will be governed by any directions sent to you by Col. E. D. Baker, and will under all circumstances report your conduct in the premises to the War Department through the Adjutant-General of the Army.

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* See Series IV, Vol. I.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 180.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 25, 1861.

...

2. The counties of San Luis Obispo, Buena Vista, Tulare, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, and San Diego, in the southern part of the State of California, will constitute a command within this department to be known as the District of Southern California, headquarters at Los Angeles. Col. George Wright, Ninth Regiment of Infantry, is assigned to the command of the district.

3. The headquarters of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry will be stationed at San Bernardino, to which point Bvt. Lieut. Col. Robert O. Buchanan, major Fourth Infantry, with the regimental staff and band will proceed.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP ON EEL RIVER, CAL., Sixty-five miles southeast of Fort Humboldt, September 26, 1861.

ASST. ADJT. GEN., DEPT. OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have selected this point as the site for the new military post to be called Fort Seward. It is by far a {p.634} better location than any that could be found after a diligent and careful examination on Larrabee’s Creek or Van Dusen, besides being in the heart of the Indian country. It is about fifteen or sixteen miles farther from Fort Humboldt than the camp occupied by the detachment of Company B, Sixth Infantry, on the 10th of July last. The trail after leaving Hydesville, twenty-two miles this side of Fort Humboldt, will be very difficult to pack supplies over after the 1st of December until the 1st of April, as some of the mountains over which it passes, I am told, will have from two to five feet of snow on them. I think by far the most economical plan of getting supplies here would be to have a large skiff boat built near Hydesville, or at Humboldt Bay, capable of carrying ten or fifteen tons. Such a boat could be managed by six or eight men of the command, and could probably be had for $150 or $200. Of course I would not recommend a boat to be built until the river is first examined by an officer to ascertain the practicability of its navigation. I am informed that white men have been up this far in canoes. There is a good wagon road from Fort Humboldt to Hydesville; or, the supplies could be boated down the bay to Myers’ Landing; thence by land across Table Bluff to Eel River is less than two miles. How long it would take to make the trip up the river it is impossible for me to say-probably ten or twelve days. As many hours would suffice for the downward trip. Three or four yoke of oxen are absolutely necessary to haul the logs for building. They can be bought here at from $60 to $120 per yoke, according to quality. A circular saw-mill will be much needed, and a competent man to set them up and run them. Except the first sergeant, whose term of service expires early in November, there is but one man called a carpenter in the company, and he is a very indifferent mechanic. It will, therefore, be necessary to modify very materially the plans of buildings sent me. I should like authority from the commanding general to put the laundresses’ quarters in some other place more convenient to water, rather than on the opposite side of the square from the company quarters. I see by the newspapers that I was promoted into the Tenth Infantry in May last, and I suppose may expect orders by every mail.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. S. LOVELL, Captain, Sixth Infantry, Commanding.

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ARLINGTON, September 27, 1861.

Hon. S. CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I take the liberty to introduce Colonel Wallace, delegate from Washington Territory, with whom I was acquainted while on duty in that country. The suggestions of Colonel Wallace in regard to preventing Indian devastations are valuable from his intimate knowledge of the country tributary to the sound and the Columbia River. I have discussed his plans with him, and I think them good if directed by a regular officer who knows the character of the Indians and the country.

I am, sir, with high respect, your most obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES, Brigadier-General.

{p.635}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 27, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor State of California, Sacramento City, Cal.:

GOVERNOR: I have received yours of the 25th. It is impossible to receive any more companies into the Second Cavalry. I have now twelve companies, after consolidating the two smallest. The law authorizes this number, but I would have preferred having but ten. I think with you that the Los Angeles company should be mustered into Carleton’s regiment of infantry, and I have given the order.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 181.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 27, 1861.

The companies of the Second Regiment of California Volunteer Infantry in camp at Hunter’s Point will proceed to-morrow morning to Camp Sumner, near the Presidio, where the organization of the regiment will be completed.

By order of Brigadier General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 27, 1861.

Col. BENJAMIN L. BEALL First Cav., Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: From recent information received from Washington by the general commanding the department, it is probable you will be cited to appear before the board for retiring disabled officers. The general desires me to inform you that upon the receipt of this order you will in consequence be relieved from the command of the district to enable you to comply therewith.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT FAUNTLEROY, N. MEX, September 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

SIR: As an old printer and soldier of the line in the grand Union Army, I exercise the privilege of addressing you this communication. Having resided sufficiently long in New Mexico and Arizona to become measurably acquainted with the wants and wishes of the people, of acquiring a practical knowledge of the geographical, physical, and moral condition of the country, and learning to a considerable extent the peculiarities of the inhabitants who are spread over this vast Territory, a region nearly four times as large as the State of Missouri, I feel that I can with some degree of safety and accuracy describe to you the present political condition and standing of the community. After {p.636} the conquest of New Mexico in 1846 by the army under the command of General Stephen W. Kearny, the people hereof have had a succession of military and civil governors, embracing General Kearny, Colonel Washington, Colonel Weightman, Col. John Munroe, Colonel Garland, Major Bonneville, Colonel Fauntleroy, and Col. W. W. Loring, besides Governors Calhoun, Lane, Meriwether, and Rencher. I am not aware that either of these gentlemen, comprising a list of high-sounding names, ever distinguished themselves by any signal abilities or left their impress upon the statutes or improved the pecuniary condition of the inhabitants, their manners or morals. There are no visible monuments in the Territory or gilded marks of progress or improvement to denote their deeds as warriors or acquirements as civilians. In 1850 New Mexico had a population of 50,000 souls, now (1860), according to the census returns, the white inhabitants, or those free born, exclusive of U. S. soldiers and Indians, number some 93,000. To govern this country requires a greater degree of administrative ability, comprehensive sagacity and research, matured judgment, and wise forecast, energy, and decision of character that is required to govern the great States of New York or Pennsylvania. In the Empire and Keystone States the Executives can rely upon aid and information furnished by the daily and weekly press of the cities and country towns, by the intelligence communicated far and near, upon the staid character of the community, the pulpit, and the school-house, the love of order, the observance of religious solemnities, the sanctity of morals, and improvements incident to a civilized and populous community. Here there are no such auxiliary tributaries to furnish intellectual and moral food for the governing power, nothing but a wild and thinly populated frontier Territory composed of a mixed and incongruous population with rude and nomadic tribes of Indians, numbering some 40,000, besides the friendly Pueblos, Gilas, Apaches, Pimas, and Maricopas. This country, stretching from the Kansas borders or Indian Territory west of the Arkansas, extends to the Colorado River west and to the Mexican line of Sonora (31° 20' north latitude) on the south. The governors of New Mexico somehow or other never have paid the slightest attention to the will or wishes or wants of the people of the district of Arizona, and hence the citizens of that expansive region, under the political teachings of Philemon T. Herbert, Judge Edward McGowan, Samuel J. Jones, Lieut. S. Mowry, Judge Lucas, Governor Owings, Granville H. Oury, Colonel Ewell (of the U. S. Army), and others, sought to erect, a little over a year ago, a provisional government, embracing the region lying between La Mesilla on the Rio Grande and extending north to the Gila, west to the Colorado, and south to the Sonora line. Our country, stretching more than 1,000 miles along the Mexican frontier, requires a vigilant eye to be kept upon the machinations of the secession forces who are now straining every nerve, using every device, pulling every cord with might and main to circumvent the supporters of our glorious Union, and incorporating the States of Nuevo Leon, Coahuila, Chihuahua, Durango, and Sonora, Mexico, into the Government of the Confederate States of the South. For this purpose Jeff. Davis, the rebel chief, has dispatched secret agents to the governors of the States above enumerated to induce them to secede from the Republic of Anahuac and join the standard of the seceshers. While all this is going on, or has been transpiring under their very eyes and noses, what have the governors of New Mexico been doing to avert the fatal catastrophe? Listless and apathetic, if not secessionists at heart, they are the next thing to them, and have remained as dormant and passive as old Mrs. Partington with her door mop. The time has {p.637} arrived when a “Sir Forcible Feeble” policy will not answer for the region of the Rio Grande. The Texas rebels and Arizona cut-throats, like the ancient Goths and Vandals, are at the very gates, the portals of the Union, ready with battering cannons to demolish the fairest fabric of freedom ever devised by the wit of man. And what has been done or is doing to prevent them from realizing their ardent longing and desires. The demolition of a free Republic and the erection in its stead of a military slavery, extending empire, is the ultimate object of the leaders. The restless eye of Jeff. Davis is particularly bent on Arizona. That country was purchased by him of Santa Anna. I say by Davis, for it was by his influence in the Cabinet, the identical man who swayed the councils of President Pierce, who originated the measure and urged it forward until its final completion. He had an object of no ordinary consideration to accomplish. He is the owner of “Empresario grants,” in Chihuahua, purchased many years ago of Iturbide and others, which cover extensive silver mines. Arizona was his beau ideal of a railroad route to the Pacific. It was to him the terra incognita of a grand scheme of intercommunication and territorial expansion more vast and complicated than was ever dreamed of by Napoleon Bonaparte in his palmiest days of pride and power. With an eye that never winked and a wing that never tired has Jeff. Davis for more than ten years past turned his thoughts and desires to the Mexican line for indefinite expansion. Hence all the appointments in New Mexico (civil and military) under Fillmore, Pierce, and Buchanan were made solely and exclusively with reference to future operations in this quarter of the Union. With him were banded Benjamin, Gwin, Slidell, and Toombs. No nominations during this period were sent to the Senate or passed by that body without undergoing his scrutiny. I have seen letters from him to some of his present allies written years ago, which shed light on his present movements. Every military order for the removal or stationing troops in this region during the last eight or ten years was subject to his approval. His military prototypes and protégés-Ewell, Fauntleroy, Steen, Loring, Longstreet, Crittenden, Grayson, Rhett, Reynolds, &c.-were placed here purposely to second and forward his ulterior designs. Magruder, too, and others in California were co-operating with him, giving him aid and comfort to carry out his villainous schemes. I have said above that it requires more than ordinary administrative ability to govern this Territory. I repeat that declaration. A statesman of unquestioned talents, who can comprehend his epoch and look somewhat into the vista of futurity, is wanting here to be placed at the head of the government. A governor is necessarily thrown upon his own resources in assuming to govern the people of New Mexico. If he has paucity of intellect, no staid or fixed principles, no wise or comprehensive views of statesmanship, no ripe judgment, no iron will or determination to guide him, he will be a perfect cipher, a mere pumpkin-head at the helm of affairs. I speak it more in sorrow than in anger when I say that the governing power in New Mexico for the period since it has been under the jurisdiction and subject to the American Union has been anything than possessing a vigorous grasp and characterized by energy and ability. The numerous Indian wars, the disregard of law and open defiance of courts and legislative enactments, the murders and robberies which are perpetrated with impunity all over the country, the demoralization of the U. S. Army, and the abandonment of their duty and of the Union in solemn contravention of their oath of officers high on the roll of military fame have all measurably proceeded from want of vigor and decisive action on the {p.638} part of the executive head. Where there is no power to curb or restrain the populace, mob law and irresponsible rule will run riot over the land. Nothing is plainer and more certain. Sir, the frontier Territories, like Utah and New Mexico, Colorado and Nevada, &c., require men of brains and nerve to govern them. In the persons of Governor Nye and Governor Gilpin (of Nevada and Colorado) there are men appointed fit to be governors. Such has not been the case either in Utah or New Mexico. Hence polygamy and slavery and peonage, twin relics of barbarism and the offspring of an oligarchy, have had sway and are held up as an example of patriarchal observance for the guidance of the masses, instead of bringing them up to an enlightened standard of civilization, of progress, and improvement. It is about time that these institutions, relics of a dark age and of a deleterious tendency upon the customs and manners of the people, were swept out of existence. I thought this was part of the task to which the Republican party had pledged itself not to overlook. The duty to perform that which has been solemnly promised in full and open convention and ratified by the people in their primary capacity in the exercise of their constitutional privilege should not, in my humble judgment, be passed over for slight or transient causes. I undertake to say that four-fifths of the voting population of New Mexico are utterly opposed to the incorporation of the slave code in the statutes of this Territory. Yet there it is, by virtue of the slave power exercising its influence through the accredited agents (civil and military) of the Federal Government. The officeholders, the tools of Jeff. Davis and company, put the slave code in the statutes of New Mexico and not the people, but in utter violation of their will and desire. Out of the three companies of Second Regiment of New Mexico Volunteers, A, B, and C (Captains Pino, Sena, and Baca y Delgado), among the rank and file, the common soldiers whom President Lincoln has eulogized as being true to the Union and loyal to the Constitution, after polling them thoroughly on the question, I did not find a solitary individual in favor of the slave code. They are all Republicans of the strictest sect. I believe it is so all over the Territory. Why, then, should this slave code, more odious and bloody than the code of Draco, be longer suffered to pollute the statute laws of this Territory, where Daniel Webster declared that the ordinances of God had forbidden its introduction, and he was opposed to their re-enactment, and where Henry Clay declared in 1825 and in 1850 that no earthly consideration, no power of man, should compel him to vote for the introduction of slavery to territory that was free from the curse and crime? Sir, it should be scorched out and will be at the next session of the Territorial Legislature, unless, as heretofore, Federal office-holders forbid the bans. Is it not certain that Collins and Connelly, appointed by a Republican Administration to the Indian superintendency and governorship of this Territory, were the friends of Mr. Pierce, of Buchanan, and Jeff. Davis? Were they not the adjuncts and co-operators of the Fauntleroys, Graysons, and Lorings? Are they not pro slavery propagandists? Did they not favor the enactment of the slave code? Did they not oppose its repeal? Is it not certain that they would be found on the side of the Confederate States of the South if their voices and votes and wishes could decide the contest? And is not the Santa Fé Gazette, published by Collins, a secessionist paper per se? I pretend to understand English and can read, and I do not hesitate to say that it has been a secessionist paper in the past, and a dissimulating one at that. It is a little more cunning than the N. Y. News, but is equally as mischievous. It publishes all the telegraphic reports in favor of the rebels and suppresses the accounts in favor of the Union {p.639} cause. To suppress a fact is equal to uttering a falsehood. Both are deficient in brains for the posts which they fill, if their opinions and predilections were not obnoxious to the vast majority of the voting population of this Territory. The sequel will show that I do not underestimate public intelligence or the virtuous instincts of the people of New Mexico. Had a Republican governor been appointed for this Territory last May (instead of old Rencher, who is fit, perhaps, to govern Buncombe or Currituck Counties, in North Carolina) and sent to Santa Fé the robbing of Government trains, the burning and surrendering of military posts, and the disgraceful surrender of old Lynde, superannuated and unfit for service, of a U. S. force of 750 men to 350 Arizona cut-throats would never have occurred. It seems to me it was a great oversight in not sending to the Rio Grande from California three months ago some 10,000 or 12,000 troops, infantry and cavalry, to crush out the Texas and Arizona rebels. I fear it is too late now. I fear very much that the Confederate forces under the lead of General A. S. Johnston (formerly commanding officer in Utah and California), Col. John R. Baylor, Major Armistead, Major Waller, Colonel Ford, and Col. Thomas J. Mastin (a young, bold, chivalrous, and talented, but mistaken, Mississippian, the friend and pet of Jeff. Davis) will form a junction at La Mesilla before the arrival of troops from California and Kansas, capture Fort Craig (as they did Fillmore), Albuquerque, and Santa Fé, and thus get a permanent foothold in New Mexico, as they now have in Arizona. I very much fear this. Should such be the case, the Union cause will be terribly menaced, if not absolutely lost, on the Pacific side. Sir, in war there must be resolution, energy, will, iron will, and nerve to push things to their very utmost. Old fogy generals and governors have played the deuce with this region. They have permitted the demoralization of the army and the people, the spread of faro and monte banks, the reign of lynch law and filibusterism, vice and crime to run riot, and virtue, liberty, and intelligence to be overslaughed. There must be a change, a radical change, or the country is undone. Last winter a distinguished citizen of Pennsylvania (ex-Governor David R. Porter) and General Duff Green, of Washington City, obtained from the Territorial Legislature of New Mexico the passage of an act granting them and their associates the exclusive right of way or privilege for a period of five years to run or build railroads through this Territory. And why? They were doubtless looking ahead for connecting Memphis and New Orleans with Guaymas on the California Gulf via Fort Smith, the Southern Overland Mail Route, to El Paso on the Rio Grande, thence through Chihuahua and Sonora (Mexico) to the terminus. In this project they were seconded by Don Angel Frias, ex-Governor of Chihuahua, and Governor Ignacio Pesqueira, of Sonora, besides English, French, Mexican, and American capitalists to back them. The secession movement has thrown this project in the background, perhaps will destroy it altogether. The scheme was a feasible one, and there were men at the head of it who would have carried it out. The valley of the Rio Grande at the present time is an isolated region, but eventually it will be to the American Union (should it continue perpetual, one, and indissoluble), what the Rhine is to France and Germany. It will be settled by the cultivators of the grape and luscious fruits, sugar cane, and fleecy flocks, and the vine-clad hills will resound with the merry music of cottagers and vintagers, making the air vocal with stirring tunes, like Bingen on the Rhine and other songs. Then there is near by, say in the State of Chihuahua, rich silver mines, which, when properly developed by science and machinery and the vigorous arms of American labor, will yield annually almost as much silver as there is now gold {p.640} extracted from the placers and quartz leads of California. This is no Utopian idea, but a certain fixed pivotal fact. Peace alone, however, can develop these treasures, and it remains to be seen whether we shall have this peace or, through the machinations of Southern conspirators, the war shall be continued for an indefinite period. In the meantime, while the war is progressing, I desire especially to call your attention to the condition of things in this Territory. I have visited five forts-Buchanan, Breckinridge, McLane, Fillmore, and Fauntleroy-within the last six months, and at each of these military posts I have uniformly found the sutlers to be bold, open, and avowed secessionists in favor of the Confederate States of the South, real, live, pure, adamantine Jeff. Davis rebels. At Fort Buchanan, White and Granger were secessionists; at Breckinridge, John H. Baird, ditto; at McLane, George M. Dyer and company, ditto; at Fillmore, Samuel J. Jones, ditto, and now here at Fort Fauntleroy George T. Gillespie is a secessionist in favor of old Virginia and the South. He is a protege of John B. Floyd, is from Southwestern Virginia, and was appointed by Floyd, your predecessor in the War Office, sent out especially as an adjunct to be relied upon to advance the schemes of Wise, Floyd, Jeff. Davis, and company. Shall he be continued in office? I hope not. I trust not. There is a good, true, and loyal Union man here, David Reeder, a brother of Capt. Ambrose Reeder, a well-known steam-boat captain and owner of Saint Louis and Cincinnati. Mr. Reeder desires this position, the position of sutler. The question arises: Is it not better to trust such offices to your friends than your enemies? If Mr. Gillespie wishes to remain in the sutlership business, let him go back to old Virginia or to Texas and try his hand with his brother conspirators, but not remain and suck the blood (charging about five prices for everything he has to sell to Union soldiers) out of loyal defenders of the American Government. A razor, for instance, which you could buy at Chatham street, Four Corners, New York, for 25 cents he asks here the modest sum of $2.50; whisky, $10 per gallon, and $16 if retailed by the gill; other articles in pretty much the same proportion. There are now stationed at this post (Fort Fauntleroy) three companies, A, B, and C, Second Regiment of New Mexico Volunteers, commanded by Capts. Manuel D. Pino, José D. Sena, and Manuel Baca y Delgado. The commanding officer here is Lieut. Col. Manuel Chavez. With the exception of five or six, they are all of Hispaño-Mexican descent, speaking the Spanish language almost exclusively. Fort Fauntleroy is located about 140 miles west of Albuquerque on the Rio Grande. It is far advanced in the Navajo country. It is in latitude 350 40' and longitude west from Greenwich 109° 14' 30”. The weather here at the present time is delightful, the air cool and bracing. The distance from here to old Fort Defiance (deserted) is about forty-five miles; from Fort McLane (burnt down or destroyed), about 120, nearly due south. The Navajoes appear to be a peaceable, quiet, inoffensive sort of Indians, more sinned against than sinning five times over, I venture to assert. White people here do a great many things in this country and then lay it to the charge of the poor Indians. They get one pound of beef, perhaps, from the Government and are charged with twenty, one blanket and are charged with six, one pound of tobacco and charged with ten, and so on ad infinitum. They are kicked and cuffed about on all sides, and if they venture to complain or retaliate upon their oppressors or aggressors a great hue and cry is raised about the encroachments of the terrible Navajoes. All gammon, for the most paint. Treated with justice and kindness, they will not be troublesome to the authorities of the United States. Col. Thomas Hart Benton, in his admirable speech delivered in the House of Representatives, at {p.641} Washington, in the winter of 1854-1855 (see Congressional Globe), told the truth in a manly way about the Navajoes and other Indian tribes of New Mexico. That speech will endure. It will “abide unshaken the test of human scrutiny, of talents, and of time.” If there be a just God, and all nature and revealed religion would imply that there is, who rules above, he will yet right the wrongs to which the untutored savages of the forest have been subjected. They have been badly treated and deserve the commiseration and fostering care of the American people. There are persons holding high positions in the civil and military service of this Territory who can neither read nor write Spanish or English. Of course their knowledge cannot be very extensive. I again repeat it, with emphasis, that a governor of this Territory should be possessed of acknowledged ability, of staid principles, of solid acquirements, of industrious habits, great energy, indomitable will, and firmness of purpose. Without these his administration of public affairs will prove a failure, a miserable farce. The times are big with the fate of “Cæsar and of Rome,” and without men at the head of affairs who can comprehend the epoch in which they live and have the nerve and resolution to carry them out, our system of government will inevitably be overthrown and a monarchy or despotism erected in its place. There is no escaping the dread alternative. I have written the foregoing at intervals snatched from military duty as a sentinel on the watch tower. I have no time to elaborate my ideas as fully as I could wish. These rough notes, however, may furnish you with a glimpse of the condition of public matters in this far-distant region of the Union, and give you a slight idea how affairs are conducted and progressing in New Mexico and Arizona. That is the object of this communication, “nothing extenuate or aught set down in malice.” Yesterday was the day set apart by the President and Congress of the United States as a day of prayer, fasting, and humiliation for the success of the American arms and the return of peace. It was not observed at this post. If the trump of the archangel were sounded to-morrow and I was summoned to appear before the throne of the Great Jehovah to testify, I would aver that the facts set forth in the foregoing rough notes are true. I have nothing further to say.

Respectfully,

WM. NEED.

P. S.-There are a number of persons in this Territory holding office who are rank secessionists at heart, but pretend to loyalty to the Union to cloak their designs and to keep their places on account of the salary. They are here, as at Washington, mighty cunning, but won’t do to be trusted. They require weeding out. I mark this letter Public Business (which you will excuse) in order to secure its safe transmission to Washington.

W. N.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 28, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington:

COLONEL: I have just received the commanding general’s dispatch countermanding the expedition to Texas, and I do feel greatly relieved thereat. I was willing to undertake it, but I could not feel sure that I could carry it through, for the difficulties were all but insuperable. {p.642} You will have received my letter of the 17th instant, informing the general that I had changed the destination of the troops ordered on the overland route. If I could have anticipated this last order I should not have made this change, for I should have had troops enough without them for the disaffected part of the State. As this change has already been made, and nearly all of Colonel Carleton’s command is now in the southern part of the State, I do not think it advisable to bring them back at a heavy expense to send them on the overland route this fall, especially as their presence there is not necessary for the protection of the mail. A company of the-First Cavalry has left Fort Churchill to march to Ruby Valley and back. Colonel Carleton’s command can move out on the overland road in March next, and thus save an immense expense in forage for this winter. The hay would have cost $60 a ton and the barley $9.96 a bushel. I would respectfully ask the general’s sanction for this arrangement.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, October 28, 1861.

Approved:

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 182.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 28, 1861.

1. Capt. Edward O. C. Ord, Third Artillery, having been appointed brigadier-general of U. S. Volunteers, is relieved from duty in this department and will comply with instructions received from the Adjutant-General. The command of Light Company C, Third Artillery, will be turned over to First Lieut. Edward R. Warner, who will receipt for all property pertaining to C Company.

...

3. First Lieut. La Rhett L. Livingston, Third Artillery, will relieve Capt. E. O. C. Ord in command of Light Company C, Third Artillery, giving the usual receipts for all property pertaining thereto.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Commanding, &c., San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs me to say that, according to the importance of the frontiers and the temper of the Indians, you station in Oregon and Washington Territory a portion of the volunteer force called out on the Pacific Coast. You can best judge, being on the spot, of the proper disposition to be made of the force.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.643}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, September 30, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, Ninth Infantry, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

COLONEL: As you are about to assume the important command of the southern district of this State, I wish to give you briefly my views and wishes in relation to that section of country. The secession party in this State numbers about 32,000 men, and they are very restless and zealous, which gives them great influence. They are congregating in the southern part of the State and it is there they expect to commence their operations against the Government. You will take such measures as in your judgment will most effectually crush out this disloyalty. It has been tolerated too homing already, and I desire that you will put a sudden stop to all demonstrations in favor of the rebel government, or against our own. You will please establish a strong camp at Warner’s ranch and take measures to make Fort Yuma perfectly secure. You will probably find it necessary to place troops at Visalia and Santa Barbara, but I give no order for this. With the exception of the camp at Warner’s, I wish to leave the disposition of the troops in your district entirely at your own discretion. If it should become necessary to re enforce your command I will do it at once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 160.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, September 30, 1861.

1. Brig. Gen. J. K. F. Mansfield, U. S. Army, is assigned to the command of the Department of the Pacific, and will repair to San Francisco with as little delay as practicable.

2. Brig. Gen. George Wright, volunteer service (colonel Ninth Infantry), will remain in command of the Columbia River, under General Mansfield.

...

By command of Lieutenant-General Scott:

E. D. T[OWNSEND], Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, October 1, 1861.

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy:

SIR: Your communication of the 21st ultimo, asking that General Sumner may be instructed to station a company at Mare Island Navy-Yard, in California, has been received and referred to General Sumner for his action.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

{p.644}

WAR DEPARTMENT, October 1, 1861.

General E. V. SUMNER, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from the Honorable Secretary of the Navy for your information.* You will take such action in reference to the protection of the navy-yard at Mare Island as you may deem best for the interests of the public service.

Respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See September 21, p 628.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 22.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 1, 1861.

Lieut. Col. Edwin B. Babbitt, deputy quartermaster-general, having reported at these headquarters, is announced as chief quartermaster on the department staff. Lieutenant-Colonel Babbitt will accordingly relieve Capt. Ralph W. Kirkham, of the same department, in the discharge of these duties.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 1, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE A. H. BLAKE, First Cavalry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs me to inform you that all the regular infantry and cavalry on this coast have been ordered to New York. The general desires you to have your command in readiness to be relieved by volunteer troops. The horses pertaining to the First Cavalry company will be, in addition to their horse equipments, turned over to the quartermaster’s department at that post. Should the detachment sent to Ruby Valley not join you at the time the relief arrives, you will leave at Fort Churchill the necessary instructions for Lieutenant Baker with his detachment to follow you to this city without delay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, October 1, 1861-3 p.m.

Col. B. L. BEALL, First Cavalry, U. S. Army, Comdg. Dist. of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

Notify the regular troops in the District of Oregon to be in readiness to be relieved by volunteers. Recall the detachment now with Lieutenant Mullan. All the regulars go to New York.

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.645}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 2, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have received your letter of the 9th ultimo. I have given orders for the concentration of the regulars, as fast as they can be relieved by the volunteers, but this will be a work of some time, as the regiments of foot volunteers fill up very slowly and some of the posts in Oregon are very remote. Shall I send the regiments of regulars to the East as fast as I can collect them?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, October 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General MANSFIELD, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Instead of proceeding to the Pacific, as directed in Special Orders, No. 160, of the 30th September, the General-in-Chief directs that you repair to Fort Monroe, Va., and report to Major-General Wool without delay.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 23.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 2, 1861.

In compliance with instructions received from the General-in-Chief, the following movements of regular troops in this department are ordered, preparatory to their sailing for New York:

1. The garrison of each of the several posts in the District of Oregon will, upon being relieved by volunteer troops, proceed to Fort Vancouver, from whence they will be sent to this city. The horses and horse equipments belonging to the company of cavalry at The Dalles will be turned over to the company of Oregon volunteers; the horses and equipments pertaining to other companies of cavalry in the district will be brought to this city.

2. The troops serving in the District of Southern California will, with the exception of those stationed at Fort Yuma and New San Diego, be in readiness to concentrate at San Pedro. When relieved by volunteers, the companies at Fort Yuma will unite with that at New San Diego.

3. The garrisons of Forts Churchill, Humboldt, Bragg, Crook, Gaston, Umpqua, and Ter-Waw will be relieved by volunteer troops. When relieved, the companies of the Sixth Regiment of Infantry at these posts will repair to Benicia Barracks, and those of the Fourth Infantry and First Cavalry to this city. The horses, with their equipments, pertaining to companies of the First Cavalry at Forts Churchill and Crook will be brought to this city.

4. The headquarters, and Companies C, H, I, and L of the Third Regiment of Artillery, will be in readiness to sail at a moment’s notice. {p.646} The horses, harness, &c., pertaining to Company C will be turned over to the quartermaster’s department, and the field battery and ordnance stores to the ordnance department.

5. Lieutenant-Colonel Merchant will at once transfer from Companies D, H, I, and L of his regiment a sufficient number of privates to make an aggregate of ninety for each of those companies selected to remain on this coast.

6. Paragraph 1, of Special Orders, No. 165, is revoked. Company L, Third Artillery, will immediately proceed to the Presidio of San Francisco.

7. The troops directed above to repair to this city, will, upon their arrival, receive further instructions.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 4, 1861.

Col. BENJAMIN L. BEALL, First Cavalry, Commanding District of Oregon:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to inform the acting Governor of Washington Territory that the exigencies of the service will not permit the issue of arms to any other than those mustered into the service of the United States.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Los Angeles, October 5, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I arrived at this place last evening. The headquarters of the Fourth Infantry and troops which came down on the Senator will reach here to-day. Everything appears to be perfectly quiet in this place. Captain Davidson is absent with all his command. I understand he has marched in the direction of Fort Yuma to afford protection to the train of wagons returning from that place. As soon as practicable I shall put Colonel Carleton on the march for Warner’s ranch with his entire regiment. There appears to be some difficulty about obtaining horses for the cavalry battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel Davis has declined buying any that have been presented at the prices asked for them. If we had the money to pay at once for such horses as we want, the best plan would be to send out officers to make the purchase in open market. However, there is no necessity for purchasing ordinary horses at exorbitant prices. We can wait awhile without detriment to the public service. There are now only two of the volunteer cavalry companies properly armed for service on horseback, and in a few weeks, at farthest, the horses of the squadron of First Dragoons will be transferred to the volunteers. Having been but a few hours here, I have nothing further to communicate.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth infantry, Commanding.

{p.647}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 7, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Herewith inclosed you will receive copies of orders I have issued since my arrival at this place. In consequence of the absence of all troops from or very near this city, I retained for the present at this place, the headquarters, one company (A) of the Fourth Infantry. Although not in accordance with the general’s orders, yet I trust he will approve of my action, as there is already a large force at San Bernardino, and the movement of Colonel Carleton’s command will require all the means of transportation at our command. I have, as you will perceive, ordered Colonel Buchanan to San Bernardino to inspect the troops and give such orders as to position, &c., as may be necessary. I have sent an express to Fort Yuma with my orders, and calling for a report of the subsistence, quartermaster’s, medical, and ordnance stores on hand. I am anxious to ascertain the amount of subsistence, particularly, as the command I am sending to that place under Colonel Carleton will far exceed in numbers that already there. I have just seen a reliable gentleman from Arizona, who passed Yuma about a week since, who represents everything as perfectly quiet in that quarter. The general may rest assured that the disunion feeling in this section of the State has been grossly exaggerated. There are many men in this district who came originally from the Southern States, and who sympathize with them; but those men will not embark in any revolutionary movements whereby their utter ruin would be rendered certain. Doubtless there is a class of men, with nothing to lose, who are always ready to engage in any enterprise in which there is a possibility of bettering their fortunes. With the force at my disposal, this country will not be in any danger from external or internal foes. Colonel Carleton is diligently engaged in preparing his regiment for the march to Warner’s ranch and Fort Yuma. It is not probable that the colonel will reach Fort Yuma before the 1st of November. I have suspended further action in the business of purchasing horses for the cavalry battalion until I hear from department headquarters. The arrangement made with the gentlemen at this place has proved an entire failure; neither the horses presented nor the prices demanded were acceptable. I believe if we had the cash in hand that all the horses we want could be purchased at an average cost of from $80 to $90 each.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 4, 1861.

I. In obedience to Special Orders, No. 180, from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, the undersigned hereby assumes command of this district.

II. Officers in command of posts or camps within the district will make to these headquarters weekly reports of their commands, with the names in full of all commissioned officers present or absent.

III. Until further orders all leaves of absence to either officers or soldiers for a period of more than twenty-four hours are forbidden, without previous authority from these headquarters.

{p.648}

IV. It is specially enjoined upon all officers in command of troops in the district to enforce the most rigid discipline, pursuing a regular course of theoretical and practical instruction with their officers and men.

V. The special objects to be accomplished by the U. S. troops in this district, and to which the attention of commanding officers will be directed, are to afford peace, protection, and security to the inhabitants residing within its limits, and to maintain the supremacy and due observance of the Constitution and laws of the United States, as well as of the State of California.

VI. The undersigned, having served for more than nine years on the Pacific Coast, appeals with confidence to the patriotic, Union-loving citizens of Southern California for their cordial assistance and co-operation in preserving their beautiful country from the horrors of civil war.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 7, 1861.

I. Col. James H. Carleton, of the First Regiment California Volunteers, will march as soon as practicable with his entire regiment to Warner’s ranch and establish a camp at that place of four companies, under the command of a field officer. Colonel Carleton will then move with the residue of his regiment to Fort Yuma and relieve the garrison of regular troops at that place.

...

III. Until further orders the headquarters of the Fourth Infantry, with Company H, of that regiment, will be established in this city. The acting quartermaster will furnish quarters for the officers and men.

...

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 7, 1861.

Lieut. Col. G. ANDREWS, Sixth Infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

COLONEL: Herewith you will receive my orders assuming command of this district, and also the order for the movement of Colonel Carleton with six companies of his regiment to Fort Yuma.* By the return express I will thank you for a report of the stores on hand at Fort Yuma-subsistence, quartermaster’s, ordinance, and medical. I am specially anxious about the amount of subsistence you may have on hand, as the command of Colonel Carleton will much exceed your present strength.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* See next, ante.

{p.649}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 43.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash-. Ter., October 7, 1861.

I. In compliance with instructions received from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, the U. S. troops in this district are notified to hold themselves in readiness to be relieved by volunteers.

II. The detachment of Company H, First Cavalry, now at the Warm Springs Reservation, will immediately rejoin their company, and the entire horses and horse equipage to that company will be turned over to the Oregon volunteers.

III. The detachments from companies of the Ninth Infantry on duty as escort to Lieutenant Mullan’s wagon-road expedition will be relieved and forthwith join their respective companies.

...

By order of Colonel Beall:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 8, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have this day telegraphed you requesting that 40,000 rations of subsistence may be sent down on the Senator to San Pedro. I presumed that the volunteer troops had subsistence sufficient to enable them to reach their destination. It was only last evening that I ascertained that all the subsistence, both at San Pedro and this place, would barely last until the 17th instant. Colonel Carleton must take at least twenty days’ subsistence. I shall be glad to get from your office any late general orders. No. 52, from the War Department, and No. 13, from Army Headquarters, are the latest I have received.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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THE DALLES, OREG., October 8, 1861.

Col. B. L. BEALL, U. S. Army, Commanding Military District, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: On my way to this place I learned with regret that orders had been received by you to remove all the regular troops from Washington Territory and the State of Oregon. While I fully appreciate the unfortunate necessity which calls for all the available force of the Government in the Eastern States to quell the rebels who are endeavoring to overthrow our institutions, at the same time I cannot be unmindful of the peculiar condition of our own people. Since the close of the Indian outbreak in this country in 1856 the Indians have not been left without the moral effect of quite a large body of troops scattered through various portions of the country. Within the last year discoveries of important mines, almost wholly within the reservation of one of the most powerful tribes of Indians, has induced an influx of miners to that region, thereby rendering outbreaks possible, if not probable. The Government is now in arrears in the fulfillment {p.650} of treaty stipulations with the Indians, and not unfrequent murmurs have been heard from them on that account, and I firmly believe that the moral effect of the presence of troops is necessary to the maintenance of peace. Difficulties have lately arisen at Colville with the Indians in which one white man was killed, and murders have been reported in or near the Bitter Root Valley by the Snake Indians, and I understand serious apprehensions are felt by the inhabitants of the upper country during the winter when the miners shall have left for the season. Another important consideration which ought to be taken into account is the fact that among the recent influx of miners to the region of Walla Walla and the Nez Percé country are many persons entertaining sentiments of hostility to the Government in the present crisis. They, in fact, compose fully one-half of those who will remain in that region during the winter, and threats of taking the military post in Walla Walla have been made, as I have learned, and I am free to say I myself entertain fears that if the troops are withdrawn from that region we shall witness symptoms of rebellion there. The universal public sentiment here is against the withdrawal of the troops. Occupying the position of superintendent of Indian affairs in Washington Territory, I can only enter my protest against this withdrawal of the last vestige of protection at a time we most need it. In the name of the feeble settlements which have long struggled, and are still struggling, to establish themselves here, and to keep this portion of our country loyal to the Union, I would respectfully protest against this withdrawal of the troops as an act which would not be committed if our condition was fully understood at home. I trust that you may make known the necessity of keeping these troops here, and if possible cause the order of removal to be countermanded.

I am, your obedient servant,

B. F. KENDALL, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Washington Territory.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, October 17, 1861.

Respectfully referred to the headquarters Department of the Pacific, for the consideration of the commanding general.

B. L. BEALL, Colonel of Cavalry, Commanding.

[Second Indorsement.]

SAN FRANCISCO, October 26, 1861.

I regret the necessity, but the orders from Washington are positive and must be obeyed.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, Commanding.

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STATE OF CALIFORNIA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Sacramento, October 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. V. SUMNER, U. S. Army, San Francisco:

SIR: I inclose herewith copies of a representation and affidavit of citizens of the counties of Napa and Mendocino relating to the depredations of hostile Indians upon the persons and property of the citizens {p.651} of Long Valley, to which I beg leave to call your attention, and to ask that you will, if within your power, render the required aid. Before acceding to the demands of these citizens for State aid I feel it incumbent upon me to take all necessary steps toward procuring from the representatives of the Federal Government such relief as it may be in their power to afford, as the care and management of Indians is exclusively the province of the Federal Government. A company of cavalry stationed in Long Valley would give ample protection to the citizens of this section, and at the same time afford protection to the U. S. mail service, which seems now to be seriously menaced in this region. An early reply is respectfully solicited.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN G. DOWNEY.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

NAPA CITY, October 8, 1861.

To His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY Governor of California:

The undersigned, citizens of Mendocino and Napa, respectfully represent to your Excellency that in Long Valley, in said county of Mendocino, tribes of wild and hostile Indians are now, and for a long time past have been, committing depredations of the most wanton and atrocious character upon the white people settled in said valley; that they have stolen and run off stock, consisting of hogs, horses, and cattle; that several citizens residing in said valley have become utterly impoverished in consequence of the stealing and killing of their stock by said Indians. And, further, the undersigned represent that said Indians have within the last twelve months killed and murdered several of the settlers in said valley and several persons passing through that section of country. That these outrages have been entirely unprovoked by any hostile or offensive conduct on the part of the whites, and from no other motives than those of willful rapine, pillage, and plunder, a rancorous hatred of the white settlers, and a determination to exterminate or drive them from the settlements they have made in and about said section of country. We further represent to your Excellency that Mr. George H. Woodman, the bearer of this memorial, is a resident of said Long Valley; and that he, together with the rest of his neighbors, has been a severe sufferer in consequence of numerous thefts of his stock committed by said Indians. Further, that we have for a long time known Mr. Woodman as a man of upright character, reliable and humane. In view of the premises, we respectfully petition your Excellency to take such steps for suppressing the evils herein complained of as may be in your power.

HENRY EDGERTON. G. W. TOWLE, District Attorney, Napa County. PULASKA JACKS, County Judge, Napa County. JAS. H. GOODMAN & CO. EDWARD MCGARRY. JOHN B. SCOTT. G. H. CORNWELL. J. BUTTERFIELD. ROBERT CROUCH, County Clerk, Napa County.

{p.652}

[Inclosure No. 2.]

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, County of Napa:

John Wooden, a resident of Napa County, and Anderson Farley, of the same place, being duly sworn, depose and say: That they were in Long Valley, Mendocino County, during the four days succeeding the 21st day of September, A. D. 1861. That they were informed by the settlers in Long Valley and it was generally reported, and by them verily believed, that near said valley one man was attacked by a band of Indians and shot, receiving three wounds from them. That another man was shot at and the ball passed through his hat while on his head. That the same band of Indians, in number from thirty to forty, took the horses belonging to the men who were shot, and killing three of them, drove off the rest, in all eleven head. We were also informed that a band of Indians, supposed to be the same above mentioned, had taken the mail station at Pine or Spruce Grove, situated about forty miles from said valley, burning the building and hay and driving off all the stock belonging to the mail company at that place. That they (the said Indians) threaten to kill and drive out all the white settlers residing in that region of country, and boldly make these threats to the whites. That they are well armed with rifles and revolvers and well understand the use of said weapons.

his ANDERSON x FARLEY. mark.

his JOHN x WOODEN. mark.

Attest:

G. W. TOWLE.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of October, A. D. 1861.

G. W. TOWLE, Notary Public.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 9, 1861.

The following movements of troops will be made at the time specified:

1. Companies A, B, C, D, and B, of the Second (Lippitt’s) and five companies of the Fourth (Judah’s) California Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Maj. James F. Curtis, of the Second, and Lieut. Col. Harvey Lee, of the Fourth, respectively, will be in readiness to embark on the 17th instant for Fort Vancouver. The distribution of these companies to the several posts in the District of Oregon will be made by the district commander, who will receive special instructions on the subject.

2. Each of the following posts will be garrisoned by one company of the Third Regiment of California Volunteer Infantry (Connor’s): Forts Bragg, Gaston, Ter-Waw, and the new post established on Eel River.

3. Colonel Smith, Second California Volunteer Cavalry, will immediately mount and equip two companies of his regiment and have them in readiness to proceed to Fort Churchill on the 17th instant. The commander of this force will be designated hereafter.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.653}

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEERS, Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, October 9, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Comdg. Southern District of California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

COLONEL: Inclosed herewith please find an order directing the movement to-morrow of four companies of infantry toward Warner’s ranch. The transportation will be at least fourteen out of the fifteen wagons now here-perhaps all of them-so that it will be necessary to hire transportation sufficient to move the remaining companies when the subsistence stores come to hand. Mr. Banning is the only person I know who can supply this transportation by that time. Colonel Swords, deputy quartermaster-general, I am informed, paid him $30 per day for each team hauling 4,000 pounds across the desert to Yuma, Mr. Banning furnishing forage and everything required for the teamsters and teams. Mr. Banning will now get a train ready to move these companies at the same price. I desire your authority before I enter into negotiations with him to this end. Surgeon Prentiss has made a requisition for an ambulance to accompany the command which moves to-morrow. If you have one at Los Angeles please direct it to be here this evening if you can spare it. If you have none Mr. Banning has one which can be hired. The Government teams which leave to-morrow will at once be put upon the road to San Diego to haul supplies to Warner’s ranch. The ten teams now coming from San Francisco can be held here for the five companies of cavalry. Captain Moore, who was to have furnished the tenth company of infantry, produced but twenty-six men. I would not accept them as a company, but have mustered them in with this understanding: If the captain can get additional men enough in eight days to make sixty I will call that number a company and organize it. If he fail to produce the men then these are to be assigned to other companies.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 9, 1861.

Col. J. H. CARLETON, First Infantry California Volunteers, Comdg. Troops at Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, Cal.:

COLONEL: I have received your communication of this date. I approve of your arrangements, and authorize you to hire such transportation from Mr. Banning as may be necessary for the movement of the remaining portion of your regiment when the subsistence stores reach you. If the quartermaster at this place has a suitable ambulance, it will be sent to you this evening or early to-morrow morning. If he has none, you can hire one.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.654}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, October 10, 1861. (Received November 5.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, or COMMANDING OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco,. Cal.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs that one of the companies, Third U. S. Artillery, to be left on duty in the Department of the Pacific, be stationed at San Juan Island in command of discreet officer.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 10, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco Cal:

MAJOR: Major Rigg, of the First California Volunteer Infantry, marched this day with four companies of that regiment for Warner’s ranch. The residue of the regiment, under Colonel Carleton will move as soon as the subsistence stores arrive which I asked for by the Senator. As soon as Major Rigg reaches Warner’s ranch his train of wagons will be sent to San Diego for subsistence. I have nothing special to report to-day.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST INFANTRY CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEERS, Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, October 10, 1861.

[Major RIGG:]

MAJOR: On your arrival at Warner’s ranch, on the road toward Fort Yuma, you will select a suitable place for an encampment of four companies of infantry and immediately send off all your wagons (save two to haul wood, &c.), to San Diego for subsistence stores. Your acting quartermaster will go with the train, and you will instruct him to load his wagons with rations complete (all the component parts in just proportion) and return at once to your camp. He will go down to San Diego in three days, load at night, if necessary, and return in four days. I rely upon this for my supplies. Should it so happen that before I come you should be menaced by enemies of our Government, you will be sure that the First Infantry is handsomely represented by your battalion. I have great confidence in you and the men you command. I shall doubtless arrive at Warner’s ranch six days after you have gotten there.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers.

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SURVEYOR-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Olympia, Wash. Ter., October 10, 1861.

General SUMNER:

DEAR SIR: Some two years ago I procured, through the influence of the superintendent of Indian affairs for Oregon and Washington, the {p.655} establishment of a military post on Gray’s Harbor for the protection of the growing settlements in that wild and isolated portion of this Territory. Some of the most wild and hostile tribes are a few miles north of the harbor. Since the withdrawal of the troops they have given unmistakable signs of hostile intentions, and I have just learned from the mail carrier that an Indian had been killed by a white man while in the act of carrying off his property, they having borne with their thieving and insolence until it could not be borne with any longer. Mr. Woods, who shot the Indian to recover his property, is a man that would not have done an act of the kind without justifiable cause. In addition to the general interest I feel in the prosperity and safety of our settlements in this wilderness, I am extremely anxious for the safety of my children and grand-children, who compose a part of that settlement. If they should become victims of savage barbarity, I shall feel that their blood will stain the skirts of those who may have deprived them of that protection they had a right to expect from their Government, and which the establishment of the post promised them as an inducement to pitch their tents in that far-off wild. It is true there are some ten or twelve men there, just enough to provoke the Indians to hostilities, but not enough to afford protection to the settlements. Troops can be transported from San Francisco to Gray’s Harbor as readily and as cheap as to Vancouver. The entrance to the harbor is-safer than that of the Columbia. Besides, small vessels are coming up every few days to Shoal Water Bay for oysters in ballast, only twelve miles south of Gray’s Harbor, and the two bays connected by the best beach road to be found on the coast. The steamer to the sound passes within sight of the barracks, and could touch there with safety without detaining her two hours. Captains Gray and Vancouver went into the harbor with their ships and report twenty one feet on the bar, with plenty of water in the channel and in the harbor, with safe anchorage. Forty years after, Lieutenant Wilkes, of the exploring expedition, made a survey of the harbor and entrance, and reported the same result. I have been on the bar recently and sounded it, and found twenty feet at an unusual low tide. I state these facts to guard you against the many false reports in circulation in regard to the depth of water on the bar and the safety of the entrance and harbor. I think I know your character too well to believe that you would have permitted the abandonment of the post had you been aware of the danger it involved the settlement in, and I think you will agree with me that the life of an innocent babe is not to be put in competition with the cost of supporting a company of soldiers.

Yours, very truly,

ANSON G. HENRY, Surveyor-General of Washington Territory.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 11, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor State of California, Sacramento, Cal.:

GOVERNOR: I have received your letter of the 9th instant. If I can ever get the volunteers I will send enough of them into the Indian country to preserve order. I shall be obliged to send companies of {p.656} volunteers to Oregon of not more than sixty strong. Is there any way in which the raising of these troops can be hastened?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 191.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 11, 1861.

I. Lieut. Col. Albemarle Cady, Seventh Regiment of Infantry, is assigned to the command of the District of Oregon, and will accordingly relieve Col. Benjamin L. Beall, First Cavalry. When relieved Colonel Beall will report at these headquarters, preparatory to sailing for New York with his regiment.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 11, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: It is recommended to me by officers who have served long on this coast, and in this section of the State, that San Pedro would be preferable to San Diego for the concentration of all the troops in this district for embarkation for the East. The troops from Fort Yuma can march to San Pedro in nearly the same time it would take to reach San Diego, and the company at San Diego can be brought to San Pedro without any expense to the Government. It is supposed that the steamer which may be employed would not go into San Diego without being well paid, and if we could concentrate all the troops in the district at one point it might be a saving of much expense to the Government.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

OCTOBER 21, 1861.

Let the present orders be executed. The troops from Fort Yuma will concentrate at San Diego.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, October 12, 1861.*

Col. JUSTUS STEINBERGER, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: At the request of Col. W. H. Wallace, late Governor of Washington Territory, you are hereby authorized to raise and organize a regiment of infantry in that Territory and the country adjacent thereto, for the service of the United States, to serve for three years, or during {p.657} the war. The Governor or Acting Governor of the Territory will please aid in perfecting this organization in such manner as may best promote the interests of the Government; the list of officers, except the colonel, to be certified and sent to this Department by the colonel commanding, with the approval of the Governor or Acting Governor. The organization of this regiment is to be in accordance with the general orders from the Adjutant-General’s Department. In case the regular troops shall have left Fort Vancouver, or the District of Oregon, the colonel herein authorized will be mustered into service by any Army officer in San Francisco, Cal. For this purpose Colonel Steinberger will, immediately upon his arrival in the city, report to the senior officer in San Francisco for information as to the presence or absence of troops in the District of Oregon. In case clothing, arms, equipage, &c., cannot be obtained from the Government stores in the District of Oregon, Colonel Steinberger is authorized to make requisition for them on the commanding officer of the Department of the Pacific.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Acting Secretary of War.

* Another copy of this letter is dated October 18, 1861.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 26.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 12, 1861.

Capt. Julian McAllister, ordnance department, is announced as chief of ordnance at these headquarters, and will be addressed accordingly.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 192.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 12, 1861.

The detachment of the Sixth Regiment of Infantry at the Presidio of San Francisco will be sent at once to Benicia, Cal.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 12, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have been much embarrassed for several months past in consequence of a scarcity of officers with my regiment, the Ninth Infantry. I have no staff officers at my regimental headquarters, Fort Vancouver, neither have I an officer to assist me in my present command. However, it is not staff officers which I need most. I have three companies of the regiment, without a single officer present belonging to either of them. On reaching New York the immediate presence of the company officers will be very necessary, particularly those who have heretofore served with the regiment, but now absent. I beg the general to submit this request to the lieutenant-general.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry.

{p.658}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 12, 1861.

Col. GEORGE WRIGHT:

Come here immediately; by stage if quicker than by boat. I leave for Washington in the next steamer. Denver is to relieve you, and you then go East. Order Carleton by express to send three companies to Fort Yuma and return with the rest. Concentrate all the regulars at San Pedro and San Diego.

K. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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COLD SPRING HOUSE, October 13, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER AT FORT WALLA WALLA:

SIR: Some days ago a number of men came here saying there were over 100 men mining on Salmon River, and were in want of provisions, and that they had viewed out a good trail as they came out. The consequence was that three trains started for that place, one yesterday and two the day before. Not knowing that any hostility existed, seven of us started to overtake the pack trains this morning. When we had proceeded some seven or eight miles, and when near Eagle-of the-Light’s camp, he and two other Indians placed themselves in the trail before us, and said if we went any farther that their men were in the woods close by and were ready for us, and that we must either go back or be killed. Eagle-of-the-Light spoke of Lawyer and others of the Nez Perces as being fools and were blind, but he could see, and that he would join the Snakes, and, being united, they would wipe out all the whites who were in their country, or who attempted to go through it. Now, unless those men who are on Salmon River get assistance soon they are in imminent danger of starving or of being massacred by the Indians. The miners in this vicinity are very poorly armed. In consequence of this, and the great need of immediate and prompt action, we would respectfully solicit your aid.

C. C. FELTON, H. CLIFTON, R. BLEDSOE, J. CREIGHTON, J. V. HINES, A. CARTER, B. BOSTWIC, D. C. COLEMAN, L. FRENCH, [AND MANY OTHERS.]

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 14, 1861.

Col. EDWARD D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

Order of the 16th ultimo just received. I leave in the next steamer, on the 21st instant, with the Third Artillery, part of the Sixth Infantry, and 10,000 muskets. What disposition shall be made of the general staff officers? Colonel Wright ought to remain here in command. The safety of the whole coast may depend upon it.

B. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.659}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 193.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 14, 1861.

1. The headquarters and Companies B, G, and K, Sixth Regiment of Infantry, and the headquarters and Companies C, G, H, L, and M, Third Regiment of Artillery, will embark for New York on the 21st instant. The deputy quartermaster-general and acting commissary of subsistence will furnish the necessary transportation and supplies.

...

4. One of the unmounted companies of the Second Regiment of California Volunteer Cavalry will be detailed for temporary duty at Benicia Barracks, and will proceed to its destination on the 17th instant.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 14, 1861.

Lieut. Col. CHARLES S. MERCHANT, Comdg. Third Regt. of Arty. and Presidio of San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: The following companies of your regiment are selected to remain on this coast: Companies A and I to garrison Alcatraz; Company B to garrison Fort Point; Company D to garrison Fort Vancouver. The general commanding desires you to transfer a sufficient number of men from the companies ordered East (except Light Company C) to make an aggregate of ninety for each of the companies at Alcatraz and Fort Point. You will transfer the men at Fort Umpqua to Company D, of your regiment, selected to remain at Fort Vancouver. If Lieutenant Wildrick belongs to either of the companies he will be directed to join immediately. You will see by the special order of this date that your headquarters and Companies C, G, H, L, and M sail on the 21st instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 14, 1861.

The undersigned having received orders to repair to San Francisco, the command of this district is hereby transferred to Col. James H. Carleton, of the First Infantry California Volunteers.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 14, 1861.

I. The undersigned hereby assumes command of this district.

II. Lieut. Col. Joseph R. West, First Infantry California Volunteers, with Companies E, G, and H of that regiment, will on Wednesday morning, the 16th instant, start en route for Camp Wright, near Warner’s {p.660} ranch. Having arrived at that point, Lieutenant-Colonel West, with Companies B, H, and I, First Infantry California Volunteers, will proceed without delay to Fort Yuma, on the Colorado River, and relieve Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews and all the regular troops, officers and men, now serving at that post. Lieutenant-Colonel West will load his train with subsistence stores at Camp Wright for the garrison at Fort Yuma.

...

IV. Maj. Edward E. Eyre, First Cavalry California Volunteers, with the staff and Companies A, D, and E of that regiment, will proceed without delay to San Bernardino, Cal., and relieve the regular troops stationed at that point under Major Ketchum, Fourth Infantry, now under orders from Colonel Wright, U. S. Army, to proceed to San Pedro, Cal.

...

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Los Angeles, October 14, 1861.

Special Orders, No. 2, of the 7th instant, from these headquarters is modified as follows: Instead of marching to Fort Yuma with six companies, Colonel Carleton will immediately detail Lieutenant-Colonel West with three companies to relieve the garrison of Fort Yuma. Colonel Carleton will then return to this place.

G. WRIGHT Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 5, HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 14, 1861.

I. Colonel Carleton will order three companies of volunteer cavalry to march immediately to San Bernardino to relieve the regular troops at that place. As soon as relieved the regular troops under Major Ketchum will march to San Pedro.

II. The headquarters of the Fourth Infantry are transferred to San Pedro. Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan will proceed immediately with the staff, band, and Company H, Fourth Infantry, to San Pedro, where he will establish a camp and await the arrival of the troops from San Bernardino. The command at San Pedro will be independent of that of the District of Southern California.

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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LOS ANGELES, October 14, 1861.

Colonel CARLETON:

COLONEL: I go to San Francisco to-morrow. Three companies of your regiment go to Yuma. Colonel West cannot go on leave. Must go to Yuma. The rest of your regiment will remain for the present at Camp Latham. Come in this afternoon, I want to see you.

Yours,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, Commanding.

{p.661}

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[OCTOBER 14, 1861.-For Baylor to McCulloch, relating to affairs in Arizona, see Vol. IV, p. 120.]

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 194.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 15, 1861.

1. In consequence of the withdrawal of the regular troops from this coast the chief of ordnance is authorized to increase, by enlistment, the detachment at Benicia Arsenal to an aggregate of eighty men.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, October 15, 1861.

Maj. W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Commanding at San Bernardino:

MAJOR: Agreeably to instructions received from Colonel Wright, U. S. Army, I have ordered Maj. Edward E. Eyre, First Cavalry California Volunteers, with three companies of that regiment to San Bernardino to relieve the force under your command so as to enable you to march [to] San Pedro. Please do me the favor to give to Major Eyre the many useful hints as to the management of affairs in the vicinity of Bernardino which your experience there may suggest. I count confidently on your kindness in this regard. The major will have to hire a private physician. Pray inform him who the best man is that can be employed. Judge Winston’s train, which goes out with Major Eyre, you can have to transport the baggage of your troops to San Pedro. I shall send an ambulance to San Bernardino with some of the sick of the cavalry. This ambulance can be used as transportation for Dr. Randle, ordered to join Colonel West at Chino Ranch.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel, California Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 16, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth U. S. Infantry, Commanding at Fort Yuma, Cal.:

MY DEAR COLONEL: You have doubtless received the orders for the regular troops now under your command at Fort Yuma, to proceed without delay to San Diego preparatory to embarking for New York. Lieutenant-Colonel West, First Infantry California Volunteers, whom you will find to be a most excellent officer and gentleman, goes to Fort Yuma with three companies of volunteer infantry to relieve you. Pray put him in possession of all the facts connected with your post, its surroundings, and its defense, which your experience may suggest. The records, orders, maps, &c., now on file, and the post books, all of which will come into his possession, will give him much information, but a few hours’ conversation with you will be of the greatest service to him. As {p.662} your troops will want only enough of clothing, camp and garrison equipage, subsistence and hospital stores, and ammunition to last them to the coast, I beg you will turn over to Colonel West all of these articles which you can possibly spare. You will only need subsistence to Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch. There you can draw to last your command to San Diego. Make use of Mr. Banning’s train and ambulance to Camp Wright. There you will give the conductor orders to proceed with it without delay to San Pedro. The United States pays $6.30 per day for it. This will admonish you to have no delays en route. At Camp Wright you will find a Government train and ambulance to convey your baggage to San Diego. If it happens to be absent when you arrive at Camp Wright, encamp there until it comes back, so as to be certain that there is no delay to the return of Mr. Banning’s train. The quartermaster’s and subsistence funds and all means of transportation pertaining to Fort Yuma not being needed to your command you will cause them all to be turned over to Lieutenant-Colonel West. I shall try to come to San Diego and see you all before you leave.

With every wish for your health and happiness, I am, my dear colonel, very truly your friend,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Col. First California Vols., Comdg. Dist. of Southern California.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, October 16, 1861.

Lieut. Col. JOSEPH R. WEST, First California Infantry, en route to Fort Yuma:

COLONEL: You are ordered with three companies of the First Infantry California Volunteers to march to Fort Yuma to relieve the present garrison there. It is important to the interest of the service that you reach there with the least possible delay. Besides, promptness in executing orders must be the cardinal point in all movements of the First Infantry. You must know that Fort Yuma in a strategic point of view is an outpost to all of Southern California. It is on the line whence must come the only troops which can possibly menace the State from Texas or Arizona overland. If you use circumspection you can never be surprised there. If you are not surprised your force properly managed, with the desert as an auxiliary, will never be whipped, to say the least. You will seize all the ferryboats, large and small, upon the River Colorado. All the crossing of the river must be done at one point under the guns of the fort. All persons passing into Sonora or to Arizona from California must take the oath of allegiance before they pass; so must all coming into California by the route overland via Yuma. Do not hesitate to hold in confinement any person or persons in that vicinity, or who may attempt to pass to or from California, who are avowed enemies of the Government, or who will not subscribe to the oath of allegiance. Keep an exact record of name, place of residence, age, occupation, and whence he came and whither he is to go, of each person passing the river to or from California. You will assume control of the steamers on the river, if in your judgment such control is vital to your safety or to the interests of your Government. You will promptly report to the officer in command near Warner’s ranch and to myself should you be menaced by an enemy in force. You will {p.663} make any, and if necessary every, sacrifice to destroy that enemy before he reaches this edge of the desert, calling on all the troops at Camp Wright to assist you by a timely advance should it be necessary to this end. Keep your command well supplied, in a high state of discipline and drill, and I have no fears but that the country will have good reports of your conduct.

I am your friend and well-wisher,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 17, 1861.

Maj. RICHARD C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: Inclosed please find General Orders, No. 2,* from these headquarters in relation to the movement of troops to San Bernardino and to Fort Yuma. Also a copy each of a letter to Major Ketchum,** a letter to Colonel Andrews*** and a letter of instructions to Lieutenant-Colonel West.**** The six companies designated in the orders marched from Camp Latham twenty miles toward their destination yesterday, and are now en route. To-day I caused the horses of the squadron, First U. S. Cavalry, at Camp Fitzgerald, to be transferred to the squadron, First Cavalry California Volunteers, remaining at Camp Latham. Will the general authorize the transfer of the Sharps carbines, sabers, &c., in the hands of Davidson’s squadron for rifles to be used on shipboard until that squadron reaches the States?

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

* See p. 659.

** See Carleton to Ketchum, October 15, p. 661.

*** See Carleton to Andrews, October 16, p. 661.

**** See Carleton to West, October 16, ante.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, October 18, 1861.

His Excellency L. J. S. TURNEY, Acting Governor Washington Territory:

SIR: Your communication dated Olympia, Wash. Ter., September 2, has been received. The withdrawal of the force of regular troops from the District of Oregon has been supplied by authority from this office to raise, in the State of Oregon, one regiment of cavalry of volunteers, and one regiment of volunteer infantry in Washington Territory. Col. Justus Steinberger has been appointed colonel of the volunteer regiment of infantry to be raised in your Territory, and is fully authorized to raise, organize, and muster it into the service of the United States for three years or during the war.

Very respectfully,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Acting Secretary of War.

{p.664}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 18, 1861.

Commander B. F. SANDS, U. S. Navy, Commanding U. S. Coast Survey Steamer Active, Harbor of San Francisco, Cal..

SIR: The general commanding the department acknowledges with great pleasure the valuable services rendered by the U. S. Coast Survey Steamer Active, under your command in the transportation of troops and supplies from this city to San Pedro, Cal.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 197.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 18, 1861.

Major Lovell’s command will be relieved at the new post on Eel River by Company A of the Third California Volunteers; the latter will arrive in this city in time to embark for Humboldt on the steamer of the 22d instant. The deputy quartermaster-general and acting commissary of subsistence will secure the necessary transportation and supplies.

By order of Brigadier-General Sumner:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SANTA BARBARA, October 18, 1861.

OFFICER IN COMMAND OF THE FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES AT LOS ANGELES:

The undersigned most respectfully beg leave to represent that in their judgment the safety of loyal citizens of the United States residing in the county of Santa Barbara is in great peril. It is well known that the great bulk of the population of this county consists of native Californians and Mexicans, none of whom have ever been supposed to entertain a sincere attachment to the Government of the United States. During a few days past, since the news of the reverses of the Federal forces at Lexington, bodies of men have collected at night and in the open day who cheer for Jeff. Davis and Beauregard and make no concealment of their warmest sympathy with the rebels. Some of the leaders of the native Californians who control the masses at their will openly declare their sympathies to be with the South. It is believed that some of these have secretly tampered with and stirred up the general mass of the native Californians and Mexicans, and it seems certain that a serious collision must result between them and loyal Americans unless a company of soldiers is sent here without delay. The Californians have a cannon and all the rifles which were formerly possessed by a military company here. The Americans are not well provided with arms, nor is there any union among the Americans. Indeed, some Americans are avowed friends of the rebels, and do much to inflame the native Californians and Mexicans. The population of this county is about 4,000. The total number of Americans, counting men, women, and children, is less than 300. If one or two companies of soldiers are sent there will be no outbreak, probably. They will at any rate form a nucleus around which loyal men can rally. Earnestly entreating {p.665} prompt action in the premises, as delay may prove not only dangerous, but fatal to not only the peace of this place but to the lives of loyal Americans, we dispatch this by a special messenger, George Stone, under-sheriff of this county.

Very respectfully,

F. J. MAGUIRE, County Judge. CHAS. E. HUSE, District Attorney. CHAS. E. COOK, County Clerk. THOS. DENNIS, Sheriff.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 20, 1861.

Respectfully forwarded for the consideration and orders of the general commanding the department.

My own opinion is it would be better to put San Diego County (at least so much of it as includes the Colorado River), San Bernardino, and Santa Barbara Counties under martial law, and so order it that all malcontents and all open sympathizers with the South be tried by a military commission. Unless this be done the troops would be powerless to stop seditious language.

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First Cavalry California Volunteers, Commanding.

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OFFICE INDIAN AGENT, WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION, Dalles, Oreg., October 18, 1861.

Captain WHITTLESEY, Commanding Fort Dalles, Oreg.:

SIR: I am informed that on the 15th instant a band of Snake Indians came into the reservation and drove off 100 head of horses, the property of friendly Indians on the reservation. The Indians report two of their men missing, supposed to be killed-or captured. Owing to this late incursion of the Snakes upon the friendly Indians, I am compelled to make a requisition upon you for a detachment of men to assist in retaking the property already stolen, and to protect the reservation from further depredations. Without protection the Indians will not remain upon the reservation, and the property of the Government will be unsafe.

I remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. LOGAN, Indian Agent, Oregon.

[First indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Dalles, Oreg., October 19, 1861.

ACTING ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver:

The within communication from the Indian agent is respectfully forwarded for the action of the commander of the district. While I feel convinced of the necessity of keeping a picket of fifteen or twenty {p.666} men at the Warm Springs Reservation for the defense-of the reservation Indians against the Snakes, yet having just recalled the detachment of Company B, First Cavalry, in conformity with orders and holding my command in readiness to be relieved from duty here by volunteers, I do not feel authorized to act in the premises. An expedition should have been made against the Snakes in question this fall, but this could not well be done at this late season, and not at all without a larger garrison at this post than one small company. I would respectfully suggest that one company of the California volunteer infantry about arriving at Fort Vancouver be sent here at once, with orders to throw out a detachment of twenty men to guard the Warm Springs Reservation for the winter. The company of Oregon cavalry ordered to be mustered in here makes no progress, and cannot be counted upon for the defense of this frontier at present.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. H. WHITTLESEY, Captain, First Cavalry, Commanding Post.

[Second indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, November 1, 1861.

By oversight, this was not sent to department headquarters at an earlier day. It is now respectfully forwarded.

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh infantry, Commanding District.

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WILLARD’S HOTEL, October 19, 1861.

THOMAS A. SCOTT:

DEAR SIR: While at Altoona last evening I received the following dispatch, which may be of interest:

The Pacific telegraph line completed to Utah. A dispatch from Brigham Young, dated Great Salt Lake City, October 18, to J. H. Wade, president of Pacific Telegraph Company, at Cleveland, Ohio, congratulates him and his associates upon the success of the enterprise, and expresses his devotion to the constitutional Government of the United States.

The line from San Francisco to Great Salt Lake City is nearly completed, and direct telegraphic communication between the Atlantic and the Pacific will no doubt be established by 1st of November.

Very respectfully,

ANSON STAGER.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 28.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. Sumner having been recalled for duty in the East, the command of this department, in obedience to the instructions of the General-in-Chief, devolves on Col. George Wright, of the Ninth Regiment of Infantry.

By order of Colonel Wright:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.667}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 20, 1861.

Messrs. F. J. MAGUIRE, CHARLES E. HUSE, CHARLES E. COOK, and THOMAS DENNIS, Santa Barbara, Cal.:

GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 18th instant asking for troops to be stationed at Santa Barbara to prevent trouble between Union men and those who openly sympathize with the South. At the present moment, in consequence of movements that have to be made to enable the regular troops to come in to the coast preparatory to their embarking for New York, it is impossible to send any of the volunteer force under my command to Santa Barbara. I will forward your communication to department headquarters for the consideration and orders of the general. Meantime I beg you will rest assured that I have at heart the welfare and safety of all good Union men in your county.

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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FORT CHURCHILL, NEV. TER., October [201,1861.

The ADJUTANT, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders from headquarters Fort Churchill, dated September 21, 1861, I left this post on the 23d of September with Company A, First Cavalry, and arrived in Ruby Valley on October 5. I saw the chief of that valley, who is also principal chief of his tribe, which includes all Indians within fifty or sixty miles of Ruby Valley. He expressed himself to be perfectly friendly toward all whites, and promised that none of his tribe should interfere with them in any manner whatever. I find that all the Indians in the Territory are perfectly destitute of provisions. They usually lived during the winter on pine nuts and grass seed, together with what little game they could kill. There are no pine nuts this year, and all, or nearly all, of their grass has been cut by the stage company or citizens living on the road. The chiefs and also the Indian agent tell me that unless Government gives them something to eat they will starve to death this winter. If any outbreak occurs it will be because they are driven to it by starvation.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. BAKER, First Lieutenant, First Cavalry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication from the Assistant Secretary of War, dated on the 21st ultimo, inclosing a letter from C. E. Bennett, of San Bernardino, Cal., addressed to the Secretary of State. The measures which were taken by General {p.668} Sumner to secure the quiet and peace of the District of Southern California have thus far produced the most happy results. When I left Los Angeles on the 15th instant everything was perfectly quiet, doubtless attributable in a great measure to the presence of our troops at the various points. After the withdrawal of the regulars there will remain in the southern district of this State a regiment of infantry and a battalion of cavalry, fifteen companies in all, the whole commanded by Col. James H. Carleton, an experienced officer, and well acquainted with that country and the inhabitants. The progress of events in the southern section of that State, as well as in the adjoining Territories, will be carefully observed, and an additional force promptly advanced if necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a copy of your communication dated on the 24th ultimo, and addressed to Col. Thomas R. Cornelius, H on. B. F. Harding, and R. F. Maury, esq. The District of Oregon, and indeed the whole Department of the Pacific, have been stripped of all the clothing we had to supply the volunteers now in service, and there are no arms suitable for cavalry service remaining in store. We are now making clothing of all kinds by contract in this city; it will be of an excellent quality, and cost but little more than the clothing received from the East.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, October 21, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN G. DOWNEY, Governor State of California, Sacramento, Cal.:

There is no authority to receive volunteers for the artillery.

E. V. SUMNER, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 21, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, First California Volunteers, Comdg. Southern Dist. of California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The colonel commanding the department desires the troops at San Bernardino and Los Angeles under orders for the East to be concentrated at New San Pedro certainly by the 1st proximo. These troops will sail on the next steamer from this port, and it is desirable {p.669} that everything should be in readiness for embarkation. Mr. Wentworth, superintendent of Indian affairs, wishes to visit several of the Indian tribes living on or near King’s River, and will call upon you for an escort, which, if practicable, the colonel desires you to furnish. The colonel thinks a small mounted escort will be sufficient.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Camp near San Bernardino, Cal., October 21, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

SIR: Yesterday three companies of cavalry (California volunteers), aggregate 272, reached this place for duty in this section of the country. To-day Companies A, D, and F, Fourth Infantry, aggregate 169, will leave this place for San Pedro, Cal., in obedience to department orders. So soon as transportation shall be furnished I shall leave this post with Companies G and K, Fourth Infantry, and Company E, Ninth Infantry, for San Pedro, Cal., in obedience to department orders. I applied to district headquarters several days since for transportation, and am looking daily for its arrival.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Major Fourth Infantry, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST CAVALRY CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEERS, Camp Carleton, October 21, 1861.

Col. JAMES II. CARLETON, Commanding Los Angeles District, Los Angeles:

MY DEAR COLONEL: I arrived here yesterday morning about 12 o’clock, being the fifth day after leaving Camp Latham. I found it necessary, in order to follow your instructions about avoiding the Cocomungo Desert, that I should camp on the Santa Aña River about ten miles from San Bernardino on the night of the fourth day. My camps throughout the march were favorably located with plenty of fuel and good water, and my men arrived at Camp Carleton, with a few exceptions, in fine condition and good spirits. On my arrival at Major Ketchum’s camp I found it necessary to camp temporarily in the same inclosure with him. This I deemed advisable in consequence of my being unable in the short time I had before the arrival of my command to look out a suitable permanent camp-which when I have made the selection of will bear the above name-as well as to be near him, that I might with greater facility receive the supplies he may have left to turn over on his departure for San Pedro, which he designs making in two detachments, one of which left this afternoon intending to pass over the Cocomungo Desert to-night; the remaining three companies leave here on the return of the train. Major Ketchum came to the conclusion of moving as above because, as he stated, there was not sufficient transportation for his six companies. I have endeavored, in accordance with your instructions to ascertain the exact amount of supplies Major Ketchum will be able to turn over to me, but as yet have {p.670} not been successful. His acting quartermaster informs me he thinks about ten days’ rations, five of which were drawn this morning, the five days’ rations which I started with being out last night. The train which left here to-day will not probably return in less than ten days, and unless they make a good trip not so soon. Would it not be well to start me supplies by other wagons, for in case the train does not return in ten days I will be obliged to go into this market and purchase, which I would rather avoid. Doctor Dickey, whom I expected to find in the employ of Major Ketchum, was not in his camp. The major was without a surgeon, being unable to agree upon the pay with Doctor Dickey. I had an interview with the doctor this morning. He will only agree to remain in camp on the same pay as assistant surgeon. I could not employ him to visit here once per day at a less price. What shall I do about it? He consented to visit camp every morning at 9 o’clock to attend to those men who really require medical service until I heard from you, at the rate of $50 per month, which is the usual price, as you are aware, for daily visits. Major Ketchum has a very good flag-staff which he will leave. As this is the headquarters of the First Cavalry, will you not send me regimental colors? I hope you will as soon as possible send the saddles left by the three companies now with me, as whispers are already circulated among the men that they are to be turned into infantry. That is the only thing I fear for a serious breach of discipline. I hope, therefore, you will not only send my saddles on the return of the train, but that the horses will be soon forthcoming also. Should I be again ordered on a five or ten days’ march before they are mounted I fear the consequences. Of course no exertions would be spared by myself, but should anything like a general mutiny occur, overboard I go, whether my fault or not. For God’s sake do not leave me long with this only cause of danger hanging over my head. Captain Singer left the pistols belonging to his company at Camp Latham in charge of Captain Fritz. Please send them by return of train. I now have 4,000 rounds Sharps carbine cartridges, 11,000 rounds rifle, and 11,000 rounds pistol. Major Ketchum took great pains to give me all the information in his possession relative to the people in this part of the country, together with written information received at headquarters in San Francisco a long time since, all of which shall receive my immediate attention. I will keep you informed of all that takes place here.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD E. EYRE, Major First Cavalry California Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 200.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 22, 1861.

...

2. Col. A. J. Smith, Second California Cavalry, will detail a company of his regiment to be in readiness to proceed to Fort Crook on the 26th instant. Upon the arrival of the volunteers the present garrison will comply with paragraph 3 of General Orders, No. 23.

...

By order of Colonel Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.671}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I have been ordered to relieve Col. George Wright, Ninth Infantry, in the command of this district. My address is Los Angeles, Cal.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Adjutant-General THOMAS, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: There has been established a new camp, garrisoned by four companies of First Infantry California Volunteers, near Warner’s ranch, on the road hence to Fort Yuma, Cal. It is called Camp Wright, and is commanded by Maj. Edwin A. Rigg, First Infantry California Volunteers. The companies are Company D, Capt. Hugh A. Gorley; Company E, Capt. Thomas L. Roberts; Company F, Capt. Washington L. Parvin; Company H, Capt. Henry A. Greene, First Infantry California Volunteers. Please send to that camp and those companies blank post returns, blank company returns, and such other blank rolls, returns, books, orders, &c., as are necessary. The nearest post-office is San Diego, Cal.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Maj. RICHARD C. DRUM, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I last evening received a telegram from you in these words: “The troops at Fort Yuma will sail from San Diego as directed on the 1st of November. By order,” &c. The commander of the department, General Wright, is aware that it will be impossible for the troops at Yuma to be relieved and reach San Diego by the 1st proximo, so I conclude the telegram is incorrectly reported here; that the original reads “as directed on the 1st of October.” I have reports of great scarcity of water on the desert. I have sent an express to Colonel West and to Colonel Andrews, with letters in relation to the passage of the desert, copies of which I herewith inclose. Would it not be well to send down, say, ten more teams? This would save the necessity of hiring transportation in all ordinary movements of troops, or for post purposes. The mules could be kept as cheaply here, perhaps, as above, and if they are on hand, and not required in the upper country, I would like to have them, but not if they have to be purchased.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.672}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Lieut. Col. JOSEPH R. WEST, En route to Fort Yuma:

I have received and forwarded Captain McMahon’s resignation, but it was not made in form and should have been directed to the general commanding the Department of the Pacific. (See paragraph 1647, Revised Regulations of the Army.) Leave the captain in arrest at Camp Wright, if he would prefer staying there to going on with his company, until orders in his case are received from department headquarters, provided he forwards through you his resignation, as required. Otherwise let him go on to Fort Yuma. I send you the Revised Regulations. Observe Article III. and Article XXVI. Have your officers and non-commissioned officers recite their tactics, commencing at the beginning of the first volume and going through, seriatim, both volumes. Report at the end of each month the progress you have made. It will be important that you at once send forward a party, even if they make forced marches, to clean out the wells. Perhaps Carrillo and his men and Dean can do thins. To be certain that you have not too many men and animals at a watering place at one time, you had better cross the desert by companies, each one day behind the other. Send word ahead to Colonel Andrews, that he may at once detach one of his companies as fast as yours, one by one, arrive. The companies meeting you can, if you have an understanding with Colonel Andrews, so overlap their marches with yours as not to bring two companies at the same water at once. You had better go with the advance company, that you may send back words of advice to those in the rear. All this is to be done only in the event that the waters on the desert have disappeared and the wells become filled. Should this not be so, of course your troops can keep together. I feel great anxiety that your men make the march without suffering. Better march mostly by night from Vallecito on. Great forecast and care must be exercised by yourself in this matter. Have the men drink heartily before setting out on a march and husband their canteens of water. I desire you will report to me all the details of how you managed this matter and give me your views as to the best method for troops to cross the Yuma Desert. Do this after you have become established at Yuma. Hadji Ali, the Turk who takes this letter to you, can give you much information. Make use of him as an expressman to Fort Yuma. Send him back as soon as you yourself have arrived there.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

NOTE.-Since writing the foregoing I have ordered Colonel Andrews to send a company of infantry to help clean out the wells, commencing on the east side of the desert. So let Hadji Ali, the expressman, go on without delay.

J. H. C.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

COLONEL: I am informed that the wells upon the Yuma desert have become filled with sand and require cleaning out.

{p.673}

You will immediately send a party of men from Fort Yuma on the road from the Colorado River toward Carriso Creek to open them until the party meets the troops now en route for Fort Yuma under Lieutenant-Colonel West. The party you send may be one company of infantry. Let it use the post teams now at Yuma for transportation. This company can continue on to Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch, and there await your arrival. The teams can remain at Camp Wright until a party of recruits arrive from this place en route for Fort Yuma, which will be in a few days. Send out water barrels and kegs to be filled at the wells and left there for the advancing troops. There must be no delay in this. Inform me by return express of your action in the matter.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 22, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Comdg. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The steamer which leaves this city on the 26th instant will take to Fort Vancouver five companies of the Fourth Regiment of California Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Lee. These companies will, the colonel commanding the department directs, be stationed as follows: One company at Fort Vancouver, one at Steilacoom, one at The Dalles, one at Hoskins, and one at Yamhill. The company for Fort Steilacoom will be designated by you on the arrival of these troops at Vancouver, and will be kept at the latter post until the arrival of the steamer leaving this place on the 7th of November. A subaltern of this company will be sent overland to relieve Captain Woodruff, in charge of the quartermaster’s and commissary property, so that on the arrival of the volunteer company there will be no delay in the embarkation of Woodruff’s command. On the arrival at Vancouver of the steamer of the 7th, Company D, Third Artillery, and the volunteer company for Steilacoom will be sent to their respective stations. The artillery company will be left at San Juan, and the steamer proceeding to Steilacoom will leave the company of volunteers and take on board Captain Woodruff’s command. On its return the steamer will touch at San Juan and take on board Captain English’s company, both commands coming direct to this city. This will give Captain English time to turn over his command. Captain Black’s company and the headquarters of the Ninth Infantry (non-commissioned staff, band, &c.), and the company at the Cascades (Captain Van Voast) will be sent on the return steamer to this city. The post at the Cascades will be abandoned and the movable property sent to Fort Vancouver. You will direct Lieutenant Wildrick to turn over to the assistant adjutant-general at these headquarters on his arrival here all funds pertaining to the adjutant-general’s department now in his possession.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.674}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 28, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN WHITEAKER, Governor State of Oregon, Salem, Oreg.:

SIR: The War Department having authorized Colonel Cornelius of Oregon, to raise a regiment of cavalry for service in that district, I have the honor to request that your Excellency will suspend the enrollment of the cavalry company at Fort Dalles, as requested in my communication to your Excellency in the early part of last month, when I was in command of the District of Oregon.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 23, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that I arrived at this place on the 21st instant, and that I have this day relieved Col. B. L. Beall, First Cavalry, in the command of the district.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 23, 1861.

Maj. H. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that Major Curtis with Companies A, B, C, D, and E, of the Second Infantry California Volunteers, arrived at this place on the 21st instant in good condition generally. Measures have been taken for the distribution of these companies, and they will be soon sent to their respective destinations. Major Curtis with two companies has been assigned to Fort Colville, and will leave here on the 25th instant for that post. This is the earliest date I find at which he could be moved from here without incurring unnecessary detention on the way. The delay has enabled him to put his command in more complete condition than it was in when he left San Francisco. I have been obliged, in view of present contingencies at Fort Dalles, to place one of these companies at that post contrary to the tenor of my instruction as to the distribution of them. The necessity has arisen in part from the removal of the guard from the Warm Springs Reservation to join its company at The Dalles. The Snakes have availed themselves of the opportunity to run off from the reservation about 100 horses belonging to the friendly Indians, as the agent reports to Captain Whittlesey. I shall have the guard replaced at once from the company of volunteers.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

{p.675}

SAN FRANCISCO, October 23, 1861.

Colonel CADY, Fort Vancouver:

Suspend the enrollment of the cavalry company at The Dalles.

By order:

RICHARD C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 23, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon:

SIR: The colonel commanding the department desires you to give the necessary orders suspending the raising of the company of mounted volunteers by Captain Whittlesey. The regiment to be organized under Colonel Cornelius will, the colonel thinks, be ample for the whole country. If any men have been raised for this company the colonel desires you to disband them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 23, 1861.

Pursuant to Special Orders, No. 191, current series, from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, the undersigned hereby relinquishes to Lieut. Col. Albemarle Cady, Seventh Infantry, the command of this district.

B. L. BEALL Colonel First Cavalry, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 23, 1861.

Pursuant to Special Orders, No. 191, current series, from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific, the undersigned hereby assumes command of this district.

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 44.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 23, 1861.

...

II. Maj. James F. Curtis, Second Infantry California Volunteers, will, with Companies C and D of same regiment, proceed to Fort Colville, Wash. Ter., via Walla Walla, and relieve Major Lugenbeel, Ninth Infantry, in command of that post. The latter, being relieved, will without delay repair with companies of the Ninth Infantry now under his command to Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter. Surg. I. Parry is assigned {p.676} to duty with Major Curtis’ command, and will relieve the assistant surgeon at Fort Colville.

III. Capt. C. W. Smith, Second Infantry California Volunteers, will, with Company A, same regiment, proceed to Fort Dalles, Oreg., and report for duty to the commanding officer at that post.

IV. Capt. J. C. Schmidt, Second Infantry California Volunteers, will, with Company B, same regiment, proceed to Fort Hoskins, Oreg., and relieve Captain Dent, Ninth Infantry. The latter on being relieved will, without delay, repair with his company to Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.

...

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 24, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

COLONEL: I wish you to keep all the clothing in depot at Vancouver for issue to the regular troops east of the Cascades, when they arrive at your headquarters. The troops from Colville, and more particularly the escort with Lieutenant Mullan, will arrive at Vancouver much in want of many articles of winter clothing necessary for their comfort on the trip to New York. The lieutenant in command of the escort will remain on duty with it until the men join their proper companies, when he will be assigned to duty with the Ninth Infantry under orders for the East.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 24, 1861.

Lieut. Col. ALBEMARLE CADY Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The colonel commanding the department desires you to have the horses and horse equipments pertaining to Captain Whittlesey’s company brought to and turned over at Fort Vancouver, and not to the volunteers as directed. Assistant Surgeon Craig has been ordered by the Secretary of War to repair to Washington. The order, therefore, retaining him at Camp Pickett is revoked, and he will accompany the movement as directed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.677}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 10.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 24, 1861.

...

II. Capt. John W. Davidson, First Cavalry, with his squadron will march to New San Pedro on the 26th instant, or as soon thereafter as practicable, and report to Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan, Fourth U. S. Infantry.

...

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Vols., Commanding Cavalry and Infantry.

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[OCTOBER 24, 1861.-For Baylor to commanding officer C. S. troops en route to Fort Bliss, relating to affairs in Arizona, &c., see Vol. IV, p. 127.]

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 25, 1861.

I. First Lieut. Benjamin C. Cutler, adjutant First Infantry, is announced as acting assistant adjutant-general for this district. All official communications front officers and soldiers serving within the district which are intended for these headquarters will be addressed to him. Those pertaining to regimental matters exclusively will be addressed to him as adjutant First Infantry California Volunteers.

II. First Lieut. Lafayette Hammond, regimental quartermaster First Infantry California Volunteers, is announced as depot quartermaster for the district, and he will immediately relieve in his duties as depot quartermaster First Lieut. Samuel McKee, First U. S. Cavalry. Lieutenant Hammond will also receipt for such public property as Capt. John W. Davidson, First U. S. Cavalry, has on hand as commander of Camp Fitzgerald.

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 25, 1861.

I. Captain Roberts’ company, of the First Infantry California Volunteers, will as soon as practicable proceed from Camp Wright to San Diego, Cal., and relieve the company of the Fourth U. S. Infantry now stationed at that post, and which is under orders to embark at San Diego for New York on the steamer which will leave San Francisco for Panama on the 21st proximo.

...

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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CAMP WRIGHT, Friday Evening, October 25, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Los Angeles:

COLONEL: I prefer without form to give you as near as possible an account of my progress in the present friendly note in preference to {p.678} any official communication. I have elsewhere given you a journal of the road. The celerity of our movements amounted to marching 140 miles in just one week. Is not that creditable for green troops? The halt here has been the bother. The troops arrived here on Wednesday, 23d, at 12 m. The train not until the following day. Then the train that went to San Diego did not reach here until to-day. I was unavoidably delayed thereby. However, I dispatched on yesterday Lieutenant Benson with seven men, accompanied by Keene, the guide, to clean out the wells. Hadji Ali arrived at 9 o’clock last night. Finding myself at liberty to do that very advisable thing, divide the command, I moved off Captain Calloway’s company with sixteen days’ rations at 7 o’clock this morning. I follow with Dresher to-morrow, and Company H comes on Sunday, the commissary’s train on Monday. All three companies will carry their baggage and sixteen days’ rations. Then there will be 1,400 pounds ammunition, 1,000 pounds clothing, and 38,600 pounds commissary stores. I make up Banning’s contract as follows: Company wagons, 6; ammunition and clothing, &c., 1; hospital field and staff, 1; twelve, averaging 4,000 pounds each. Total, 20 wagons. I could not go forward with the first company, as there was too much to arrange here to-day. Had I not been compelled to wait for the train from San Diego I should have gone on with all to-day. Perhaps it is better as it is. The changing of companies and repacking of provisions has also involved delay. I wrote to Colonel Andrews last night, giving him an exact account of my proposed movements, and leaving him to time his accordingly. I expect to be at Fort Yuma by the 5th proximo, twenty days from Camp Latham. Changes considered, is not this fair time? I shall rely on jerked beef on the desert-in fact, from here. Upon that article and the beans I shall report hereafter. Both promise well. I shall endeavor to give you such information in regard to our march across the desert as will prove useful in further movements of troops. Carrillo’s men have not turned up. In fact, he cannot get any. I shall take him and his son to Yuma, when if he proves no more useful than he has, I shall send him in with an express to report to you for further action. Keene is worth a dozen of him. I shall rely mostly for information as to the enemy upon the Indians up the Gila and Colorado. You must bear in mind that should it become necessary to evacuate the fort I have no train to accompany me thence. I shall fight them to the bitter end sure, standing or running. The enemy could send an advance party and clean out the wells, I suppose. I am imagining all his resources, perhaps making some for him. On the entire road from the San Gabriel River I have heard of gangs of armed men, from three to ten in a party, making the best of their way to the Colorado. Of course they had preceded us. I have given Major Rigg a copy of your instructions to me that he may follow them in detaining avowed rebels. I have made some presents to the Indians here, and believe that they can be relied on to give the major information. The camp should, in my judgment, be moved in to Oak Grove. Colonel Andrews can halt here, and the major send him up the required subsistence; the distance fifteen miles and road superior. That a paradise, this a tophet. The news about Denver is glorious. Is not General Wright now in our way? However, we will all fulfill our destiny as you say, but I would be better pleased to hear of his being transferred to a more active field. When you get the department and I the district, there will still be fresh worlds to conquer.

In conclusion, I would say that I am fully impressed with the responsibility of my command. Green troops and an inexperienced commander could scarcely be more severely tested. I brace myself to {p.679} the trial, and shall endeavor to meet each new trouble with another link to let out. No doubt you were aware of the delicacy of this expedition, but I scarcely think to its full extent. Secesh looks ominous from the other side, but I have no fears for the result. Captain McMahon remains here. Elsewhere I forward his resignation addressed to General Wright. I send this by special express, and have given the rider the assurance that he shall be paid the customary fee. I think it would be advisable to have no more beans brought down from San Francisco at all. Enough can be had in the district to supply the whole command. I inclose Don Abel Stearns’ account for beef. His team driver claims to have been delayed on the road one day by me. This is so, but Mr. Stearns can well afford to pay him, as he has charged too much for transportation. I have kept this letter open before me all this evening. It is therefore rather desultory.

Yours, truly,

J. H. WEST.

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CAMP WRIGHT, San Diego county, October 25, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Comdg. First Regt. Infantry California Volunteers, Los Angeles:

COLONEL: I wrote to you the day that I arrived here, which, I suppose, you received. I camped near Señor Carrillo’s house, where we mow are. The location for a camp here is a beautiful one. Water is plenty and good and wood can be easily procured, but the climate is objectionable. It blows terribly the greater portion of the time, and Doctor Prentiss thinks it unhealthy. I have examined nearly every inch of the entire ranch, and can find none better than this. The camp is situated about one mile north of Carrillo’s house and at the intersection of the San Diego road with the road to Yuma. The only place that I know of near here is Oak Grove (or Cable’s), twelve miles from here. There is plenty of water and wood at that place. I sent forward the teams in charge of Lieut. R. S. Barrett, acting assistant quartermaster, to San Diego, as per instructions from you. They returned to this camp to-day with commissary stores. Mr. Barrett reports no quartermaster’s stores of any description at San Diego. The train will leave again for San Diego on the 27th. I am afraid that they will not be in a condition to make as good time as before (seven days), from the fact that a number of the mules are without shoes and cannot be shod either here or at San Diego. There are no shoes or nails at either place. We are also short of pants for the command. Colonel West takes 100 pairs from us here, which only leaves seventy-one pairs. Blankets we have none at all, and one blanket is not sufficient (in my opinion) to keep the men warm in this climate. The nights are extremely cold, and becoming more so every night. Complaints of sleeping cold are made by the men. We have no woolen socks or drawers, and but 204 pairs of bootees. Overcoats also we have none on hand. I would suggest that those articles be forwarded as soon as practicable. The roads will soon be in a bad condition from here to San Diego and transportation will be difficult. I would call your attention also to the company property left at Camp Latham, to be shipped via San Diego. The companies-that is to say, Company I, Company D, and Company F-brought but one pick, one spade, and one ax with them, besides but a few camp-kettles and mess-pans. They are now lunch in want of all those articles. I also forward a requisition for stationery, &c., for this camp. We have none of any kind here. I would {p.680} also like to have blank clothing rolls, weekly reports, officers’ pay accounts, and what other blanks and papers you may deem necessary for use here. The command here are in good health and spirits, and if an opportunity occurs will give a good account of themselves. They are improving rapidly in their drills, and, I am happy to say, orderly and obedient to their officers. They stood the march remarkably well after the first two or three days. Their feet blistered somewhat, but by frequent bathing soon got well, and when our destination was reached were in condition to undergo almost any kind of fatigue. Lieutenant-Colonel West will give you the particulars of the whole command here and of those already on the route to Fort Yuma. I find that the barley has been nearly all bought up by speculators, and 4 cents per pound is now asked for it here. Mr. Carrillo, to whom you referred me for barley, has sold out to other parties, and of course cannot furnish any more; but I found a man, Samuel Warneck, who has 60,000 pounds of fine barley and will sell to Government for 2 1/2 cents per pound. I will contract with him for what we require and get him to hold the balance until I can hear from you. His barley is superior to any that I have seen here. The 2 1/2 cents is the price at his ranch, but we will have teams and men enough to haul it. His brother also has some 10,000 or 12,000 pounds. Your instructions in reference to this section of the country will be carried out to the letter.

Respectfully,

EDWIN A. RIGG, Major, Commanding Camp Wright.

P. S.-Stoves for the Sibley tents would be very acceptable.

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OCTOBER 25, 1861.

DEAR RIGG: Send Roberts down at your earliest convenience by a train going one of its regular trips for supplies. The telegraph is through to the States. In a battle fought the 21st of October at Leesburg, Va., General Baker was killed while cheering on his men. I have not heard yet how the battle went, but probably in our favor. Send the express on to overtake West. As he returns write me all your news. Keep your command ready to fight. Drill three times a day and have all your officers recite tactics.

Truly, your friend,

CARLETON.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 46.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 25, 1861.

I. Capt. J. C. Schmidt, Second Infantry California Volunteers, will, on taking command at Fort Hoskins, Oreg., detach a subaltern and eighteen enlisted men to proceed to Fort Umpqua as promptly as possible and relieve the detachment of the Third Artillery now stationed there.

...

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.681}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 26, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, California Vols., Comdg. District of Southern California:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to acknowledge the receipt of a letter addressed by you to certain citizens of Santa Barbara County and to say in reply that two companies of volunteer infantry will be sent to Santa Barbara so soon as they can be organized.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 26, 1861.

Maj. EDWARD E. EYRE, First Cavalry Cal. Vols., Comdg. at San Bernardino, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have received yours of the 25th instant. I do not wish you to contract for forage, at least until you get your horses. Then, if for purposes of speculation people raise the price unreasonably of forage, &c., I will not buy of them. I will move the troops or haul supplies from some other localities. Buy only what you need from day to day. As I before intimated, all bargains involving an expenditure of public money, even to a dollar, must have your written approval. The allowance of wood is greater than you can consume, so cause to be issued by your quartermaster only what is absolutely necessary. I wish you to have your rifle company drill according to Hardee in the manual of the piece. I send you fifteen muster and pay rolls for your three companies for October 31. I believe you have others on hand. Be prudent with them, as when these are gone we shall have to rule what we need till others come. Make out five rolls to a company-one to keep in the company, one to send to department headquarters, one to send to the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, and two for the paymaster.

I am, major, respectfully,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 26, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth infantry, Commanding Fort Yuma, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to conduct your present command to San Diego, when you will turn it over to Major Haller, Fourth Infantry, or the senior officer present. You will then comply with the orders you have received from the Adjutant-General’s Office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.682}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 26, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to acknowledge the receipt of Mr. Kendall’s letter,* protesting against the removal of the regular troops from the District of Oregon, with Colonel Beall’s indorsement thereon. The general regrets the necessity for the removal of these troops, but the orders from Washington are positive, and must be obeyed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Kendall to Beau, October 8, p 649.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 27, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, U. S. Army, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have received a letter from Lieutenant-Colonel West. He had reached Camp Wright; his men in fine health and spirits. He (as well as all others) agrees that the camp in that vicinity should be at Oak Grove, fifteen miles this side of Warner’s ranch, or preferably at Temecula, a more strategic point, twenty-three miles and a half this side of Oak Grove. It will shortly be very cold, with snow, at Warner’s ranch. I beg to have authority to move Camp Wright to one of these last-named places, i.e., Oak Grove or Temecula, as soon as practicable after the companies of Colonel Andrews’ command have passed into San Diego. I inclose herewith an itinerary of Colonel West’s march to Camp Wright from Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, Cal. I also inclose Captain McMahon’s resignation. It must take place on the 31st instant, because that is the date of the resignation he forwarded to the Governor. (See paragraph 1647, Revised Regulations.) I would recommend that the beans needed at Camp Wright and Fort Yuma be bought at or near Warner’s ranch, where they are abundant and cheap, and better than the American beans. I have written to Colonel Babbitt to have the stoves for the Sibley tents sent at once for Camp Wright and the camp near San Bernardino. They should be sent at once; also some blouses and trousers for the First Cavalry California Volunteers. I inclose an extract from a private letter from Lieutenant-Colonel West.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding.

NOTE.-Surgeon Letterman had been ordered to New San Pedro before the receipt of your dispatch. Lieutenant Hammond had also been ordered to relieve Lieutenant McKee. But I can find useful employment for Lieutenant McKee until it would be proper for him to leave (for reasons known to the colonel commanding), as when the regulars have gone I shall commence to move the depot to San Pedro.

J. H. C.

{p.683}

EL PASO, October 27, 1861.

General H. H. SIBLEY, C. S. Army, Commanding Brigade for Arizona and New Mexico, en route or at San Antonio:

MY DEAR GENERAL: A week since Judge Crosby called on me in reference to supplies for your brigade. I immediately took steps to secure supplies of breadstuffs, the greater part of which must come from Sonora, as there is great scarcity in the State of Chihuahua. I sent for my Sonora agent to come to me here a month since, to meet and see what would be required of me to furnish the Confederacy. This agent was to have left about this time with a proper escort from Colonel Baylor, and some thirty to forty wagons, to commence hauling supplies from the Sonora border to the Rio Grande, which would have commenced to arrive at Fillmore by the middle of December. In the meantime my mills will furnish from the limited supplies of grain here. I have now some 40,000 to 50,000 pounds of flour, and will have 40,000 to 50,000 pounds more if the New Mexican troops do not succeed in forcing Colonel Baylor to fall back beyond this place.

The flour I have here, and may make till I am interrupted, I am now placing in a place of safety in El Paso, Mexico, as recommended by Colonel Baylor in his letters, which I inclose. I shall do everything in my power and all that is possible for a man to do in my circumstances and situation to further the public service. This you well know, and I need not assure you of the fact. You must especially heed Judge Crosby’s and Mr. Richardson’s suggestions as to things here, and what you and the commanding officers of the department must do to facilitate Mr. Richardson and myself to furnish supplies by procuring some cash funds. I can command here now from $40,000 to $50,000, all or most of which must go into Sonora immediately to pay for flour, &c. As suggested by Colonel Baylor, I have engaged an express to go into Senora to learn if Sumner is actually coming from California via Guaymas or Fort Union. By the same express I will order the purchase of more flour, beans, salt, beef, soap, corn, &c. I have there already some 10,000 pounds of corn and 300,000 pounds of flour, all for your brigade, and waiting your movement. I inclose herewith my last letters from Colonel Baylor.* His command is in peril. I hope God in His goodness will so order things as not to make his retreat necessary from Arizona.

Our express from Sonora, with intelligence from Forts Yuma and Guaymas, will be back in twenty days, when you and Colonel Baylor will be fully posted up as to Sumner and his movements, if he is making any, toward Arizona from California. Be easy about your supplies; we shall get all we want from Sonora-what this valley cannot furnish-until such time as you may be in full possession of New Mexico and can avail of its resources or such part as the hungry Federals may leave for your command.

Truly and sincerely, yours,

S. HART.

* See foot-note, Vol. IV, p 134.

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VALLECITO, October 27, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Commanding Southern District:

COLONEL: Your courier of the 25th instant arrived here at 8 p.m. Surgeon Prentiss is with me. I have one company (B). Company I is {p.684} one day ahead, and H the same distance behind. As the doctor is of the opinion that the command can go through without him, and leaves a very competent steward, he returns to-morrow, and will be at Camp Wright at sundown. We are getting along finely. I left Camp Wright at 7 a.m. yesterday, but started this morning at 3.30 a.m. from San Felipe, and reached here at 10 o’clock; eighteen miles, and heavy road. I leave again at 3 a.m. to-morrow, and shall go to Carriso Creek, eighteen miles more, and heavy road. As soon as the weather gets too hot for morning travel I shall commence my marches at sundown. The advance party of seven, under Lieutenant Benson, are doing well preparing the water for us. He is to leave a note at each station for me; I received the first one this morning. Captain Calloway I hear is getting along finely, and Lieutenant MacGowan, with H, is close at my heels. I am within five hours’ ride of each of them, and both have instructions to communicate with me in case of difficulty. I am not prepared to report definitely as to best plan of crossing the desert. So far I favor the present mode. Am living on jerked beef. Would it not be well to have 5,000 pounds of it always on hand at Camp Wright? One company is enough in any one party, I think. I should mention that the commissary train is coming along with Company H. Governor Gaudara’s two sons passed Warner’s ranch six days ago. It strikes me that if Major Rigg had a company of cavalry with him he could stop all such characters. There are prowlers around; six were within a mile of here yesterday, and seven at Carriso Creek on Thursday. I am much obliged to you for the news; it is most acceptable, but I shall most anxiously look for that promised letter from yourself.

Yours, truly,

J. R. WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 48.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 28, 1861.

Capt. E. B. Gibbs, Second Infantry California Volunteers, will with Company E, same regiment, take post at Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., and report for duty to the commanding officer.

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 28, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 30th ultimo, also an extract from Special Orders, No. 160, of the same date from the Headquarters of the Army. On the 17th instant five companies of the Second Infantry California Volunteers left this place on the steamer for Oregon for the purpose of relieving the regular troops at the most remote stations in that district. To-morrow five companies of the Fourth Infantry California Volunteers will embark for Oregon and relieve the troops at Fort Dalles and the garrisons in the district west of the Cascade Mountains. After the withdrawal of the regular troops from the District of Oregon, there will remain, under the present arrangement, ten companies of volunteer {p.685} infantry and one company of regulars (Third Artillery). The company of the Third Artillery now at Fort Vancouver will occupy San Juan Island and the volunteer infantry will occupy all the posts in the district now garrisoned by the regulars with the exception of Fort Cascades. No more troops will be sent to Oregon for the present, and I have suspended the enrollment of the volunteer company of cavalry at Fort Dalles, as the recent call made by the War Department for a regiment of cavalry to be raised in Oregon will, it is presumed, be ample for any emergency likely to arise in that country. The District of Southern California is under the command of Colonel Carleton. He has ten companies of infantry and five of cavalry and should it be necessary an additional force can be thrown into that country with promptness. On the steamer which will leave here on the 1st proximo there will embark at San Pedro the headquarters, staff band, and six companies of the Fourth Infantry, one company of the Ninth Infantry, and two companies of the First Cavalry, the whole under command of Bvt. Lieut. Col. R. C. Buchanan, Fourth Infantry. The regular troops from Fort Yuma will reach San Diego in season to embark on the steamer leaving here on the 21st of November. I shall send forward the regular troops to New York with the utmost dispatch as fast as they reach the coast, without regard to regiments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 28, 1861.

Col. EDWARD D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I beg leave, most respectfully, but earnestly, to request that the General-in-Chief may be pleased to reconsider the second paragraph of Special Orders, No. 160, current series.* I have served on the Pacific Coast more than nine years; six of them passed in the dark valleys of the Columbia River, or in pursuing the savage foe in the mountain fastnesses on the eastern borders of Oregon and Washington. Under these circumstances I appeal with confidence to the General-in-Chief, and pray that I may be ordered to service in the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

* See September 30, p. 643.

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CAMP WRIGHT, October 28, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Commanding California Volunteers, Los Angeles, Cal.:

COLONEL: I received yours of the 25th instant. Captain Roberts’ company (B) will leave to-day for San Diego. Your orders came just as the train was ready to go, and I have detained their wagons one day longer to take him down, which will enable them to join the balance of the train in time to return here with them. The command is getting along admirably, and improving in their drill very fast. I will have your instructions in relation to rehearsals attended to. I have had it reported to me by good authority that a party of forty persons are concentrating at the Monte bound for Texas via Fort Yuma. They were {p.686} waiting for parties to arrive from San Francisco to move. My informant states that from what he could understand it was their intention to pass out in detached parties of from one to five. They were very inquisitive about the location of troops, &c. It is almost impossible for me at this point to stop parties of this kind (unless they should pass by on the main road) without some cavalry. They can get around me by three different passes in small parties. I am as vigilant as can be, and besides have a good deal of pride to be of service. I have no idea of lying here doing nothing, and am extremely anxious to do something, even to capture a few of the enemy, bloodless though it be. I feel the want of an interpreter that I can place confidence in very much. I have no one here that I can use for the purpose that, in my opinion, could not be used by any one who would pay well for their services. Ramon Carrillo, I think, has not acted toward the Government in the way of furnishing barley, hay, &c., as you expected him to do. In the first place, he sold, after my arrival here, what barley he had on hand (or pretended to do so) to other parties, and immediately the price of barley was raised to 4 cents per pound. Hay he also raised from 1 cent to 4 cents per pound. I refused to purchase any more from him, and have contracted for 50,000 pounds of barley at 2 cents, to be delivered to me at his ranch, fourteen miles from here. I can have it hauled as we require it by our own teams, and what is required for the teams going to San Diego they can pick up there, being on the road. I have also purchased four tons of good hay for $40 per ton at the same place. I can now, I think, get all the barley that will be required for our use at reasonable rates. Beef he also asks 8 cents for, and I can, I think, have it supplied at 6 1/2-at 7 at most. We require more ammunition. Captain Greene’s company (G) brought but 1,300 rounds. We have altogether 8,000 rounds. Caps we are very short of. Company commanders report to me that only about three-fourths of the caps will explode, and about the same average with the tape. We are also much in want of stoves. The weather is extremely cold, and stoves would be very acceptable if we can get them. In reference to contracts, will the orders be drawn on Quartermaster Hammond for payment at Los Angeles? Please instruct me. Again, in reference to some cavalry. If I had a few good cavalry horses I could mount a few men for scouting purposes from the command, or employ others. It would enable me to obtain information that I cannot procure in any other way. For that purpose I would require a few revolvers. I suggest this to you for your consideration. 1 received a note from Colonel West this morning, in which he states that two important persons passed ahead of him, and must have passed here. He does not mention names. If they passed here they have gone around through one of the passes or cut-offs that I have mentioned. Oak Grove is a better location than this. Every one coming this way must pass there; besides, this is a horribly dusty country. This camp to-day is scarcely visible 100 yards from it for dust, and I am informed that it is nothing to what I may expect. Colonel Wright’s promotion was received in camp with every satisfaction, and your own to the same rank, although to their personal loss, they would rejoice to hear of. Have you received the document I forwarded to Colonel Connor? General Baker’s death cast quite a gloom over the entire camp. I hope by the time you receive another communication from me that I will be able to report having had a pow-wow with some gentlemen bound out of the State.

Very respectfully,

EDWIN A. RIGG, Major, Comdg. Detach. 1st Regt. Inft. California Vols., Camp Wright.

{p.687}

P. S.-I sent out Lieutenant Taylor with ten men to Agua Caliente last night, hoping to intercept some one passing out through there, but he reported all quiet. At 1 o’clock this morning I had an alarm; the long-roll was beat, and with every soul in camp, ignorant of such an intention, the companies were under arms in good order in eight minutes. I sent one or two off on a short scout, and deployed the others around the camp. I was much pleased with their conduct, and am satisfied that they are ready at a moment’s warning for service.

RIGG.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, Cal., October 28, 1861.

Maj. W. SCOTT KETCHUM, Commanding Camp near San Pedro, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have received your note of this date, Lieut. Lafayette Hammond, regimental quartermaster First Infantry California Volunteers and acting commissary of subsistence, is instructed to send at once Mr. Hanson, the quartermaster’s agent, to New San Pedro to issue such subsistence stores now on hand there as you may require. By Special Orders, No. 5, current series, the command of New San Pedro is made independent of that of the District of Southern California. It follows that Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan’s instructions about hard bread and pork for your voyage east do not reach these headquarters. If these stores are on hand at New San Pedro, you shall have them. If they are to be shipped from San Francisco exclusively for the use of command not included in this district, perhaps it would be well for the commissary of that command to telegraph to San Francisco for the subsistence stores he requires to have on shipboard. I say this, not from a disinclination to do all in my power to oblige the command at San Pedro, but because I fear it might be indelicate for me to order supplies for the command of another. I ordered four teams and an ambulance to proceed to San Bernardino, to be a part of the transportation of your command to New San Pedro. I supposed, of course, the ambulance went until I got your letter.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

NOTE.-If you will furnish me with the number of rations of hard bread, pork, &c., you desire to have placed upon the steamer at San Francisco, and desire me to have it done for you, I will do it with pleasure.

J. H. C.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 47.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., October 28, 1861.

Pursuant to instructions from the headquarters of the Department of the Pacific of October 23, 1861, the enrollment of the company of volunteer cavalry at The Dalles is suspended.

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.688}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 29, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: Under instructions from the War Department dated September 28, 1861, I have the honor to report for orders to the General-in-Chief. Again most earnestly requesting that I may be ordered to the East,

I am, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 204.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 29, 1861.

...

2. The troops in camp at San Pedro, Cal., will, upon the arrival of the steamer Golden Gate, embark for the East.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, October 29, 1861.

Colonel BLAKE, U. S. Army, Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

By order No. 23 your command, when relieved, with horses and horse equipments will repair to this city and take post at the Presidio.

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOS ANGELES, CAL., October 29, 1861.

Capt. R. W. KIRKHAM, U. S. Army Commissary of Subsistence, San Francisco, Cal.:

Colonel Buchanan wants 12,000 rations pork and hard bread put on steamer that takes his command from San Pedro. Send by Senator 40,000 rations subsistence stores for troops in this district.

JAMES H. CARLETON.

NOTE.-Captain Ketchum, commanding at San Pedro, wrote to the undersigned a letter to which the foregoing is a reply, but afterward the undersigned concluded to send for the rations, fearing the troops might need them. The following is the basis of the calculation:

Colonel Buchanan’s command, October 13, 71; Captain Davidson’s command October 13, 113; Major Ketchum’s command, October 20, 350; total strength, 534; round numbers, to include laundresses, servants, &c., 600; for twenty days, 12,000.

{p.689}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., October 29, 1861.

Maj. EDWIN A. RIGG, Commanding at Camp Wright, near Warner’s Ranch, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have applied for authority to move your camp to Oak Grove or Temecula as soon as Colonel Andrews has gone to San Diego and embarked. The command from Fort Yuma is ordered to embark for New York at San Diego on the steamer which is to leave San Francisco for Panama on the 21st of November, 1861. Colonel Andrews’ command is to have your teams as its transportation from Camp Wright to San Diego, so that Banning’s train and ambulance can come on from Camp Wright to San Pedro without delay. If a company of infantry with transportation belonging to Fort Yuma reaches Camp Wright in advance of Colonel Andrews’ main command, you will, continue it on without delay to San Diego with the Fort Yuma teams, with orders for those teams to load at San Diego for your camp and return without delay. When returned keep this transportation, and when Colonel Andrews comes use it with your own, if necessary, to transport the colonel’s command to San Diego. When the Yuma wagons again return (loaded, of course), you will detain them at Camp Wright until the arrival of a detachment of recruits which I shall shortly send to Fort Yuma.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

NOTE.-Send Private Cole, of Captain Gorley’s company, by Banning’s train for extra duty at the quartermaster’s department at Los Angeles.

J. H. C.

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SACKETT’S WELLS, Mon day, October 29, 1861-3 p.m.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Los Angeles:

COLONEL: We are progressing finely and have no difficulty about water the way the command is divided. In fact, we have nothing to complain of. The health of the command is mainly excellent. There are about ten men riding in the three companies. I pushed on in person last night and overtook Captain Calloway, inquired after his welfare and moved him once more in advance of me. Dresher joined me at daylight this a.m. I gave Lieutenant MacGowan orders to keep within one day of me. I learn that he has fallen behind, too; I presume from yielding too readily to the solicitations of the wagon-master for rest. I shall require him to close his gap between here and the river. From this point all our marching is to be done from 6 p.m. until we reach water. Both I and H are similarly instructed. Hadji Ali is just in from the river. Colonel Andrews makes no reply to my note. None was required, but I have no news, consequently I shall be at Fort Yuma on the 3d proximo. The advance party, under Lieutenant Benson, are doing excellent service. Properly provided for and managed, 1,000 men can be marched across the desert without difficulty. I shall send you an official report from Yuma. So far as I can glean news from Sonorians coming this way, the Gaudara party is instigated in the movement against Pesqueira by assurance of help from the {p.690} secession leaders at Tucson, whence it is rumored a party is already moving to Gaudara’s aid. This is all roadside talk, but it may contain some truth. Will any such expedition require to make a dash at Fort Yuma? Let me hear from you, if you please, whenever convenient.

Yours, &c.,

J. R. WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 29.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, October 30, 1861.

...

IV. Surg. Richard H. Coolidge, medical department, having reported at these headquarters in pursuance of orders from the War Department, is announced on the department staff. Surgeon Coolidge will accordingly relieve Surg. Charles McCormick, medical department, when the latter will comply with orders received from Washington.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

R. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 205.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 30, 1861.

1. The officers of the Regular Army appointed by the Governor to positions in the regiments of volunteers called into service from the State of California will, with the exception of Colonel Carleton (major, Sixth Cavalry) and Lieut. Col. Benjamin F. Davis (captain, First Cavalry), rejoin their respective regiments and companies as soon as others have been selected to relieve them.

2. Capt. Benjamin F. Davis, First Cavalry, having tendered his resignation as lieutenant-colonel of cavalry, California volunteers, will join his company at Saint Pedro in time to embark with the same on the steamer leaving this port on the 1st proximo.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Salem, Oreg., October 30, 1861.

First Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant General:

SIR: Your communication of the 28th instant, containing Special Orders, No. 47, has this day been received, and the order will be promptly attended to.

Yours, with respect,

CHESTER N. TERRY, Private Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 31, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I deem it my duty to submit to the General-in-Chief the condition of affairs in the Southern District of California and the prudential measures which I consider of vital importance in suppressing {p.691} any attempts of the rebel forces to gain a foothold on the Pacific Coast. The U. S. troops in this department can repel any direct invasion of the State by the rebels, but the adjoining State of Sonora, with a feeble government and sparse population, presents inducements of the strongest kind for the rebels to march a force into that country and obtain possession of the fine port of Guaymas. This once accomplished, it destroys our commerce in the Gulf of California and interrupts the natural transit in and out of Arizona. The fondly cherished hopes and aim of the rebels are to obtain a port on the Pacific. Timely interference on our part will frustrate their designs. To protect Arizona and re-establish the authority of the United States Government in that country the occupation of Sonora is a military necessity. The amicable relations existing between our Government and that of Mexico would not necessarily be interrupted by our temporary occupation of Sonora; the design and object would be apparent. At all events, Sonora is de facto independent of the Central Government, and has been so for four years; and I am assured by persons whose responsible positions and reputation guarantee their assertion that the introduction of a force of U. S. troops would be hailed with joy, and meet with the moral and physical support of the entire population. We would not enter the country as conquerors, but as friends, to unite with the government and people in driving back the Southern rebels, who are now threatening their country with ruin and devastation. I am informed by gentlemen of high standing that the introduction of U. S. troops into Sonora would be agreeable to the present governor-Pesqueira. Under all the circumstances, to protect ourselves, I consider it imperative that we should take the initiative in this matter. Sonora is weak and unable to resist a rebel force, and if our aid is withheld she will inevitably be overrun-virtually conquered-and the rebels obtain possession of the port of Guaymas. Let two regiments, one of cavalry and one of infantry, with a light artillery battery, be promptly thrown into Guaymas, and all will be well. A discreet and prudent commander would conciliate the government and people of Sonora, and co-operating harmoniously together, no rebel forces could enter the State. Peace and prosperity would reign within its borders. Once occupy Sonora, and the re-establishment of our authority in Arizona would be a work of easy accomplishment. The force necessary for the expedition is now on this coast, and could be transported to Guaymas by steamers in a week’s time.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 206.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 31, 1861.

1. Capt. Horatio G. Gibson, Third Artillery, having been transferred to Light Company C, Third Artillery, will immediately proceed to the East and join his company.

2. A company of the second Regiment of Cavalry California Volunteers, to be selected by the colonel, will, properly mounted and equipped, proceed overland to and take post at Fort Seward. Major McGarry, Second Cavalry, will accompany these troops and upon his arrival at Fort Seward assume command of the same.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant. General.

{p.692}

HDQRS. DETACH. FIRST REGT. INFTY. CALIFORNIA VOLS., Camp Wright, October 31, 1861.

[Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, First California Volunteers, Commanding:]

COLONEL: I have detained your expressman returning from Fort Yuma twenty-four hours to send by him to you the monthly returns of this post camp. I have reviewed, inspected, and mustered the command to-day, and forward by messenger all the returns I can furnish with the limited number of blanks I have. I hope that you will find them correct. I have no one here who is well posted in making out returns, and errors may have occurred. I hope that you will forward to me blanks of every description that I will require, also general orders, all of which I am munch in want of. The command is getting along very well. The men are improving in their drill very fast. I have been for several days drilling in skirmishing, which is a change, and the command enter into it with much spirit. Your instructions in reference to recitations I have not been able to pay as much attention to as I would wish, because a great deal of my time has been taken up with getting off Lieutenant-Colonel West’s command, which left here on successive days, also Captain Roberts’ company for San Diego. Captain Roberts’ company left here on the 28th instant, and the day after I received your orders to send him on without delay I wrote to you that I was much in want of some one that I could trust who spoke the language (Spanish) of this neighborhood. If I could be furnished with some one to interpret for me it would be to the interest of the service. I find that every one here is suspicious of one another, and all, without one exception, have but one idea, and that is to make something out of the Government. Carrillo raised the price of hay from 1 to 4 cents per pound as soon as line arrived here; or rather, left orders to do it after he left with Colonel West. I refused to buy from him at that price, and purchased from Warner four tons, at $40 per ton, and I think can get more at the same price. The worst feature in the whole affair was his majordomo telling me that hay or barley for my own horses would cost me nothing. He may or may not have given such instructions to him, but, nevertheless, it was done. I will have no trouble about barley or hay either. The combination have quarreled among themselves, and are willing to sell at fair prices. In reference to beef, Mr. Wallace has no copy of his contract, and I have none either, and cannot tell whether his contract was for twenty days or for twenty issuing days, and as the latter closes out his stock I have given him the benefit of the doubt. I have had a number of applications to furnish me with beef, and have had them make them in writing. They run all the way from 8 1/2 cents per pound to 6 cents to deliver at the camp at any point from Oak Grove, including the boundaries of Warner’s ranch. My lowest bid is from Francisco O’Campo. I had it reported to me on the evening of the 28th after dark that a party of from sixteen to twenty men were encamped in the valley at Agua Caliente, all mounted. I sent out Captain Greene with thirty men to hem them in, whilst Lieutenant Hargrave, with twenty men, accompanied by Surgeon Prentiss and a guide, crossed above them to close in on them and capture them, but, much to my disappointment, and the command also, it turned out to be a false alarm. They had to return without their game. Some loose horses had been roaming around, which alarmed my informant, and it was easy to imagine them mounted. {p.693} However, it had a good effect on the command, as well as the community around us. They see that we were not sent here to play, and if there are any persons who are disloyal they keep very quiet. I hope that I will have the pleasure of reporting to you-very soon some tangible evidence of our vigilance. After detaining the express I am obliged to send him on without all the returns. It has blown a perfect cloud of dust to-day in camp, and several copies were so much disfigured by the upsetting of inkstands, &c., that I would not send them. Inclosed you will please find monthly reports from all the companies. I will forward them the first opportunity.

Respectfully,

EDWIN A. RIGG, First Infantry Regiment, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., October 31, 1861.

Col. A. J. SMITH, Commanding Second Cavalry, Camp Alert, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to have the company directed in Special Orders, No. 206, to proceed to Fort Seward (a new post being established on Eel River, in this State) in readiness to start on Monday next. The route has not yet been determined on, and there is therefore no specific time stated for its departure. As soon as this is fixed you will be informed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., October 31, 1861.

Col. P. E. CONNOR, Stockton, Cal.:

Send the two companies for Gaston and Ter-Waw on Monday’s boat. They will sail from here on Tuesday morning. Designate the company for Gaston and the one for Ter-Waw. Hold the third company in readiness for movement.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT CHURCHILL, NEV. TER., October 31, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report the arrival of two companies of volunteers to relieve this command. No return has been furnished to enable me to make the necessary return of the same. The command will leave here on the 2d November, or sooner if the public property can be turned over.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. H. BLAKE, Lieutenant-Colonel First Cavalry, Commanding Post.

{p.694}

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., November 1, 1861.

Col. P. E. CONNOR, Stockton, Cal.:

You will send the three companies on Monday’s boat. The third goes to Fort Bragg.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 1, 1861.

Major MCGARRY, Second Regiment of Cavalry: (Through Colonel Commanding Camp Alert, Cal.)

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to inform you that the company of cavalry under orders to proceed to Fort Seward will leave this [city] on the steamer Benicia on Monday, the 4th instant. From thence it will proceed to Long Valley, Mendocino County, striking the main road from Petaluma to Long Valley at Santa Rosa. The commanding officer at Fort Seward has been directed to send a pack train to Long Valley to transport your stores thence to the fort. Should the pack train not be sufficiently large to take all your baggage and stores at once, you will leave a detachment with the remaining portion until the return of the train. The wagon train will, as soon after your arrival in Long Valley as possible, be sent back to Benicia. You will examine carefully all instructions on record from these headquarters, and execute the same so far as the means at your disposal will permit. The general particularly desires you to keep him constantly advised of everything important relating to our Indian affairs, and hopes that with the force placed at your disposal you will be able not only to give the necessary protection to the inhabitants, but also to unoffending bands of Indians. On this subject you will find very full instructions on record at Fort Seward.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 1, 1861.

Maj. CHARLES S. LOVELL, Tenth Infantry, Commanding Fort Seward, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs me to inform you that one company of cavalry will leave this city for Fort Seward on Monday next (November 4). The general desires you to have a pack train at Long Valley in time to meet this company, so that the wagon train can return to Benicia from that point.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.695}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 1, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by this morning’s mail of your letters of the 22d, 23d, and 24th ultimo, and of that of the colonel commanding the department of the 24th ultimo. The enrollment of men in the company of volunteer cavalry was suspended on the receipt on the 28th ultimo of your telegram, and the disbandment of the company has been this day directed. As the disposition of the companies now looked for, directed by your letter of the 22d, conflicts in some degree with what I have already done, some explanation as to that, and to what I purposed doing, may be necessary. My letter of the 23d ultimo and orders of that and subsequent dates show what I have done with the five companies received on the 21st ultimo-two companies under Major Curtis to Fort Colville, one to Fort Dalles, one to Fort Hoskins, and one retained here. I was governed as far as possible by the general tenor and spirit of the oral instructions received from the former commander of the department before I left San Francisco, the most distant troops to be relieved at once, &c. In this category Hoskins was necessarily included, to allow of the relief of the artillery detachment at Fort Umpqua as soon as possible, so that it might join its company (D), designated for San Juan. The eruption of the Snakes upon the Warm Springs Reservation, a report of which met me on my arrival here, made it necessary to place a company at The Dalles at once, so that the guard could be replaced at the reservation without delay. I wished also that this company should have the benefit as largely as possible of the experience and local knowledge of the present commander there, whom I did not intend to remove until the arrival of the companies from Walla Walla. The company retained here (E) was the smallest one of that battalion, being less than sixty strong, and probably the least instructed, considerations which determined me. My purpose with regard to those now coming was to place Lieutenant-Colonel Lee with two companies at Walla Walla, one at Steilacoom, one at Yamhill, and one at the Cascades.-As that place, however, is to be abandoned, I will retain it here until further orders, though I think it would be a better arrangement to have it at Walla Walla, where, from present indications, the largest force possible is necessary. The same reasons make it desirable to have one of the field officers at that station. Captains Black’s and Van Voast’s companies and the band, &c., of the Ninth, will be sent down by the Cortez, which leaves on the 7th instant. It is probable that Captain Dent’s company will be in from Hoskins in time to go down, in which case it will be sent.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 1, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN WHITEAKER, Governor of Oregon, Salem, Oreg.:

SIR: I have the honor to notify your Excellency that by instructions this day received from the headquarters of the Department of the {p.696} Pacific the raising of the company of volunteer cavalry heretofore called for has been suspended, and the men, if any, already enrolled are to be disbanded, the regiment to be organized under Colonel Cornelius being considered amply sufficient for the whole country.

I have the honor to be, with much respect, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 50.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 1, 1861.

...

II. The headquarters of the Ninth Infantry (non-commissioned staff and band), Companies G and K, and such other companies of the same regiment as may be in readiness, will embark on the steamer Cortez hence to San Francisco on the 7th instant.

...

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 1, 1861.

Capt. J. H. WHITTLESEY, Commanding Fort Dalles, Oreg.:

CAPTAIN: The colonel commanding the district directs you to hold yourself in readiness to repair to this post with your company on the arrival at The Dalles of Captain Magruder’s company from Walla Walla.

...

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT HOSKINS, GREG., November 1, 1861.

Lieut. A. C. WILDRICK, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, District of Oregon:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I shall leave this post en route for Fort Vancouver on or about the 6th instant. I may be delayed a day longer for the reason that the streams are high, and my party from the Siletz block-house may be unable to reach this place by the evening of the 5th. The block-house is thirty miles from this place, and should never have a less garrison than twenty men. Captain Schmidt will not be able to place a proper garrison at that post if he sends a garrison to Fort Umpqua such as is called for by Orders, No. 46. The Indians are not quiet, and need looking after. I presume it had escaped the colonel commanding that a garrison for Siletz had to come from this post, or the garrison for Umpqua would have been detailed from Yamhill.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. T. DENT, Captain, Ninth Infantry, Commanding.

{p.697}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, November 2, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE WRIGHT, San Francisco, Cal.:

Send by telegram condition of your troops. Report by letter fully and frequently.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 207.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 2, 1861.

A detachment, to consist of one sergeant, two corporals, and fourteen privates, will be selected by the commanding officer, from the companies stationed at Alcatraz, for service at Mare Island Navy-Yard. The sergeant will be instructed to report to the commandant of the yard. Captain Kirkham, assistant quartermaster, will provide the necessary transportation.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 2, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON California Vols., Comdg. Dist. of Southern California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to say that the suggestions contained in your letter of the 27th ultimo relative to the removal of the camp from Warner’s ranch are approved. When the troops were sent to the ranch it was not the intention of the general to keep them there during the winter. After the troops under Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews have crossed the desert and marched on San Diego, and you are assured that Fort Yuma is not in danger, the general desires you to withdraw the troops from the ranch and place them in camp either at Oak Grove or Temecula, as in your judgment may be best suited for a winter camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 52.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 2, 1861.

I. Captain Crowninshield’s company (E, Fourth Infantry California Volunteers) will take post at Fort Steilacoom, Wash. Ter. to which place it will proceed by the steamer Pacific about the 11th instant, and relieve the present garrison.

...

III. On being relieved by the company of volunteers, Captain Woodruff, with Companies D and F, Ninth Infantry, will embark on the steamer, on which he will continue until its arrival at San Francisco.

{p.698}

IV. Captain Scott’s company (D, Fourth Infantry California Volunteers) will first take post at Fort Yamhill, to which place it will proceed with as little delay as practicable and relieve its present garrison, Company I, Ninth Infantry. On being relieved Company I will proceed to this post, whence it will go to San Francisco by the first steamer after its arrival. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation for the movements of these two companies.

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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[NOVEMBER 2, 1861.-For Baylor to Hébert, relating to affairs in California and Arizona, see Vol. IV, p. 149.]

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LOS ANGELES, CAL., November 4, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON:

MY DEAR SIR: I have been put in possession of some facts this morning which would appear to warrant the conclusion that men are concentrating, or will soon meet, on the Colorado River. I believe my information is reliable, and I also see in the Alta of the 26th ultimo a letter from San Diego, which, taken in connection with what I have learned here this morning, is quite significant. I believe there is a party of twenty-five men now at El Monte. They have been there some days, waiting the arrival of Showalter and others to proceed on to the Colorado. I am quite unwell to-day or I would go to your camp. If you should be in town to-morrow I will endeavor to see you.

Yours, truly,

J. J. WARNER.

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FORT YUMA, November 4, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Los Angeles:

DEAR COLONEL: An official communication herewith will inform you of our march and arrival here. I scarcely as yet comprehend my position, but am exerting myself to that end. To-morrow I shall have most of the ferry-boats under my control; one thirty miles below I hope to secure by Wednesday, and another twenty miles above in a few days. The river is so low that it can be forded in many places. Indians swim the animals of travelers, and some may escape me. Accounts from Tucson and thereabouts are conflicting, and therefore unreliable. I hear that Baylor is at Tucson with 200 men, and Van Dorn at Mesilla with a larger command. Of course the outside talk is that they intend to come here. I place no reliance upon it, however. They may or may not. Carrillo is becoming more useful. I send him to Tucson by way of Altar. He will be back in twenty days. My scouts now number four, and are not idle. I shall send you an account of stores in a few days. I have on hand 50,000 rounds of ammunition; provisions in abundance. A good deal of work is needed to strengthen this position. Were I commander of this district I would send here two 12-pounders and a small corps of artillerists. Excuse the suggestion. I have four 12-pounder howitzers and 150 rounds of shot and shell. My Greek makes {p.699} an odd-looking letter of this, but it is very interesting to those that understand it. I shall begun drills of officers at the earliest possible moment. At present I am only devoting one hour daily to company drill, as the work on the defenses of the post mostly occupies the time. Will you be good enough to inform me whether you propose to keep up an express and how often For instance, I may avoid sending off a special messenger if I know when to expect a regular one. I have many things to write to you about, but matters are so indefinite as yet that I cannot satisfactorily allude to them. Since writing the above Mr. Yager has acquainted me with the fact that he once carried the mail to San Diego weekly at $4,500 per annum, and is willing to renew the service on same terms, or to Los Angeles for $6,000. I merely mention the matter incidentally for your consideration. An allusion is made elsewhere (in communication to adjutant) of a scout that I made to Gonzales’ Ferry. Unfortunately it was unsuccessful, as the game had flown. While I was away from Dresher’s command he searched a messenger on the road and discovered the two letters which I inclose herewith.* I sent an emissary to Gila City yesterday, but there was nobody there. They had all moved on. I shall keep on the alert for foes of all numbers and kinds. Greenwade, at Temecula, is a rank secessionist, giving aid and comfort to the enemy. The same may be said of Weld, the factotum of Yager, on the other side of the desert. I have omitted citizen employés from my post return, but will send them on the next. It is bad policy to mention their names. I am much in want of some envelopes. Company blanks are a scarcer article at this post. I keep my letters open, and write as one matter or the other suggests itself. Hence they are rather desultory.

Truly, yours,

J. R. WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel, &c.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 4, 1861.

Maj. EDWIN A. RIGG, Commanding at Camp Wright, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have received your note of the 28th ultimo. If any party of the size and character described attempt to pass you, stop it, search the persons and baggage if you suspect them of being enemies of our country, and cause them to take the oath of allegiance to our Government. If you find upon them evidence of their being disloyal, or of their giving aid and comfort to the enemy, hold them in confinement and report all the facts and all the evidence in each case to me. You will not buy one dollar’s worth of any kind of property of Mr. Carrillo, or the people he sold his barley and hay to. Nor will you pay over 2 1/2 cents for barley. If you cannot get hay for less than $40 I will send it from San Francisco. Buy your beef from him who will sell it cheapest. Make no bargains for beef for a longer time than a month, nor buy over a fortnight’s supply of barley or hay. Buy nothing from any person who wishes to raise on his prices, the ordinary rates, because of the presence of the troops. We can get all we want cheap from above, and if worse comes to worst will move the troops before we will suffer imposition. Buy nothing of Ramon Carrillo, since he has acted the way he has. You must make no contracts without my approval first obtained, when I have seen the written contract unless it be for daily use, {p.700} until you can hear from me. I have sent 10,000 rounds of ammunition to you at San Diego by the Senator last night. Have it got at once. I have written to have stoves sent to you. I will soon send you some cavalry, say a lieutenant, a sergeant, a corporal, and twenty-five men, starting to-morrow or next day. Try and have shelter for the horses. The horses must be kept in fine condition if you have the hard service you anticipate for cavalry. Mr. Showalter and men of that stripe must be searched for expected evidences of treason, and at all events they must take the oath of allegiance besides. If they refuse, hold them securely and report all the facts in the case, as I have before written. We have had enough of the bullying and treason of such men. If Judge Terry tries to pass, he must go through the same ordeal. There must be no child’s play with him. Keep your own counsel; act with great circumspection, but with firmness. Put yourself in en rapport with the Indians. They will give you much valuable information of little parties attempting to-dodge by you. I have sent you a forge, muleshoes, nails, tools, and some clothing. You can now put everything in service order and keep it so. Be ready at a moment’s notice to move on to the help of West. Your position is such at this critical juncture that you must keep up a sleepless vigilance. Have your command in fighting order all the time, night or day. Keep me advised of all you do. Much is expected of you and all your command, officers and men. Drill, drill, drill, until your men become perfect as soldiers, as skirmishers, as marksmen. Keep the command in good health. Look after the messing every day yourself, and be sure the police and cleanliness of camp is perfect.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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LOS ANGELES, CAL., November 4, 1861.

MY DEAR EYRE: I received your kind note of the 30th of October this morning. In case you find by a shrewd and careful set of traps, which you have the address to set, that the person alluded to in the copy of a letter sent by Lieutenant Cutler is playing false to the Government (Doctor B-)-in case you obtain good evidence to this end (and if it exist you will obtain it, I am sure), then seize him quietly, search him and his premises thoroughly for all papers going to prove his disloyalty, and hold him securely until you hear from me. Obey no writ of habeas corpus in his case after you have once seized him, as you will have in your possession evidences of his guilt strong enough to justify his detention. I will uphold you in resisting the writ until you hear from me. There must be no child’s play in what we do in so flagrant a case as his will be, holding the position he does. It is said the mail-carrier and post-office people in your place are to be doubted. Is this so? If so, then all important communications to me must be sent in by an officer by stage, as you have no horses. Lieutenant-Colonel Davis has resigned. His resignation has been accepted by the Governor, and Davis has gone home on the Golden Gate. Keep every string drawing; practice skirmish drill, and (judiciously as regards ammunition) target practice. We may have use for your men at any day. It is not certain that an attempt will not be made to come across the desert. See Alta; see inclosed letter (Warner’s).* Keep all these matters in your own bosom. {p.701} If Showalter comes to San Bernardino, or where you can get hold of him, have him swear allegiance to the Government. If he refuse, hold him good. I will send him to Alcatraz; same of Judge Terry. Be on the qui vive. There are plotters all about us, without a doubt.

Sincerely, yours,

JAMES H. CARLETON.

NOTE.-If any person fires into your camp, hang him.

* Page 698.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 4, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that Lieut. Col. H. Lee, Fourth Infantry California Volunteers, with Companies A, B, C, D, and E of that regiment, arrived at this post on the evening of the 1st instant (403 enlisted, 419 aggregate present). I have given the necessary directions for the disposition of these troops, in accordance with my letter of the 1st instant, viz, Colonel Lee with two companies at Walla Walla, one company at Steilacoom, one at Yamhill, and one at Fort Vancouver. I trust that this arrangement, under the explanations already given, may meet the approval of the commanding general. No medical officer accompanied these troops. I trust that the deficiency consequent on the operation of General Orders, No. 24, will be supplied as soon as possible. I have given no directions in regard to the movement of the medical officers from the relieved stations except in the cases of Fort Colville and Camp Pickett, supposing that those interested would be governed by the terms of the general order above referred to. I feel compelled, however, to retain Surgeon Brown here as long as I possibly can.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 53.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 4, 1861.

I. Lieut. Col. H. Lee, with Companies A (Rowell’s) and C (West’s), Fourth Infantry California Volunteers, will take post at Fort Walla Walla, Wash. Ter., and relieve the present garrison. The command will be in readiness to move at 8 a.m. to-morrow, and will proceed to its destination with as much expedition as possible.

II. Captain Magruder, First Cavalry, when relieved will proceed to this post with his command. The quartermaster’s department will furnish the necessary transportation for these movements.

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant. General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 54.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 4, 1861.

I. Company D, Third Artillery, will proceed by the steamer Pacific about the 11th instant to Camp Pickett, San Juan Island, where it will take post, relieving the present garrison, Company H, Ninth Infantry.

{p.702}

II. Captain English, Ninth Infantry, will with his company embark on the steamer Pacific on its return from Fort Steilacoom, and will continue thereon until its arrived at San Francisco.

...

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 5, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. WILLIAMS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Army Headquarters, Washington, D. C.:

Troops in good condition. Cavalry regiment full. Infantry regiments lulling up. Fifteen companies sent north.

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 5, 1861.

Brig. Gen. SETH WILLIAMS, Adjutant-General at Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have this moment received Major-General McClellan’s dispatch of the 2d instant, calling for a report of the condition of may troops. I have replied briefly by telegraph as follows: “Troops in good condition. Cavalry regiments full. Infantry regiments tilling up. Fifteen companies sent north.” The organization of the volunteer force called for from this State by the War Department will be completed at an early date. The cavalry service is the favorite arm in this country, and both regiments, the first of five and the second of twelve companies, are full. It is confidently expected that the five infantry regiments will be nearly filled up by the 1st of December. The First Infantry is fully organized and is in the southern district of the State. Five companies of the Second and five of the Fourth Infantry have already been sent to Oregon to relieve the regular troops in that State and the Territory of Washington. Four companies of the Third Infantry and one of the Second Cavalry have been sent to relieve the garrisons of Forts Bragg, Seward, Gaston, and Ter-Waw; one company of the Second Cavalry to Fort Crook; two companies of same regiment to Fort Churchill, and one to Benicia Barracks. In the Southern District of California Colonel Carleton is in command. He has his own regiment, First California Volunteer Infantry, and the First Cavalry, a battalion of five companies. Commands have already been sent to relieve the regular troops at Fort Yuma and at San Diego. Colonel Carleton’s intimate knowledge of the southern section of this State makes it of the highest importance that he should remain there in command.

As the War Department specially designated Colonel Carleton to command the First Infantry California Volunteers, originally designed for protection to the overland mail service, I have taken it for granted that it was not intended to withdraw him from the volunteer service, under the instructions from Adjutant-General’s Office of the 3d of October, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel Cady, of the Seventh Infantry, {p.703} Regular Army, is now in command of the District of Oregon, having been sent there by General Sumner to relieve Colonel Beall, of the First Cavalry. The regular troops I shall send East as fast as they reach the coast. Most of then will have sailed by the 1st of December; those from Colville and Walla Walla will not get off quite so soon. Should it be the wish of the Department to send volunteers from this country to the East, I doubt not that the regiments would be filled very promptly. The personnel is not surpassed by any troops we have; all that is required is instruction and discipline.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

Inform General W. that Colonel Carleton and Colonel Cady will be retained in his department; that his arrangements are approved. Recommend to the Secretary that six picked squadrons of Californians be formed for service with the Army of Potomac, and four for service in Texas; that two regiments of California and Oregon infantry be raised for service here and two for Western Texas.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 5, 1861.

Col. EDWARD D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have this moment received your communication of the 10th ultimo. Anticipating the wishes of the General-in-Chief, orders were issued some days since for Company D, Third Artillery, now at Fort Vancouver, to proceed to San Juan Island and relieve the company of the Ninth Infantry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 5, 1861.

Maj. RICHARD C. DRUM, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I send you copies of letters * received and written by myself as the best account of what is transpiring in this district. I cannot believe any force will attempt to come over the desert, but I want to keep my command in as near a state of preparation for such an emergency as could be expected from raw troops. The camp at Warner’s ranch should be moved. I desire authority to change it to a warmer and healthier point-say to Oak Grove or to Temecula. I have sent Captain Fritz and one subaltern and thirty rank and file, First Cavalry California Volunteers, to Owen’s River. I have sent Lieutenant Wellman and twenty-seven rank and file, First Cavalry California Volunteers, to remain a while at Camp Wright, to act as vedettes, scouts, {p.704} expresses, &c. I have sent thirty-five recruits, via San Diego (by steam) and Camp Wright, to fill up the companies at Fort Yuma.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers.

* See Rigg to Carleton, October 25; Carleton to Rigg and West to Carleton, October 29; Rigg to Carleton, October 81; Carleton to Eyre and Warner to Carleton and Carleton to Rigg, November 4, ante.

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CAMP LATHAM, Near Los Angeles, November 5, 1861.

Col. J. H. CARLETON, Commanding First Infantry California Volunteers:

SIR: I inclose you extracts from a letter received by me from Assistant Surgeon Randle in reference to the climate at Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch.

Major Rigg requests me to state to Colonel Carleton through you, my opinion as to the propriety or impropriety of this command remaining at its present position. It is my professional and official opinion that the command under Major Rigg ought to be removed from this place as speedily as possible, for the following reasons: First. The wind blows here a perfect gale (not a moderate breeze) more than half the time, driving the dust in clouds, and blinding the eyes of every one, and infiltrating into every coffee pot, camp kettle, water bucket, &c. This has been the day of general muster, and Major Rigg has pertinaciously and punctiliously discharged all his duties, and the men have turned out with commendable zeal, notwithstanding the gusts of wind and dust have prevented anything like cooking in camp. The wind has blown so hard that a fire could not be made, and this is no unusual occurrence. Second. We are four miles from fire-wood, which is cotton wood when we get it. Third. The water here is strongly impregnated with alkali. Fourth. The weather is very cold now, and growing colder. Snow falls here a foot deep frequently in winter, and sometimes remains a week on the ground.

The above extract contains everything touching the climate at Warner’s ranch.

J. M. MCNULTY, Surgeon First infantry California Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 5, 1861.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE ANDREWS, Sixth U. S. Infantry, en route from Fort Yuma to San Diego:

COLONEL: General Wright, commanding the Department of the Pacific, has made arrangements for the troops under your command from Fort Yuma to embark at San Diego for New York on the steamer which will leave San Francisco for Panama on the 21st instant, and he directs that there be nothing to interfere with your command being entirely ready at San Diego when the steamer puts in to that port to receive it.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 5, 1861.

Lieut. Col. JOSEPH R. WEST, First Infantry California Vols., Comdg. Fort Yuma, Cal.:

COLONEL: I have sent via San Diego and Camp Wright thirty-five recruits for the companies at Fort Yuma. You will have them assigned by lot to the different companies, so that each will have the same {p.705} strength. Report to me how many more you will want to bring your companies to the maximum number allowed by law. I shall fill your companies first and those at Camp Wright next. It is reported that near low tide-water at the mouth of the Colorado people can ford the river at “low water slack.” The steam-boat men can tell you if this be so. The Cocopah Indians will know all about it. So be on your guard about that point, and also about the point near Pilot Knob, and the one above the fort about which I spoke to you. If you are sure that you have all the boats, large and small, under your guns (and I advise you to destroy all that you do not need), and are en rapport with the Indians, so they can give you information about the fords and people collecting near them to cross, it seems to me you will have good control of the river. Are the steam-boat men reliable? I hear the steam-boat has gone to the mouth of the river for supplies. It would be well, I think, always to have a trusty officer go down on her, and a few trusty men, so if there be treachery, as to setting a force across the river below the fort, this officer can seize the boat and burn her up. Your officer and men ostensibly can go down “to see the Indians and to learn the river.” None need know of your instructions to the officer to destroy the boat and, if necessary, shoot the officers in charge of her, in case of treachery, but he who goes in command of the men; say such a man as Lieutenant Mitchell. I have all sorts of rumors from your direction, but do not believe them and do not get stampeded about you. I only want you to guard all the points. This done, with your resolution and sagacity, I have no fears of a surprise; and unless you are surprised you will whip any force coming from the direction of Texas. You will see by letters taken by this express that Mr. Showalter with a party of Texans from El Monte will attempt to cross the desert; so, too, doubtless, Judge Terry. Give me a good account of these two men. They will try to steal by you if possible; if not possible, they will try to bully you. In either event, give me a good account of them. The time has gone by when matters are to be minced with such men-such open and avowed traitors. For myself, if I were in command at Yuma and they came there with armed men and would not take the oath of allegiance and attempted to show fight, knowing their political sentiments as I do I should hang them both. Your duties are of a most responsible character. California expects that when her own troops are guarding the approaches to the State there shall be no doubt as to how efficiently the duty is done. I know you will keep on the alert, and that your command will by night and by day be kept ready to fight at a moment’s notice.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 55.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 5, 1861.

I. Captain Fitch’s company (B, Fourth Infantry California Volunteers) will, until further orders, take post at Fort Vancouver. The company will move into quarters as soon as an opportunity is afforded by the departure of one of the relieved companies.

...

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.706}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 6, 1861.

Maj. EDWIN A. RIGG, First Infantry California Volunteers, Comdg. at Camp Wright, near Warner’s Ranch, Cal.:

MAJOR: I send by Lieutenant Wellman 20,000 rounds of musket ammunition for your command, thirteen Sibley stoves, ten camp kettles, two hospital tents, and two sets hospital tent poles. Report to me how much ammunition you have on hand for your infantry command when you have received this. The 10,000 rounds I wrote to you as having been sent to San Diego did not go down. I should think there could be no mistake about your getting barley at 2 1/2 cents and so wrote you, but you must have it even though you pay more. In the latter event report at once to me, and I will send to San Francisco for it.

Respectfully, &c.,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, November 6, 1861.

Maj. EDWARD E. EYRE, First Cavalry California Volunteers, Comdg. Camp Carleton, near San Bernardino, Cal.:

MAJOR: The colonel commanding directs that you cause your quartermaster and commissary to forward at once to this office a full and complete list of all quartermaster’s stores and property now in his possession, and all subsistence stores and commissary property now in his possession, from whatever source they may have come. The colonel also desires that you send to this office a list of all the ammunition you have on hand, specifying the amount of each kind, particularly in regard to the pistol cartridges, whether for revolvers army size or for revolvers navy size.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BEN. C. CUTLER, First Lieut., First Infantry California Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

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CAMP WRIGHT, November 6, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Commanding California Volunteers, Los Angeles, Cal.:

COLONEL: I take advantage of Mr. Wallace’s kindness to be bearer of dispatches to you to give you the news from our little camp. Of course we have not changed our locality since our arrival here except to move farther to the northward, say one-eighth of a mile, to get on to higher and drier ground. I have since my last communication to you examined every corner and nook to better our position, and find none but at Oak Grove. I have been there again and took a great deal of pains to examine the locality in an entirely military point of view, and am satisfied that it is the only point within fifty miles of here where a perfect blockade can successfully be had. The valley at the northwest corner where the road (and the only one) enters the valley is not more than half a mile wide, and can easily be closed up. But there is no good place to camp near that point, say half a mile, where {p.707} any drill-ground can be had. But farther up the valley, near the house of Mr. Cable, formerly Clark’s, is a beautiful camp-ground and also fine ground for drilling. With a few cavalry I can cut off any and every person who approaches from the Los Angeles road and also from Fort Yuma or force them from ten to twenty miles to the north or south of me to get by. There is a trail from San Bernardino that debouches the desert near Indian Wells that passes about ten miles to the north of Oak Grove beyond the mountain, but a few mounted men could easily close that up, supported by a few infantry. And then there is but one other that I know of, and that is from Temecula to San Isabel, on the San Diego road; from thence to San Felipe on the desert. Making Oak Grove the headquarters would leave the San Diego road open, but it is, in fact, open at present, and with my present force I cannot well help it. The only outlet, however, is at Santa Isabel, where a few men could intercept any one coming by way of Temecula, or striking off at San Felipe and attempting to go to Los Angeles by the same route. I simply throw out these suggestions for your consideration. Now for this location. The valley is about eight miles wide and can be passed without coming near me either through the Agua Caliente Valley or around the San José Valley and by several trails that start in this side of Oak Grove and pass both to the north and south of me. I am exceedingly anxious to do some service, and know that I was sent here by my Government for that purpose. I therefore feel the necessity of being in a position where I can do it. I think that many have passed me here that should not, and I could not help myself notwithstanding my vigilance. Captain Roberts reports his arrival at San Diego all well. He also asks for several teams to haul wood for the winter, which cannot be spared until all the stores are brought up from there. He informs me that wood for his use has to be hauled a distance of twenty-seven miles. I received orders from Lieutenant MacGowan to-day, a copy of which I inclose. The proceedings of a court-martial held at this camp November 2 I also forward to your headquarters. I would also like to have your orders respecting Private Jones, of Company D, charges preferred by Lieut. John Martin, of Company D, and in the hands of Adjt. B. C. Cutler. I would state that the prisoner has behaved remarkably well since his confinement, obeying orders to the letter. In fact, his conduct is commendable. I have been compelled to place Capt. Hugh A. Gorley in arrest, which leaves his company without a duty officer, First Lieutenant Martin being absent and Second Lieut. D. C. Vestal, acting as adjutant, acting assistant quartermaster and acting commissary of subsistence. If it were possible another lieutenant should be attached to each company. I have given the contract for beef to Francisco O’Campo for one month, he being the lowest bidder, viz, 6 cents per pound, delivered at any point within the boundaries of Oak Grove or Warner’s ranch. He comes highly recommended to me by an old acquaintance of mine, Capt. George Johnson, of Fort Yuma. I have found him loyal, and in fact the greater part of the information that I have received has been through him, corroborated by others. As I informed you in my last, every man here seems to be against his neighbor, and if all can be believed they are a pretty set of scoundrels. I have found O’Campo the only man who has expressed himself freely. If he has anything to say about any one he does it, and gives himself as authority; if otherwise, he candidly says his intercourse with them is so slight that he knows little, good or bad, about them. The command are very much in want of blankets. One blanket is not enough to keep the men warm in this climate, and {p.708} the result of sleeping cold is rheumatism to an alarming degree. The command are getting along with their drill very well. In all light movements they are progressing rapidly and enter into it with spirit. We require quartermaster’s tents for stores badly. Captain Bates sent me a number of paulins from Saint Diego, but tents would be better if they could be had, also carpenter tools and forge. The road to San Diego is a rough one and the mules will have to be well shod to be serviceable. I believe I have now given you a brief account of everything except blanks, which we are out of entirely of all kinds.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN A. RIGG, Major First Regiment Infty. California Vols., Comdg. Camp Wright.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Salem, Oreg., November 6, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Your communication of the 1st instant, relative to disbanding the men in volunteer cavalry, has this day been received and will be attended to.

Yours, with respect,

CHESTER N. TERRY, Private Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 7, 1861.

Maj. EDWARD E. EYRE, First Cavalry California Volunteers, Comdg. Camp Carleton, near San Bernardino, Cal.:

MAJOR: Your letter of November 4, 1861, was handed to me last evening. Your men should be punished whenever they absent themselves from your camp without permission from proper authority. Have them tried by a garrison court-martial or a regimental court-martial which you have the right now to order. In these times when so grave an insult was offered to soldiers in the service of the United States as the one offered to your men by the bully and desperado who was knocked down, I am only surprised that they did not kill the traitor outright. If the man who so promptly resented the insult to himself and country is otherwise fitted for the place it would be well to make him a non-commissioned officer. While you must discourage rows and repress all disturbances and all breaches of the peace, still, when the country is insulted through your men, I hope you will always resent the insult on the spot in such a manner that the villain will never offer another. I know well that in San Bernardino the civil authorities are not respected and the administration of the civil law is a farce, so that in a measure you come back to first principles. If then, a traitor insults the country by treasonable toasts and your soldiers have active patriotism enough to punish him well for it, I have not the heart to advise you to repress their inclination to do so; only see that this is not made a pretext for inflicting injury for other causes. Let the case be a clear one, the punishment prompt and effectual. By and by your men and the colors will be properly respected.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.709}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 7. 1861.

Lieut. Col. JOSEPH R. WEST, Commanding at Fort Yuma, Cal.:

COLONEL: A Mr. John F. Bilderbock, who came, as he says, from Ohio to New Mexico, and thence with Mr. Rees last winter with cattle to California, says there is a hay road which turns off about six miles west (this side) of the Alamo Mucho, and another about three miles east of the New River Station, on the road hence to Fort Yuma. In going eastward these roads lead off from the Fort Yuma road to the right, and each leads to what is called Paddock’s Old Ferry, on the Colorado River. An old adobe house (or ruins of a house) marks the spot. Three miles below this point is Gonzales’ Ferry. Here is a small boat large enough to take one horse over at a time and large enough to take over a wagon if in pieces. This point was an old Mexican crossing, used by swimming over their horses and rafting over their effects before the boat was put there, and could be so used again after you have destroyed the boat. The ferry is twenty-six miles below the fort. Cooke’s Old Ferry, belonging to Mr. Yager, who lives one mile below the fort, is about six miles below Algodones. There is a near trail which heads to it front Algodones. It is said Yager has taken his boat up to the house he occupies from this ferry. Maybe he has, perhaps not; a small boat and a skiff may still be in that neighborhood. At the Colorado mines (or the Ripple), twenty-one miles above the fort, there was a small boat, and is now, perhaps. This boat belonged to a blacksmith. Yager’s partner also had a boat there, and there, when the river is low, it can be forded. The Cocopah Indians cross the river on tule boats; these carry two men. The Cocopah Indians live near the month of the river.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 7, 1861.

Lieut. B. C. CUTLER, Post Adjt., Southern District of California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

LIEUTENANT: In compliance with Revised Army Regulations, 1861, I have the honor to submit the annexed journal of the march of a detachment of the First Infantry California Volunteers from Camp Lath am, Los Angeles County, to Fort Yuma, Cal., October 16 to November 3, 1861, pursuant to Orders, No. 4, from headquarters Southern District of California, dated October 14, 1861. In explanation of the fact that it is not returned in the form prescribed by the Revised Regulations, I have to state that a copy of that work was first received by me when half the present march was accomplished, and under circumstances that did not admit of its examination during the remainder.

Your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infantry California Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

{p.710}

[Inclosure.]

Journal of the march of Companies E, G, and H, First Infantry California Volunteers, commanded by Lieut. Col. Joseph R. West, from Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, Cal., to Camp Wright, at Warner’s ranch, San Diego County, Cal., pursuant to District Orders, No. 4, October 14, 1861:

October 16, 1861.-Left Camp Latham at 11 a.m. by road to the right of the cienega; crossed the swamp two miles east of the road to Los Angeles; passed Los Angeles two miles to the left. Reached Lagunita at 6 p.m. Road fair, but wagons cannot cross the swamp other than by the road to Los Angeles. Camping facilities at Lagunita are good; wood is furnished by the proprietor; water abundant for a large command. Weather on the march very warm. Distance, 18 miles.

October 17.-Left Lagunita at 7.30 a.m.; marched six miles, by good road, to San Gabriel River; the stream is about thigh deep and sixty yards wide; water clear and cold; banks at ford easy of access; evidences of miry spots elsewhere. Fine farms and vineyards bordering the river. From San Gabriel River to Reed’s ranch, nine miles, roads sandy in some places, but generally good; no water last stretch. Workman’s ranch is passed on the left hand two miles before reaching Reed’s; water to be had there, and good camp, wood, &c. Good camping ground at Reed’s; wood scarce; small stream of water, sufficient for 500 men and train. Weather very warm in daytime, nights cold. Distance previous, 18 miles; distance to-day, 15 miles; distance in two days, 33 miles.

October 18.-Left Reed’s ranch at 6.50 a.m.; good road to a small settlement called San José; distance, five miles; water good. Thence to Chino Ranch, eleven miles by good road; water two miles after leaving San José and two miles before reaching Chino, but intervening stretch of seven miles without. Good camp at Chino Ranch; wood and water ample. Passed Chino two miles and camped on small stream sufficient for 500 men and train; no wood; good grazing for animals. Weather growing cooler. Distance previous, 33 miles; distance to-day, 18 miles; distance in three days, 51 miles.

October 19.-Left camp two miles southeast of Chino Ranch at 6.35 a.m.; marched five miles to River Santa Aña; water all the way. The river is about seventy yards wide and two feet deep at ford; banks easy of access and evidently fordable for a mile on either side of the road; water good. Thence by rolling and partially hilly road, without water, to Greenwade’s Station; there good water, wood, forage, and camp-ground. Thence three miles by rather rough road to Temescal; fair camp, enough water for 500 men and train; also wood, good grazing ground. Weather pleasant. Distance previous, 51 miles; distance to-day, 17 miles; distance in four days, 68 miles.

October 20.-Left Temescal at 6.25 a in.; thence five miles by rough, hilly road without water to Lagunita; supply there scanty. Thence by first part of road, hilly and rocky, latter part level and good, to Laguna Grande. From Lagunita to Laguna Grande the distance is eight miles and no water on the road. Water insufficient for more than 300 men, and a water-hole for 100 animals, but notice must be sent in advance to have a supply prepared. Wood abundant and camp-ground good. Grazing fair. Weather warm. Distance previous, 68 miles; distance to-day, 13 miles-distance five days, 81 miles.

October 21.-Left Laguna Grande at 3.40 a.m.; thence by superior level road to Kline’s, fourteen miles and a half; no water on the road. {p.711} At Kline’s an abundance of fine water, wood, forage, and grazing. From Kline’s to Temecula, Indian village, six miles and a half by good level road, with more or less of water. At Temecula large stream of good water, easily passable; wood and forage abundant; grazing and camp-ground good. Weather warm by day; night quite cold, with heavy frost. Distance previous, 81 miles; distance to-day, 21 miles; distance in six days, 102 miles.

October 22.-Left Temecula at 3.35 a.m. by broken hilly road and difficult for teams, eight miles and a half, without water, and latter part dusty and close to Negro Ranch, where there was good supply of water, grazing, and wood. Thence to Giftaler’s by mountainous, rocky road through cations, five miles; no water on the road; a dangerous gorge, and could be used to a good advantage against an enemy. At Giftaler’s, the supply of water is ample, but of poor quality; grazing good and wood plenty. The ranch occupies a valley about two miles square. Weather very warm. Distance previous, 102 miles distance to-day, 13 1/2 miles; distance in seven days, 115 1/2 miles.

October 23.-Left Giftaler’s at 2.10 a.m. by ascending though easily traveled road, without water, to Oak Grove; fine camp-ground, pleasant valley and adjoining thick growth of oak trees; water, forage, and grazing good. From Giftaler’s to Oak Grove ten miles; thence fifteen miles by easy rolling road through a finely wooded country to Warner’s ranch. Camp Wright is located just beyond the junction of the Los Angeles and San Diego roads; water, forage, grazing, wood, &c., all that is required for a large command. The climate is unfavorable; very windy, with hot days and cold nights, and in winter said to be very inclement and unhealthy. Arrived at Camp Wright at noon. Weather pleasant. Distance previous, 115 1/2 miles; distance to-day, 25 miles; distance in eight days, 140 1/2 miles.

Journal of the march of Companies B, H, and I, First Infantry California Volunteers, commanded by Lieut. Col. Joseph R. West, from Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch, San Diego, to Fort Yuma, Cal., pursuant to District Orders, No. 4, October 14, 1861.

NOTE.-This march is made by similar orders and in continuation of the preceding one. Two companies were exchanged at Camp Wright. Company I left en route on the 25th October; Company B on the 26th accompanied by the commanding officer, and Company H on the 27th. An advance party of seven men had been sent forward on the 24th October to clean out the wells, and the command was divided to avoid any scarcity of water. This, in the opinion of the writer, is the best way of crossing the desert with troops. Premising that no more than 100 men and train should reach a watering place at any one camp, the command should be divided into three divisions; the immediate commander should habitually remain with the center one. At his option and without fatigue he can personally communicate with all three within ten hours, and readily concentrate them if necessary. If any larger force than 300 men is marching it should be subdivided into parties of 300, with a special commander for each such subdivision. The present command was fortunate enough to escape sand-storms, which are represented as distressing and sometimes dangerous. There was no surgeon attending, but no inconvenience resulted therefrom; the health of the men was excellent. The rations embraced hard bread and jerked beef. It is difficult to bake bread on all occasions on this march, and beef-cattle are not easily taken care of. Reliable persons state that sheep can be driven over the desert without food or water, and by being driven constantly will overtake troops at each halt.

{p.712}

Owing to the fact that most of I he following marches were made at night, little observation of the country was practicable. That it is a desert, however, in the most comprehensive sense of the term, admits of no doubt. From Vallecito to Fort Yuma a command should commence each march at 5 p.m. The road is easily distinguished and traveled; the troops pack up more readily than at any other hour; they avoid the heat of daytime, and march briskly to camp and rest.

October 26, 1861.-Left Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch, with Company B at 7.30 a.m.; marched five miles over pleasant rolling road and well-wooded country to a vineyard, called La Puerta, at which found fine mountain stream, but no ground for a camp; thence by fair road without water to San Felipe, eight miles. San Felipe is an old overland mail station; forage left by the line exists there and the pasturage is good. Wood has to be hauled four miles; water neither over abundant nor good; camp ground rather inferior. Weather very warm and close. Distance, 13 miles.

October 27.-Left San Felipe at 3.30 a.m. by heavy hilly road to Vallecito; road sandy through bottom-land, seven miles to first hill; thence by broken road six miles, a great portion of which is a cañon with but one wagon track winding between cliffs. A very small force could here impede an enemy of far superior numbers. Latter part of road more level until reaching another hill. On the left-hand side of the road, a bout half a mile back, is a spring that affords enough water for fifty men; thence a small rugged hill is surmounted and a valley is reached five miles in length by heavy sandy road to Vallecito. There is an old mail station in a narrow pass between two ranges of hills; water in fair supply; no wood but mesquite bushes; pasturage good, and forage left by mail line. Weather warm. Distance previous, 13 miles: distance to-day, 17 miles; distance in two days, 30 miles.

October 28.-Left Vallecito at 3.30 a.m.; marched nine miles by heavy sandy road to Palm Spring; water in limited supply, and requires to be prepared for a command; the locality could be used for a camp. Thence by heavy sandy road to Carriso Creek, where there is an old mail station with some forage, but there is no pasturage in the vicinity. The country has now become a complete desert of most forbidding aspect. The creek is a small stream, affording an abundant supply of water of inferior quality; the bottom-land is filled with a stunted growth of mesquite and arrow-weed. Distance from Palm Spring to Carriso Creek is seven miles and a half. Weather intensely hot. Distance previous, 30 miles; distance to day, 16 1/2 miles; distance in three days, 46 1/2 miles.

October 29.-Left Carriso Creek at 11.50 p.m. October 28, following the stream and constantly crossing it; road heavy and sandy; thence over level road, with somewhat improved traveling, four miles to a short, steep hill; thence a level plain with desert brush to Sackett’s Well; last part of road makes fair traveling; complete desert. Sackett’s Well when cleaned out affords a good supply of excellent water; it is a mere water-hole, with out any marks to distinguish it at the distance of 200 yards; men must be kept away from the brink, as it is liable to cave. Reached the well at daylight. Weather very warm. Distance previous, 46 1/2 miles; distance to-day, 17 1/2 miles; distance in four days, 64 miles. Left Sackett’s Well at 5.45 p.m., traveling through a continuous desert; first five miles of road sandy; thence better traveling to Indian Well. This is an old mail station entirely deserted. The well is some thirty feet deep, water good, but not very ample supply. Signal Mountain, a prominent landmark, bears southwest, distant about fifteen miles. Reached camp at 11 p.m. Weather {p.713} very warm in daytime. Distance previous, 64 miles; distance to-night, 15 miles; distance in live days, 79 miles. The time is here called five days; that number of marches has been made, but the time between camps has been curtailed in order to travel by night hereafter.

October 30.-Left Indian Well at 5 p.m. for New River Station; road a perfect level, over a barren, alkali plain, with a few patches of mesquite; dusty and heavy for wagons. At New River, old mail station, deserted. Deep well of inferior water; a lagoon within 400 yards now affords a supply, but would fail after a long spell of dry weather; it cannot be relied upon. This station is a precarious one for water. Weather very warm. Distance previous, 79 miles; distance to-day, 15 miles; distance in six days, 94 miles.

October 31.-Left New River Station at 5.10 p.m. for the Alamo; road heavy, over barren flat. The Alamo is another old deserted mail station; there is a well thirty feet deep, affording a supply of good water. Animals can now make use of a lagoon, half a mile southwest from the house. Within 350 yards of the house the road to Fort Yuma branches off to the left; the right-hand fork leads to the Mariposa ferry, thirty-six miles, and down the Colorado thirty miles from Fort Yuma. That route can be used to advantage by any one acquainted with the water lagoons, which are in thickets off the road and hard to find by strangers. Weather warm. Distance previous, 94 miles; distance to-day, 14 miles; distance in seven days, 108 miles.

November 1.-Left Alamo Station at 4.50 p.m.; road inferior. Gardner’s Wells (old mail station, but water has failed), nine miles; thence by same character of road and country to Salt or Seven Wells, and camped. Water plenty, but brackish; wood abundant. Weather warm. Distance previous, 108 miles; distance to-day, 18 miles; distance in eight days, 126 miles.

November 2.-Left Salt Wells at 4 p.m.; mime miles to Cooke’s Wells; first two miles and a half bad road. At Cooke’s, water and wood good and abundant. Thence fifteen miles to Pilot Knob; camped on the bank of the Colorado at the foot of a mountain. From Cooke’s the road is mostly good, through a mesquite flat, and latter part Indian gardens. Weather more pleasant. Distance previous, 126 miles; distance to-day, 25 miles; distance in nine days, 151 miles.

November 3.-Left Pilot Knob at 1.30 p.m.; road follows up the River Colorado to Fort Yuma, distance ten miles. Road a good deal broken first three miles and a half; reached the fort at 4.30 p.m. Weather pleasant. Distance previous, 151 miles; distance to-day, 10 miles; distance in ten days, 161 miles.

Itinerary from Camp Latham, near Los Angeles, to Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch, San Diego County. Distance, 140 1/2 miles.

No. of campName of camp.Daily milesAggregates miles
1Lagunita1818
2Reed’s ranch1533
3Two miles beyond Chino1851
4Temescal1768
5Laguna Grandel381
6Temecula21102
7Giftaler’s131/21151/2
8Warner’s ranch251401/2
To Fort Yuma161
Total distance3011/2
{p.714}

Left Camp Latham at 11 a.m., October 16, and arrived at Camp Wright October 23, 1861, at 12 noon.

Itinerary from Camp Wright, near Warner’s ranch, San Diego County, to Fort Yuma, Cal. Distance 161 miles.

No. of campName of camp.Daily milesAggregates miles
1San Felipe1313
2Vallecito1730
3Carriso Creek161/2451/2
4Sackett’s Well171/264
5Indian Wells1579
6New River station1594
7Alamo Station14108
8Salt or Seven Wells18126
9Pilot Knob25151
10Fort Yuma10161

Left Camp Wright at 7.30 a.m., October 26, and arrived at Fort Yuma November 3, 1861, at 4.30 p.m.

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infantry California Vols., Comdg. Detachment.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 8, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF CALIFORNIA:

I have the honor to request that you will forward on the 10th, 20th, and last day of each month to the Adjutant-General of the Army, for the information of this Department, a full report of the condition of the volunteer recruiting service in your State, setting forth the number of complete regiments for duty, the number nearly completed, and the number in process of organization. The names of the commanders and the arm of the service will be specified for each regiment. You are further desired to comply with any request of the Adjutant-General of the Army regarding the movement of troops from your State to any army in the field, and to regard the same as coming directly from the Secretary of War.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, November 8, 1861.

Lieut. Col. B. B. DE RUSSY, Corps of Engineers, or the SENIOR OFFICER OF ENGINEERS AT SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.:

You are hereby appointed the authorized agent of the United States to purchase or acquire “Lime Point,” at the entrance of San Francisco Bay, Cal., for the erection of fortifications and other military purposes. You are authorized to offer $30,000 for the land, and if refused you will commence proceedings under the law for condemnation.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Acting Secretary of War.

{p.715}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 209.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 8, 1861.

Col. Ferris Forman having received from the Governor of this State the appointment of colonel of the Fourth Regiment of Infantry California Volunteers will proceed to Camp Sigel and assume command of the regiment.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 8, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, California Vols., Comdg. Dist. of Southern California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to have an express sent from Warner’s ranch to your headquarters informing you of the time the command from Yuma passes en route to San Diego. Upon the receipt of this information you will telegraph the same for the information of the general.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 9, 1861.

Maj. EDWIN A. RIGG, First Infantry California Volunteers, Comdg. Camp Wright:

MAJOR: Your note of November 6, instant, I received last evening. As soon as Colonel Andrews’ command arrives from Yuma give the colonel all your wagons and your ambulance, if necessary, to move his command from Camp Wright to San Diego. Not one of Mr. Banning’s wagons can be used for this purpose, as they must come on without delay to San Pedro. You will load Mr. Banning’s train with the stores and property of Camp Wright and move that camp to Oak Grove, or to Temecula, if in your judgment, after having surveyed the country, the latter would be considered the best point, and direct your train to return with supplies from San Diego to the new camp, which, by the by, will retain its present name. Colonel Wright decided before he left Los Angeles that Mr. Banning’s train must not go to San Diego, so use it to move your camp, provided you do not delay it. Have everything packed against it comes up.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., November 9, 1861.

Lieutenant-Colonel BLAKE: (Care of N. L. Perkins, Folsom, Cal.)

March your command to Benicia.

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.716}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash, Ter., November 9. 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: On the 7th instant I was called on by Messrs. Cornelius, Maury, and Harding, of the State of Oregon, who exhibited to me a letter of instructions from the Adjutant-General,* by which I learned that they were authorized, as colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and quartermaster thereof, to raise a regiment of mounted troops for the defense of the frontier. The authority conferred on these gentlemen is ample for all purposes necessary, and any failure in raising this force (and I found them by no means sanguine of success) may be ascribed to causes familiar to the commander of the department. I gave them such information and advice as I best could, and assured them of my readiness to aid them to the full extent of my power and menus. As authorized by the letter of the Adjutant-General I mustered them into service informally and administered the oath of allegiance. They had received no blanks of any necessary kind, and will require those for mustering in, both of field and staff, and of the companies, which I have to request you will forward to me at once for them. Mr. Harding is made the mustering officer, and from what I learn of him the duties will be faithfully and carefully performed. There was considerable disinclination on his part to take the position conferred upon him, arising both from the state of his health and of his private affairs, and he was finally induced to act temporarily, on the suggestion that his services were essential to prevent a falling through of the whole matter. My advice to these gentlemen, in conclusion, was to look about and select such careful, faithful, and energetic officers as might be suitable for the companies, and wait a few days for further instructions. I will endeavor to furnish them with such regulations relative to volunteers, &c., as I can obtain from the published orders in my possession.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh infantry, Commanding District.

* See September 24, p. 632.

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HEADQUARTERS, La Mesilla, Ariz., November 10, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Commanding Department of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: I have nothing new to report as to the movements of the enemy. My spies report that there are sixteen companies at Fort Craig and three within thirty miles of the fort, and that every effort is being made to enlist the Mexicans, who are much divided on the subject of making war upon Texans or of taking any part in the war at all. There exists, too, disaffection among the regular troops, who have not been paid, many of them for one year and a half. There is a large train at Craig and quantities of supplies are being hauled there. All this would indicate that the enemy intend to make a move of some sort. I shall have them watched closely, and, should they come down, I have my supplies at Bliss, and transportation ready to move it down to Quitman or Davis, if necessary. I shall, with my mounted force, push to Santa Fé, and hold the country until the arrival of General Sibley. A party of citizens from California, who have joined my forces, report great excitement in Southern California. They know of no troops marching {p.717} for Arizona, but say that Fort Yuma is being strongly re-enforced. I am convinced that a strong force stationed in Western Arizona would enable us to get hundreds of good Southern men, well armed and mounted, who are anxious to join our cause, and this would enable us to watch Sonora, and prevent United States troops from crossing that State, and, what is of importance, open communication with Guaymas and other posts on the Pacific, where we must, of necessity, get most of our supplies. I will keep you advised of all matters here, and act as circumstances may direct.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Texas Mounted Rifles, P. A. C. S.

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LOS ANGELES, November 11, 1861.

Colonel CARLETON:

DEAR SIR: For the past three days I have been confined to my room and to my bed, or I would have visited you at Camp Latham. Parties are, I am informed, passing here en route east toward Texas. One party of about twenty left here on Saturday or Sunday, and another small party arrived yesterday, as I am informed. Some of the men have acquaintances in this city and have endeavored to get them to join their party. I think it would be a good plan if some reliable person could be induced to join them, and go with them as far at least as Fort Yuma. Some of these men are still in town, and more are expected mini a day or two. I now think there is cause to fear an attack on Fort Yuma. If my health will permit I will go out to your camp in the stage to-morrow morning.

Yours,

J. J. WARNER.

12 m.-I have this moment learned that Showalter is now in this city. I have accordingly opened this letter to apprise you of the fact.

J. J. W.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 11, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Regiment of Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: In reply to your letter of the 1st instant, wherein you state the disposition made of the volunteer force under your command, I am directed by the general commanding the department to say that your action is approved.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 11, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Regiment of Infantry, Comdg. District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: Captain Whittlesey’s letter* with inclosed petitions having been submitted for the consideration of the general commanding the {p.718} department, I am directed to say that, notwithstanding the general fully concurs with the representations made therein as to the importance of retaining the regular troops in the District of Oregon, yet under the existing orders from the War Department he cannot authorize a suspension of their removal.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Logan to Whittlesey, October 18, p. 665.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 12, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, California Vols., Comdg. Dist. of Southern California, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has perused with much satisfaction your communication of the 5th instant, and the accompanying letters, and highly commends the activity of Lieutenant-Colonel West, Major Rigg, and others, and the prompt measures adopted for the preservation of order in the southern part of this State. The general desires you to cause early requisitions to be made here for all supplies the troops may require, except such as can be procured in the neighborhood at reasonable rates. You will also, the general directs, consider the propriety of at once strengthening the garrison of Yuma. A company of cavalry would be of great service at that point, if forage can conveniently be had, and at a reasonable price. Instructions with reference to the removal of the camp at Warner’s ranch were communicated on the 2d instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 12, 1861.

Lieut. BEN. C. CUTLER, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Southern Dist. of California, Los Angeles:

LIEUTENANT: I beg leave to represent to the colonel commanding the Southern District of California that the commander of this post should be provided with presents for distribution to the Indians. Their aid is asked and required in obtaining information of the movements of the enemy, and nothing but promises of good treatment and friendly assurances can be offered in requital. The value of $1,000 in blankets and leaf tobacco distributed among the principal chiefs would in my opinion be a judicious expenditure. I inclose herewith weekly return of this garrison, also journal of my late march from Los Angeles to the post.*

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infantry California Vols., Commanding Post.

* See p. 710.

{p.719}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 12, 1861.

Lieut. BEN. C. CUTLER, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Southern Dist. of California, Los Angeles:

LIEUTENANT: In accordance with a personal communication from the colonel commanding the Southern District of California, I submit the following statements as to the defenses and supplies of this post:

Defenses.-Some delay has been involved in getting possession of all the boats upon the river. There is a boat at Gonzales’ Ferry, some thirty miles below this post, which I shall have in my possession within the next forty-eight hours, either by negotiation or seizure. Another boat is kept by a man named Winegar, sixteen miles above here. I shall take steps to have it secured as soon as possible. All others on the river are in my possession except the steamer which has been absent twenty-four hours over time on a trip to the mouth of the river for supplies. I am assured of the loyalty of the steam-boat men, and see no reason to question it. It is manifestly so much to Mr. Yager’s interest to be faithful to the United States Government that I credit his assertions to that effect. He has co-operated with me in all my efforts to promote security. Whenever there is any doubt about the fidelity of any person I require them to take the oath of allegiance. This and keeping them watched is all that lean do until I have proper grounds for taking them into custody. The Colorado is very low, but there are really no fords upon it that can be used by an armed force. A few travelers may partially wade and swim across in one or two places, but no munitions of war could be crossed in that way. The reported ford at the mouth of the river remains yet to be inquired into. Rafts could be constructed on the left bank out of cottonwood and other trees, and should the enemy resort to that method at any point properly removed from this post I am at a loss to counteract it. Little has yet resulted from my communication with the Indians. I have had some informal interviews with one or two of the chief Yumas, and am to have a grand talk on the coming Sunday. As yet I have formed no high opinion of their efficiency as allies. The circuit of the Yumas is limited. They are at war with the Maricopas and Pimas, consequently will not venture into the country whence our enemies are expected, and the same cause prevents the receipt of news from the last-mentioned tribes. I shall spare no effort toward being kept properly informed with such means as I can command. But I shall mainly rely for defense upon constant vigilance and preparation. In the latter respect everything is to be done-organization, temporary field-works, preparation of ordinance and ammunition, drill of artillery detachments, &c. Without wishing to cast any reflections upon the command which preceded the present garrison, I cannot forbear the remark that a very great improvement in its late defenses has been found necessary. Two 12-pounder or 18-pounder pieces with the requisite ammunition would add to the strength of the post, and I recommend that they be sent here as soon as possible.

Medical department.-The post surgeon states officially that the medical supplies are ample for 300 men until May 1, 1862. He also has called my notice to the necessity of issues of antiscorbutics. By my direction the acting commissary of subsistence has purchased one month’s supply of potatoes, to be issued in accordance with Revised Army Regulations, but no such opportunity is likely to offer again, and steps should be taken to supply the command either by sea or land {p.720} transportation. The health of the men is generally good. There are no local diseases to be feared here, except such as arise from bad whisky and diseased women.

Ordnance and ordnance stores.-I inclose herewith a copy of the list turned over to me by the late commander. The four 12-pounder mountain howitzers can only be used at short range against an assault. Pieces of 12-pounders or 18-pounders planted on the hill on the other side of the river would do us great damage. The howitzers and ammunition need much preparation for active service. This is being done. The supply of shell, shot, &c., is limited. I shall endeavor to increase it by making canister out of musket buck-and-ball cartridges. For muskets I have on hand 28,000 rounds and 11,000 expanding bullets, as per list herewith; 14,000 brought with me and 6,000 in hands of company commanders. Total, 59,000 rounds; an ample supply. With diligence I trust soon to feel better satisfied with the condition of this branch of our defense.

Subsistence.-I inclose herewith a statement of the acting commissary of subsistence showing the condition of this department in a shape that requires no comment at my hands.

Quartermaster’s department.-Further examination is needed into supplies generally before a report can be submitted. I inclose requisition for clothing, of which there is great need. It is [for] the incompleted quota of the three companies here for the first six months of their service.

Supplies on the way.-I am not apprised of any. Those for which the steamer has gone below are included in quantities on hand.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infty. California Volunteers, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, November 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE WRIGHT, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

Will you please order the necessary force (probably one or two regiments), if possible under Colonel Carleton, to protect the Overland Mail Route; the number of troops to be employed is left to your discretion. Please confer with Louis McLane about the location of the troops.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Armies.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 13, 1861.

[Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Comdg. Southern District of California, Los Angeles:]

DEAR COLONEL: I have looked over my letter of yesterday before closing the express this morning. It is rather sensational, but I see nothing in it that reflection does not confirm. I have been over the river this morning to have an earnest talk with Mr. Joseph Hooper and his partner about the steamer’s being so much behind time, now nearly forty-eight hours. They are in no wise apprehensive about her, but attribute the delay to some accident. This idea is confirmed by reports {p.721} of the Indians, who state that she was going down the river four days after she left here. This implies an accident-perhaps the rudder knocked off, &c. Of course I shall be uneasy until I ascertain the cause of the delay. I am throwing up one work 350 feet-faces on a low hill west of and adjoining the fort-and three smaller ones at different points. This gives us plenty of work. Also drilling all spare time, and artillery detachment at it constantly. As Mose says, I shall “spile” for a fight in about a week. Much was to be accomplished, but I shall soon have matters all snug in my grasp and then hold them so. There is a lull in all excitement about attacks, but I am not inclined thereby to relax vigilance. I think it would be quite worth while for the Government to send down by sea to mouth of river the two pieces of artillery that I have asked for. Somebody will be to blame, unless greater efforts are made to hold this post, enemy or no enemy.

Yours,

WEST.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 13, 1861-8 p.m.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Commanding Southern District of California, Los Angeles:

COLONEL: I believe that I can accomplish my present object best by addressing you in person. Hadji Ali, the expressman, left here at 1.30 p.m., and the steamer was at the landing in one hour afterward, setting at rest all anxiety on that account. I am so impressed with the policy of holding this post securely, if held at all, that I am induced to address you again on the subject, a different plan for re-enforcing it having suggested itself since my letter of yesterday was written. For this plan I am indebted to Captain Johnson, of the steamer Cocopah. It is an economical one, and permits of the retention of the command at Warner’s ranch also. Captain Johnson is of the opinion (and leaves here believing that he is prepared to contract with Government to that end) that 300 men, with 150 tons of freight, two pieces of artillery, &c., can be landed here in ten days from San Francisco at an expense not to exceed $20,500, viz: Charter a steamer to mouth of Colorado from San Francisco to carry 300 men and 150 tons of freight, $10,000; passage 300 men from mouth to Fort Yuma, at $10, $3,000; freight, 150 tons, from mouth to Fort Yuma, at $50, $7,500; total, $20,500. If this can be done it would, in my opinion, be a most judicious expenditure, and would, I believe, secure beyond question the possession of this post against any force the enemy can bring against it. Fort Yuma is a valuable position to be retained by the United States Government. It has cost a vast amount of money, holds a large amount of stores, and possesses great strategic importance, as you are aware. Its abandonment would be equivalent to a loss of $1,000,000 by the United States, and contrary to the spirit that dictates the holding of all Federal property. I am not now conscious of any attempts to be made or projects entertained by the enemy for getting possession of it. I am not alarmed for the safety of my command, as the way of retreat is easy should an overwhelming force advance upon me. But I see here a valuable position, both in a military and moral point of view, at the mercy of such a force as the enemy can bring against it, and I assume that it is my duty to suggest that it be held securely, and how that shall be done. Three companies of the five regiments raised in California subsequent to our own could very probably be spared for the service. They are {p.722} either at or convenient to San Francisco. They could be landed here by the 12th to 15th proximo, should the department commander see the justice of my views. With 600 men the post could be made a fortification in a short time. Now its weakness consists in its many assailable points, requiring a larger force for its successful defense than its present garrison numbers. The three additional companies could be encamped in the immediate vicinity of the post without detriment to their health, I am told by the surgeon here. The 150 tons of freight and the stores that I have notified you of as being on hand will amply provide for them. They could be employed from the 15th of December to 15th of April in defending and fortifying, and be withdrawn when the weather became too warm, and leave the place stronger than it is now. Should the enemy attempt the passage of the river I could dispute it with him fifty miles up or down. Now I dare not leave it. Its extensive area makes it indefensible unless occupied by a sufficient force, and if the enemy plants heavy artillery across the river he would make it untenable, and I have no pieces to prevent him. If I have given satisfactory reasons for the re-enforcement of the post (you will remember that your original order was for six companies), I believe that Captain Johnson can take charge of the whole matter of transportation advantageously for the Government. He is a responsible man, and can give security for the performance of his contracts. I have no wish to assist him to make money improperly. As a friend I should like to see him succeed. I believe that he could facilitate affairs by contracting through to Fort Yuma from San Francisco. The present project has been elicited by asking him how it could be accomplished. The idea originated with myself, the means from him. Every accommodation except quarters exists for the additional force; they would be far more comfortable than in any camp with the convenience of the post adjacent. In conclusion, I repeat that this is a weak and valuable post within the enemy’s reach. I have given my opinions why this is so, and it remains for those having authority to adopt such course as they deem proper. I see no pressing danger, and my honest convictions are that the enemy is not likely to advance against it. He can come, and he can take it, and it is against those two possibilities that I wish to secure the Government; but as long as I am here I shall do my best to hold it, re-enforced or not.

Yours, very respectfully,

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 13, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that Company D, Third Artillery, and Company E (Crowninshield’s), Fourth Infantry California Volunteers, left this post yesterday to embark on the steamer Pacific for their respective destinations, Camp Pickett and Fort Steilacoom. The relieved garrisons of those posts, as also Company B, Ninth Infantry, now here, having arrived on the 9th instant, may be looked for at San Francisco by the Pacific about the 22d instant.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

{p.723}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. V. SUMNER: (Care of Quartermaster, No. 6 State street, New York.)

Bring all of your troops at once to this city.

By command of General McClellan:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant. General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: At 11 o’clock this morning I received your telegraphic dispatch of the 13th instant. On the 17th instant I shall forward the return called for, as complete as circumstances will admit of. In the meantime, in order to keep the Department fully informed of the progress we are making in organizing the volunteers in this State, I will give you a synopsis of the different regiments. The First Cavalry, a battalion of five companies, has been filled and is posted in the southern district of the State. The Second Cavalry, consisting of twelve companies, has been filled. Two of the companies are at Fort Churchill, one at Fort Crook, one at Fort Seward, one at Benicia, and the remaining seven are in camp four miles from this city. Both of the cavalry regiments have their horses, but thus far they have only been drilled on foot. They are undergoing a thorough course of discipline and instruction. The First Infantry has been organized and is nearly full. The regiment is stationed at Fort Yuma and other points in the southern district. The Second Infantry has its headquarters at the Presidio, near this city. Five companies of the regiment have been organized and sent under a field officer to Oregon, to relieve some of the regular troops in that district. The remaining five companies will, I think, be filled in the course of a month. The Third Infantry has its headquarters near Stockton, in this State. Four companies have been detached to relieve the regulars at Forts Ter-Waw, Gaston, Bragg, and Seward. The remaining six companies will soon be filled. The Fourth Infantry has its headquarters near Auburn, in this State. Five companies of this regiment, under the lieutenant-colonel, have already been sent to the District of Oregon, and the remaining five will soon be filled. The Fifth Infantry is near the city of Sacramento. No detachments have been made from this regiment.

The recruiting is progressing favorably. I think we can rely upon it that all the regiments will be filled by the close of the year. A rigid course of discipline and instruction has been instituted in all the regiments; the officers are generally enthusiastic and zealous in the discharge of their duties, and are to be commended for their assiduity in acquiring a knowledge of their duties. On the steamer which left here on the 11th I sent no troops East; they could not reach here in season. On the steamer leaving on the 21st I shall embark three companies of the Sixth Infantry, now at Benicia, and three of the Sixth and two of the Fourth Infantry, at San Diego, the whole commanded by Colonel Seawell, Sixth Infantry. I expect to send the last of the regular troops in the department to New York on the steamer of the 11th proximo. {p.724} I have nothing special to report. Everything is quiet to all appearance, but we must not relax in our vigilance nor be lulled into a false security.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 16, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

The within communication, addressed to Brigadier-General Thomas, after receiving his telegraphic dispatch of the 13th instant, is respectfully submitted to Major-General McClellan.

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 212.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 15, 1861.

1. Col. Benjamin L. Beall will transfer the command of the First Regiment of Cavalry to Lieut. Col. George A. H. Blake. Colonel Beall will then comply with the instructions he has received from the Adjutant-General’s Office.

2. Maj. Charles S. Lovell, of the Tenth, and Maj. Franklin F. Flint, of the Sixteenth Regiments of Infantry, will continue on duty with the Sixth Infantry and proceed to the East on the steamer of the 21st instant.

3. The following troops will embark for New York on the steamer leaving this port on the 21st instant, under the command of Col. Washington Seawell, Sixth Infantry: Companies A, B, and H, of the Sixth Infantry, now at Benicia; Companies E and I of the Fourth, and C, F, and I, of the Sixth Infantry, at San Diego.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Wright,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 15, 1861.

Maj. E. A. RIGG, Commanding Camp Wright, San Diego County, Cal.:

MAJOR: General Wright has directed that as soon as Colonel Andrews’ command has passed your camp for San Diego you will at once send me an expressman stating the fact. I have directed quite a large supply of stationery to San Diego by the last Senator for your command. You can muster the man who talks Spanish as a teamster when you have discharged the one you write about, but he must be a teamster in fact. I had but a moment to write.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.725}

HDQRS. DETACH, 1ST REGT. INFTY. CALIFORNIA VOLS., Camp Wright, near Warner’s Ranch, San Diego County, Southern California, November 15, 1861.

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Commanding California Volunteers, Los Angeles, Cal.:

COLONEL: I wrote to you on the 13th instant informing you of the arrival at this camp of Colonel Andrews with two companies of troops (infantry) from Fort Yuma, en route for San Diego-one company Fourth Infantry, U. S. Army, Captain Dryer, and one company Sixth Infantry, Captain McCleary. Colonel Andrews-turned over the command here to Captain Dryer, and left on the morning of the 14th for Los Angeles. I had written to you expecting that he would arrive there before the express would get through, but he thought differently, and you will receive my communication of that date and this at the same time. The train arrived as expected, and at an early hour this morning Captain Dryer’s command left for San Diego. At 11 a.m. the balance of the troops came in from Fort Yuma under command of Captain Bryant, two companies of the Sixth Infantry, and will leave to-morrow morning. They did not, as you seemed to expect from your last letter to me, bring any of the teams belonging to the post. Banning’s teams furnished the transportation. I have, as instructed, discharged them here, but Captain Dryer thinks that he will not have transportation enough, and thinks that he will employ one of Banning’s teams to take him to San Diego. I have informed him that if he employs extra transportation he will have to do so upon his own responsibility. I have given the whole command thirteen wagons, keeping the post teams to haul our fuel, and two teams (the mules broken down) to haul in hay and barley. I furnished the express with two mules here, as you directed, and of course have to take the ambulance mules (two). Colonel West took one more with him from the same team, leaving one here. Mrs. MacGowan arrived here, and for her transportation I was obliged to send the express mules in the ambulance to meet and change, but it was not done, and the express takes mules from here. I would respectfully suggest that I should have here mules expressly for the express. I am obliged to break a team to furnish him with a change, and even then the animals are not in condition for the expressman’s use. They are working every day, and when he requires a change the animals that I have to furnish are not in condition for the use of your express. I must either spike teams, and thus cut short our transportation teams, or I should have mules or horses for express use, and nothing else. I released Captain Gorley, captain Company D, from arrest with a reprimand. He is now getting along very well, and doing his duty with spirit and energy. It commenced raining here on the evening of the 13th and has kept it up, but moderately until last night at 9 p.m., when it commenced in good earnest, and from that time until this, midnight, it has rained incessantly. The two companies now here are encamped with us. I am proud to say, without being accused of egotism, that our companies lose nothing from comparison. Good order and quietness prevail through camp at this hour. The detachment of cavalry are drilling and perfecting themselves for active service. I have not as yet had occasion to use them much, except to cover the main road, but in a few days their duties will be extended. I would again call your attention to the fact that we are without pants for the men. As I wrote to you in a former letter, Colonel West took 100 pairs of infantry pants from here, leaving but twenty pairs of cavalry pants here for our use, which have all but some fifteen pairs been drawn or issued. The {p.726} remainder I have ordered to be kept for absolute use. Also the acting assistant quartermaster informs me that but some seventy blankets are invoiced to him. That number of blankets is not enough. The men should have at least one pair of blankets in this climate. Without blankets I am afraid that the men will be laid up with rheumatism. The transportation will be sufficient without employing Banning’s teams.

Very respectfully,

EDWIN A. RIGG, Major First Regiment Infantry California Vols., Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 15, 1861.

Lieut. Cob A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to inform him when the telegraphic dispatch of October 1, directing the recall of the detachment under Lieutenant Mullan, was received at Fort Vancouver, in what manner the orders were sent to Lieutenant Mullan, and when they were received by him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDERS, No. 78.}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Walla Walla, November 15, 1861.

In compliance with Special Orders, No. 53, headquarters District of Oregon, the command of the post is hereby turned over to Capt. C. W. C. Rowell, Fourth Regiment California Volunteers.

W. T. MAGRUDER, Captain, First Cavalry, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 16, 1861.

Adjutant-General THOMAS, Washington, D. C.:

Received your dispatch of the 13th instant. It will be attended to.

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 31.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TUE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 16, 1861.

1. Officers commanding posts or companies remote from these headquarters will make a careful investigation of the military resources of the counties in their vicinity. It is believed that many articles of subsistence for the troops, as well as supplies to be furnished by the quartermaster’s department, can be obtained at or near the location of the troops.

{p.727}

2. Special reports on the foregoing subject will be made as soon as practicable by commanding officers, noting particularly the quantity, quality, and price of such articles as can be contracted for in the country round their posts.

3. Organization of volunteer regiments and companies will not have reference to any State organization, but will be in strict conformity with General Orders, No. 15, of May 4, 1861, from the War Department, and subsequent orders modifying the same.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 214.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 16, 1861.

...

2. The headquarters of the Third Regiment of California Volunteer Infantry will be established at Benicia Barracks. The companies of this regiment will be placed in camp near the barracks.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., November 16, 1861. (Received 25th.)

Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, Los Angeles, Cal.:

The troops to concentrate at San Diego will sail on the next steamer. Send word to Andrews.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DETACH. 1ST REGT. INFTY. CALIFORNIA VOLS., Camp Wright, Warner’s Ranch, San Diego County, Southern California, November 17, 1861.

[Col. JAMES H. CARLETON, First California Volunteers, Commanding:]

COLONEL: Your letter of the 9th containing instructions in reference to Colonel Andrews’ command was received this morning too late for me to act. I had already given him transportation for his command, and I suppose by this time he has arrived at Los Angeles in person. The train arrived here just in time for him to get it without any delay, and to-day they are all in San Diego. I followed your instructions and discharged Banning’s and Kitchen’s train at once. Your letter received to-day instructed me to take that train and move to Oak Grove or Temecula, but too late-they had gone. I sent on a messenger to Oak Grove, where I knew they would encamp the first night, and requested Mr. Sanford to return here this morning in time to make the return trip, thus not losing time, not feeling authorized, under your positive orders to discharge them at this point, to order or employ them. Mr. Sanford wrote to me that he would very much like to accommodate me and my command, but that his teams could not do it; his animals were worn out; and although he would like to accommodate me without extra {p.728} charge, but under the circumstances it could not be done. I finally concluded to employ him for one day, and sent Lieutenant Wellman with a proposition to that effect, but on his arrival at Oak Grove the train had gone, and as my instructions to him were not to follow unless he (Sanford) was but a short distance on the road from that point, I have missed the transportation and disarranged your plans, but from no fault of mine as I conceive. Your orders not to employ, or rather to discharge, their train upon their arrival here, were positive, but the whole cause is the delay of your messenger. He has been nearly five days on the road, and reports having broken down several horses. Your calculation as to the time of arrival here of Colonel Andrews’ command was exact, and twenty-four hours earlier arrival of the express would have found the train here, and our camp would now have been at Oak Grove, just where I want to be at this particular time if the information is correct which I have received from your informant. I will now have to remain here until our own train returns, which will not be before the 20th and perhaps not before the 23d, as it has been raining in torrents for several days. To-day we have had a specimen of the climate on this ranch. While I am writing (9.40 p.m.) the rain is falling in torrents and the wind is whistling through the camp. If we have any tents standing in the morning I will consider ourselves fortunate. It will depend altogether upon the peg ropes and guys. It was reported to me to-day that the messenger stopped, unsaddled, and remained at Oak Grove for three hours. He must have pursued the same course at other places on the route. The horse he brought in here was entirely broken down, and I had to furnish him with another to proceed to Yuma. Your communication of the 15th instant came in this morning early, and as Colonel Andrews’ command has gone on and you have been notified of it I will send him (expressman) back in the morning to Los Angeles. My officers are very busy getting their returns in shape, but without proper blanks it will be difficult for them to have them perfect. I forwarded the post returns to your headquarters a few days since, as well as our weekly return. For several days I had not paper enough in camp to make one out on, and finally had to consolidate. I had sent to Lieutenant Thompson, acting assistant quartermaster, San Diego, several times for some stationery, but he would not send it. I think from the reports of Acting Assistant Quartermaster Vestal, Wagon-master Peale, and Sergeant Wheeling, both he and Captain Roberts were anything but courteous. Major Haller sent me some, which arrived to-day by the ambulance from San Diego. Colonel West sent on the post ambulance with Mrs. Captain Dryer, and as I had no mules for our own I sent it on the San Diego ambulance with her, and by instructions from him will keep it here until I hear from him. I intend to send to Oak Grove a lookout for my friend, Mr. Showalter, and will stop him if I can catch him, or anyone else whom I know to be as deeply dyed a traitor as he is. He has not the excuse that some others have of being born and educated in the South. He is a Pennsylvanian, and never lived in a Southern State in his life, and could have no sympathies of a family nature to excuse him, and I want to see him and a few more. If the party is as large as your informant thinks it is we may have an opportunity to expend some extra cartridges. I have an Indian prisoner here that I would like to have some disposition made of or receive some instructions in regard to him. He has killed several Indians lately, and the chiefs in council decided to hand him over to me for safe-keeping until they could linear from the superintendent of Indian affairs. I addressed a letter to Mr. Baker, supervisor of Indian affairs for the southern district, located at Los Angeles, but {p.729} have not heard from him. I would hike to know from you what disposition to make of him. The Indians have heretofore tried their own people, but they have learned that they have a new chief, and respectfully submit the case to him. At all events, I would like to be advised whether I should hand him back to his people for trial, or what to do with him. I was interrupted by a cry, “The hospital tent is down!” and found it partially true. By lashing and tying it was kept from coming down. We have had a stormy night of it. The guard tents have blown down. Officers’ tents, kitchen tents, tent in which I had the ammunition, and a number of others were laid to the ground. It was a gale, and the rain came down in torrents. I think that I have never seen it rain harder. Our tents were all full of water. The men were cheerful and worked hard all night. The morning broke with but little change, excepting it did not rain so hard. The hills all around us are covered with snow. Ice was formed on our tents and ropes. We have had really a specimen of the weather I had reason to expect. I cannot get away from here until our train comes up. We managed to keep our sick from the weather by using all the blankets we could find, the men cheerfully going without themselves. As they were out all might and wet they had no use for them. It continues raining and hailing, but with less wind. We are preparing for another stormy night. It is impossible for the company officers to have all the returns ready that you require by this messenger. Their tents are wet, and writing or ruling is almost out of the question. I have directed them to forward to you letters of explanation. I hope this storm will blow over soon, or we will be in a bad fix. I called your attention in a former letter to you to Jones, of Company D, against whom charges were preferred by Lieutenant Martin.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN A. RIGG.

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LOS ANGELES, November 18, 1861. (Received 4 p.m. 25th.)

Maj. B. C. DRUM:

The regulars from Yuma left Camp Wright for San Diego on the 16th instant.

JAMES H. CARLETON.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 18, 1861. (Received 25th.)

Col. J. H. CARLETON, Los Angeles, Cal.:

Colonel West will take command of the district. Send for him to come to Los Angeles. You will report here as soon as possible, without awaiting West’s arrival.

By order of General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 57.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 18, 1861.

Companies B and I, Ninth Infantry, will embark on the steamer Pacific on her return from the sound and proceed to San Francisco, {p.730} Cal. The quartermaster’s department will furnish transportation for two horses belonging to Surg. J. F. Head, who goes with this command.

By order of Lieutenant-Colonel Cady:

A. C. WILDRICK, First Lieut., Third Artillery, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 309.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 19, 1861.

1. Brig. Gen. George Wright, volunteer service, is assigned to the command of the Department of the Pacific. He will retain in his command the Ninth Regiment of Infantry, which is now under orders transferring it to the Eastern coast.

...

By command of Major-General McClellan:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter, November 19, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that Companies B and I, Ninth Infantry, are now leaving the post to embark on the steamer Pacific for San Francisco. Captain English’s command, from Camp Pickett, and Captain Woodruff’s, from Fort Steilacoom, are now on board. This completes the withdrawal of the Ninth, except the two companies from Colville and the detachment with Lieutenant Mullan. I have received no official information in regard to the movements of these commands, but do not anticipate their arrival here until some time in the ensuing month. The companies of the First Cavalry will commence arriving here to-morrow, and may be expected to be in time to take the steamer of the 27th.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 20, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: On the 16th instant I had the honor to acknowledge (by telegraph) the receipt of Major-General McClellan’s dispatch of the 13th. I have recalled Colonel Carleton from his command in the southern district, and as soon as-he arrives I shall organize his command of at least one regiment, for the protection of the Overland Mail Route. I have conferred with Mr. Louis McLane, the agent, as to the most suitable point to locate the troops, in order to afford the required protection. He suggests Simpson’s Park, Ruby Valley, and Camp Floyd as the best positions to occupy. The first is 326 miles from Sacramento, {p.731} Ruby Valley 98 miles from Simpson’s, and Camp Floyd is 217 miles in advance of Ruby Valley. The weather for many days past has been tempestuous in the extreme, and the snow on the mountains is reported as very deep, and it may be next to an impossibility for the troops to cross over with their necessary supplies. Were it not for the starving condition of the Indians, no fears need be entertained of their committing any depredations. Twenty thousand dollars’ worth of provisions, annually distributed to the friendly tribes along this section of the route, would save the Government vast sums of money. The contracts made last summer for the transportation of our supplies from this place to Ruby Valley were at the rate of about $400 per ton; and at this season it will cost much more. Everything is quiet on this coast; nothing of importance has transpired since my communication to the Adjutant-General of the Army, dated on the 16th instant, a copy of which was forwarded to the Headquarters of the Army. I have removed the Third Infantry California Volunteers from Stockton to Benicia Barracks. Four companies of this regiment are already at their stations; the remaining six have been organized, and are progressing favorably in recruiting. Clothing for all the troops in the department is being made here. Very soon the supply will be ample and of a superior quality, at a reasonable rate. On the 9th I inspected the troops at Fort Point, one company, Third Artillery, commanded by Brevet Major Austine, and on the 13th I inspected the troops at Alcatraz Island, two companies, Third Artillery, commanded by Major Burton. It affords me pleasure to report that I found the troops in high order. The armament of the fort, although incomplete, was found in handsome condition, and ready for any emergency.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 20, 1861.

Lieut. JAMES P. MARTIN, Seventh Infty., Comdg. Co. D, Sixth Infty., Fort Bragg, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs that you will march your company to Mendocino and be prepared to embark without delay on the return of the steamer Columbia from Crescent City.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco Cal., November 20, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding the department to say, in reply to your letter of the 9th instant, that such supplies as can be furnished from Fort Vancouver without detriment to the service may be issued to Colonel Cornelius or the quartermaster of the Oregon regiment. This, of course, does not include horses or horse equipments. {p.732} If Colonel Cornelius desires to be furnished with clothing for his regiment he will make a requisition on the deputy quartermaster-general at these headquarters, when the general will give the necessary directions for having the clothing made in this city.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have this day forwarded to you by steamer a return of troops of this department. It is made up of the latest reports we have received. My troops are occupying a vast extent of country, extending from Yuma in the south to Colville in the north, a distance of about 2,000 miles over the route usually marched. The severe snow-storm in the mountains has completely blocked up the mail route east; and it will probably be several days before they can resume their regular trips. In the meantime I shall avail myself of the telegraph and the tri-monthly steamers to communicate with headquarters. Colonel Seawell sailed on the steamer to-day with three companies, Sixth Infantry. At San Diego he will receive five additional companies. Major Lovell, Tenth Infantry; Major Flint, Sixteenth Infantry, and Brevet Major Andrews, Third Artillery, I have placed on duty with Colonel Seawell’s command. The last steamer from Oregon brought down two companies of the Ninth Infantry, and on the steamer now due I expect five more companies of the same regiment. They will all go East on the steamer of the 1st of December. The companies from Forts Dalles, Walla Walla, and Colville may be looked for by the 10th of December. Lieutenant Mullan has 100 good men of the Ninth Infantry as escort to the Walla Walla and Fort Benton wagon-road expedition. An order was sent early in October for those men to join their companies, since which we have heard nothing from them. The last general order I have received from your office was No. 89, of 11th of October, a single copy only. I have not yet received the Revised Army Regulations. I would suggest that in sending out books and large packages, the ocean route be used. Quiet pervades the Pacific Slope.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, November 21, 1861.

Lieut. BENJAMIN C. CUTLER, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Southern Dist. of California, Los Angeles:

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to report as follows upon the crossings of the River Colorado at points adjacent to this post, and upon the measures that I have adopted for their security: I found upon assuming command that Mr. Yager had a ferry at Pilot Knob, ten miles down the river. The boats used at that point have by my orders been brought to the post, and are under my control. Mr. Yager’s main ferry is still one mile below the post. At that point I have constantly kept a picket guard of thirteen men, under charge of an officer, and no one {p.733} is permitted to cross the river unless by my orders. This ferry will be removed immediately opposite the post as soon as a necessary road and landing can be completed. The work will be finished by the first of the coming week. The main crossing of the Colorado has been heretofore done at Gonzales’ Ferry, about thirty miles below this post, both by Mexicans traveling to and from Sonora, and by all the parties of disaffected persons who were making their exit from California. For these reasons, and also because the boats there could have been availed of by an enemy designing to attack my position, I recently sent Capt. William P. Calloway with a detachment, with instructions to either send the boats up to the fort or to destroy them. The former course not being feasible the latter was adopted. Although this ferry was located in Mexican territory, and its owner a citizen of that Government, it was such a disadvantage as in my judgment warranted the steps taken, under orders from the district commander, to seize and hold all ferryboats on the Colorado River. The crossings below this post were, first, Yager’s main ferry, one mile down the river (this is about being removed to the fort); second, Yager’s Ferry at Pilot Knob (this has been discontinued); third, Cook’s Old Ferry, six miles below Algodones (there has been no boat at that point for several months); fourth, Paddock’s Old Ferry (has been for a long time obsolete); fifth, Gonzales’ Ferry (broken up as noted above). At the latter point travelers who wish to avoid this post may resort to swimming their animals upon discovering that the boats have been destroyed. There is scarcely an available ford anywhere on the river below Fort Yuma. Casual travelers might ford in one or two places, but no force could be crossed with either artillery or provisions. This conclusion is formed from information deemed reliable, and is corroborated by Captain Calloway, who proceeded with his detachment on board the steamer Cocopah 100 miles down the river and returned. At the Colorado mines, twenty miles above the fort, there were three boats-one (Mr. Yager’s, in a lagoon adjoining the river) I had destroyed by that gentleman’s consent. The other two, belonging to parties residing in that vicinity, were brought here by a detachment under Lieutenant Mitchell, sent out by my orders. At this last point an enemy’s force could be crossed by fording and using rafts. The water is about breast deep, and (here is enough dry cottonwood to furnish rafts. At present I judge this to be the point whereat the danger of an enemy’s crossing is most to be apprehended. The roads diverging from the Alamo and New River Stations to Gonzales’ Ferry have been referred to in my previous communications. On my march here I had some opportunities of examining them, and I find the information then obtained of service. Any further measures that may suggest themselves for the further security of the crossing of the river shall be promptly adopted.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. R. WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel First Infty., California Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

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CAMP ALERT, November 21, 1861.

Brigadier-General WRIGHT, Commanding Department of the Pacific:

GENERAL: We, the officers of the Second Regiment Cavalry California Volunteers, beg leave to respectfully submit for your consideration and adjudication the following questions, which materially affect {p.734} their allegiance to the General Government and their duties as officers in the service of the United States:

First. Which are we to consider of paramount importance and authority, our allegiance to the Federal Government or that which we owe to this State?

Second. If our allegiance is primarily due to the Federal Government, are we to obey orders directed to us from the State Government?

Third. If our allegiance is due first to the State Government of California, are we bound to obey the Federal Army authorities?

Fourth. The oath of allegiance taken by each and all of us, as well as by the men under our orders, was to the Government of the United States of America, and utterly exclusive, even to abnegation of State allegiance. Are we to be held by this oath, or was it of no effect?

Fifth. Are we to understand that the Governor or any other State authority of California is rightfully empowered to take charge and control of such property belonging to the Federal Government as may be required for the use and subsistence of the various volunteer corps called into existence by the Federal Government for the suppression of State rebellion and treason?

Sixth. Has the Governor of California any rightful authority to fill vacancies among the officers of this or any other volunteer regiment, which has been or may be called into the field by the General Government, after such regiment has been duly organized, accepted, commissioned, and turned over to the Federal Government or its legally appointed agents?

Seventh. If the Second Regiment Cavalry California Volunteers were serving at the East, and vacancies should occur among its officers, would those vacancies be filled by the dictatorial authority of the Governor of California, or would the Federal authorities exercise that power?

The officers of the Second Regiment Cavalry California Volunteers most earnestly disclaim the slightest intention to utter one word or make one inquiry that can be construed as evincing any want of respect whatever to the properly constituted authorities, either Federal or State, always hoping that they will be the first to set a praiseworthy example either as citizens or soldiers, but they find themselves involved in the most serious and perplexing doubts, which materially impair their usefulness and check the full expression of their loyalty and devotion to their beloved country and her majestic cause. They therefore unite in respectfully asking their chief military commander on this far-distant coast to solve these doubts and direct them aright.

Most respectfully submitted.

JOHN C. CREMONY, Captain Company B, JAMES WINNE, Captain Company G, ALBERT BROWN, Captain Company L, [AND 10 OTHER OFFICERS.]

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 218.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 22, 1861.

1. The headquarters of the First Regiment of Cavalry will, until the 1st proximo, be established at Benicia Barracks.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.735}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 22, 1861.

His Excellency J. W. NYE, Governor of Nevada Territory, Carson City:

SIR: I have received instructions from the Headquarters of the Army to send a regiment of troops, or more if I deem it necessary, to protect the Overland Mail Route. The command will be under Colonel Carleton, and will move as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made. I am informed that it is next to an impossibility for troops with their supplies to cross the mountains at this time, and my object in addressing Your Excellency is to obtain reliable data as to the practicability of the route, and particularly as to the condition of the Indians and the probability of their committing depredations on the stock of the mail company. As soon as practicable I design to establish troops at Simpson’s Park, Ruby Valley, and Camp Floyd, and in the meantime is it within your power to issue such provisions to the starving Indians along the route as may be necessary for their existence? I have an extra supply of provisions at Fort Churchill, and although I am not authorized to issue to Indians, except in small quantities, yet I should not hesitate to sell it to the Indian Department, under existing circumstances, even if the Department should not be in funds, not doubting that such a course would be approved. I shall esteem it a favor to receive your views on the subject, with any suggestions you may deem pertinent. I have been assigned to the command of the department and remain on this coast. A service of more than nine years on the Pacific has familiarized me with the whole country and also with the character and temper of the inhabitants. The Union-loving people of this coast are vastly in time ascendant, their fiat has gone forth, and no secession doctrine can flourish here. Nevertheless it behooves us to be watchful at all times. I shall not assume a threatening attitude, for the purpose of warning our enemies to refrain from unlawful acts, but pursuing the even tenor of my way, ever observant of impending events, and ready at all times to enforce a due respect and observance of the Constitution and laws of our country; and if it becomes my duty to act, I shall do so fearlessly, and without regard to personal consequences, feeling assured that I shall receive the cordial support of every true and loyal citizen on the Pacific Coast.

With great respect, I have the honor to be Your Excellency’s obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Bragg, November 23, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you that I have this day relieved Lieut. James P. Martin, Seventh Infantry, in command of this post. I have appointed First Lieut. Thomas S. Bridges, acting assistant quartermaster and acting commissary, and Second Lieut. Joseph C. Morrill, post adjutant.

J. B. MOORE, Captain Company B, Third Regiment California Volunteers.

{p.736}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 24, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor herewith to inclose a copy of a letter which I have just received from Lieutenant-Colonel West, commanding at Fort Yuma.* A few days since I wrote a private letter to the general commanding the department, in which I suggested sending by sea to Yuma two 18-pounders, with ammunition, &c., and a supply of barley for fifty picked cavalry, &c. I still think this will be re-enforcement enough. When I have filled West’s companies to 102 each, and send him fifty cavalry, he will have a force of numerical strength equal to seven ordinary companies of regulars. It would seem that an officer handling these men well, as West would be likely to do, they would trouble a larger force travel-worn and with a formidable river in front of them. As soon as I learn the barley is sent I will make arrangements to cut some hay. Mr. Hooper informs me this is a good time of year to get hay at Yuma.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

* See West to Carleton, 13th, p 721,

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 25, 1861.

His Excellency the GOVERNOR OF CALIFORNIA, San Francisco:

SIR: It is found by experience that competition by agents of States, authorized to purchase arms, in competition with agents of the Government, is highly detrimental to the public service, as it advances prices both to the States and to the United States, the loss of which may ultimately fall upon the General Government. To avoid this competition you are respectfully requested to withdraw all agents for the purchase of arms, in order that the Government of the United States may make all such purchases with the greatest possible economy, and remove the present inducement for speculators to withhold arms from the service. The arms will be distributed to the troops of the several States as soon as received.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 25, 1861.

Capt. J. C. CREMONY, AND OTHER OFFICERS OF THE SECOND REGIMENT CALIFORNIA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY: (Through Colonel Sims, Commanding Camp Alert, Cal.)

GENTLEMEN: The general commanding the department has carefully examined the subject submitted in your communication of the 21st instant with reference to the organization of volunteer regiments, their rights under the law, &c., and directs me to answer categorically as follows: First. Your allegiance is first due to the General Government. {p.737} Second. After U. S. troops of any description have been mustered into the service the authority of the State government over them ceases entirely. Third. Allegiance being first due to the General Government, of course all are bound to obey the Army authorities. Fourth. Of course all are bound by oath. Fifth. Certainly not. Sixth. He has. (See section 3 of act approved August 6, 1861.) Seventh. Cannot say what might be done, but the right and duty of the Governor to fill the vacancies is positive law. It makes no provision for any other mode of filling vacancies, no matter where the regiment may be serving. By the plan of regimental organization for volunteers announced in orders by the President, the adjutant and regimental quartermaster are to be selected from the company officers by the colonel. They are appointed by him and reassigned to companies at his pleasure. After a careful examination of the laws relating to the volunteers and the orders organizing the same, the general is of the opinion that the appointment of the regimental staff rests entirely with the colonel or other permanent commander of the regiment, and that the Governor has nothing whatever to do with such appointments. These views were expressed by the general to Colonel Smith, and with this understanding the colonel appointed Lieutenant French regimental quartermaster, the colonel intending to assign Lieutenant Wright to the company from which Lieutenant French was taken for staff duties.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOS ANGELES, November 25, 1861-8.30 p.m.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, U. S. Army, Assistant Adjutant-General, San Francisco, Cal.:

Just got your messages of 16th and 18th. The troops were at San Diego on the 21st. Will send express to West to-morrow; also to Eyre to come here. I have a very sick family. If it is possible for me to be spared till Senator comes, say so to-night.

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers.

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LOS ANGELES, November 25, 1861-9.30 p.m.

Maj. R. C. DRUM:

Shall I not order Major Rigg to Yuma by the express that goes for West. It is important that he be here. Let Major Fergusson go to Camp Wright. Answer to-night.

JAMES H. CARLETON.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Gal., November 25, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. B. EYRE, First Cavalry California Volunteers, San Bernardino, Cal.:

COLONEL: Turn over your command to Captain McCleave and report to me without delay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.738}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 25, 1861.

Lieut. Col. JOSEPH R. WEST, First infantry California Vols., Comdg. Fort Yuma, Cal.:

COLONEL: The following dispatch I have just received. It did not come sooner, as the wires were down.*

I am entirely at a loss to know what the cause is of this sudden change unless it be that General Wright is ordered East. Pray lose no time in getting here.

I am, colonel, very respectfully,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

* See Drum to Carleton, November 18, p. 729.

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MARSHAL’S OFFICE, SOUTHERN DIST. OF CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, November 25, 1861.

Col. J. H. CARLETON, U. S. Army:

SIR: I learn that probably Showalter’s party will go by way of the Mojave River and Mojave Crossings. Peoples, one of the party, intimated as much sub rosa to a friend here. I think they left the Monte yesterday. At least they have left here.

Very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant,

H. D. BARROWS, U. S. Marshal.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 25, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to halt Major Lugenbeel’s command at Fort Vancouver. For the present they will take post at that station.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter., November 25, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt by this morning’s mail of your letter of the 15th instant, and to state, in reply thereto, that the telegraphic dispatch referred to appears to have been received at this place on the 7th of October, and that orders were issued the same day by the commander of the district (Colonel Beall) for the recall of the detachment with Lieutenant Mullan in terms as follows:

III. The detachments from companies of the Ninth Infantry on duty as escort to Lieutenant Mullan’s wagon-road expedition will be relieved and forthwith join their respective companies.

I have no means to show in what manner the orders were sent to Lieutenant Mullan, nor when they were received by him, as no official {p.739} report thereon has been received from him. Lieutenant Wildrick, Third Artillery, acting assistant adjutant-general at the time the orders were sent, and who is now at San Francisco, can furnish full particulars in regard to the transmission of the orders both to and beyond Walla Walla.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Hoskins, Oreg., November 25, 1861.

Lieutenant WILDRICK, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: I am directed by the commanding officer of this post to make the following statement: Prior to his arrival at this post the disaffected around this part of the country, as he learns, exulted in the withdrawal of the troops, supposing that the garrison would be a little more favorable to their views. Finding it was not so they seem to have kept pretty still until the garrison was reduced, when they seem to be again about to give some trouble. It seems by the statements made daily and hourly for the past few days that the late commander aided the inhabitants in their nefarious designs on this garrison. Mr. Patton, a packer in the Indian agency employ, came in and avers that when Mr. Newcomb was going away he distributed to the Indians guns and revolvers and ammunition, and told them to fight for Jeff. Davis and the Southern Confederacy. He says the Indians understand too much about this matter, and that they have those arms, which he wishes us to take away from them, as he thinks they will give some trouble by being allowed to keep them, but we have no available force to recapture them, as there are only twelve men at the Siletz block-house; not half enough to guard it properly, as there is one year’s supply of provisions there, and as for this post there are only eight men for duty, with two sergeants and one corporal, Lieutenant Watson and eighteen men, with one corporal and two teamsters, having left this post on the 16th for Fort Umpqua. The peaceful inhabitants of this valley are now daily and hourly making reports to us of the disaffection prevailing around us. Yesterday Mr. Wisner substantiated to us as follows: Mr. Jerry Evans, of this valley, told him that Captain Dent gave him a box of ammunition containing 1,000 rounds of rifle musket cartridges; that he knew the said Evans to be a rank secessionist, and that Captain Dent must have known so also when he gave him those cartridges. He is also of the impression that there is more Government ammunition than this box in this valley. He says that he and Mr. Allen went to Mr. Evans and purchased the box of him for $20, but he would not deliver it. Their object was to get it out of their hands and return it to the post, being Government property falsely squandered. He also says that one more reason was that he overheard the disunionists making menacing threats against the garrison, such as, “Well, I have been up there, and I think that we can take that garrison in one hour; there is only five or six men about there.” “How would you do it?” asks one. “Oh, we would fire the buildings and shoot the officers as they come out,” was his reply. Their constantly using those menacing threats against this garrison and the loyal men in it induces me and Mr. Allen to make this statement to the commanding officer. This afternoon Mr. Tateham informed the commanding officer that very lately from 250 to 300 stand of arms have been distributed to the traitors of this valley by, as he {p.740} supposes, Joe Lane and [the] Governor of the State; that he does not consider the garrison safe, as he has overheard them also make threats against it, such as, “How easy it would be to take it and get all the arms and ammunition in it. We know every nook in it and all the hiding places about it,” &c. These men do not wish their names to be made public at present, as they are generally married through each other, and are afraid of their own lives. An instance occurred to-day to prove this. A young man came to the garrison and told us that he was a Union man but his father was a secessionist. We are at a loss, being strangers here, to know how to take these reports. They, however, emphatically declare that they could place no confidence in the late commander, and learning that we were true to the dear old flag they feel no diffidence in stating the facts, too. They say, moreover, that all the associates of the late commander were with those men and that they believe that there is a deep-laid plot in this valley to make a move of some kind before long. They ask for arms and ammunition, but we cannot let them have either until we hear from you on this subject. To-day a citizen applied for twenty rounds, but the commanding officer refused him, not knowing who he was. He replied that he was a good Union man, and that he wanted them for self-protection. True the garrison is in a helpless condition, as there is not sufficient men here to garrison it properly. The men are on guard every other day (only eight) until they are perfectly worn omit, but what there is of them can be relied upon. I do not consider that anything of the kind would be made until they have all their plans matured, which may take some time yet; yet from what I can learn in case they do move they will immediately attack the garrison for the purpose of securing time arms and ammunition. They seem to be aware of the exact number of arms and ammunition at this post. The commanding officer would respectfully request that in case that Messrs. Wisner and Allen get possession of that box, that they be permitted by the colonel commanding to retain it in their possession, or to pay them $20 and have it returned to this post. There is at this post one 12-pounder and cartridges, shells, &c., about fifteen old flint-lock muskets (useless), eleven pistols nearly all unserviceable, and forty (new) muskets (pertaining to Company B, Second Infantry California Volunteers) in store, together with about 35,000 rounds of rifle-musket cartridges, 400 pistol cartridges, but they are all poorly guarded. The commanding officer would request that these eleven pistols be returned to the ordnance department for repairs, and that about fifty good ones be furnished this post for the purpose of arming the men more effectually. The teamsters going on detached service require one each. The express rider should have one, and the detachment at the Siletz block-house should each be furnished with one. You will please to give this due consideration, as at present things do not look very pleasant in this vicinity.

Respectfully submitted.

T. B. CAMPBELL, First Lieut., Second Infantry California Vols., Post Adjutant.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 26, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: On the 22d instant I had the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the dispatch of the 19th, from the headquarters of the Army, assigning me to the command of this department, and further instructing me {p.741} to retain the Ninth Infantry under my command. Two companies Ninth Infantry (G and K), with the non-commissioned staff and band, arrived here on the 14th, and five more companies of the same regiment reached here on the 22d. This command I have concentrated at the Presidio, San Francisco, to undergo a thorough course of instruction. The remaining two companies of the Ninth Infantry are en route from Fort Colville, and I have ordered them to halt at Fort Vancouver. I propose to send one of those companies to Camp Pickett, on the island of San Juan, and let the other remain at Fort Vancouver, the headquarters of the District of Oregon and the principal depot for that command. Company E, Ninth Infantry, left this coast on the steamer of the 1st instant for New York, with the command under Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Buchanan Fourth Infantry. The company was without any officer present belonging to it. The captain, Woods, is on recruiting service East. Nothing was said in the telegraphic dispatch about retaining any additional medical officers, but I have assumed that I should anticipate the wishes of the General-in-Chief by keeping three assistant surgeons-Heger, Craig, and Taylor. Their services are necessary in consequence of the retention of the Ninth Infantry. They were selected after consultation with the medical director. After the company of the Ninth Infantry reaches San Juan Island the company of the Thud Artillery now there will be brought to this place and posted in one of the fortifications in the harbor. I have ordered the horses and horse equipments of the four companies of the First Cavalry now in Oregon to be concentrated at Fort Vancouver. They have about 200 horses, but a majority of them are old and unfit for hard service. I would recommend that they be turned over to the volunteer cavalry being raised in Oregon, should the department design furnishing those troops with horses and equipments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 221.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 26, 1861.

1. The following troops will, should they arrive in time, embark for New York on the steamer of the 30th instant, under the command of Lieut. Col. George A. H. Blake, First Cavalry: Companies A, F, and H of the First Cavalry; Companies B and C of the Fourth, and D of the Sixth Infantry. The deputy quartermaster-general will furnish the necessary transportation.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Wright:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., November 26, 1861.

Col. J. H. CARLETON, Los Angeles, Cal.:

Send Rigg to Yuma and Fergusson to Wright. Come up in Senator.

By order:

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal., November 26, 1861.

Maj. E. A. RIGG, First Infantry California Volunteers, Commanding Camp Wright:

MAJOR: Proceed at once to Fort Yuma and relieve Lieutenant-Colonel West in the command of that post. The officer next in rank to yourself at Camp Wright will have command of that camp until the arrival of Major Fergusson, First Cavalry California Volunteers, now en route from San Francisco, Cal., direct. Colonel West will repair to Los Angeles to replace the undersigned, now under orders for San Francisco.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES H. CARLETON, Colonel First California Volunteers, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 61.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter, November 26, 1861.

1. Companies H and I and the band of the First Cavalry, under the command of Capt. J. H. Whittlesey, will embark on the steamer Cortez to-day for San Francisco.

...

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Sacramento, November 27, 1861.

General GEORGE WRIGHT, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of the Pacific, San Francisco:

GENERAL: In the month of July last General Sumner, then commanding Department of the Pacific, U. S. Army, ordered the seizure of some fifty-seven stand of improved rifles belonging to the State of California and then in Nevada Territory, being a portion of the State arms sent there in May, 1860, at the time of the disastrous fight between the citizens of that Territory and the Indians. Since that time General Sumner made a verbal promise to turn over an equivalent number of same style of arms to the State. I desire to know if any steps have been taken at department-headquarters in relation to the matter, and whether an order can be obtained for the number of arms thus taken upon the ordnance department at Benicia in favor of the State?

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

WM. C. KIBBE, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, November 29, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Since my communication of the 26th instant, nothing of interest has transpired within this department. At this moment (1 p.m.) it is not probable that the steamer which leaves here to-morrow morning {p.743} will take more than the headquarters and two companies of the First Cavalry. It is possible, however, that the two companies of the Fourth and one of the Sixth Infantry may reach here in time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Ter-Waw, November 29, 1861.

Maj. H. C. DRUM Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific:

SIR: In accordance with the direction of the general commanding, I have the honor to report my arrival at this post on the 14th of November and its occupation by Company C, Fourth Infantry. The post was turned over to me on the 20th of November by Capt. L. C. Hunt. I found upon my arrival at Crescent City that the weather would not permit the steamer to land near the wharf. I was compelled to land my company in small boats under a heavy expense of $2 per man; and also the transportation from Crescent City to the mouth of the Klamath River of a small portion of my camp equipage cost me 8 cents per pound. I am pleased with the post and hope to give satisfaction.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN H. MAY, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., November 30, 1861.

COMDG. OFFICER DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles, Cal.:

SIR: The general commanding the department desires you to select one company of infantry from the command near Warner’s ranch and direct it to proceed to Fort Yuma. You will also detail from the cavalry battalion three officers and fifty picked men for service at the same post. This latter force will not proceed to its destination until evidence of the arrival of the forage at Yuma has been received. The general has this day directed two 18-pounders, with implements complete and a liberal supply of ammunition, and sixty tons of barley to be shipped to Fort Yuma. You will be duly notified when these stores leave this city.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Sacramento, December 1, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: Pursuant to the requirements of the act of Congress of March 2, 1803, which requires the adjutant-general of the militia of each State to make the return of the militia of each State to which he belongs, with the arms, accouterments, and ammunition, to the President of the {p.744} United States annually, on or before the first Monday in January of each year, I have the honor to transmit herewith an abstract of the annual return of the militia of the State of California for the year 1861.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. C. KIBBE, Adjutant-General State of California.

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Abstract of the annual return of the militia of the State of California for the year 1861.

General staff.Cavalry.Artillery.Infantry.Rifleman.Enlisted militia.Aggregate.
Major-generals66
Brigadier-generals1212
Adjutant-general11
Inspector-general11
Quartermaster-general11
Aides-de-camp3737
Brigade majors108108
Brigade quartermasters1212
Colonels112114
Lieutenant-colonels56258
Majors15318
Adjutants21324
Quartermasters21324
Paymasters1818
Surgeons18321
surgeons’ mates18321
Captains13417088
Lieutenants123210225
sergeant-majors51152
Quartermaster-sergeants347
sergeants205280305
Corporals164280300
Artificers33
Privates320854,9005,305
Total commissioned689
Aggregate6,661146,000152,661
Number of divisions66
Number of brigades1212
Number of regiments11
Number of battalions22
Number of companies417075

Arms, accouterments, and ammunition.

Ordinance and ordnance stores:
Brass-
6-pounders4
12-pounder howitzers3
Iron, 6-pounders2
Sponges and rammers15
Bricoles and drag ropes6
Trail handspikes6
Ammunition boxes6
Tumbrils or powder-carts6
Sets of harness24
Muskets1,830
Cartridge boxes and belts2,662
Bayonet scabbards and belts1,695
Rifles1,137
Horseman’s pistols50
Swords182
Sword scabbards and belts182
Haversacks12

WM. C. KIBBE, Adjutant-General of the Militia of the State of California.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE. December 1, 1861.

{p.745}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., December 2, 1861.

His Excellency J. W. NYE, Governor of Nevada Territory, Carson City:

SIR: I have given instructions to the commanding officer of Fort Churchill to transfer to you such amount of flour and bacon or pork as you may deem necessary for issue to the Indians along the Overland Mail Route. The commanding officer at Fort Churchill has been directed to keep a supply of subsistence for his present command sufficient to last until the end of July next. Although I am not authorized by the regulations to dispose of these provisions except for cash, yet under the pressing circumstances of the case I have not hesitated about having them placed at the disposal of Your Excellency as superintendent of Indian affairs for the Territory, and if you are without funds of the Indian Department, the transfer can be made at Washington, which I doubt not will be approved by our Government. It is probable that the quantity of flour and meat which can be spared at Fort Churchill will amount to at least 60,000 rations of the former and 40,000 of the latter-possibly more.

With great respect, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

G. WRIGHT, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF OREGON, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter, December 2, 1861.

Maj. R. C. DRUM, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the Pacific, San Francisco, Cal.:

MAJOR: I have been informed by Captain Magruder, First Cavalry, since his arrival at this place that the orders for the recall of the detachment of the Ninth Infantry with Lieutenant Mullan were received at Walla Walla on the 18th of October; that having endeavored in vain to obtain the services of an express, he had on the 20th fallen in with a Mr. Owen, an Indian agent, who was about proceeding to his station some distance beyond Lieutenant M[ullan]’s camp, and who took charge of the letter, promising its delivery on his arrival there. Mr. Owen left Walla Walla on the 21st, and it was probable that he would lose no time on his trip, as his train had left Walla Walla two or three days before, and it was necessary that he should overtake and go with it. It is a fair presumption that the orders did not reach Lieutenant M[ullan]’s camp until after the 1st of November. As far as I can learn from private sources Lieutenant M[ullan] was in winter quarters, and deemed it impracticable for the detachment to get to this place this season. I look for the companies here from Fort Colville some time next week in time for the steamer of the 17th, they having started, as I learn privately, about the 18th ultimo. The companies of the First Cavalry under command of Captain Magruder will leave on or about the 7th instant for San Francisco.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. CADY, Lieutenant-Colonel Seventh Infantry, Commanding District.

{p.746}

HEADQUARTERS, Fort Yuma, December 3, 1861.

Capt. RICHARD C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department of the Pacific:

CAPTAIN: I have received from Col. James H. Carleton, lately commanding Southern District of California, a copy of a dispatch, dated department headquarters, November 18, recalling me to Los Angeles. The officer assigned to relieve me at this post, Maj. Edwin A. Rigg, First Infantry California Volunteers, will reach here on the 7th instant, when I will immediately comply with the department order. You will be good enough to say to the general commanding that the position of this post is becoming daily more assured by work upon the defenses and by perfecting means of acquiring intelligence of any contemplated movement upon it. For the present there seems little prospect of the latter, as I lately advised the district commander.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. WEST, Lieut. Col. First Infantry California Volunteers, Comdg. Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., December 3, 1861.

Capt. E. A. ROWE, Second Regiment California Volunteer Cavalry, Commanding Fort Churchill, Nev. Ter.:

SIR: After setting aside a sufficient number of rations to subsist your command to the 1st of August next, the general commanding the department desires you to turn over to the Governor of Nevada Territory, ex officio superintendent of Indian affairs, out of the surplus rations, such quantities of flour and pork or bacon as the superintendent may deem necessary for issue to the Indians along the Overland Mail Route. Should the superintendent be without funds, the acting commissary of subsistence will take receipts in duplicate for the stores he turns over. The actual cost with the transportation added will be stated both on the invoices and receipts to facilitate the settlement of these accounts in Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., December 3, 1861.

Lieut. Col. A. CADY, Seventh Infantry, Commanding District of Oregon, Fort Vancouver, Wash. Ter.:

SIR: The general commanding the department has this day directed Col. Justus Steinberger to repair to Fort Vancouver and commence raising and organizing the regiment of infantry authorized by the Secretary of War. The general wishes you to give the colonel in the performance of these duties the aid of your experience. You will give Colonel Steinberger the use of any quarters which may be needed at {p.747} Vancouver, and furnish him with any supplies of clothing, arms, equipments, &c., which may be available at that post or the depot, on the requisitions of the colonel, without further reference.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 225.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE PACIFIC, San Francisco, Cal., December 3, 1861.

I. Col. Justus Steinberger having been mustered into the service of the United States and specially authorized by the Honorable Secretary of War to raise and organize a regiment of infantry in the Territory of Washington and the country adjacent thereto, he will repair to Fort Vancouver and take prompt measures to carry out the instructions from the War Department dated October 18, 1861.

II. The commanding officer of the District of Oregon will afford Colonel Steinberger every facility in his power to enable him to organize his regiment.

III. Colonel Steinberger will, by frequent reports to the assistant adjutant-general at department headquarters, keep the commanding general fully informed of the progress he is making in recruiting his regiment.

By order of Brigadier-General Wright,

RICHD. C. DRUM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT YUMA, December 4, 1861.

Col. J. H. CARLETON:

SIR: I reached this place last evening, and am pleased to find everything wearing the appearance of activity and preparation for whatever may occur in the unsettled condition of our country. I shall be compelled to remain here two or three days in order to recruit my riding animal, so as to get in over the desert. I met Mr. Fecunda Gonzales (the proprietor of the ferry below the line) at Carriso, on his way to Los Angeles. He was accompanied by his family. I shall take a trip along down the river probably as far as the ferry, as I was informed by a man of Gonzales’ party that I could get over the river there by the assistance of the Indians, and that my horse could be crossed (probably by swimming). There has been no information up to this d