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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 8, Ch. XVIII–Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XVIII.
OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS. KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY.
November 19, 1861-April 10, 1862.
(New Madrid, Island No. 10, Pea Ridge)
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UNION CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.367}

SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 29, 1861.

General MEIGS, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I am sorry to have caused you so much annoyance by my frequent importunity for money and complaints at existing state of things, but really our difficulties have been legion, and it is now almost a doubtful struggle in coming out right in the quotient; that is, of having gun and mortar boats in efficient condition for going down the river in December.

I am urging on the gunboats proper, but amid difficulties almost insuperable. Still I hope to succeed. I have appointed Mr. S. Henriques paymaster-in-chief, who, independently of doing a single paymaster’s duty for a gunboat, not only acts as my clerk and secretary, but also performs the duties of supervising contracts; in fact, is a thinking as well as working man. I appointed him to do the work intended for Mr. Wise while he acted in that capacity before being appointed assistant paymaster. I give him in all $200 per year less than Mr. Wise received. I trust that this is all right; in fact, I cannot get on without him, and he only could be secured at his present pay.

Excuse my hurry.

Respectfully and truly, yours,

A. H. FOOTE.

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SAINT Louis, Mo., November 7, 1861.

General MEIGS, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I am happy to say, although at a late day, that guns, powder, shell, small-arms, as well as all or most material stores, are now here, and with the men coming (as I infer from Secretary Fox’s late letter to me that they will be on hand before the 25th instant), we shall be ready, as far as I can control matters, to equip and soon have the gunboats in fighting order. Still the boats are not ready, and I am nervously anxious about them, finding that they are drawing so much water on being launched, and therefore consider it my duty to make the following statement in reference to the gunboats and the mortar boats now building, most of which are already launched.

{p.368}

The gunboats draw light; but with the iron plating on (except 22 tons, mostly forward of the center of gravity), 5 feet 10 inches aft and 3 feet 11 inches forward, the fan-tail, forming the deck between hulls, abaft the wheel (the recess), is now 13 inches from the water lying still in smooth water. Two rudders are still to be shipped, and these in a short time, by absorption of water, will sink from their own weight if detached from the vessels. The wheel buckets are also to be put on, which will increase the weight astern. All of which you will see leaves little or no room for clearance of water, as the wheel buckets, rudders, &c., alluded to will have an actual weight of 3 1/2 tons on the extreme stern, which will reduce the clearance to 11 1/2 inches; I mean by clearance of water the confined space of 11 1/2 inches from the surface of the water to the deck forming the recess, which water will be so disturbed by the action of the wheel as to prevent the escapement of water in so confined a place, for the waves caused by the action of the wheel will be 4 feet, and the half of which, of course, as you will see, will be required for clearance. Now, all this is based upon the draught they will have when ready to receive armament, outfit, stores, and crew.

In my opinion the remedy which appears the most feasible to correct the evils that I have set forth is to cut out the deck and beams covering the clearance, springing a heavy timber arch over the space, and connecting the ends of the arch beams’ with, say, 2 1/2-inch round iron, and upon these beams construct a light deck. Mr. Eads, the contractor, believes that the draught astern will not be increased, for the reason that so much iron plating and a large portion of the vessel’s armament will go forward of the center of gravity, which will, in his opinion, lift the stern and give greater clearance. Mr. Eads also says that while he had no part in the modeling of these boats and is therefore relieved of all responsibility as to their imperfections, he thinks I am unnecessarily concerned as to the amount of clearance for the wheel and the difficulties which I fear will ensue from that defect.

I have had the mortar boats examined, and send herewith a rough sketch and description of them.* It is a pity that the decks will come nearly awash or even with the water; but still, the bulwarks being well calked and secured, it is believed that the boats will carry safely the mortars and beds, with necessary appurtenances, keeping the weight below 35 tons. I am greatly exercised about the mortar boats, and also the propellers to tow them, which have been ordered by General Frémont.

I am obeying these orders, however, and fitting out the boats as far as having no money or credit for this work will enable me to do.

Please telegraph me if I am authorized to appoint officers and get men for this purpose, as we are behind time, arising from causes wholly beyond my control.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Captain, U. S. Navy, &c.

* Omitted as of no present importance.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 15, 1861.

Capt. ANDREW H. FOOTE, U. S. N., Commanding Gunboats, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I am instructed to say that General Halleck has instructions in regard to the gunboats.

{p.369}

The appropriation not being sufficient to complete and equip more than three altered and seven built gunboats, the department is embarrassed by the action of the commanding general [Department of the] West, in ordering so many mortar rafts, tugs, and altered boats in addition to those contracted for by this department.

All cannot be completed without further appropriations, and for the present at least this department cannot remit money except for those contracted for under its authority.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 15, 1861.

Capt. ANDREW H. FOOTE, U. S. N., Saint Louis, Mo.:

DEAR CAPTAIN: I regret the bad promise of the gunboats in regard to draught.

I cannot advise you at this distance how to remedy the evil. One boat fitted up would show its extent, and enable you to determine the best means of remedy, if any be needed.

As for the mortar boats, I have written to you that the appropriation cannot meet the cost. They were never intended. I see Mr. Adams, with a letter from Lieutenant Porter, calls for forty more tugboats, small propellers.

Money is wanting. I am informed here that General Halleck has full instructions and I hope will bring order out of all this.

In the mean time use your own discretion as to alterations of construction.

We relied upon the naval constructor who modeled these gunboats. I still hope he has not blundered.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 19, 1861.

I. In compliance with General Orders, No. 97, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, November 9, 1861, the undersigned hereby takes command of the Department of the Missouri, including the States of Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Arkansas, and that portion of Kentucky west of Cumberland River.

...

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 20, 1861.

Col. RICHARD J. OGLESBY, Commanding Second Brigade, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

You will cause an immediate investigation to be made of the property now illegally held by officers and soldiers of your command. All officers {p.370} found with captured property, taken at Belmont or on your recent expedition, without written authority from these headquarters, will be placed in arrest, and soldiers so holding will be put in confinement. Conduct of such an infamous character has been reported to me as to call for an investigation. If incorrect, it is well that the matter should be set right. If true, the guilty should be punished, in order that the innocent may not suffer for the acts of others. Knowing that your views in this matter accord with mine, I trust you will have this matter thoroughly investigated.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 20, 1861.

I. It has been represented that important information respecting the numbers and condition of our forces is conveyed to the enemy by means of fugitive slaves who are admitted within our lines. In order to remedy this evil, it is directed that no such persons be hereafter permitted to enter the lines of any camp or of any forces on the march, and that any now within such lines be immediately excluded therefrom.

II. The general commanding wishes to impress upon all officers in command of posts and troops in the field the importance of preventing unauthorized persons of every description from entering and leaving our lines, and of observing the greatest precaution in the employment of agents and clerks in confidential positions.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

WILLIAM MCMICHAEL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Saint Louis, Mo., November 20, 1861.

I. Pursuant to orders from Headquarters at Washington the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Department of Kansas.

II. The following-named gentlemen are announced as constituting the staff of the major-general commanding:

Surg. Joseph K. Barnes, medical director; Maj. Charles G. Halpine, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. Marcus J. Parrott, assistant adjutant-general; Lieut. Edward W. Smith, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. J. W. Shaffer chief quartermaster; Capt. J. W. Turner, chief commissary of subsistence; Maj. Edward Wright, aide-de-camp; Maj. R. M. Hough aide-de-camp; Maj. L. D. Hubbard aide-de-camp; Capt. Richard W. Thompson, aide-de-camp; Lieut. Samuel W. Stockton, aide-de-camp.

D. HUNTER, Major-General.

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[NOVEMBER 20 (about), 1861.]

Preamble and resolutions by a committee from Missouri.

Major-General HALLECK, Comdg. United States forces in the State of Missouri, &c.:

We, the undersigned, citizens resident of Southwestern Missouri, in {p.371} view of the great desolation of the country and suffering of thousands of women and children, present the following preamble and resolutions for your consideration:

Whereas there is now and has been a large force of the rebel troops in Southwestern Missouri, laying waste the whole country and subjecting women and children to destitution and starvation; and whereas that portion of the State has remained loyal to the Government under all the trials and reverses through which she has been compelled to pass; and whereas that part of the State, in an agricultural point of view, will compare favorably with any other of the Western States and contains more mineral wealth than any other State of the Union and whereas that portion of the State lying between Springfield and Neosho is the key to Southern and Western Missouri, as also to Kansas and the Indian Territories, from an invasion from the South; and whereas, if that portion of the State was held by Federal forces, it would enable the Federal and State authorities to raise several thousand troops for the service:

Resolved, therefore, 1st, That the Government of the United States is under obligations to the people of that part of the State to protect them in their rights as American citizens.

Resolved, 2d, That the recent retrograde movement of our army from Springfield has been the cause of from 3,000 to 5,000 men, women, and children leaving their homes, without money and many in a suffering condition.

Resolved, 3d, That the people of the Southwest entertain the highest opinion of the military skill of Brig. Gen. Franz Sigel, and that we respectfully petition you to send to the Southwest sufficient force to hold that part of the State.

Resolved, 4th, That we believe that 15,000 men, under a competent general, will be sufficient to drive the rebels from our land and restore peace to the country.

Resolved, 5th, That Nathan Bray, of Barton; Col. A. Williamson, of Dade; J. B. Clerk, of Dade, and Dr. N. Hocke, of Lawrence Counties be appointed a committee to present these resolutions and preamble to Major-General Halleck.

A. WILLIAMSON, President.

NATHAN BRAY, Secretary.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 21, 1861.

Capt. ANDREW H. FOOTE, U. S. N., Commanding Gunboat Flotilla, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: Your letter of the 15th instant in relation to the employment of paymasters is received.

The system of accountability seems a good one, but the name of paymaster grates upon official ears here, paymaster being appointed only by the President and Senate. We should call them clerks. No chief paymaster can be needed. That is the duty of the captain and assistant quartermaster, Captain Wise, who is the legal agent for the disbursement of all quartermaster’s funds connected with the gunboats.

There is, I presume, a necessity for some one on each gunboat to take care of the property and make issues. On transports this is {p.372} usually the master of the vessel; on Western boats, the clerk, who acts as agent.

All money remitted from this department for this service will go to the quartermaster, Captain Wise, and be charged to him.

He must see, with your assistance and direction, that it is put into safe hands and properly and honestly disbursed. The accounts, therefore, of all subordinate agents must be made up in his office as his accounts.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., November 21, 1861.

General MEIGS, Quartermaster-General:

GENERAL: We have partially investigated three claims from Cincinnati, Ohio, for horses. The uniform price was $130, J. E. Reeside, appointed by General Frémont inspector of horses at Cincinnati, also contracted for the horses. We understand that there are other contracts there made by Reeside at $125. His authority was from General Frémont to inspect horses and allow not to exceed $130, and to receive 4 per cent. for inspecting. Ought an inspector of horses to have anything to do with their purchase?

We would suggest that 4 per cent. for inspection of horses is an enormous price.

A witness this morning testified that he understood that Mr. Reeside was inspecting harness in Cincinnati.

Ought there not to be an inquiry as to whether the same abuse does not exist in this as in the case of horse contracts? Ought not Reeside’s authority to inspect horses to be revoked?

We are satisfied that any compensation given to inspectors of horses, harness, or anything else which is made to depend on the value of the article inspected will lead to the grossest fraud.

Most respectfully,

DAVID DAVIS, Chairman of Board of Commissioners.

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SPRINGFIELD. November 21, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The Fifty-second Regiment, Colonel Wilson, and Fifty-fifth Infantry Colonel Stuart, and Fourth Cavalry Regiment, Colonel Dickey, and Ninth Cavalry Regiment, Colonel Brackett, are nearly full. Those regiments have been ordered to Saint Louis by General Hunter without consultation with me. I have directed Colonels Stuart and Brackett to disregard the order. I have just learned of the orders to Colonels Wilson and Dickey. Both of the latter regiments are now being armed and will soon be ready for service. Referring you to order No. 78 of the War Department, I have the honor to request that you countermand the orders to Colonels Dickey and Wilson, and as soon as the organization of these regiments can be completed I will report the fact to you. I had a most pressing application from Generals Grant and McClernand for an armed regiment at Cave in Rock, in Hardin County, Illinois, and will, with your approbation, send one of them to that point when their organization earn be completed. I have no other armed regiments but these at present. Please answer immediately.

RICH’D YATES, Governor Illinois.

{p.373}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 22, 1861.

Hon. RICHARD YATES, Governor of Illinois, Springfield, Ill.:

Yours of the 21st received. Orders for moving troops suspended. Make no movements till further orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., November 22, 1861.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commander of the Western Department:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to represent to you that the force now under my command at Jefferson City is very small (numbering only about 1,000 effective men), which is to garrison the post, furnish the police of the city) and guard the Osage and Moreau Bridges on the Pacific Railroad and five bridges over Gray’s Creek on the same railroad. Jefferson City being the seat of government of Missouri, the only political point in the State, the home of Gov. C. F. Jackson, increases the anxiety of the rebel army under General Price to recapture Jefferson City over any other point in Missouri. The prestige given the secessionists in Missouri would be very powerful in the occupation of the capital of the State; therefore the enemy will make a greater effort to retake that point than all others in Missouri.

I would respectfully submit for your consideration the propriety of placing a good force at Jefferson City and at as early a period as possible. If we had, say, one good regiment of cavalry and two or three regiments of infantry, in addition to what we have, with some artillery, which we greatly need, we would be able, with the completion of our fortifications, which can be finished in a few weeks, to hold Jefferson City against a very large force.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. L. PRICE, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Comdg. Post, Jefferson City.

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ROLLA, MO., November 22, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

The rebel forces between Springfield and Lebanon are large. Their pickets extend 10 miles this side of Lebanon. Their forces are scattered over a large part of the country for subsistence. They pick up many stragglers and rob the fugitives.

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 22, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have frequently reported to the Western Department that the line of steamers plying between Saint Louis and Cairo, by landing at points on the Missouri shore, were enabled to afford aid and comfort to the {p.374} enemy. I have been reliably informed that some of the officers, particularly the clerks of these boats, were regularly in the employ of the Southern Confederacy, so called. The case of the Platte Valley, a few days since, confirmed me in this belief. I have heretofore recommended that all the carrying trade between here and Saint Louis be performed by Government, charging uniform rates. I would respectfully renew the suggestion, and in consideration of the special disloyalty of Southeastern Missouri I would further recommend that all commerce be cut off from all points south of Cape Girardeau. There is not a sufficiency of Union sentiment left in this portion of the State to save Sodom. This is shown from the fact that Jeff. Thompson or any of the rebels can go into Charleston and spend hours or encamp for the night on their way north to depredate upon Union men, and not one loyalist is found to report the fact to our pickets, stationed but 1 1/2 miles off.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SEDALIA, November 23, 1861.

General HALLECK:

GENERAL: I have what is deemed reliable information that Price is marching north with a large army at the rate of 30 miles a day. Force estimated at from 33,000 to 50,000. He will cross the Osage to-day at Huffman’s Ferry. It is said that he is marching for this place. The lines are down between this and Syracuse.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 23, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding, Sedalia, Mo.:

Make armed reconnaissances in sufficient force in the direction of the enemy’s reported movements and keep me advised of the results.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 8} HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, November 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman, having reported for duty in this department, will proceed at once to visit the different stations of the troops in this department, and will report, during his progress, to these headquarters the number and effective strength of the several regiments and companies, the State from which they came, the character of arms and ammunition, their equipment of clothing, wagons, tents, &c., the means of obtaining subsistence and forage, their drill and discipline, the character of defenses, if any, and their ability to serve the guns in position or harnessed up, and generally all things considered to give the commanding general an idea of their real condition for service. He will also report upon the routes of rivers or railway upon which these troops depend for their supplies or transportation, and such other matters as may seem to him proper to be communicated.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.375}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Saint Louis, Mo.:

The major-general commanding directs that you carry into effect the recommendations of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, conveyed in a communication to these headquarters, dated November 22, concerning the river navigation of the Missouri as far as you may deem necessary and practicable.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ROLLA, MO., November 24, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

My scouts are just in from Springfield; left Wednesday night. The enemy’s main force was still south of Springfield. They had scouting parties out in all directions. The force that followed Major Wright to Lebanon has disappeared from the country between Lebanon and Springfield. Their scouting parties made several of our stragglers prisoners at Lebanon. There was a scouting party of 80 or more.

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Poet.

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SEDALIA, November 24, 1861.

General H. W. HALLECK:

Stage proprietor left Warrensburg at 1 p.m. to-day. Major Hough has been skirmishing with the enemy three days. Our re-enforcements passed through Warrensburg at 4 a.m. to-day within 15 miles of Hough. Six hundred rebel cavalry entered Poison last night. Eighty cavalry passed through Clinton yesterday en route to Warrensburg.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 24, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding, &c., Sedalia, Mo.:

Order in all troops except strong and well-organized reconnoitering parties, and be prepared to resist or attack the enemy. Communicate this order to General Pope’s division, so that they may be ready to move at a moment’s warning.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 24, 1861.

Generals SIGEL and ASBOTH, Commanding Divisions at Rolla, Mo.:

Hold your divisions in readiness for an attack or to move against {p.376} the enemy, and telegraph me all information. Send out strong reconnoitering parties in the direction the enemy is said to be moving.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SEDALIA, November 24, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding Post, Sedalia:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you my proceedings as commandant of the post at Warsaw, Mo. In obedience to orders from General Sturgis, on the 14th instant, I was ordered to remain at Warsaw with my own company (H, First Regiment Nebraska Volunteers), in connection with one company of Merrill’s Horse, Capt. H. Wilson, to occupy the place, protect the Government stores, and remain until all the commissary and quartermaster’s stores were removed to some other point. On the night of the 18th, learning from undoubted authority that the enemy were concentrating in small bodies at various points within from 8 to 15 miles of us on this side of the Osage and were contemplating an attack on us, I deemed it proper to telegraph you for a small re-enforcement. On the night of the 20th re-enforcements came to the number of about 150 men, viz: Captain Baird, of Merrill’s Horse, 60 men, and Captain Williams, of Seventh Missouri Volunteers (two detachments), about 90 men, together with 24 wagons. On the morning of the 21st the wagons were all loaded. During the morning of the 21st a telegraphic dispatch was received by the commissary of the post, Captain Schenck, at Sedalia, from Captain Swain, quartermaster, stating that 52 teams were sent. The balance are only ten hours behind those already there. These teams did not arrive.

On the evening of the 21st a fire broke out in some old buildings on the southwest corner of the public square, and diagonally from the quarters occupied by myself, my company, and the hospital department, on the opposite side of the street. This occurred at dusk in the evening and as the guard were being posted. I immediately sent a soldier to ascertain what the light originated from. He quickly returned, and reported to me that a fire was burning between two old deserted houses about 2 feet apart, and that a man in citizen’s dress ran away from the place and disappeared in the darkness on his approach. I immediately ordered a portion of the guard to the spot with axes and a few buckets of water, and endeavored to arrest the fire, but in vain, as a heavy wind was blowing from the southeast. The whole corner of the block was in a very few moments in flames, with the wind blowing very hard towards my quarters and the hospitals in the same building. It required our utmost exertions to prevent the whole from being in flames. At this juncture the wind veered to the southwest, and in a very short time all of the block of brick buildings in which the Government property was stored was in flames. Some of the Government stores were got out of the buildings, but the heat became so intense that it was impossible for men to work and it was nearly all consumed.

I had previously ordered Captain Schenck, commissary of the post, that if the balance of our teams did not arrive soon and there was no prospect of getting away what remaining property was not loaded into the wagons already, to burn it, in order to save it from falling into the hands of the enemy. But very little of the stores were burned at our {p.377} hands, as the flames spread so rapidly that it was impossible to remove them from the buildings.

We left the place at 10 o’clock that night (21st) and bivouacked 4 miles from town until morning; reached here on the 23d, in the afternoon; met the balance of the train of wagons sent to us 15 miles from this place on the 23d at night.

My own conclusion is, in reference to the origin of the fire, that it was done and deliberately planned by the enemy.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. F. KENEDY, Captain, Comdg. Post at Warsaw, Co. H, First Regt. N. Vols.

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HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 25, 1861.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. Army, Commanding Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: In reply to your telegram of the 20th instant* the General-in-Chief desires you to give your views more fully as to the necessity of enforcing martial law in your department, and, if you think the necessity is sufficiently pressing for such a step, to mention the names and address of the officers to whom you think the power should be given.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* See Appendix, p. 817.

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SYRACUSE, November 25, 1861.

Capt. WILLIAM MCMICHAEL, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The report of the approach of the rebel general in this direction is strongly confirmed this morning. I have sent out reliable scouts from here.

JEFF. C. DAVIS, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Division.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 25, 1861.

Gen. THOMAS L. PRICE, Jefferson City, Mo.:

All the forces under your command must be ready to resist an attack or to take the field should the rumors of the enemy’s approach prove true.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Jefferson City, Mo., November 25, 1861.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

Nine hundred effective men at the post; two batteries and one cavalry company totally unarmed; fortifications incomplete; insufficiency {p.378} of guns and ammunition; applications repeatedly made for necessary forces; bad condition to resist attack, much less to go into the field. The enemy will more likely attack Jefferson City, knowing our weakness. Is it possible to furnish more force here?

THOS. L. PRICE, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Saint Louis, November 25, 1861.

An arrangement having been made between the Governor of Missouri and the Government of the United States, under which troops to be raised as Missouri State Militia, to serve in the State during the war, are to be armed, equipped, clothed, subsisted, transported, and paid by the United States during the time they are embodied as a military force, to be held in camp and in the field, drilled and disciplined, according to the regulations of the Army of the United States, and to be subject to the Articles of War, the following general order has been issued from the War Department, and is herewith published for the information and guidance of all concerned.*

...

This arrangement has been made in order to secure to the troops raised for the purpose of suppressing insurrection in and repelling invasion of the State of Missouri the same compensation as that received by the United States Volunteers.

To the end that the State Militia may be placed as nearly as possible upon the same footing with the United States Volunteers, the organization will be made the same, as follows, viz:

Each regiment shall have 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 quartermaster (a lieutenant), 1 surgeon and 1 assistant surgeon, 1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster-sergeant, 1 commissary-sergeant, and 2 principal musicians, and shall be composed of 10 companies, each company to consist of 1 captain, I first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, I first sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 1 wagoner, and from 64 to 82 privates.

This force to be organized into brigades of not less than four regiments each; each brigade to have 1 brigadier-general, 2 aides-de-camp, 1 assistant adjutant-general with the rank of captain, 1 surgeon, 1 assistant quartermaster, and 1 commissary of subsistence (captains).

The company officers are to be elected by their respective companies and the field and staff officers appointed by the Governor.

The troops already organized under the call of the Executive of the State can have the benefits of the arrangement made with the Government of the United States by increasing the numbers in companies and regiments to the requirements of the arrangement, and being mustered into service for the war, according to its terms, their officers having the rank they now hold.

Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, of the United States Army, has been appointed and commissioned major-general of the Missouri State Militia.

H. R. GAMBLE, Governor of Missouri.

* See General Orders, No. 96, A. G. 0., November 7, 1861, Series I, Vol. III, p. 565.

{p.379}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., November 26, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of Kansas, Port Leavenworth, Hans.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief thinks an expedition might be made to advantage from your department west of Arkansas against Northeastern Texas. He accordingly desires you to report at an early day what troops and means at your disposal you could bring to bear on that point.*

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* See Hunter to Thomas, December 11, p. 428.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 26, 1861.

FRED. STEELE, Colonel Commanding, Sedalia, Mo.:

Telegrams from Rolla indicate that the enemy is moving north, but not in any large force. This force is spread over a wide extent of country, to deceive as to strength and point of attack. Throw out reconnoitering parties, and advise me of all reliable information you obtain. It is only by comparing reports from different points that I can judge as to the true facts of the case.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SEDALIA, November 26, 1861.

General HALLECK:

Look well to Jefferson City and the North Missouri Railroad. Price aims at both. He is gathering large numbers of recruits and is driving out all Union men as he comes north. I think McCulloch will threaten Rolla, whilst Price crosses the Osage, by large number of detachments, to assemble at some agreed point. Two detachments are out, about which I feel uneasy.

SHERMAN.

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SEDALIA, MO., November 26, 1861.

General HALLECK:

My information of Price’s movements and intention is good. A strong reconnoitering party is in, confirmatory of other accounts. Our troops must be in easy supporting distance.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, U. S. Volunteers, present:

GENERAL: You are assigned, by General Orders, No. 9, of this date, to the command of the District of Northern Missouri. You will immediately {p.380} proceed to the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, and station along the line of that road and the Northern Missouri Railroad, at the bridges, &c., such portion of the troops under your command as you may deem necessary for the purpose of protecting those lines of communication. You will arrange to have the troops so stationed and hut themselves in such a manner as to be protected from the winter cold and storms and to afford at the same time the desired protection to the roads. The remainder of your forces along that route will be collected at Chillicothe or some point in that vicinity deemed best for operating against the enemy in Ray and the neighboring counties. It is represented that rebels, not organized enemy troops, have assembled at Albany, Richmond, and other points in that neighborhood, arrested loyal citizens, and seized and destroyed their property. You will proceed to arrest and confine any persons so offending against the peace and order of this State and the authority of the United States. You will be very careful to ascertain, by proper reconnoitering parties, the strength and position of all hostile forces, and not to divide your own troops, so that they may be cut off or your line of operations endangered. You will, if possible, put yourself in communication with our forces south of the Missouri River, and will keep me advised by telegraph and letter of all your movements. It is thought that a large portion of your provisions and forage can be procured in the counties in which you operate. On this subject, however, you will communicate with the chiefs of the supply departments as soon as your troops are concentrated. The duty here assigned you, general, is deemed one of great importance, and will require much energy, care, and discretion for its due execution. It is hoped that by mild but strong measures against these offenders you may be able to restore peace and quiet in that portion of your district which is now disturbed by marauding parties. You will assure the inhabitants of your district that the power of the Government, both of the State and the Union, will be exercised to protect all loyal and well-disposed citizens, but that rebels, robbers, and marauders will hereafter be punished with the utmost severity. As the leniency which has hitherto been extended to such offenders has only served to increase crimes of this character, the commanding general is determined hereafter to impose the severest penalties authorized by the laws of war.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 26, 1861.

I. It having been represented that many of the troops in this department are in want of pay, clothing, blankets, &c., and that this want results from irregularities and neglect in the appointment of the officers and the mustering of the troops or in the making of requisitions on the proper departments for supplies, inspecting and mustering officers will be immediately sent to the different divisions, brigades, posts, and detachments to apply, as speedily as possible, a remedy for these evils. The officers so detailed will, where no proper musters have been made, muster or remuster the troops so as to cover the full time of their service, and will see that the proper requisitions for supplies be made out and duly presented. The general commanding is convinced that the present wants of the forces under his command result from the ignorance {p.381} or culpable neglect of those whose duty it was to have them organized according to law and properly furnished with arms, clothing, and provisions, and he will hereafter punish with severity every neglect of this kind.

...

III. Numerous cases have been brought to the attention of the commanding general of alleged seizure and destruction of private property in this department, showing an outrageous abuse of power and a violation of the laws of war. To avoid a recurrence of these evils the following rules will hereafter be observed:

1st. No private property will be taken, except where necessary for the subsistence or transportation of the troops or in cases of persons in arms against the United States or affording aid and assistance to the enemy.

2d. Where it becomes necessary to take private property for the former purpose, intelligent and responsible officers will be detailed for that purpose, who will take an accurate account of the property so taken, and give receipts therefor. All such property must be duly returned and accounted for, and the authority for the seizure must be stated in the receipts and returns. Any unauthorized and unnecessary seizure or destruction of private property will be punished with the extreme penalty imposed by the laws of war, which is death.

3d. The seizure and conversion of the private property of an enemy (where not required for immediate supplies, as provided in the foregoing paragraph) is justifiable only in particular cases, provided for by the laws of the United States and the general laws of war, and should never be made except by the orders of the officer highest in command, who will be held accountable for the exercise of this power. Great caution should be used in this matter, as much injustice has been done to individuals who are not enemies, and much discredit cast upon our patriotic army by excesses committed by unauthorized persons pretending to act in the name of the United States. All property taken from alleged enemies must be inventoried and duly accounted for.

Any person violating these rules will be immediately arrested and reported to headquarters.

IV. In all cases where prisoners taken at other posts or in the field are sent to Saint Louis, they will be accompanied with a written statement of the charges against them and the evidence upon which the arrest was based. Otherwise prisoners so sent will be released on their arrival here.

V. No person will be hereafter arrested without good and substantial reasons, and officers making arrests without sufficient cause or without authority will be held to account and punished. And officers sending prisoners to Saint Louis without charges, proofs, or proper explanations, will be charged with the expenses of their transportation.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SEDALIA, November 27, 1861.

General HALLECK:

Steen’s division of the enemy is at Wilson’s Ferry, 10 miles from Clinton Prairie, at Osceola, and the country full of returned secessionists, {p.382} who are driving out all Union men. I have ordered forward the whole force from Lexington. Will reach Saint Louis and will communicate the designs of the enemy.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Or, in his absence, Col. F. Steele, Sedalia, Mo.:

No forward movement of troops on Osceola will be made. Only strong reconnoitering parties will be sent in the supposed direction of the enemy, the remainder of the troops being held in position till more reliable information is obtained.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, Mo., November 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Affairs here in complete chaos. Troops unpaid; without clothing or arms. Many never properly mustered into service and some utterly demoralized. Hospitals overflowing with sick. One division of 7,500 has over 2,000 on sick list. Five divisions still in the field-two at Rolla and three near Sedalia. Price and McCulloch said to be moving north, crossing the Osage on Sunday near Osceola, and intended to attack either Lexington or Jefferson City. Have sent out strong reconnoitering parties from Sedalia and Rolla. Some skirmishing with enemy’s advance guard and flankers, but nothing certain as to position of main body. Telegraph wires all work well, and I am in hourly communication with headquarters of divisions. All troops ordered to be in readiness to move. Price’s forces estimated at from 15,000 to 23,000. Local rebels have risen in arms in Ray County and are fortifying themselves in Albany. General Prentiss ordered to move against them from Chillicothe with all the available troops of his command.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SYRACUSE, November 27, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

My scouts have just come in with news from 25 miles south of the Osage. There are no signs of any enemy, except wandering parties of guerrillas in small numbers, who are now probably trying to make their way home north of the Missouri River. Price is reported at Greenfield, and in my opinion there is not the slightest prospect of his attempting to come north.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General. Commanding.

{p.383}

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CAIRO, ILL., November 27, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

The rebels are fortifying New Madrid; have 500 negroes at work. A party of our cavalry was yesterday in Belmont. No enemy found on the Missouri side.

U. S. GRANT.

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SAINT LOUIS, November 27, 1861.

Quartermaster-General M. C. MEIGS, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have received your letter of the 15th [21st] instant, and am pleased to find that you commend my system of accountability, although objecting particularly to the grade or name of paymaster.

Allow me in regard to this subject to state that Commodore Rodgers, I believe with your concurrence, appointed three captains’ clerks and acting paymasters for the three gunboats under his command. These appointments were, in accordance with the usage in the gunboat and transport service, at a salary of $1,200 per annum, and a responsible bond given by each of these men so appointed, with two good bondsmen, in the sum of $5,000, certified to by the United States district attorney. This plan prevailed under Commodore Rodgers, and I adopted a similar one, and appointed good men for these positions, with responsible bondsmen, to act under the authority and direction of their respective commanders and myself in their various disbursements.

You are aware that you gave me the authority by which I appointed Mr. Wise as a kind of an assistant to me at a salary of $200 per month.

On my arrival at Saint Louis and after consulting with Commodore Rodgers we both saw the necessity of finding a person with attainments and business capacity, not only to assist me personally in my various duties, but a man with naval experience in all needed matters in the difficult task of organizing a navy in the West.

Commodore Rodgers and myself immediately secured the services of Mr. S. Henriques for this purpose, who we both have sailed with in the Navy, and in whom we both knew, from personal experience, that we would find the needed and requisite qualities. He has been in the service of the Government for upwards of twenty years, and his services have been and are indispensable to me.

Not knowing what to do with Mr. Wise, who was not fully qualified for my purposes in this respect, and finding, according to your letters to me, that you intended to send me the money for disbursement, I applied to you for a quartermaster, and thus relieve myself from any direct money disbursement, as my time would necessarily have been occupied by many detail matters of less importance. I also informed Mr. Wise to apply for the position, not imagining for an instant that the appointment of Mr. Wise would debar me of the more useful services of Mr. Henriques, the former of which could not efficiently take charge of all the disbursing agents on board the gunboats.

In view of these circumstances, and to get up a system and supervision of all matters in the flotilla connected with my arduous duties, and after a due consultation with Commodore Rodgers, who strenuously urged me, for the good of the service, to secure the services of Mr. Henriques, I appointed him paymaster-in-chief of the naval flotilla under my command, and I have given him the lowest pay of a paymaster {p.384} in the Navy, $2,000, with an extra $200 per annum. His duties are as acting paymaster and my secretary on board the flag-ship, besides a general superintendence over all matters in relation to a perfect system of the details of accountability as adopted in the gunboats, similar as in the Navy, with that difference only that the funds are supplied from the Army. I have dispensed with the services of a secretary at $1,000 per annum, to which I am entitled by the Regulations of the Navy. Thus you see that Mr. H. is a necessity to me, and I fear, with all my pressure of troubles, it would break the “camel’s back” if he could not be retained in his present position.

I respectfully call your attention to the following passage of your letter, relating to having somebody on board in charge of public property, &c.: “On transports this is usually the master of the vessel; on Western boats, the clerk, who acts as agent” and in reply to this passage would state that transport vessels are not men-of-war, neither are Western boats. But our twelve gunboats are in all essentials regular men-of-war, commanded by regular Navy officers, who are exempted by the Regulations of the Navy from any disbursing accountability, and who must necessarily employ all their time on board in the proper training of the undisciplined material of crew to insure success in our undertaking.

It would in my opinion embarrass this service very much by making them responsible for issue to the crew, and when you take into consideration that, unlike the Army, our men are paid partly in “clothing” and “small stores,” and that a paymaster’s duty on board of a man-of-war comprises in its details the duties of a paymaster, quartermaster, and commissary of subsistence of the Army, you will see with how much more economy our Navy is managed than the Army.

In the emergencies of our service it is often the custom of the flag-officer to appoint proper disbursing officers, if needed, taking into consideration the bonds given by such persons and their personal standing.

I do not see how the several accounts of the acting paymasters could be settled in Mr. Wise’s office without making him personally responsible for the acts of persons appointed by me under the authority vested in me, and I cannot assist him in this duty.

The only duty I wish Mr. Wise to perform is to disburse the money, under my approval, to these several captains’ clerks, or acting paymasters, who will pay the officers and men their wages due them, under the approval of their respective commanders; to make all purchases for the squadron, &c.

The several acting paymasters might make out quarterly rolls of “money,” “clothing,” and “small stores” furnished the officers and crew, with their commander’s approval, and forward them to Captain Wise or to any accounting officer you may direct, but a conclusive settlement of their accounts cannot be effected with them, as their statements would necessarily show a balance in their hands of clothing and small stores for which they are accountable.

I trust that the views herein presented, showing our peculiar circumstances, will be satisfactory, and earnestly hope that no change will be required, as my present duties are even harder than I have health to perform satisfactorily to myself.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, &c.

{p.385}

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 27, 1861.

Hon. Jos. HOLT, DAVID DAVIS, HUGH CAMPBELL, Commissioners on Liabilities of Western Department:

GENTLEMEN: I have received your letter in regard to Mr. Reeside’s inspection of horses.

I trust it may be possible to prevent his being paid. The information of Mr. Reeside’s appointment came to me by a letter from himself to a claim agent, Mr. Goszler, who referred it to this office. I inclose a copy, with the note which I made upon it, and my letter to Captain Dickerson, assistant-quartermaster, U. S. Army, at Cincinnati, in regard to it.

I called the attention of the Secretary of War to the matter at the time of its receipt. Over General Frémont and his order I had no authority.

As regards the purchase of horses, I would never have adopted this method.

Captain Turnley, assistant-quartermaster, U. S. A., can give you some information in regard to Mr. Reeside’s shipment of horses, which at the rate verbally reported to me would net him sometimes $400 or $500 a day.

I also inclose copies of a telegram and a letter to Captain Turnley, sent upon receipt of his first estimate for purchase of horses at Saint Louis.*

The Secretary disapproved one of the contracts-that for the purchase of horses in Canada-and the purchase was forbidden. The prices estimated were disapproved. Money was remitted, however, as it was understood here that more horses and supplies would be needed.

I trust this matter may be sifted thoroughly and no such compensation be allowed as Mr. Reeside would claim. I take it for granted that he is no longer employed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

* Omitted as unimportant.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington City, September 3, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I inclose a letter* addressed by J. E. Reeside, at Cincinnati, to one of the clerks in this office.

Mr. Reeside states that he has received and accepted the appointment of inspector of horses for the Western Department, and that he has been ordered by General Frémont to Cincinnati. He desires to be appointed inspector for the Eastern Department also, as he says he can attend to all his duties for the Western Department and have idle time. He wishes to be clothed with authority to confine contractors within geographical districts, in order to prevent competition. He also offers to inspect all horses intended for the Eastern Department and for {p.386} Western Virginia for the same commission allowed by the Western Department, to wit, 2 1/2 per cent. upon the cost price.

There are some 20,000 horses and mules to be brought to the Army of the Potomac for artillery and transportation, besides some twenty regiments of cavalry, requiring 20,000 horses more.

Of these the first 20,000 will probably be collected and delivered by the end of six weeks from this time. Their average cost will be $120, which would net the inspector in six or eight weeks, were he able to perform the duty, $60,000.

The quartermaster at Saint Louis, under General Frémont’s direction, estimates superior cavalry horses at $130. Thousands are contracted for to be delivered here, to pass the inspection of cavalry officers or quartermasters and to conform to specifications which all officers tell me are sufficient, and to cost, delivered here, $120. These are brought from the West.

No horses are being purchased in Cincinnati by Government agents for the Army of the Potomac. Those bought there by the quartermaster are for Western Virginia or other Western armies.

The practice of going outside the legal agents of the Quartermaster’s Department-the officers selected and appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate-to make contracts and disbursements is liable to great abuse, and should be resorted to only, I think, in case of extreme emergency.

I also inclose a telegram received from James M. Beebe & Co., Boston, by which it appears that they are informed that General Frémont has delegated to the Union Defense Committee of Chicago the powers and duties of the Quartermaster’s Department in relation to contracting for and providing clothing for the troops. The advice and assistance of a committee of respectable and patriotic citizens might be of great use to this department, but I doubt the propriety and the wisdom of placing its funds thus under the control of a committee responsible only to public opinion. Certainly as Quartermaster-General and legal head of this department I cannot hold myself responsible for the acts of this committee or of Inspector Reeside, with whose appointment, so far as at present informed, no officer of this department has had anything to do, and whose functions and powers I learn only from themselves or from those with whom they attempt to deal.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

* Not found.

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UNITED STATES MILITARY TELEGRAPH, [Received September 2, 1861, from Boston.]

To M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General, U. S. Army:

General Frémont having appointed a Union Defense Committee at Chicago, Ill., they have made large contracts with a clothing house for army clothing, who apply to us for the goods. Is the United States Government legally responsible for contracts made in this way?

JAS. M. BEEBE & CO.

[Endorsements.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, September 2, 1861.

Respectfully referred to the Secretary of War.

General Frémont appears to have delegated, if this statement be {p.387} correct, the power to make contracts for clothing to a Union Defense Committee.

All bills will finally receive an examination in this office, but I think that all contracts should be examined by some Government officer before being executed.

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster. General.

Suggestion of Quartermaster-General approved.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, September 3, 1861.

[Enclosure No. 2.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, September 3, 1861.

Capt. J. H. DICKERSON, Cincinnati, Ohio:

CAPTAIN: Mr. J. E. Reeside writes here that he is, by order of General Frémont, at Cincinnati, with power to inspect all horses for the Western Department.

He desires, having “idle time,” to perform the same duties for the Eastern Department and for Western Virginia.

This he offers to do on the terms allowed him for the Western Department-2 1/2 per cent.

Some 20,000 horses are to be delivered here in the next six weeks, and at this rate, if he performed the duties, the fees would amount to about $60,000-$10,000 a week.

The cost of mounting a regiment would be increased $3,000 by such inspection. I trust no such arrangement has been made.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

[Enclosure No. 3.]

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington City, October 4, 1861.

Maj. ROBERT ALLEN, Quartermaster, Saint Louis, Mo.:

MAJOR: I have received from Captain Turnley several estimates of large amount, upon which I find it necessary to make some remarks.

Some of the objects of expenditure are not embraced in the appropriations for this department. They belong properly to the Engineer Department and to the Ordnance Department, and for them requisitions and estimates should be addressed to those departments. Others exceed the amounts appropriated by Congress. Upon these, however, I will write more fully at a later hour.

I have called urgently for $500,000 to be remitted to you for the quartermaster’s department in the West.

The calls upon the Treasury have for some time exceeded its daily receipts, and the Secretary of the Treasury, at a meeting of the heads of bureaus night before last, called by the Secretary of War, informed us that it would be necessary to spread the payments for equipping, organizing, and raising this army over a longer time.

Heavy debts must in some cases wait. Thus far the Government has {p.388} endeavored to pay promptly as it went on. But $1,000,000 a day is for the present its rate of income, and it cannot pay at a more rapid rate. Therefore use this $500,000 to pay the most necessary expenses only; those necessary to make the army effective.

Use a careful discretion in relation to paying accounts for supplies not purchased under advertisements and legal contracts. Examine prices and reduce them to fair and equitable rates. Leave no margin for profits in jobbing contracts. Let speculators wait.

I have within a few days, for example, a letter from the Union Defense Committee of Chicago, naming a person to supply 1,000 horses quite as good as the Government has been getting at Chicago and offering these horses at $95 each. Why, then, should the high prices named in Saint Louis be paid? It is reported that horse contracts are sold by speculators in Saint Louis. The papers so publicly and loudly declare this, that the officers of the Quartermaster’s Department cannot ignore the accusation.

Whenever a bill bears the aspect of jobbing, of speculation, of illegality, set it aside as one of those to be deferred. For services duly rendered pay a fair equivalent.

It is understood that prices of clothing have risen beyond the standard in some places. Do not pay such bills if much exceeding the standard prices without first referring them to this office.

For fortifications and for ordnance we have no money, and the $500,000 now forwarded should not be applied to such uses, however necessary.

Of course you understand your duty in case the commanding general assumes the responsibility of ordering an account to be paid. He is the responsible head in his department and must judge in extreme cases, taking by a distinct order the pecuniary responsibility upon himself. But he should be made aware, with all respect and loyalty, of the legal or other objections, so that he can act with knowledge and be protected against errors arising from inexperience in the regulations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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SPECIAL ORDER, No. -.

DIVISION HDQRS. 1ST AND 2D DIVISIONS, Syracuse, November 27, 1861.

The following movements will be made by the First and Second Divisions of the Army of the West:

The Second Division, under Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, will march tomorrow morning, the 28th instant, at 9 o’clock a.m., and will encamp at the edge of the timber, 3 miles north of Otterville.

The First Division, under Brig. Gen. T. J. Turner, will also march to-morrow morning at 10 o’clock a.m., and will encamp between La Mine River and Otterville.

On the following morning, the 29th instant, the two divisions will march at 8 o’clock a.m., and report to the general commanding them at Sedalia.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.389}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Saint Louis, Mo., November 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. John M. Schofield, of the United States Volunteers, having been appointed and commissioned brigadier-general of the Missouri State Militia, is hereby placed in command of all the militia of the State.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General Missouri State Militia.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 28, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding the Army, Washington City:

GENERAL: I reached this city on the 18th, where I met General Hunter, who had just arrived. On the 19th I assumed the command, and have since used every endeavor to ascertain the true condition of affairs here, but for the want of proper staff officers and in the absence of returns my progress in this matter has not been as rapid as I could wish. One week’s experience, however, is sufficient to prove that everything here is in complete chaos. The most astonishing orders and contracts for supplies of all kinds have been made and large amounts purport to have been received, but there is nothing to show that they have ever been properly issued, and they cannot now be found. If ever really received, they have either been stolen or diverted from their legitimate purposes. Many of these diversions are represented to have been made by order of Capt. I. C. Woods, of the Commissary Department, who acted as a colonel of General Frémont’s staff and chief of transportation. Captain Woods was ordered to report to me in person and to turn over all property in his possession. He has reported, but says he has no property belonging to the United States, and that he has never been responsible for any. It is officially reported to me that such diversions were frequently made by Captain Woods and no receipts whatever given to the officers who were accountable for the property diverted. Property invoiced and sent from this place to officers at other places never reached its destination and was never receipted for either by the officer to whom it was directed or by the person who arrested it on the way and diverted it to some other purposes, sometimes probably very proper, and sometimes very improper. It is exceedingly difficult to obtain reliable information on this matter, as this business seems to have been carried on in such a manner as to leave the least possible trace behind. Captain Woods has reported to Capt. T. J. Haines, chief commissary, but from the reputed bad character of Captain Woods Captain Haines is unwilling to assign him to any duty.

Many of the troops at different points are reported to be without arms and suffering for the want of clothing and blankets. It being impossible to ascertain whether or not sufficient supplies had already been issued in such cases, I detailed Brigadier-General Sturgis to examine into the condition of those in this vicinity and sent Brigadier-General Sherman to examine the three divisions near Sedalia and the detachments along the road. General Sturgis has already remedied some of these evils here and I hope soon to hear the result of General Sherman’s mission. I have no officers to send to other points in the department

{p.390}

I have been greatly embarrassed in my endeavors to ascertain the true condition of affairs here. On my arrival I was without a single staff officer to assist me. General Hamilton accompanied me, but he was without a commission or orders and could exercise no authority. I was told by yourself and General Thomas that Captain Fry, assistant adjutant-general, was ordered to this department, but afterwards learned that he had been sent to the Department of the Ohio, where there were already two. As most of the officers here were charged with being involved in the existing disorders, I have been unable to obtain a sufficient number for staff duty. I hope that a few more regular officers may be sent to this department for staff, mustering, and inspecting duty. This is absolutely necessary for the public service.

Reports come to me daily of troops being in a suffering, disorganized, and mutinous condition, and I can ascertain the real facts only by sending out officers of experience and worthy of confidence. This department is almost stripped of regular officers. The organizing and mustering into service troops who claim to have served for months without being mustered is a matter of pressing necessity, but it is very difficult to find officers capable of performing this duty. I shall keep you informed by telegraph and letter of the condition of this department so far as I can ascertain it. I have not written before, as I had nothing of particular importance to communicate.

Very respectfully, your obedient-servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. ARMY NORTH MISSOURI, Quincy, Ill., November 28, 1861.

I. The undersigned having been, by General Orders, No. 9, dated Headquarters Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, November 26, 1861, assigned to the command of the District of North Missouri, comprising all that portion of the State of Missouri north of the Missouri River, hereby assumes command of the said district.

...

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 28, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding at Sedalia, Mo.:

Yours of the 26th received. No orders have been given to fall back, nor is there any intention to do so. The only movement contemplated is an advance. I fully approve your views.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, MO., November 28, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

A party just from Springfield states there were between 4,000 and 5,000 of the enemy, Arkansas troops, at that place on Friday. He saw {p.391} none at Lebanon, but heard that there were 80 of them there. Rains and Parsons, Price’s generals, are farther west of Springfield with their forces.

ASBOTH.

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SEDALIA, MO., November 28, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have ordered forward Pope’s and Turner’s divisions to-day, but we cannot stay long here. The cold is intense on this naked prairie. We must move forward or back. Will you indicate your wishes?

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 28, 1861.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Sedalia, Mo.:

General Halleck is satisfied, from reports of scouts received here, that no immediate attack on Sedalia is intended. You will therefore return to the city and report your observations on the condition of the troops you have examined. Please telegraph when you will leave.

SCHUYLER HAMILTON, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, U. S. Army.

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SYRACUSE, November 28, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your dispatch of this date received. General Sherman ordered division from Tipton to this place, and both divisions were on the march to Sedalia when your dispatch arrived. Do I understand that I am in command of all the forces west of Jefferson City and expected to post them for comfort and convenience at my discretion? First and Second Divisions now here.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Syracuse, Mo.:

General Sherman has been telegraphed to return to this city. I see no necessity for any movements of troops. I wish them left as they were and made as comfortable as possible.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 28, 1861.

Gen. JOHN POPE, Syracuse, Mo.:

General Sherman being directed to return to this city, you, being as I understand the ranking officer, will, if these troops be united, be {p.392} entitled to the command; but it was not intended, unless necessary to take the field, that they should be moved from their stations, but that the commanders of divisions remain as they were. If you deem movements necessary telegraph me, and I will order them. If not, return to your stations and remain as before.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., November 28, 1861.

General HALLECK:

Steamer Shreveport arrived; reports one division rebel army expected at Lexington to-day, part to recross the river and destroy North Missouri Railroad. Great number returning from rebel army in detached forces through upper country.

THOS. L. PRICE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, November 29, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

After thoroughly sifting for a whole week all information received from scouts, spies, &c., I am satisfied that the enemy is operating in and against this State with a much larger force than was supposed when I left Washington, and also that a general insurrection is organizing in the counties near the Missouri River between Booneville and Saint Joseph. A desperate effort will be made to supply and winter their troops in this State, so as to spare their own resources for a summer campaign. What is wanted here most is arms. Many of our regiments have none of any kind.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., November 29, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

Price and McCulloch are said to be moving towards Lexington or Kansas City, and that insurrections are being organized on both sides of the Missouri River west of Sedalia, both to re-enforce them and to destroy the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad. General Prentiss has returned to the command of Northwestern Missouri, and is, or soon will be, at Chillicothe. Please telegraph me any information of enemy’s movements or your own dispositions.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, November 29, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding:

D. W. Contvere who was following the secession army since November 14, when he left Sarcoxie, together with about 900 men of General Rains’ division, gives me the following intelligence:

{p.393}

There was a general movement of the Missouri troops northward, and their line was formed on Tuesday last, November 26, from Stockton on the right to a point near Nevada City on the left-the right wing, about 6,000, under command of General McBride; the left, under General Rains. General Price, commanding the center, was then probably near Montevallo. Colonel Clarkson bringing up the rear, left Greenfield last Sunday, November 24. The whole fighting force was about 14,000 men, as per statement of the quartermaster. The men are poorly clad and very short in food and forage, and express manifest threats against Kansas. They think that their present move is directed against that State. Some entertained the hope that they would remain in their present position several weeks. They say they have nearly sixty pieces of cannon and some batteries, lately received from the Confederate States. My scout further says that an order from General Price to General McCulloch to follow up with his command was disregarded by the latter, and that he and McCulloch were performing retreat into Arkansas. General McCulloch was at or near Springfield on the 23d of November. There are no troops, except a few scattering marauding squads, in all the country east of Stockton. My authority passed near Buffalo on the 26th. The next day he came through Lebanon, and staid last night on the road about 30 miles from Rolla, and he met no troops, but heard of an occasional scout.

P. J. OSTERHAUS, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

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SYRACUSE, November 29, 1861.

General HALLECK:

My opinions about Price’s forces are confirmed by intelligence from all quarters. His army is scattered all over the country for a hundred miles in every direction in squads more or less large. It is more than doubtful whether they will again unite. I think it certain they will not this winter. It is known that the term of enlistment of nearly all of them expires this month. They are anxious to get home to the river counties and North Missouri. It is probable that Price himself has not crossed the Osage, and has a small, if any, force with him. Pursuit will only scatter them more, without other result than breaking down our own troops. Our forces are suffering much for want of shelter, which cannot be found in this section.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. FIFTH DIVISION, ARMY OF MISSOURI, Sedalia, November 29, 1861.

Col. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. Dept. of Missouri:

COLONEL: An acquaintance of mine, Major Marvin, a resident of Henry County, of this State, came from Clinton to-day. He informs me that there is no considerable force of Price’s army in that vicinity. He had seen two small parties who were pressing animals for artillery service. He says most of Price’s army and all his artillery, according to the best of his information and belief, are still on the other side of the Osage.

{p.394}

This Major Marvin is a loyal citizen, and in my opinion perfectly reliable. From the information I have obtained from different sources I am satisfied that there will be no movement of the enemy upon this point so long as our troops occupy their present position, nor do I believe that they will move north of us except in small parties.

We frequently hear of marauding parties making their way towards Warrensburg and Lexington, who are represented as soldiers on furlough from Price’s army. Major Marvin told me that Price’s army did not number as many now by 5,000 as it did two weeks ago. It is said that the rebel army is almost destitute of clothing and their numbers have been considerably diminished by desertions. The hoof disease is among their animals and has rendered a large proportion of them totally unfit for service.

If it should be ascertained that the principal part of Price’s army had crossed the Osage, I should be in favor of endeavoring to engage them with a well-organized force from this command by rapid march at night. I am satisfied that they will not, with their present force, give us battle as long as they can run.

If it is the intention for this command to winter here, we can get a good camping ground about 3 miles from the depot, sheltered from the wind, and with facilities for obtaining fuel, good water, and forage. There is a saw-mill near this place belonging to the Government, where Colonel Bissell’s battalion of mechanics are now stationed. Colonel Bissell informs me that he has considerable timber out now, and could in a short time furnish enough to hut the whole command.

I shall probably move the division to this locality to-morrow, and wish to be advised as to whether I shall commence building huts. The troops have already suffered from the inclemency of the weather; the sick list is constantly increasing, and if we have not soon some protection from the weather besides tents the consequences may be still more serious. I continue to throw out scouting and reconnoitering parties, which, besides the information which they bring me, has the effect of intimidating the enemy.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI MILITIA, Saint Louis, November 29, 1861.

I. In compliance with orders from Major-General Halleck, of the Missouri Militia, dated Saint Louis, November 27, 1861 I hereby assume command of all the militia of the State.

II. The organization of the State forces and their muster into service, according to the terms of the arrangement entered into between the President of the United States and the Governor of Missouri, will be prosecuted as rapidly as possible. Mustering officers will be appointed and rendezvous designated from time to time, as circumstances may require.

...

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.395}

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SAINT LOUIS, November 30, 1861.

GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN. Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army:

My letter of the 25th* explains in relation to martial law, the authority to be given only to myself. I can do nothing here without it. Surrounded as I am by traitors and spies, I must have it. I know nothing of Koerner; never heard of him before. Cannot appoint him till I make inquiries.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See Appendix, p. 817.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 30, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commander-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: There can be no doubt that the enemy is moving north with a large force, and that a considerable part of Northern Missouri is in a state of insurrection. The rebels have organized in many counties, taken Union men prisoners, and are robbing them of horses, wagons, provisions, clothing, &c. There is as yet no large gathering in any one place so that we can strike them. To punish these outrages and to arrest the traitors who are organizing these forces and furnishing supplies, it is necessary to use the military power and enforce martial law. I cannot arrest such men and seize their papers without exercising martial law, for there is no civil law or civil authority to reach them. The safety of Missouri requires the prompt and immediate exercise of this power, and if the President is not willing to intrust me with it he should relieve me from the command. It is and has been for months exercised here by my predecessors, but I cannot find any written authority of the President for doing so. I mean to act strictly under authority and according to instructions, and where authority will not be granted the Government must not hold me responsible for the result.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, MO., November 30, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Another of my scouts in from the southwest. Left Osceola Tuesday night. Price was there with 4,000 men, McBride at Stockton with 6,000, and Rains at Chester with 5,000. The quartermaster of the force is own cousin to my scout, who informed him that Price is determined to ravage and burn Kansas even if peace was declared to-morrow, and intends to go into Kansas north of Fort Scott at or near Butler. McCulloch was ordered north with his whole force, but he refused to go, and is falling back into Arkansas. About one-third of the Cherokees are rebels. About 5,000 of them are moving north to join Price in Kansas.

John Ross, after being hung up three times, was forced to agree to remain neutral, with the remainder of the tribe. One of Price’s spies {p.396} came into his camp Tuesday morning. Had been to Fort Scott; reports Lane there with 5,000 men. Price will attempt to get into Kansas north of him. He says he does not intend to attack the troops in Missouri. They had already sent back into Arkansas 400 stolen horses.

J. B. WYMAN, Acting Brigadier-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 30, 1861.

Hon. JOSEPH HOLT, DAVID DAVIS, HUGH CAMPBELL, Commission, &c.:

GENTLEMEN: I find that I omitted in my answer to your letter* in regard to Mr. Reeside to take notice of what you reported in regard to his authority to inspect harness.

I was not aware that he had any authority to inspect harness. Inspection on commission is not the policy of this department. I do not think a worse policy could be adopted.

I have called the attention of the major-general commanding the Department of the West, General Halleck, to this matter, and have no doubt he will revoke the order, if there be one, under which Mr. Reeside acts. I think that the order issued by the Secretary of War, while in Saint Louis, confining the making of contracts and purchases to the regularly and legally appointed officers of the staff departments, fully revoked all authority under which Mr. Reeside could claim to act.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

* See November 27, p. 355.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 30, 1861.

General H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose a copy of a letter to this office from the Commission upon Expenditures in the Department of the West.*

I have answered the letter, and the authority given to Mr. Reeside came from General Frémont. I had no power over it. As soon as I was informed of it this fall I made it known to the Secretary of War, and I expressed to the quartermaster at Cincinnati, Captain Dickerson, my opinion upon the subject.

I have sent copies of the correspondence upon the subject to the Commission. I advise that Mr. Reeside be informed that his appointment was never approved by the War Department and that he be stopped in his operations as soon as possible.

Did not the order of the Secretary of War, issued while in Saint Louis, revoke any authority to Mr. Reeside? It directed all purchases and contracts to be made by the legally-appointed officers of the staff departments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

* See Davis to Meigs, November 21, p. 372.

{p.397}

SAINT LOUIS, November 30, 1861.

Quartermaster-General M. C. MEIGS, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I inclose two letters from Captain Howard in relation to men, which will explain themselves. I await your directions in the matter, yet we want the men, but regret that it will require so much money to obtain them.

The remaining two of the four gunboats built here in convoy of the New Era leave to-morrow or next day for Cairo. I hope to be able to leave myself in the Benton on the 4th proximo, next Wednesday, for Cairo, to have her and the gunboats there completed with the best facilities we can command. We have tried the engines successfully of the two of the seven gunboats which leave to-morrow or next day. I am using every means, working night and day and Sundays, to get our boats down to Cairo.

Will you please give me instructions as to the mode of accepting the several gunboats, the first of which will be ready to be handed over soon after I reach Cairo-this day week or before. I shall want funds, or would rather the advance and other expenses of Captain Howard’s men should be paid before they leave New York, in case you conclude to have the men sent, as preferred by him.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

[Enclosures.]

WASHINGTON, November 26, 1861.

DEAR SIR: I wrote you this morning, since when I have seen Assistant Secretary Fox. He says I may send you 1,000 men, although they are doing better than he expected; still he will be glad if I will join you with 1,000 more seamen. If you can arrange it in such a manner as to have some money (advance) paid in New York, the thing can be arranged at once. I shall make it a point to see General Meigs after (if possible) a grand review of regulars to be held now (1 p.m.).

Ever, yours,

W. A. HOWARD.

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WASHINGTON, November 26, 1861.

Flag-Officer FOOTE, Commanding U. S. Naval Forces of the Mississippi:

MY DEAR SIR: This is the third of to-day, but thinking perhaps I had better see General Meigs before I left, I deferred my going to New York until to-morrow. I went to the review and met him; informed him what I had done, what I had written you respecting the advance, what Fox had said, &c. The general then said he had no doubt you would advance the money; hoped you would; that it was in your power, &c. I mention these things to show you the feeling of the officers at the head of the department. You will of course be governed (as you always were) by what you consider right. I said “May I make this statement as coming from you?” “Yes, certainly,” was the reply. My anxiety, as you will see, makes me seize every shrub in climbing this hill. Don’t get tired of me.

Yours, truly,

W. A. HOWARD.

{p.398}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 30, 1861.

I. The following officers of the staff and staff corps of this department having reported for duty at headquarters will be recognized and obeyed accordingly:

Brig. Gen. George W. Cullum, chief of staff and chief of engineers.

Brig. Gen. Schuyler Hamilton, assistant chief of staff.

Capt. J. C. Kelton, assistant adjutant-general, in charge of office.

Capt. William McMichael, assistant adjutant-general.

Capt. S. M. Preston, assistant adjutant-general.

Maj. Robert Allen, chief of quartermaster’s department.

Capt. Thomas J. Haines, chief of subsistence department.

Surg. J. J. B. Wright, chief of medical department.

Lieut. Col. T. P. Andrews, chief of pay department.

Lieut. Col. J. B. McPherson, aide-de-camp and assistant to chief of engineers.

Col. George Thom, aide-de-camp and chief of Topographical Engineers.

Col. Richard D. Cutts, aide-de-camp on topographical duty.

Capt. Franklin D. Callender, chief of ordnance department.

Lieut. Col. James Totten, chief of artillery.

Capt. John Hoskin, acting aide-de-camp.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Rolla, Mo., December 1, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: The reliable reports from Springfield are that Price’s, Rains’, and McBride’s forces are in Vernon, Cedar, Dade, Saint Clair, and Barton counties. A scout in this morning 34 miles from Springfield makes it certain that no heavy force is between here and that point. Price has ordered Freeman and his band to steal, rob, and pillage around us at this point, which order they are carrying out to the best of their ability. I caught this morning a fugitive slave from the Cherokee Nation. He says that the Cherokees are dissatisfied and afraid of the force at Fort Scott, and that a portion of them have gone home.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Leavenworth, Hans., December 1, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

From reliable information I am convinced that a large force is moving north to Kansas City, Mo., and that the place must fall unless a brigade is sent there immediately from Sedalia and kept there during the winter. One should also be sent to Lexington.

D. HUNTER, Major-General.

{p.399}

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HEADQUARTERS, Fort Leavenworth, Hans., December 1, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have no reliable information with regard to the movements of Price. Report says he is moving north with a large force. The rebels have possession of the railroad between Weston and Saint Joseph, and have cut off our mails. I think it all important that an efficient officer should be placed at Saint Joseph and a regiment sent to Weston and one to Liberty. These regiments should come together to Weston, and have some artillery, as the rebels have several pieces there. Please telegraph me what you do in the premises, that I may co-operate with you.

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT JOSEPH, MO., December 1, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I will move from this point with forces into the counties directed on Wednesday. Many of Price’s men are north of Missouri River. From letters taken from prisoners a large force from Price’s army is en route for Lexington. Will write you first train.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SIXTH BRIGADE, Rolla, Mo., December 2, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Two companies of cavalry, returning from a reconnaissance-one by way of Little Piney, across the Gasconade, and another 5 miles from Hainesville, on the right bank of that river-confirm my former reports. No rebel troops are at Lebanon nor in its vicinity; but many men of the enemy, returning to their respective homes, are committing depredations and other outrages on Union men. Our camps are covered with snow, and I am obliged to move some of my regiments to higher ground.

ASBOTH, Acting Major-General, Commanding Fourth Division.

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SYRACUSE, December 2, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Dr. Moore, a prominent citizen of this section, desires to go to Price’s camp, south of Osceola, with letters from Governor Gamble, having in view negotiations for disbanding Price’s forces and their return to allegiance to the Government. Shall Dr. Moore be passed through our lines for this purpose? The letter of Governor Gamble states the condition of immunity for past offenses, as defined to him by the President. Price is in a desperate condition, and no doubt many of his command, if not the larger part of it, would avail themselves of such a chance to lay down their arms, Dr. Moore awaits your decision.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.400}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 2, 1861.

General B. M. PRENTISS, Saint Joseph, Mo.:

Please consult and act in concert with General Hunter at Fort Leavenworth. If deemed advisable, you can move from Saint Joseph on Weston. Telegraph me the numbers and position of your movable force.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 2, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, Fort Leavenworth, Hans.:

General Prentiss is now at Saint Joseph. He is directed to consult and act in concert with you. If you deem it advisable to cross the river, you are authorized to direct the movements of Prentiss’ force. I can neither learn their numbers nor position. Please telegraph me the movements and numbers of your troops.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 2, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding at Sedalia, Mo.:

It is proposed that you send a cavalry force of say, 400 to Marshall, to seize all secessionists in arms or who have been in arms, then to move on Arrow Rock or on Grand Pass and Waverly, and destroy boats, &c., at these places. Movement and destination to be kept secret and attack made in the night. If you approve, make it; if not approved, state reasons.

H. W. HALLECK.

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General HALLECK: Mo., December 2, 1861.

Previous to receiving your dispatch I had ordered a scouting party from Merrill’s Horse 400, to go towards Marshall. From recent accounts they have collected a considerable force in that section and have a large train loaded with supplies for Price’s army. I have just seen orders purporting to come from headquarters Fifth Division, Saint Louis, directing 6 enlisted men of this command to repair to Saint Louis, among them I first sergeant, 4 corporals, and 2 clerks in this office, with the papers &c. Does General Sturgis command this division in Saint Louis? Snow 4 inches deep and intensely cold.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 2, 1861.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding at Sedalia, Mo.:

Send additional forces in direction of Marshall to sustain the detachment. {p.401} In other respects carry out my orders on that subject. General Sturgis does not command your division. Send no one here without orders from these headquarters.

H. W. HALLECK.

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Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding in the Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: As an insurrection exists in the United States and is in arms in the State of Missouri, you are hereby authorized and empowered to suspend the writ of habeas corpus within the limits of the military division under your command, and to exercise martial law as you find it necessary, in your discretion, to secure the public safety and the authority of the United States.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed, at Washington, this second day of December, A. D. 1861.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 24.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 2, 1861.

Brig. Gen. George W. Cullum, Col. George Thom, Lieut. Col. James Totten, Lieut. Col. J. B. McPherson, and Capt. Franklin D. Callender will constitute a board to examine and report upon the defenses of this city. They will make a reconnaissance of the country immediately adjacent, the approaches, barracks, camps, &c., and examine the fortifications which have been erected, particularly with reference to the location, plan, strength, present and required garrisons, accommodations for troops, &c. They will state particularly whether these works, or any of them, are improperly located or planned; and, if so, what locations and plans ought to have been adopted. They will also report how these defects, if any be found can now be best remedied, so as to place this city in the best possible state of defense. In this relation they will give particular attention to the present position of the barracks and camps. The armament of each fort, its supply of ordnance stores, present and required, will be examined and reported.

A brief preliminary report on these points will be made to the commanding general as soon as possible, to be followed by a more detailed and formal statement, accompanied by such sketches, maps, and drawings as may be necessary for a full understanding of the whole subject. This board will also inquire into and report upon the construction and cost of these works, whether built by the troops, by hired labor, or by contract; if by day labor, the amount paid or due, and if by contract, the terms of the contracts, and whether or not if works paid for or allowed was the real amount of work done in conformity with such contract or contracts, and also whether the contract prices were fair and just. In making this investigation they are authorized to call for and examine any papers in the quartermaster or other departments in this command, and will call upon the commissioners of claims appointed {p.402} by the President for such information as they may deem proper to furnish.

The president of the board will notify the members of their appointment, and fix the times of meeting, &c.

...

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, Mo., December 3, 1861-11 a.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

Price is probably still near Osceola. Our preparations have checked his advance. McCulloch near Springfield, falling back towards Arkansas. Perhaps his retreat is a mere ruse, to draw our forces from Rolla in the direction of Osceola. Our troops suffering terribly from sickness and cold. Every effort is being made to supply their wants. Neither the quartermaster’s nor pay department have money. Why is this?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 3, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commander-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Your telegram of yesterday, desiring a report of the general state of affairs, condition of gunboats finished, their draught of water, number of guns, &c., is received. My letters Nos. 1 and 2 will afford some information on these points, especially as to their condition. I have not yet been able to obtain reports of their numbers and organization, although such reports were ordered soon after my arrival here.

As already stated, my first efforts, after making provisions against the enemy’s movements in the west and north, have been directed to supplying and reorganizing the troops, who are in a most disorganized and some of them in a suffering, condition. I have not been able, and shall not for some time be able, to give any attention to the gunboats. Flag-Officer Foote is now at Cairo. He has made no formal reports to me. As soon as he returns I will call upon him to report to me the information you desire. In the mean time the information, if immediately required, can probably be obtained from his reports to the Navy Department.

The cold here is very severe, and our troops, in miserable tents and poorly clothed, suffer very much, and the sick list is enormous. Every one at headquarters is working night and day to remedy these evils; hut this requires time, for the volunteer officers are generally ignorant of their duties and have to be taught. My supply of regular officers should be increased, at least temporarily, in order to enable me to muster in and organize the fragments and regiments now in service. As soon as possible I will send you more formal and complete reports. In the mean time I will give you all the information I can myself obtain.

Price is still near Osceola. His force is variously estimated at from {p.403} 10,000 to 30,000 men, but greatly demoralized and dissatisfied. The following have been represented to me as the enemy’s plans and intentions: Insurrections were to be organized in various counties north of the Missouri, so as to draw off our troops in various directions. In the mean time Price was to threaten Sedalia, not supposed to be strong, and make a dash at Jefferson City, the insurgents at different points also moving in that direction. If the troops at Rolla moved in Price’s rear McCulloch was to cut them off from Saint Louis.

It is said that these plans were abandoned on finding our forces in the vicinity of Sedalia much stronger than was supposed. Price halted near Osceola, not venturing to advance any farther. He and McCulloch are said to be waiting for us to make some move. If Price succeeded in the north, the large Confederate forces at Columbus were either to attack Paducah or to cross the river and threaten this city. I give you these reported plans for what they are worth. I shall prepare as large a force as possible for the field, but I shall make no movements without some definite object, except the sending out of strong scouting parties. This I am doing daily.

I have directed to the Adjutant-General of the Army the correspondence between General Grant and Bishop General Polk in relation to the exchange of prisoners.* After full consideration of the subject I am of the opinion that prisoners ought to be exchanged. This exchange is a mere military convention. A prisoner exchanged under the laws of war is not thereby exempted from trial and punishment as a traitor. Treason is a state or civil offense, punishable by the civil courts; the exchange of prisoners of war is only a part of the ordinary commercia belli.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* To appear in Series II.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Rolla, Mo., December 3, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

GENERAL: My scout, Isaac S. Coe, left Linn Creek on the 3d at noon. He met no secessionists until he got there, when he found a few armed men, and reports that the right wing of Price’s army had crossed the Osage below Warsaw and Osceola-there are three practicable fords below the place-and is contemplating an attack on our forces at and near Sedalia, with a view to destroy the principal railroad bridges. From another source I learn that part of McCulloch’s army had already reached Cassville on its retreat.

P. J. OSTERHAUS, Acting Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF WESTERN MISSOURI, Syracuse, December 3, 1861.

In compliance with orders from the headquarters of the Department of the Missouri, the undersigned assumes command of all the forces between the Missouri and Osage Rivers.

...

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.404}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 4, 1861.

Col. L. F. Ross, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cape Girardeau, Mo.:

Your communication of yesterday* is received and the following instructions are given in reply:

You will require Colonel Murdoch to give over to the quartermaster all property taken by them from citizens of Missouri. Such as may be reclaimed by owners you will direct to be returned, unless taken from persons directly giving aid and comfort to the enemy.

When you know of depredations being committed by armed bodies of rebels within reach of you, you can use your own discretion about the propriety of suppressing them. I know your views about allowing troops to interpret the confiscation laws; therefore no instructions are required on this point. One thing I will add: In cases of outrageous marauding I would fully justify shooting the perpetrators down if caught in the act-I mean our own men as well as the enemy. When you are satisfied that Thompson’s men are coming in with honest intentions you may swear them, but in this matter I would advise great caution. As a rule it would be better to keep them entirely out of your camp or confine them as prisoners of war. A few examples of confinement would prevent others from coming in.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 4, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I would respectfully report that the goods landed at Price’s Landing on Monday last by steamer Perry were moved directly by team to Hickman, Ky., and New Madrid, Mo. I learned these facts too late to capture the goods and the teams used in their transportation. Eighty barrels of this freight were whisky; a character of commerce I would have no objection to being carried on with the South, but there is a possibility that some barrels marked whisky might contain something more objectionable. I would not be understood as saying that I would sanction the passage South of anything interdicted.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT JOSEPH, MO., December 4, 1861.

MAJOR-GENERAL COMMANDING THE DEPT. OF THE MO.:

I start this afternoon with four field pieces, 475 cavalry, and 1,175 infantry. Colonel Morgan’s regiment has left for Weston. Forces on road will be: Hannibal and Salt River Bridge, Twenty-sixth Illinois; Palmyra, Glover’s cavalry, four companies; Macon City and Chariton Bridge Foster’s regiment; Grand River Bridge, Tindall’s regiment; Saint Joseph and Cloth River Bridge, five companies of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Illinois and 300 State Militia.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

{p.405}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI. Saint Louis, Mo., December 4, 1861.

I. Lieut. Col. Bernard G. Farrar is hereby appointed provost-marshal-general of this department. Capt. George E. Leighton is provost-marshal of the city of Saint Louis and its vicinity. All local provost-marshals will be subject to the orders of the provost-marshal-general, who will receive his instructions direct from these headquarters.

II. It is represented that there are numerous rebels and spies within our camps and in the territory occupied by our troops, who give information, aid, and assistance to the enemy; that rebels scattered through the country threaten and drive out loyal citizens and rob them of their property; that they furnish the enemy with arms, provisions, clothing, horses, and means of transportation; and that insurgents are banding together in several of the interior counties for the purpose of assisting the enemy to rob, to maraud, and to lay waste the country. All such persons are by the laws of war, in every civilized country, liable to capital punishment. The mild and indulgent course heretofore pursued toward this class of men has utterly failed to restrain them from such unlawful conduct. The safety of the country and the protection of the lives and property of loyal citizens justify and require the enforcement of a more severe policy. Peace and war cannot exist together. We cannot at the same time extend to rebels the rights of peace and enforce against them the penalties of war. They have forfeited their civil rights as citizens by making war against the Government, and upon their own heads must fall the consequences.

III. Commanding officers of districts, posts, and corps will arrest and place in confinement all persons in arms against the lawful authorities of the United States, or who give aid, assistance, or encouragement to the enemy. The evidence against persons so arrested will be reduced to writing and verified on oath, and the originals or certified copies of such affidavits will be immediately furnished to the provost-marshal-general in this city. All arms, ammunition, and other personal property required for the use of the Army, such as horses, wagons, provisions, &c., belonging to persons so in arms or so assisting and encouraging the enemy, will be taken possession of, and turned over and accounted for. Such property, not of a proper character for issue, will be examined by a board of officers, and sold as directed by the Army Regulations.

IV. Commissions will be ordered from these headquarters for the trial of persons charged with aiding and assisting the enemy, the destruction of bridges, roads, and buildings, and the taking of public or private property for hostile purposes, and also for the condemnation of property taken by our forces from disloyal inhabitants for the use of the Army.

V. In all certificates given for private property taken for public use, in accordance with General Orders, No. 8, of this department, it will be stated whether the property was taken from loyal or disloyal persons, and as a test of the loyalty of persons claiming to be such, from whom property is so taken, officers commanding districts, posts, divisions, or separate brigades are authorized to appoint some competent and reliable officer to require and administer the usual oath of allegiance to the United States.

VI. All persons found in disguise as pretended loyal citizens, or under other false pretenses, within our lines, giving information to or communicating with the enemy, will be arrested, tried, condemned, and {p.406} shot as spies. It should be remembered that in this respect the laws of war make no distinction of sex; all are liable to the same penalty.

VII. Persons not commissioned or enlisted in the service of the so called Confederate States, who commit acts of hostility, will not be treated as prisoners of war, but will be held and punished as criminals. And all persons found guilty of murder, robbery, theft, pillaging, and marauding under whatever authority, will either be shot or otherwise less severely punished, as is prescribed by the Rules and Articles of War, or authorized by the usages and customs of war in like cases.

VIII. The law of military retaliation has fixed and well-established rules. While it allows no cruel or barbarous acts on our part in retaliation for like acts of the enemy, it permits any retaliatory, measures within the prescribed limits of military usage. If the enemy murders and robs Union men, we are not justified in murdering and robbing other persons who are in a legal sense enemies to our Government, but we may enforce on them the severest penalties justified by the laws of war for the crimes of their fellow rebels. The rebel forces in the southwestern counties of this State have robbed and plundered the peaceful non-combatant inhabitants, taking from them their clothing and means of subsistence. Men, women, and children have alike been stripped and plundered. Thousands of such persons are finding their way to this city barefooted, half clad, and in a destitute and starving condition. Humanity and justice require that these sufferings should be relieved and that the outrages committed upon them should be retaliated upon the enemy. The individuals who have directly caused these sufferings are at present mostly beyond our reach. But there are in this city and in other places within our lines numerous wealthy secessionists who render aid, assistance, and encouragement to those who commit these outrages. They do not themselves rob and plunder, but they abet and countenance these acts in others. Although less bold, they are equally guilty. It is therefore ordered and directed that the provost-marshals immediately inquire into the condition of the persons so driven from their homes, and that measures be taken to quarter them in the houses, and to feed and clothe them at the expense of avowed secessionists and of those who are found guilty of giving aid, assistance, and encouragement to the enemy.

IX. The laws of the United States confiscate the property of any master in a slave used for insurrectionary purposes. Should Congress extend this penalty to the property of all rebels in arms, or giving aid, assistance, and encouragement to the enemy, such provisions will be strictly enforced. Military officers do not make laws, but they should obey and enforce them when made.

X. Where the necessities of service require it, the forced labor of citizens, slaves, and even prisoners of war, may be employed in the construction of military defenses, but no one will be forced to such labor without orders from these headquarters, except in case of siege or attack. All persons so impressed will be fed and quartered at the public expense, and an account be taken of their labor, to be settled as may be directed by the War Department. All such working parties will be strictly guarded, and kept as far as possible from communicating with the command where employed.

XI. These orders may by some be regarded as severe, but they are certainly justified by the laws of war, and it is believed whey are not only right, but necessary; it is therefore expected that all loyal citizens in this department will assist the military authorities in strictly enforcing them. There is already a large military force in this State, {p.407} which is daily increasing in numbers and improving in organization and discipline. In a few weeks this force will be able not only to expel or punish all traitors and rebels, but also to strike the enemy in his strongholds.

XII. All communications relating to prisoners of war will be directed to the provost-marshal-general, to be by him laid before the commanding general daily, at orderly hours.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 34.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 4, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. Thomas J. McKean is hereby assigned command of Jefferson City, Mo., and the troops in that vicinity. He will be under the general orders of Brigadier-General Pope, commanding the district, but will also report directly to these headquarters.

...

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SYRACUSE, December 5, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Heard from Warsaw by scouts day before yesterday. About 300 of them in the town, belonging to companies raised in the neighborhood. My cavalry pickets are out as far as Cole Camp, and visited beyond that place yesterday. Nothing but marauding squads, at from 5 to 40, this side of Warsaw. Will send five companies and two pieces of artillery at daylight to-morrow. Have sent orders to Colonel Steele to send a regiment of cavalry and two pieces of artillery to feel enemy on Osceola road. There are no large bodies of the enemy north of Osage.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SYRACUSE, December 5, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Colonel Steele telegraphs me that all his available cavalry has been sent north by your orders. All from here leave for Warsaw at daylight, according to your dispatch. There are only four more companies, and they are at Tipton. Shall I send them? They are very inferior and unreliable. Judge Birch, just at Sedalia from Price’s camp, will be here to-night. No considerable force north of Osage. I have had several reliable spies from Price’s camp within a day or two. One left there day before yesterday. He reports Price 7 miles above Osceola with about 4,000 men. Parsons at Osceola with about 7,000. I think, from other information that their figures are too large. I do not suppose Price to have altogether more than 7,000 or 8,000.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.408}

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ROLLA, MO., December 5, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Two reliable men arrived here to-night, one from Springfield and one from Granby Lead Mines, Newton County, Mo. Both report McCulloch at Pea Ridge, Benton County, Ark., building barracks. McBride, with 2,000 men, arrived at Springfield on Sunday morning from the north. All reports agree that all parts of the rebel army are in a deplorable state and large numbers going home and enlistments running out. Many of them who reside near here are coming to give themselves up.

G. M. DODGE, Commanding Post.

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SEDALIA, MO., December 5, 1861.

General HALLECK:

I heard from part of the cavalry to-day. Nothing important. Judge Birch arrived from Price’s camp this evening, and says lie expects to see you to-morrow. Price is making desperate exertions to raise and start out a large army. Stage just in from Warrensburg. Rebels are plundering the whole country in that direction. All the wagons and horses are taken. All the stage horses are taken. All the stage horses west of Warrensburg have been seized. General Pope ordered me to make a reconnaissance in force in direction of Osceola. It is not necessary, and I have no cavalry.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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SAINT Lotus, Mo., December 6, 1861.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

The information respecting gunboats will be telegraphed as soon as it can be obtained. One or more unarmed regiments can be detailed as crews, but not any armed can be spared from Missouri. You can form no conception of the condition of affairs here. The enemy is in possession of nearly one-half of the State, and a majority of 60,000 or 80,000 of the inhabitants are secessionists. Our army is utterly disorganized, clamorous for pay, but refusing to be regularly mustered in-in many places mutinous and disbanding. I will restore order and rout the enemy if you will give me time and assistance. We are not prepared for any important expedition out of the State; it would imperil the safety of Missouri. Wait till we are ready. The “On to Richmond” policy here will produce another Bull Run disaster. You may rely on this.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 6, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: General Prentiss is moving from Saint Joseph with all the available means he can collect in Northern Missouri against the {p.409} organized insurgents at Weston, Platte City, Liberty, and Richmond. I order to-day a regiment from this place to re-enforce him. I also send one to Jefferson City to replace the Home Guards, who refuse to be mustered out or in or to obey any orders. They are reported as decidedly mutinous and it may be necessary to forcibly disarm them. The garrison at Booneville is in a similar condition. A force was sent from Sedalia two days ago to Marshall, Waverly, and Arrow Rock, to disperse the rebels, and to destroy the stores and boats collected at those places. Result not yet known. Major Bowen, with 500 cavalry, is in pursuit of rebels, under Colonel Turner, south of Salem.

Scouting parties from Rolla and Sedalia represent Price as only 7 miles north of Osceola. Spies and others say his force is larger than I had supposed. Our forces at Sedalia and Rolla are held in readiness to move, but their efficiency is greatly reduced by disorganization and sickness. Many have never regularly been mustered into service, and it is doubtful if they can be persuaded to come in. The camp measles are prevailing, and daily increase our sick list.

We have already done much to relieve the pressing wants of the troops, and now are engaged night and day in attempting to organize them according to law and regulations. This, however, is a very difficult task, for want of returns and muster rolls. Many of them are illegally mustered, and refuse to be mustered over again for future or to cover past services. Some were merely sworn in without any muster rolls at all, and yet they have been paid and supplied as regular troops. The officers in many cases oppose being mustered, hoping in this way to avoid accountability for public property wasted and stolen and for offenses committed. Moreover, many of the organizations on paper are mere shams-companies and regiments not having half the numbers returned and paid for, the officers in such cases having appropriated to their own use the surplus clothing and provisions issued on these false returns. The most outrageous frauds are daily being developed, especially in the quartermaster’s department. Many of the regimental quartermasters are unworthy of trust or confidence. It will take time, General, to ferret out these abuses and to properly organize and discipline our forces here, but I will do it if you will give me time and assistance. The material, so far as the men are concerned, is generally excellent, but that of the officers very poor. It is impossible yet to form any correct idea of their numbers. In many cases no returns have been made and many of those sent in are entirely unreliable. There is probably not one-half the effective force shown on paper.

This, General, is no army, but rather a military rabble. A high officer, who was at Washington at the time of the battle of Bull Run, says the army here is more disorganized than that of the Potomac after its defeat. Every one appreciates the change which you have effected in that army in five months. I hope, with your assistance, to do the same here. You are aware that I am almost destitute of regular officers, and those of the volunteers are, with some exceptions, entirely ignorant of their duties. It is said, General, that you have nearly as many regular officers on your personal staff as I have in this whole department. I was very sorry to receive your orders to-day taking away four or five of the very few I now have. I will, however, do the best I can without them.

Your telegram of last evening indicates your intention to withdraw also a portion of the troops from Missouri. I assure you, General, this cannot be done with safety at present. Some weeks hence I hope to {p.410} have a large disposable force for other points; but now, destitute as we are of arms, organization, and discipline, it seems to me madness to remove any of our troops from this State. You will pardon me if I use strong language, for you must know that I have no object in view other than the success of our cause. At your distance from the scene of hostilities here you cannot fully appreciate the true condition of affairs.

I write you hastily and in a desultory style, for as yet I have neither the time nor the means for formal reports.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Pilot Knob, December 6, 1861.

General H. W. HALLECK:

I have sent out scouts from Potosi and this post towards Salem, Steelville, and Centreville. The Potosi scouts report no rebel troops at or east of Salem or Steelville; that Freeman’s band-400-had been to both places, but were driven away by Colonel Wyman. My scouts have not returned, but will probably bring the same reports. A force of 400 rebels, under Freeman, is on Current River, 80 miles southeast of this point.

W. P. CARLIN.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 6, 1861.

Col. RICHARD J. OGLESBY, Commanding at Bird’s Point, Mo.:

Information having been received at these headquarters that the enemy have some heavy pieces of artillery at Belmont, or at the point on the river immediately this side, not yet mounted, with but a small guard and working party to protect them, you will order the entire force of cavalry at Bird’s Point, Mo., to make a reconnaissance towards Belmont to-night, and if the enemy are found in force not too strong they will make a dash upon him and spike all his guns they may find after which they will immediately return to Bird’s Point. They will observe great caution not to be drawn into ambush or engage a superior force of the enemy. A detachment will be sent from Cairo to act in concert with those of your command.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-The expedition will be in readiness to move immediately upon the arrival of the force from Cairo, between the hours of 6 and 7 o’clock.

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SEDALIA, MO., December 6, 1861.

General HALLECK:

It is reported by a Union man, who has before come from Henry County to give information concerning the enemy, that Price’s army {p.411} crossed the Osage day before yesterday. The day Judge Birch left one division marched towards Warsaw and one towards Clinton. This he heard from both Union and rebels. There are 20,000 pounds of flour at Robinson’s Mill, near Leesville, and considerable amounts at other mills in that section. A movement of troops from here to La Mine has been ordered. The surgeons object, on account of small-pox at Syracuse.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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ORDERS, No. 2.}

OFFICE PRO. MAR. GEN., DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 6, 1861.

Capt. LEIGHTON, Provost-Marshal:

SIR: With a view of carrying out the orders of the commanding general in regard to quartering Union refugees upon persons who are disloyal to the Government, you will please take the necessary steps without delay to make out a list of such persons residing in the lines within your jurisdiction. I wish, first, to have made out a list which shall embrace that class of persons who reside within the city, and who are, judging by their mode of living, in good circumstances.

This list you will please have completed, if practicable, by to-morrow afternoon, and annex to each name the place of residence and size of house, and also, if known to you, any unoccupied buildings belonging to such persons. The list of persons outside of the city it is desirable to have at the earliest practicable time. Let each list embrace two classes. In the first include those persons known to you to be disloyal. In the second those persons strongly suspected by you, briefly stating grounds of suspicion.

Respectfully,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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SYRACUSE, December 7, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

It is reported to me by a reliable scout that Price crossed the Osage yesterday morning with a large part of his force, one division taking the road to Warsaw, the other moving in the direction of Clinton. News is not yet confirmed by other scouts. Cavalry force sent yesterday morning. I presume Price only intends to occupy counties north of Osage for subsistence, but it may be necessary, within a few days, to move against him in force to defeat this purpose. Will write fully by mail, and telegraph if news is confirmed.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 7, 1861.

General JOHN POPE, Syracuse, Mo.:

Don’t move the troops from Sedalia till the other forces are in position at La Mine.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.412}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Syracuse, December 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that it is reported to me on tolerably reliable authority that Price, with the greater part of his force, crossed the Osage yesterday morning, one division taking the Warsaw road, the other moving on Clinton. I shall know certainly before the mail goes out whether this information is correct, as also the exact position and about the strength of each division. The five companies of cavalry and two pieces of artillery sent to Warsaw yesterday morning were doubtless in that town early this morning. I shall hear from there to-night. There is as yet no news from the cavalry force sent north from Sedalia.

I have strong bodies of cavalry scouring the country for 15 miles north and south of this place. My pickets of cavalry are as far out as Cole Camp in the south and Bell Air and Palestine in the north. Each picket consists of one company of cavalry 80 strong.

I presume Price only intends to occupy the counties bordering the north side of the Osage for subsistence, and to defeat this purpose it may be necessary to move against him in such force as will compel him to recross the river. I shall know in the course of the day whether such be his purpose.

From all the information I can gather I do not doubt that Price’s force is greatly reduced, and that he is losing many more men by desertion and expiration of service than he is recruiting. It is more than probable that by maintaining our position in force in this section and keeping the country scoured by our cavalry between the Missouri and Osage for a month or six weeks longer the greater part of his force will be dispersed. Many of his men have come in and asked to lay down their arms, promising to take them up no more. Of course such promises, even when accompanied by the oath of allegiance, amount to nothing. One-half the men in this section of country have been thus sworn by one side or the other, but there are few of them who observe such oaths.

The patrolling parties frequently capture men from Price’s army who are at home on furlough or to recruit. I have many such prisoners.

I would also say that I am fearful that important dispatches by telegraph are intercepted between here and Saint Louis; that is, that they are taken off from the lines in course of transmittal and communicated to the enemy. It is easy with a short wire and instrument to do this at any point of the line, and I therefore very much dislike to send important news by telegraph, unless in cipher. A cipher has been made for this department, and I would respectfully suggest that it be used in all dispatches of importance.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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ROLLA, MO., December 7, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The following dispatch is just received from the commander of a reconnoitering party sent out by me the 5th. From another source I learn {p.413} that considerable numbers of the enemy are scattered in the valley and ridges of the Gasconade. I will detail the men of the Third Division, Colonel Marshall, to proceed on the Union or Northern road towards Lebanon, to support Captain Woldemar in case of an engagement.

P. J. OSTERHAUS, Commanding Third Division.

[Inclosure.]

CALIFORNIA HOUSE, December 6, 1861.

Acting Brigadier-General OSTERHAUS, Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: I arrived here at 10 a.m. with my command, having left Waynesville early this morning. We passed the whole night on horseback, expecting to be attacked before morning. We heard firing in three different directions. My scouts inform me that between 200 and 300 men are encamped near Gasconade, about 16 miles south of Waynesville. I will reconnoiter in that direction and return by the Union road, deeming it imprudent to come back the same road I went. It is rumored here that a brigade of General McBride’s command will reach the Gasconade to-day.

Very respectfully,

C. A. VON WOLDEMAR, Captain, Benton Hussars, Commanding Company C.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Camp near Rolla, Mo., December 7, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri:

GENERAL: Captain Woldemar, of Benton Hussars, whose dispatch from California House, as telegraphed to-day, reports himself back with his command at this moment. He was yesterday, at 11 p.m., within 8 miles of Lebanon, and in sight of the camp-fires of a corps of the enemy, said to be 3,000 strong, under command of General McBride. The captain returned on the so-called Union road, north of the Gasconade, and learned at Humboldt that another secession force was approaching that point from Iberia. I will have my scouts there tomorrow.

P. J. OSTERHAUS, Colonel, Commanding Third Division.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 7, 1861.

Col. FRED’K STEELE, Sedalia, Mo.:

What of your detachment? You should have ascertained the result before this. Find out about it immediately. It may have required re-enforcement. See to this.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General

{p.414}

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SEDALIA, MO., December 7, 1861.

General HALLECK, Headquarters:

No news from the cavalry, but I apprehend no disaster. Sent an express to-day, which will probably return to-morrow evening. This afternoon, as our teams were out a few miles from camp north of Georgetown, for hay, the men were attacked by rebels and disarmed. The teams and men are safe. An irregular mounted force and some infantry in wagons were sent in pursuit. We frequently perceive the want of cavalry. Mr. Allen, from Lexington, states that nearly everybody in that part of the State has gone to join Price, and it is believed there Sedalia will be attacked in a few days. I have spies watching the movements of the enemy.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 19.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 7, 1861.

I. The mayor of the city of Saint Louis will require all municipal officers to immediately subscribe to the oath of allegiance prescribed in the ordinance passed by the Convention of this State on the 16th day of October, 1861.

II. The provost-marshal-general will take measures to ascertain whether any civil officer of this State fails within the time fixed by said ordinance to subscribe and file the oath there prescribed, and any person having failed to take such oath, who attempts to exercise civil authority in violation of the terms of said ordinance, will be arrested.

...

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 8, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

News that Price has crossed the Osage not yet confirmed. Detachment sent to Warsaw will be in to-day. Are the disposition of troops and the selection of my headquarters approved? First and Second Divisions in position at La Mine to-day.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 8, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Steen’s division of Price’s force crossed the Osage three days since, and scattered along the river above and below Osceola. Price on south side. Steen’s returns of his force show 8,000 men. It is undoubtedly his purpose to scatter most of his forces in counties adjoining the Osage, on north side, for subsistence. One battalion of Steen’s division descended the river towards Warsaw. If it be deemed necessary to keep Price’s force on south side of Osage, our advance in force towards Clinton will be necessary.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.415}

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SEDALIA, MO., December 8, 1861.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

No news from the north; reliable information from Price. Steen’s division crossed the Osage and scattered his forces along the river; one battalion marched towards Warsaw. Camp talk says Price’s returns show 8,000. Ten thousand rebels in Saint Louis ready to spring to arms at a moment’s warning; this from a prisoner in Price’s camp. Magoffin’s son and son-in-law taken prisoners by my scouts; both been in Price’s army. If I had cavalry, could confiscate property to a large amount. There are considerable parties of the enemy scouting within 20 miles of us and quite a large force at Blackwater.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, &c.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 8, 1861.

Col. FRED’K STEELE, Sedalia, Mo.:

Stay where you are till you get orders from me.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Rolla, Mo., December 8, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: All the reliable scouts that come from the west report that there are no forces of the enemy, except small scouting and stealing bands, which are in all the counties around this post. The news from Lebanon is the same. Mr. Scott, one of my scouts who left Lebanon yesterday morning, says there were no forces there, except a band of State Guards under Captains Sweeney and McNey. All the little bands of horse-thieves, robbers, and destitute rebels are stealing on account of Price’s army.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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OSAWATOMIE, KANS., December 8, 1861.

Gen. JAMES H. LANE:

SIR: Everything is going wrong here. What you and I feared at Springfield is coming to pass. The enemy is advancing. He disbanded his three-months’ men about the 20th of November, and moved north with his regulars, some 10,000 strong. He marched by way of Sarcoxie, Greenfield, Stockton, and Bolivar, striking the Osage at Warsaw and Osceola. The disbanded men have carried their arms home with them and engaged in guerrilla operations. The country swarms with guerrillas, and this makes it difficult to procure information. Our faithful scouts (Breedin and Nelson) brought me accurate information of the enemy’s movements, though they obtained it with great difficulty, being shot at not less than one hundred times.

{p.416}

The enemy moved in three divisions and with great caution, throwing off at Greenfield a strong flank guard to Montevallo. His advance was at Stockton before I knew it. Ritchie had gone to Carthage. Hearing the enemy had some force still behind, I dared not move all the force from Fort Scott. The movement of the enemy evidently menaced Sedalia, but I feared he would strike to the left if he found Sedalia too strong. I informed General Hunter of the enemy’s advance, and, without waiting for orders advanced to Osawatomie, to cover our trains and prevent the enemy from outflanking me.

The enemy numbers full 10,000, and has twenty pieces of artillery, most of them rifled. Here, at Osawatomie, General Denver’s order reached me, directing the Fourth Regiment to Wyandotte; Newgent’s to remain at Paola; Jennison’s to Leavenworth; Rabb’s battery to Leavenworth; Third and Fourth to Fort Scott. I have kept Denver posted in the movements of the enemy; but I am coolly snubbed with the information that Price’s advance is all stuff; that Price has no army; that his army is disbanded, &c.

To-day my scouts bring the word that a force 700 to 1,000 strong is at Butler. A dispatch this evening brings the word that 400 or 500 rebels are in full view of Barnesville and advancing. The dispatch thinks the enemy is advancing in force. Price made a speech in his camp at Sank Crossing, in which he said he would make a “wide sweep” into Kansas before Christmas. This last move looks as if he intends to make his words good.

You will see at a glance that I am in no condition to fight if the enemy comes in force. The measles are still raging in our camps, and our regiments are reduced to mere skeletons. One mountain howitzer and an 8-pounder gun, with 6-pounder ammunition, constitute my show for artillery. With such a show I must say I fear the worst.

In haste, yours,

JAMES MONTGOMERY.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 8, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding Post: Col. W. H. L. WALLACE, Commanding Third Brigade:

I am instructed by Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant to say, owing to the inability of the gunboats to co-operate, the proposed expedition to New Madrid is postponed.

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ROLLA, December 9, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

A dispatch from Salem has just reached me. Bowen was in full chase of Freeman in Texas County, 5 miles in his rear; intends giving him battle if he can overtake him. A rumor had reached Salem that McBride was moving from Huntsville with 1,600 men and two pieces {p.417} of artillery to re-enforce Freeman. If such proves to be the fact, I wish permission to re-enforce Bowen with one battery of artillery.

J. B. WYMAN, Colonel and Acting Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 9, 1861.

Col. J. B. WYMAN, Rolla, Mo.:

You are authorized to re-enforce Major Bowen if you deem it advisable. Do not let him advance so far in pursuit as to be cut off by McBride. Look out for that.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SYRACUSE, December 9, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Detachment returned from Warsaw this morning. Drove in enemy’s pickets from points 10 miles this side. Found no forces in Warsaw, which confirms information that Steen is on north side of Osage. Strong pickets of enemy from Bolivar to Osceola to cover his rear. Whole region south of Osage devastated by Price. It was understood by people at Warsaw and along the road that this detachment was our advance guard, moving on Springfield. The people understand that it is the determination of Price to force his way to the Missouri. Doubtful. No news of importance from the front. I shall not move to Tipton until I hear from you.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 9, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The west bank of La Mine is very rough and rocky; most of good ground is on the east bank and all large timber. I have ordered 3,000 men to occupy the west bank below the intrenchments. I did propose to make the cantonment conform exactly to a military encampment but for color line to follow the winding of the stream. There are easy fords and bridges for wagons across La Mine, so that communication will be easy. My objection to Syracuse is want of shelter. It is a small, dilapidated place, depending for water on cisterns; no running water within several miles. Tipton is 12 miles from La Mine, a large town, and plenty of water.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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PILOT KNOB, MO., December 9, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

My scouts from the southwest report no rebel troops nearer than Howell County, where McBride’s division is said to be moving northeastward. Secessionists of Shannon County report McCulloch at Pocahontas. {p.418} Deserters from Thompson’s army report that the Confederate Government is building a new fort at New Madrid, having 500 negroes at work on it.

W. P. CARLIN, Thirty-eighth Illinois Volunteers

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 9, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Magoffin, son, and son-in-law captured by our patrols. Father and son will lay down their arms and take the oath if permitted. I have many others of Price’s men in same condition. What shall I do with them?

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SEDALIA, MO., December 9, 1861.

General HALLECK:

Rumor says the cavalry are returning with a large captured train, but nothing definite from them or the spies. In case of disaster I should certainly have heard. They had a long march. I did not expect them back before to-morrow. General Pope has cavalry, and could send out a force with the same facility that I could if I had it. I will endeavor to send another spy. Colonel Magoffin is not a prisoner.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 21.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 9, 1861.

I. The following letter, having been brought to the notice of the major-general commanding this department, is published for the information of all concerned, viz:

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, October 25, 1861.

SIR: Information having been received that bodies of troops are being formed in and about Saint Louis, Mo., which, under the name of Home Guards, Reserve Corps, and other appellations, are being mustered into the service of the United States for duty only in limited localities or upon certain contingencies, you are hereby cautioned that such organizations are entirely without authority, and that no payments made to them will be sanctioned by the Government.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

To the PAYMASTER-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.

Officers appointed from these headquarters to muster troops are authorized to muster or remuster into the service of the United States all such bodies of troops for three years or during the war, unless sooner discharged, as directed by the act of Congress on the subject, provided their plan of organization conforms to the orders of the War Department including in the muster or remuster so made the period during which the bodies of troops above referred to have been in actual service.

II. All persons commissioned by Major-General Frémont, and discharged {p.419} under the second paragraph of Special Orders, No. 304, dated Headquarters of the Army, Washington, November 12, 1861, and whose names are not included in the lists furnished to the chief of the pay department, in compliance with instructions from the Secretary of War, dated November 25, 1861, will refer their claims for payment to the Adjutant-General, at Washington, the commanding general of this department not being authorized to act upon such claims.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, December 10, 1861.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: Yours of the 6th has this moment reached me. I am obliged to you for the spirit of frankness in which it is written. Let me begin by replying to the last part of your letter.

You will probably remember that soon after General Hunter assumed command of the department he ordered two divisions from Western Missouri to Saint Louis, regarding them as available for other service. My dispatch was predicated on that, and if you had informed me that you had any available troops I intended to propose to you a movement in concert with Buell. His project, though very important, must either be deferred or be carried out in some other way. I have no intention of stripping you of troops when you cannot spare them. I to-day directed General Thomas to telegraph to you that Major Ketchum might remain with you and,that I would recommend him as a brigadier-general. I had already determined to try to secure his appointment. I do not understand your statement that four or five of the regular officers you now have are ordered away, but will look into it in the morning. There is some mistake about it, unless you allude to the paroled officers, who cannot under their parole be of any service to you. You are also misinformed as to the number of regular officers on my personal staff. I have two regular aides, instead of the authorized number of three, and one chief of staff; the others apparently are my personal staff, and are really doing their appropriate duties in the line and their respective corps. Even my personal aides are on duty constantly as inspectors.

I am sorry to learn the very disorganized condition of the troops. I appreciate the difficulty of the task before you, and you may rest assured that I will support you to the full extent of my ability. Do not hesitate to use force with the refractory. Can you yet form any idea of the time necessary to prepare an expedition against Columbus or one up the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, in connection with Buell’s movements? I shall send troops to Hunter, to enable him to move into the Indian Territory west of Arkansas and upon Northern Texas. That movement should relieve you very materially. It will require some little time to prepare Hunter, but when he moves you might act in concert with him.

In haste, very truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

{p.420}

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SAINT LOUIS, Mo., December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Commanding, &c., Syracuse, Mo.:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of the report and accompanying maps of Lieut. Col. J. B. McPherson.* I approve the recommendations there made with respect to the encamping and hutting of the troops at La Mine. You will seek to carry out these views, with such modifications as circumstances may require. As stated in my previous instructions, it may or may not be found necessary to place your troops in winter quarters there, but the encampment should be formed in part with reference to that idea, while at the same time the army should be held ready to move at a moment’s warning. Your troops, supplies, and means of transportation should be arranged as if you might at any time break up your encampment to march against the enemy or as if the enemy might at any moment attack you. Your attention is particularly called to this matter, for commanders of corps d’armée and divisions are properly and will be held accountable that their commands are in fighting and marching order when in the vicinity of an enemy.

As already directed, the force left at Syracuse and Tipton need only be sufficient to guard those points from a surprise of detached bodies of the enemy sent to destroy the road. Sedalia will be considered as an advance post of the main encampment. If the troops should remain at La Mine it will probably be well to reduce its garrison to about two regiments, but at present it will not be well to withdraw many of the forces now there. I wish the cavalry to be held in hand for scouting purposes and for expeditions which will probably soon be ordered if the main force should not be moved. No considerable expense must be incurred in the encampment at La Mine. The work must be all done by the command. Each squad should be required to provide for its own comforts in a hut or tent. With proper attention on the part of the officers this can be readily accomplished. A few nails and tools and a little lumber are the only things required. Very little lumber, however, should be used, for in case the troops move the encampment must be abandoned. They, however, should be given to understand that they are to make themselves as comfortable as possible for the winter.

I hear nothing of the expedition sent north by Colonel Steen before you took command. I am very much dissatisfied with this apparent neglect to ascertain its result or to re-enforce the party if necessary. My telegrams are answered as if it was of little consequence whether the matter was properly attended to or not.

I think your headquarters should be at La Mine or Otterville, near the main body of your army, where you can attend to their discipline and preparation for the field.

Do not telegraph me upon unimportant matters or business of no pressing importance. This is contrary to positive orders from Washington.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Syracuse, December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Since my dispatch of this date to the general commanding {p.421} a trusty man, sent some ten days ago into the counties of Henry and Cass, came in direct from Price’s camp, which he left yesterday morning. He is a resident of this neighborhood, trusty, and well acquainted with many of the men in Price’s force, who were enlisted in this neighborhood. He gives a full account of the condition of things in the counties of Henry and Cass and in Price’s army, corroborating what I have gotten from other sources.

Price’s forces are greatly in need of clothing and are suffering very much. In a speech he made them on Sunday Price stated to them that Missouri had been annexed to the Southern Confederacy; that his army would be reorganized and incorporated with the Southern Army and that money and clothing would be immediately furnished to all who remained in service. Price was daily expecting his commission as major-general from Richmond, though it was already whispered in camp that Jackson had succeeded in having him superseded. The greatest dissatisfaction prevailed in the army in consequence of this report, one-half of the men declaring openly that they would serve under no one else; that they were fighting for Missouri, and not for the Southern Confederacy.

It is very sure that no graver mistake could possibly be made in Richmond than to displace Price from the command of this Missouri army. He is greatly beloved by his whole force, and it is his popularity and his influence which keep so large a body of men in arms in this State without pay, without clothing, and with very scanty rations. Many of Price’s men, even as it is, are very anxious to return home, and will take almost any oath if they can thus be exempted from arrest. Those whose time has expired are also afraid to return home lest they be arrested and taken to Saint Louis. If there were any method of holding such men to their engagements I have little doubt that an assurance of exemption from arrest on taking the proper oath would bring many hundreds to their homes.

Price is not recruiting nearly so fast as he is losing men. My scout estimates his whole force at 12,000 or 13,000, which I am sure is too large an allowance. They have, for the present, plenty of corn meal, flour, and beef, but the region in which they are encamped will soon be exhausted. They have almost destroyed the country in their rear. Price notified them in the speech to which I refer that they must try and get shoes and clothing from their homes as soon as possible, as he did not mean to remain in winter quarters, but intended to be constantly on the move. The belief in the camp was that as soon as he got all the men he could hope for he would make a dash into Kansas. He does not believe that there are 7,000 or 8,000 Federal troops west of Jefferson City. I will send you a paper published in his camp. His advanced pickets are near Calhoun, as are ours, though they have not yet met.

I propose, as soon as I can assemble cavalry sufficient at Sedalia, to advance upon Calhoun and to points this side of Clinton, and destroy several mills which have been used for a few days by the rebels. One is a large steam mill, 4 miles south of Calhoun.

I have not yet heard of the expedition sent north in any official manner, though I have occasionally heard of it from citizens, who themselves heard from other people what they told inc. I have telegraphed and written Colonel Steele on the subject.

I keep the cavalry fully occupied, and could employ a much larger force of it very advantageously. Already I am making the Missouri and Osage too hot for security for Price. Companies of cavalry are moving about every night through the country, and have already arrested {p.422} a large number of returning soldiers and recruiting parties. I trust the general commanding will send up the four companies of the First Iowa Cavalry now at Benton Barracks. The eight companies of that regiment are now with this command, though the colonel, lieu tenant-colonel, and one major remain in Saint Louis with the other four companies.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 10, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Have you received Colonel Steele’s dispatch of this date? He telegraphs that he has sent it. All my cavalry is out through the country, breaking up small camps of rebels. Can send full regiment of infantry and four pieces of artillery to re-enforce the cavalry near Lexington if you think it advisable.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Syracuse:

The troops at Sedalia are all subject to your orders, but I wish no retrograde movement to La Mine at present. Why is it that I can get no information from Colonel Steele about the expedition sent to Marshall, &c.? If this results from neglect, it should be investigated. Full instructions will be sent you in writing.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI MILITIA, Saint Louis, Mo., December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. BEN. LOAN, Saint Joseph, Mo.:

I inclose herewith an order assigning you to the command of all the State troops in your vicinity.* You cannot legally be placed in command of United States troops until your brigade is mustered into service for the war, according to the agreement between the Governor and President; nor can any United States officer assume command of the State troops, unless they are expressly assigned to his command by competent authority.

I desire that you may have a perfect understanding with the officer commanding the United States troops in your district. You will cooperate with him as far as possible in carrying out such instructions as no may receive from time to time from the general commanding this department or other competent authority, and furnish him with detachments from the command for active operations, upon his request, whenever in your judgment it is practicable. You will superintend {p.423} the organization of the militia for service for the war, uniting companies into battalions and regiments as rapidly as they may be formed and mustered into service. Until field officers are appointed by the Governor the command of a battalion or regiment will devolve upon the senior captain.

The selection of competent field officers is a matter whose importance you will readily appreciate, and your recommendations will doubtless have much weight with His Excellency. I prefer to have such appointments postponed in general until the candidates have exhibited their qualities as company officers. Aspirants for field commissions should raise companies, and show by their efficiency in drill and discipline their fitness for higher command.

You are authorized to furnish subsistence at the expense of the State to companies not fully organized in the same manner as to the six-months’ militia. This must be done with the strictest economy possible. Recruits must be united into companies and mustered into service as quickly as possible, so as to place them in condition to draw their subsistence from the United States. A small supply of clothing will be sent you soon for issue to men mustered into service for the war.

Send me a return of the entire force under your command as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

* Inclosure omitted. It assigns Brigadier-General Loan to command in the counties of Buchanan, Andrew, Nodaway, Atchison, and Holt.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS TROOPS IN KANSAS, Leavenworth City, December 10, 1861.

I. Colonel Montgomery, Third Kansas, will concentrate the troops now in his command at or in the vicinity of Fort Scott, Kans., which post he will, if possible, defend; retreating in case of necessity to West Point, Mo., or in that direction. Colonel Montgomery will be guided in his movements as his judgment will dictate as being the most conducive to the public interest.

II. Colonel Jennison, First Kansas Cavalry, will, with the troops now under his command, proceed immediately to West Point, Mo., and if possible, protect the frontier of Kansas from incursions of the rebel bands now in that neighborhood.

III. Colonel Wessells, Eighth Kansas Volunteers, will immediately proceed with such troops as he may have in his command ready for service to West Point, Mo., and report to Colonel Jennison, First Kansas Cavalry, for duty in that vicinity.

By command of Brigadier-General Denver:

C. FRANCIS CLARKE, Captain, Sixth Kansas, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 11, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Colonel Steele telegraphs:

Enemy’s scouts within 10 miles of Osceola road. Large cavalry force, estimated at 400, at Cole Camp last night. The infantry battalion, 1,500, arrived at Warsaw yesterday. Refugees flocking in say Price is advancing in force. Do not believe it. A man just in from Price’s camp says Rains’ division will be at Warsaw to-night.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

{p.424}

I think, from other sources of information, that Price is moving; whether in this direction is doubtful. News of his being suspended in command may have occasioned his advance. Will keep you advised.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SYRACUSE, MO., December 11, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Intelligent men just from Price’s camp. His army occupies same position, viz: one division north side of Osage; the other south. Price’s headquarters 7 miles west of Osceola. Price states that, Missouri being admitted into the Southern Confederacy, policy and operations of his army dictated from Richmond. I have just returned from La Mine. Troops in position and at work getting out timber. Will write fully by mail.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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SEDALIA, December 11, 1861.

General HALLECK:

Spy just in. Been captured twice. Cavalry at Grand Pass. Have been within 3 1/2 miles of Waverly. Joe Shelby fired two cannon shots into their camp last night; did no harm. Men going to Waverly today in pursuit of Shelby; will return to Marshall. The major commanding says 800 rebels at Lexington. Wishes re-enforcements to go there. He surrounded a rebel camp; took 2 captains-one Sweeney-3 lieutenants, 40 men, and several Government wagons. His pickets had been fired into several times.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding.

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SEDALIA, MO., December 11, 1861.

General HALLECK:

A Union man from a few miles this side of Waverly reports that Joe Shelby sent to Lexington for re-enforcements; that he can raise 2,000 or 3,000 men in twenty-four hours; that our troops had a-fight with him yesterday, and that they were fighting this morning when he left. The 800 that left Lexington yesterday probably went to Shelby’s assistance. I withhold my scouts for your answer.

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 11, 1861.

Col. FRED’K STEELE, Sedalia, Mo.:

Send re-enforcements, say 1,000 men, or more if you deem necessary, in direction of Marshall and Waverly, and inform General Pope.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.425}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Syracuse, Mo.:

Colonel Steele is ordered to re-enforce his expedition to Marshall and Waverly. Expedition to Warrensburg suspended till further orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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DECEMBER 11, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri:

GENERAL: The constantly-increasing disturbances in all this region, occasioned by the efforts of Price’s scouting officers and straggling parties of guerrillas, exhibited in the general alarm, the robbing of peaceful inhabitants, the outrages of every description perpetrated in every village, hamlet, and farm-house, are caused directly by the encouragement and countenance given to such acts by the presence of the enemy in such force on the Osage. Once driven from that position and forced back into the region of country which he has so recently laid waste, and all encouragements would be withdrawn from his adherents and sympathizers now disposed to enlist in his army.

We can march from the railroad in this vicinity with a full and well-appointed army of 15,000 men and forty pieces of artillery and still leave force enough along the railroad to guard all the public stores and protect the road itself from any damage. I would respectfully suggest, therefore, that to quiet all the disturbances and uneasiness engendered by the presence of so large a hostile force in this region an advance in force against Price be made as soon as possible. For this army of 15,000 men there is abundance of transportation and of supplies, and they constitute a force large enough, considering the difference of organization, discipline, and arms, to deal with Price easily, even had he the 50,000 men he calls for in his proclamation. Most of his men are only armed with shot-guns, and have scarcely the pretense of an organization. He has perhaps 4,000 or 5,000 tolerable troops, armed with muskets, and about thirty pieces of artillery, few of which can be properly served, and some of which are rough iron pieces, made in Missouri.

Our forces here are in such condition that they can march with two hours’ notice. Each regiment has its own transportation, and there is nothing necessary except to throw into the wagons camp equipage and rations.

Should such a movement be intrusted to me I would respectfully suggest the following plan: The first object to be kept in view is that the enemy to some extent must be surprised, in order that he may be brought to an engagement. For this purpose I would propose that for several days before the real movement was made strong bodies of cavalry, with some artillery, be sent forward on the Warsaw and Clinton roads, to force in their pickets, reconnoiter in force, and then return; that this operation be repeated several times, and that finally, under cover of such a movement, the whole force be rapidly thrown forward to the Osage at Warsaw. I believe by proper management and vigor the advanced division of this army could cross the Osage before the news of the movement could reach the enemy. If he then crossed the river and attempted to retreat to the southwest he must at least lose his baggage train and supplies. Whilst his line of retreat would be {p.426} threatened, if not intercepted, by such a movement, ours would be open to the railroad at almost any point east of Otterville. I, however, do not suppose for a moment that he will stand unless retreat is cut off, and in either event the disturbances in this section will be ended. Such a campaign would not last more than twenty days, if so long, and the forces here would enter upon it with a feeling very different from that of going into winter quarters on the La Mine.

I submit these views to you with much diffidence, and should probably not do so at all, but that I am impressed with the belief that neither secession in Missouri nor Price’s army can survive another retreat toward Arkansas.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SYRACUSE, December 11, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I transmit a number of letters captured with the mail-carrier* There is a large number of them, but in substance they convey the same information, viz, that Price’s force is disintegrating; that he has short of 10,000 men now with him; that recruiting is very slow; that unless he can raise five regiments to enter the Confederate service he cannot get a commission in their army, &c.

I am satisfied that a rapid movement would utterly destroy his army, either as the result of an action or of a retreat. His army cannot possibly survive another retreat south. His men are only kept together now by the speedy termination of their terms of service and the prospect of getting home by New Year’s Day. They will not be led south again in any large number. With the delightful weather we have had and which promises to continue for some time and the good roads, such a movement would consume but a few days, and would destroy in a moment all hope of recruiting for Price in this whole region.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 11, 1861.

Col. J. W. BIRGE, Present:

SIR: Your regiment or command will immediately proceed to Centralia and Renick, Mo., about one-half to be stationed at each place. Immediately on your arrival you will send out strong detachments, one from Centralia, in the direction of Columbia, and another from Renick,in the direction of Fayette, to scour the country and arrest all enemies. Particular caution should be observed in regard to these detachments, as rebel forces may be moving from the river counties upon these points or the railroad. Little or no transportation will he required for these detachments, as they are not expected to be absent more than two or three days from their posts, and will probably be able to get a part of their subsistence in the country passed over. As {p.427} you will probably remain but a short time at Centralia and Renick no particular arrangements will be required for quartering your men; tents, barns, and unoccupied buildings may be taken for this purpose.

The object of this expedition being an important one, you will be prompt and vigilant in the execution of these instructions. You will keep these headquarters advised by telegraph of all your movements, and will report fully by mail. In regard to taking prisoners and seizing property, you will be governed by General Orders, No. 8 and 13, of this department.

Additional instructions will probably be given you soon after your arrival at your destination.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: You will receive this to-morrow evening. In the mean time you will receive instructions to have the Eleventh Iowa Regiment on board a steamer for transportation up the river. The destination of that regiment is Providence, at which place it will land, and immediately proceed to capture or disperse a band of rebels said to be assembled at Columbia. Having accomplished this object, it will proceed direct, or by Rochefort or Booneville, to Fayette, for the same purpose, and thence to Glasgow and Brunswick.

General Pope will probably send a force across from Booneville to Fayette, to co-operate with the Eleventh Iowa. A regiment has been dispatched to Centralia and Renick, to operate south against Columbia and Fayette, to intercept any of the enemy moving from these places towards the North Missouri Railroad.

The steamer sent with the Eleventh Iowa will remain at Providence till the result of the expedition to Columbia is known, to carry the troops to Rochefort or Booneville, or will be permitted to proceed up the river to those places and Glasgow, as you may deem advisable. It is supposed that from your position you will be better able to judge of the rebel forces at the places named than can be done here. As the expedition will move but a short distance on land they will require but little transportation-say five or six wagons-and provisions of only six or eight days. Additional supplies should be put on the boat, which, if not wanted, may be landed and turned over to the proper officers at Booneville. The four companies of cavalry which you will receive to-morrow afternoon will be sent in another steamer to Providence, Rochefort, or Booneville, to co-operate with the Eleventh Iowa. All these forces should be well supplied with ammunition. You will keep me informed by telegraph of the movement of these forces.

If steamers should not be able to ascend the river to Providence the expedition should cross the river at Jefferson City and march by land to Columbia. In this case a larger amount of transportation should be given. It is supposed that a portion at least of supplies and forage may be procured in the country passed over. In regard to taking prisoners and private property, strict compliance with General Orders, Nos. 8 and 13, of this department, will be required.

{p.428}

These instructions will be read to the commanding officer of the expedition, but not communicated to any other person.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., December 11, 1861.

[Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS:]

GENERAL: Your letter of the 26th ultimo, in consequence of the destruction by the enemy of railroad bridges, was delayed a number of days. In reply I have the honor to report that I think the expedition proposed by the General-in-Chief altogether impracticable. We have a hostile Indian force, estimated at 10,000, on the south, and Price’s command, some 20,000, on our east and north. To cope with this force we have only about 3,000 effective men, scattered over an extended frontier. So far front being able to make successful expeditions into the enemy’s country with our present force, I think we shall be very fortunate if we prevent his having possession of the whole of Kansas. The guns necessary for the defense of this post were taken away by order of General Frémont, and have not been replaced. The possession of Leavenworth would be a great feather in the enemy’s cap, and really there is nothing to prevent his having it any day he may see fit. We will give him a hard fight, but he will have ten to our one.

In my humble opinion the division of the Western Department was not for the good of the service.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

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UNOFFICIAL.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, December 11, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, Commanding Department of Kansas:

GENERAL: Your telegram to General Thomas* surprised me exceedingly. Realizing as I do the very trying nature of the circumstances in which you are placed, I have attributed it to momentary irritation, which your cooler judgment will at least lead you to regard as unnecessary.

In regard to placing General Halleck in command of the Department of Missouri, that step was taken from the evident necessity of placing some one there who was in no manner connected, for or against, with the unfortunate state of affairs previously existing in that department. Immediately after you were assigned to your present department I requested the Adjutant-General to inform you that it was deemed expedient to organize an expedition under your command to secure the Indian territory west of Arkansas, as well as to make a descent upon Northern Texas, in connection with one to strike at Western Texas from the Gulf. The general was to invite your prompt attention {p.429} to this subject, and to ask you to indicate the necessary force and means for the undertaking.

I would again call your attention to this very important subject, stating the necessary force shall be placed at your disposal. Three regiments of Wisconsin infantry have been ordered to report to you; also a battery and two companies of cavalry from Minnesota. This is intended only as a commencement, and will be followed up by other troops as rapidly as your wants are known and circumstances will permit.

Requesting your early attention to this subject, I am, general, very respectfully, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

* Probably dispatch of same date, above.

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SYRACUSE, December 12, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The expedition from Waverly will be at Sedalia at 4 o’clock to-day. They have 4 captains, 2 assistant adjutant-generals, 1 lieutenant, and 40 men, with all their arms; also Shelby’s mortar. His cannon burst. Sixty horses, seven wagons. Some of the wagons taken off the Sunshine destroyed. He lost 1 corporal.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SYRACUSE, December 12, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I omitted to state last night that force sent towards Lexington consists of 1,600 infantry and four pieces, sent in empty wagons for speed. Yesterday Captain Cunningham’s full brass band of rebels captured. Have several hundred prisoners above I will dispose of according to your order. Sent you captured mail from enemy’s camp. Gives full account of their condition. Their number said to be 8,000, and decreasing. Great gloom and apprehension in their camp. McCulloch in Arkansas, and much abused. Rapid advance on Price will destroy his army in a few days. Have written by mail.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Commanding at Syracuse, Mo.:

One and a half regiments have been sent to. Jefferson City. They will move to Columbia and Fayette, and possibly Glasgow, under instructions sent to General McKean. Have all disposable forces at Booneville ready on arrival of steamer to cross if necessary, and move on Fayette or ascend the river to Glasgow. In the mean time scour the country between Tipton and Booneville. I wish no considerable movement made towards Lexington till General Prentiss’ forces are in {p.430} proper position. I wish to break up all recruiting camps the first thing. Keep ready, but make no movements except for reconnoitering.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

You will receive written orders (instructions) to-night by mail with the Thirteenth Iowa Regiment. In the mean time embark the Eleventh Iowa on the steamer, with eight baggage wagons, a small supply of tents, ten days’ provisions, and full supply of ammunition, and be ready to move as soon as the Thirteenth and my dispatches arrive; also have another steamer ready to-morrow for four companies of cavalry also sent you to-day. Use Sioux City and other steamers bound up the river. Is the river still navigable to Lexington?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 13, 1861.

Col. RICHARD J. OGLESBY, Commanding U. S. Forces, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

Indications are that an attack upon Bird’s Point or Fort Holt may be made to-night or to-morrow. You will therefore instruct your out-guards to be extra vigilant. Send scouting parties out by the different approaches, and see that the entire command are kept at their posts-men sleeping under arms, with their cartridge-boxes filled. Information will be given the gunboats, to the end that they may be able to give all the assistance in their power.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 13, 1861.

Commodore GRAHAM, Commanding Transports, Cairo, Ill.:

Let no boats go out from here to-night. Keep them all fired up and ready to start at a moment’s warning. Report how many transports, and their names, you have now in port.

By order Brigadier-General Grant, commanding:

WM. S. HILLYER, Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 13, 1861.

Commodore ANDREW H. FOOTE, U. S. N., Commanding Gunboat Flotilla, Cairo, Ill.:

Information that I have received indicates the probability of an attack being made upon either Fort Holt or Bird’s Point to-night or {p.431} to-morrow. I have given instructions to the commanding officers at these two points. Have given directions also to have all the transports fully ready, in case a move on the water should be necessary. I would respectfully ask your co-operation with the gunboats.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 24.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 12, 1861.

I. The suffering families driven by rebels from Southwestern Missouri which have already arrived here have been supplied by voluntary contributions made by Union men. Others are on the way, to arrive in a few days. These must be supplied by the charity of men known to be hostile to the Union. A list will be prepared of the names of all persons of this class who do not voluntarily furnish their quota, and a contribution will be levied on them of $10,000, in clothing, provisions, and quarters, or money in lieu thereof. This levy will be made upon the following classes of persons, in proportion to the guilt and property of each individual: 1st, Those in arms with the enemy who have property in this city; 2d, Those who have furnished pecuniary or other aid to the enemy or to persons in the enemy’s service; 3d, Those who have verbally, in writing, or by publication given encouragement to insurgents and rebels.

II. Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis, U. S. Volunteers; Lieut. Col. B. G. Farrar, provost-marshal-general, and Charles Borg, esq., assessor of the county of Saint Louis, will constitute a board of assessors for levying the aforementioned contribution. In determining the amount of property of the individuals assessed the board will take into consideration the official assessment lists for municipal taxes.

III. As soon as any part of this contribution has been assessed by the board the provost-marshal-general will notify the parties assessed, their agents or representatives, stating the amount of provisions, clothing, or quarters, and the money value thereof required of each; and if not furnished within the time specified in such notice he will issue an execution, and sufficient property will be taken and sold at public auction to satisfy the assessment, with costs, and a penalty of 25 per cent. in addition. Where buildings or parts of buildings are to be used, and where any of the sufferers are to be quartered on families, care should be taken to produce as little inconvenience to the owners or families as possible, this not being considered a military contribution levied upon the enemy, but merely a collection to be made from friends of the enemy for charitable purposes.

IV. If any person upon whom such assessment shall be made shall file with the provost-marshal-general an affidavit that he is a loyal citizen and has been true to his allegiance to the United States, he will be allowed one week to furnish evidence to the board to vindicate his character; and if at the end of that time he shall not be able to satisfy the board of his loyalty, the assessment shall be increased 10 percent, and the levy immediately made.

V. The supplies so collected will be expended for the object designated, under the direction of the provost-marshal-general, with the advice of the State Sanitary Commission. Where moneys are received in lieu of supplies, it will be expended for them, as they maybe required {p.432} Any money not so expended will be turned over to the Sanitary Commission for the benefit of sick soldiers. A strict and accurate account of these receipts and expenditures will be kept and returned to these headquarters.

VI. Any one who shall resist or attempt to resist the execution of these orders will be immediately arrested and imprisoned, and will be tried by a military commission.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 13, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: From information received this afternoon from Columbus some movement is taking place from that point. I am inclined to believe that it will be made on Bird’s Point-possibly at an early hour in the morning. I am fully prepared for the best defense our means will allow, let it occur where it may. Every possible disposition has been made to detect the intention of the enemy. All the troops at Bird’s Point, Fort Holt, and Cairo are sleeping upon their arms, with cartridge-boxes filled. Steamers are in readiness to move the Cairo troops to any point at the shortest notice.

I inclose herewith a report from Colonel Ross, commanding at Cape Girardeau, which may contain some information of interest to the department.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS CAPE GIRARDEAU, December 12, 1861.

General U. S. GRANT:

DEAR SIR: I have just received information from hew Madrid from a reliable source. My informant arrived there on Monday last. Governor Jackson was addressing the troops there on his arrival. A colonel from Tennessee and M. Jeff. Thompson followed, all urging those whose term of enlistment had about expired to re-enlist, stating that they had money to pay off all the troops.

My informant further states that there were two regiments there from below and ten more expected; that all were well fed and clothed; that there are eight 32-pounders mounted within the fortifications; the speakers stating to the soldiers there that Missouri, having been recently received into the Southern Confederacy, would be assisted by the “united South” in her efforts to “free herself.”

Richard Watkins, one of the sons of the general, has come in and taken the oath of allegiance. I rather think the general will be in soon. From two to five of Thompson’s daily are coming in and renewing their allegiance and going to their homes.

In haste, yours, truly,

L. F. ROSS, Colonel Seventeenth Illinois Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.433}

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RICHMOND, MO., December 13, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

On yesterday we drove the last of the organized forces of rebels from Platte and Clay across river at Lexington. Had slight skirmish. We killed some 3 or 4. They fired from houses in Lexington, and to silence them we gave them eleven shots from 6-pounder field pieces. Will drive them from this county to-day and to-morrow, and then move to Carrollton.

B. M. PRENTISS.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 13, 1861.

Col. JOHN COOK, Commanding U. S. Forces, Fort Holt, Ky.:

Be on the qui vive to-night and to-morrow. Strengthen your pickets and tell them to keep a vigilant lookout. Let every man be at his post, and have your men sleep on their arms.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 13, 1861.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding Post, Cairo, Ill.:

Information just received, in connection with that obtained a few days ago, leads me to believe an attack upon Bird’s Point or Fort Holt to-night or to-morrow quite imminent. I have given the necessary orders to the commanders there; also orders to secure prompt movements with our transports. Commodore Foote has also been notified of our danger and requested to co-operate. It will be advisable to have all the troops at this point notified that they are to keep within their camps. Ammunition should be issued, so as to give cartridge-boxes full, and the command sleep under arms.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill.., December 13, 1861.

Brigadier-General MCCLERNAND, Commanding, Cairo, Ill.:

For security and expedition, in case of an attack, you will please quarter on the steamers now in port four regiments. The following boats can be used: Aleck Scott, Memphis, White Cloud, and J. Wilson.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.434}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: On examination of the organization of the troops in this department I find numerous irregular and fragmentary bodies actually in service, but not in the manner authorized by law. It is very difficult to dispose of these in such a way as not to injure the public service or do injustice to the officers and men and at the same time conform to the law and regulations.

In the case of the Frémont Body Guard, I used my best endeavors to induce them to remain in service, but they unanimously protested against it, on the ground that they were not enlisted to serve the United States, but to serve Major-General Frémont, and that on his removal their term of service ceased. I directed the captains of companies to present me their original muster rolls, which they did, and I found that they had only obligated themselves to serve as General Frémont’s body guard. They said, moreover, that the mustering officer, Capt. John D. O’Connell, Fourteenth Infantry, announced to them at the time of the mustering in that if General Frémont should die or be otherwise removed from the command their term of service would cease. I therefore, at their own solicitation and the request of Major-General Frémont, mustered them out.

There seems to have been some misapprehension at Washington in respect to the Reserve Corps and Home Guards. The former, at least the regiment stationed in this city, are regularly mustered into service for three years, without any limitation as to their place of service. They are regularly-organized Missouri Volunteers, and entitled to pay and allowances the same as any other volunteers. They will be paid accordingly. The Home Guards are not a regular organization; some have been mustered in with the reservation of serving only in this State, while others, although long in service, have never been mustered at all. I have offered them the option to be mustered in according to law, so as to cover their past services, or to be mustered out, and receive pay only for active service in Missouri away from their homes, in accordance with your instructions of the 2d instant. Most of them will probably prefer the latter alternative. If they do, it will be very difficult to ascertain the length of their services away from home.

The engineer organization in this department is a very peculiar one and the greater part of it without any authority of law. As near as can be ascertained this organization is as follows:

Officers.Enlisted men.
Colonel Bissell’s Engineer regiment36925
Two companies of telegraph men6200
One company of telegraph guards325
Signal company451
Force of sappers and miners42
Company of pioneers, sappers and miners398
Company of pontoniers3100
Engineer detachment at Ironton317
Engineer Corps, &c.43

Colonel Bissell’s regiment is regularly mustered into service, receiving infantry pay, with allowance for extra service, as provided by law.

{p.435}

The other ten companies, under various names, I propose to unite into a battalion, and to muster them in as infantry on the same terms as Bissell’s regiment; that is, to have the extra allowance when acting as engineer troops. To effect this it will probably be necessary to break up the present organizations, so as to dispense in the new with the extra officers. The two companies of telegraph men and telegraph guards, 9 officers and 225 men, have already been mustered out, but many of them are ready to reorganize as infantry in the manner proposed.

The Engineer Corps proper, as it is called, has no troops, but probably about 50 officers. The names of 43 have already been ascertained, but some one turns up every few days holding a commission or appointment from General Frémont. Some of these are already discharged; but it is impossible to discharge them all at present, their services being absolutely indispensable in the construction of the works which are now being built at Paducah, Cairo, Fort Holt, Girardeau, Rolla, Jefferson City, La Mine Cantonment near Sedalia, &c. The commanding officers at these places report that it is impossible to proceed with these defenses, now partially constructed, without the aid of one or more engineer officer at each place. I coincide in their opinion, and shall be obliged to retain in service some 10 or 12 of the most competent of these officers, with the pay of captains and lieutenants of Engineers, until some arrangement can be made to replace them by regular officers.

I would remark that the pontonier company has a large and costly bridge train nearly complete, and that the signal company has in its possession signal instruments, not, perhaps, of much value for military operations, but which have cost a large sum of money.

The changes proposed will obviate the present irregularities and anomalies of organization; greatly reduce the expenses, and give efficiency to this branch of the service, which now seems to be without form and almost without use. I consider myself authorized by the instructions of the 2d instant to make them, and shall do so as rapidly as possible, unless otherwise directed. The reorganization of the fragmentary bodies of artillery, cavalry, and infantry will be pushed forward with all possible dispatch.

I inclose herewith a communication of this date from General Cullum.* It is of vital importance that this request be granted. I have but one regular engineer and one topographical officer for duty in this department, and these have also to perform the duties of aides-de-camp. Important defenses are being constructed without any competent person to direct them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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OTTERVILLE, December 14, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Reliable information just from Lexington. The rebels, 4,000 strong, left Lexington to-day to join Price, with large train. Prentiss, after firing several rounds into the town, fell back out of sight. I think there is no need to send to Lexington, but best to intercept rebels before they reach Warrensburg. Please reply, as force ready to move from Sedalia.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.436}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 14, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Syracuse, Mo.:

Send strong party in direction of Lexington; cavalry, artillery, and infantry in empty wagons to feel the enemy. Support it, if necessary, by other infantry. Just received news from General Prentiss. He is opposite Lexington. He neglected my orders to keep me advised of his movements so that I could co-operate with him.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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OTTERVILLE, December 14, 1861.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Have sent towards Lexington 2,000 infantry in empty wagons, four pieces of artillery, and 500 cavalry. Have ordered the commanding officer to feel the enemy, but not hazard engagement if enemy is largely in superior force. I think strong bodies have passed up west of Warrensburg.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 14, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

Your last telegram differs most essentially from your previous advices as to rebel forces. Move with strong forces in direction of Warrensburg, but do not permit the enemy to cut you off from your base at Sedalia. Do not underrate the enemy’s forces. Your estimates have been, I think, too low.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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OTTERVILLE, December 14, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I do not see that my telegram differs from other advices given by me. Force retreating from Lexington consists in most part of those driven across from North Missouri. I fear move on Warrensburg may be too late. I propose to march nearly whole force to Clinton, interpose between Price and this detachment, and if Price retreats, to throw his line as far east as possible. Unless you approve, however, I will march on Warrensburg, as you direct.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, December 14, 1861.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Expedition sent against insurrectionary organizations so far entirely successful. Marshall, Arrow Rock, and Waverly, in Saline County, {p.437} cleaned out; also Platte, Clay, and Ray counties. We have taken in the last few days 300 prisoners, artillery, arms, and wagons. General Prentiss was opposite Lexington last night. A force ordered this morning from Sedalia to co-operate on the south side of the river. Fifteen hundred men have been sent into Boone and Howard Counties. Salem, south of Rolla, threatened by a large force. It has been re-enforced. Returns as far as received will be immediately forwarded.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General

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RICHMOND, RAY COUNTY, MO., December 14, (Via Saint Joseph, Mo., December 16, 1861.)

Major-General HALLECK:

I shall not leave here until to-night. Find in this country several Government horses taken at Lexington. Many rebels willing to return home from Price’s army. Some are candid; others not. Will be in Carrollton Monday. Our trip is doing good. Union men feel more confident. State troops will be able to keep peace in North Missouri after ten days is my opinion.

B. M. PRENTISS.

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SEDALIA December 15, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Troops from this place on road (4,000) replaced by troops from La Mine. Shall take command in person of the column on Warrensburg. Several respectable men just in from Lexington. Secessionists certainly left Lexington yesterday. Immense train of supplies, rope, &c. About 4,000 men, only one-half armed. All concur that it is too late to intercept them at Warrensburg, but possible to do so at points half way between Warrensburg and Clinton. Ouly two ways of getting to Osceola (by Clinton and by Rosa Hill). Have sent to burn bridge at Rose Hill. Enemy will be forced to Clinton or to move west towards Kansas. Jennison, with considerable force, at West Point. Have pushed cavalry reconnaissance toward Clinton to cover flank by keeping south of Warrensburg. Certain at least to capture train. Can guard against any movement of Price on flank. Will wait myself one-half hour for answer.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 16, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington City:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 10th instant is received and I am much gratified with its contents. I was satisfied that the orders which I had previously received had been issued without your knowledge or upon a misconception of the condition of the troops in this department. I think I have plenty of men for the service here, but we are terribly deficient in organization, discipline, and arms. I hope to remove the former deficiencies as soon as possible, and when the 11,000 arms sent by you are received I shall feel that the latter is partially supplied. Your telegram {p.438} with respect to these arms is almost the only good news I have beard since I arrived here. There is a large body of troops at Benton Barracks, but most of them are without arms, and therefore can neither be sent into the field nor be used to suppress insurrection here, if one should be attempted.

Major Bowen wrote from Salem on the 9th that he had driven the enemy through the Current Hills, taking 20 prisoners and some 35 horses. I have since learned that about 1,500 of the enemy returned on him. He has been re-enforced with infantry and artillery from Rolla. At Pilot Knob a number of prisoners have been taken, and scattering men from Price’s army are coming in daily and taking the oath of allegiance.

General Prentiss has cleaned out all the counties north of the Missouri River and west of Brunswick. He is at Carrollton to-day. The three regiments sent through Callaway, Boone, Howard, and Randolph Counties will meet General Prentiss about Glasgow. They have already taken several hundred prisoners and broken up the insurgent organizations. The expedition sent by Colonel Steele to Marshall, Arrow Rock, and Waverly have returned to Sedalia, having been completely successful. They took some 50 prisoners, including one piece of artillery, a quantity of arms, and destroyed a number of wagons and other property. Among the prisoners are two assistant adjutant-generals and one lieutenant of Price’s army. A mail-bag was also taken, giving us valuable information. We had one corporal killed in the skirmish near Waverly, where one of the enemy’s field pieces burst in discharging it. As well as I could ascertain, about 8,000 or 10,000 insurgents were organizing in the counties north of the river, and I deemed it imprudent to move against Price with this large force in our rear. They will be thoroughly broken up this week.

Unfortunately General Prentiss neglected to obey my orders to keep me advised of his movements. Expecting that the insurgents scattered by him would cross the river, I had a large force of cavalry and infantry (in empty wagons) at Sedalia, ready to co-operate on the south side and cut off their retreat. Early yesterday morning I learned that about 4,000 of the insurgents had crossed at Lexington, with the intention of joining Price at Osceola. I immediately telegraphed General Pope at Sedalia to move with all possible dispatch 4,000 men to some point between Warrensburg and Clinton to cut off their retreat. The expedition was ready and started instantly, but I fear it will be too late to catch them. Had Prentiss advised me in time I would have taken the whole of them. His carelessness, neglect, or obstinacy, whichever it may be called, thwarted my plans. Possibly they may yet succeed. A large force has been placed in position to re-enforce General Pope and to protect his flank from any advance made by Price’s army to cut off his retreat.

The large number of prisoners taken and about to be sent to this city already begins to be embarrassing, and some means must be devised for disposing of them. I will address you a communication on this subject in a few days.

General Sigel is still sick, and I feel greatly embarrassed about a commander for the troops, mostly German, at Rolla. If General Asboth has not been appointed, or if there be any objections to him, please have P. J. Osterhaus made brigadier-general of volunteers. Perhaps, all things considered he is the better man of the two.

The following regular officers, not on parole, have been within the {p.439} last few days ordered by the Adjutant-General away from this department, viz:

Capt. J. C. Davis, artillery; Capt. H. B. Hendershott, artillery; Capt. J. M. Schofield, artillery; Lieut. A. M. Randol, First Artillery; Maj. W. L. Elliott, First Cavalry; Lieut. L. Merrill, First Cavalry; also the officers of Companies B and E, Second Infantry, names not known.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, December 16, 1861.

Col. J. W. BIRGE, Commanding Sharpshooters, Centralia, Mo.:

COLONEL: As soon as you have cleaned out Centralia, Sturgeon, and Renick, and the roads leading to Columbia and Fayette, I wish you to turn your attention to the rebels about Huntsville, Randolph County, and Mexico, Anderson County. You will arrest not only enemies in arms, but all who aid and assist them, and you will have it distinctly understood everywhere that rebels will be punished and Union men protected; but the latter, in order to deserve protection must do something for themselves. Induce them to unite under the protection of your forces in that part of the country and form companies of State Militia. Heretofore probably many have been deterred from acting in self-defense against rebels from a fear that the Union troops might finally abandon this State. This will never be done. Missouri is and must remain in the Union and all rebels must be driven out or punished. There must be no more half-way measures, and there can be no middle course of individual neutrality. All citizens who are not rebels must loyally support the Government. If they aid rebels, they are traitors; if they refuse aid to the cause of the Union, they are disloyal, and by this disloyalty give countenance to those who are openly enemies. Both classes will be treated as their conduct deserves. Those who are not for us will be regarded as against us. We must know who are friends and who are enemies; the line will be distinctly drawn. There can be no individual neutrality in the rear in Missouri. Let the people where you go distinctly understand this.

It is said that parties of men are cutting down telegraph posts and attempting to destroy the railroad. Shoot down every one engaged in such attempts and put in close confinement every one who has done so; also seize every one making signal-fires or who conveys information to the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 16, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The expedition up the river will probably be in Booneville to-morrow. The river is falling, and I doubt the expediency of trying to get above there with boats, unless you have strong reasons. General Pope has a small force at Booneville to co-operate against Fayette, and if anything further is to be done there should be an experienced commander. {p.440} The boats were not in as good order as I should have wished. Some men left in the hospital by the Eleventh Iowa are taken with small-pox.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 17, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

On the strength of a telegraphic dispatch received from Saint Louis that the prisoners arriving here yesterday were imposters, I have ordered them back to Saint Louis. Eight of these prisoners did not claim to have been taken at Camp Jackson, and had with them regular certificates of exchange. As I am anxious to make as few shipments of these men as possible, and as there was nothing in my telegraphic instructions to prevent it, I returned these also.

I would report that I received a dispatch a few days ago that quinine was being shipped from Saint Louis via the Ohio and Mississippi and the Illinois Central Railroad to Duquoin, where it was received by special agents and transported across land to the Mississippi River, thence through Missouri south. I sent up a detective, who captured 100 ounces, together with evidence that it was destined for Memphis, and that the agent was to receive $500 for his trouble if he succeeded in getting it through. Shall I turn this over to the marshal of the district, with the evidence?

I have heretofore reported the fact that the quartermaster’s department has been carried on at this place almost without funds from the earliest assembling of troops. There is therefore necessarily a large indebtedness accrued against the Government. The vouchers issued in payment of these claims are constantly coming before me for approval (the quartermaster declining to settle anything without), and necessarily occupy much of my time. As many of these accounts should not be allowed and others should be reduced, I would respectfully urge the necessity of sending here an experienced agent of the department. Aside from the necessity of an experienced agent to settle the old claims I think the good of the service would be subserved by having an old officer of the Quartermaster’s Department here.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Carrollton, via Chillicothe:

You will continue your march east to Brunswick and Glasgow till you meet the force sent out from Jefferson City. Having cleared out the rebels from the counties north of the river, you will report to these headquarters for further orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.441}

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SAINT LOUIS, December 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General CURTIS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: You will immediately detail 1,100 or 1,200 unarmed men from Benton Barracks to hold themselves in readiness for service down the river on the gunboats.

By order of General McClellan:

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, December 17, 1861.

Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo, ill.:

SIR: I have ready in this city some 1,100 or 1,200 unarmed men to be sent to man your gunboats, if you wish them. They are volunteers. You will please inform me if you want them; and, if so, when and where?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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CARROLLTON, December 17, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I leave here to-day for Utica, having accomplished object of trip. Some 500 have crossed from this county to join Price. They have gone without outfit, and have destroyed all ferries that I could find. The counties through which we have passed have furnished large quantities of clothing for Price, most of which crosses at Lexington, which place, in my opinion, should be held by our troops.

B. M. PRENTISS.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 17, 1861.

P. B. EWING, Esq., Cincinnati, Ohio:

DEAR SIR: Your note of the 13th, with inclosure, is received. I am not surprised that General Sherman should be abused by the newspapers, for it seems to have become the fashion all over the United States for editors and scribblers to criticise, abuse, and even blackguard any officer who devotes his time and health and life to the service of his country. I have had a pretty good share of it myself within the last few weeks, but I have not and shall not notice anything they say of me. I hope General Sherman will not let these squibs trouble him in the least. They can do him no serious injury. When General Sherman came here his health was much broken by long and severe labor and his nervous system somewhat shaken by continuous excitement and responsibility. Those who saw him here may have drawn wrong inferences from his broken-down appearance and rather imprudent remarks; but no one who was personally acquainted with him thought that anything was the matter with him except a want of rest. I have no doubt that the quiet of home will enable him in a short time to resume {p.442} his duties and silence all these scandalous and slanderous newspaper attacks.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Rolla, Mo., December 18, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: Franklin Asbell arrived here to-day and makes the following statement, viz: Price was on the Osage River, at the mouth of Sac, on Saturday, at 1 o’clock. His whole force would not exceed 8,000. He intended to stop where he was until he could get re-enforcements from the South and Lexington, and then go to Kansas. McBride was in Springfield; most of his men had gone home. Robbing and thieving companies are organized in all the counties, which are taking and destroying everything wherever they go. One hundred and fifty rebels attacked Mr. Asbell 23 miles this side of Lebanon and took his horse and everything else that he had.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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CAMP THREE MILES WEST OF WARRENSBURG, Major-General HALLECK: December 18, 1861.

By forced march interposed between enemy and Clinton intersection road from Warrensburg to Clinton, near Shawnee Mound. Enemy immediately broke up his camp, 6 miles northwest of Chilhowee, and beat hasty retreat towards Rose Hill. Threw forward ten companies cavalry and section of artillery and pursued with whole force. Followed him as far as Johnstown, when his force scattered towards Butler and Papinsville. Party sent out to burn bridge at Rose Hill utterly failed to get through. To cover pursuit, forced strong cavalry reconnaissance through Clinton, within 15 miles of Osceola. One hundred and fifty prisoners, 7 wagons, tents, baggage, horses, &c., fell into our hands. Enemy’s force about 2,200-1,200 of them recruits. Only 70 country wagons altogether. Whole country clear as far west as Rose Hill and as far south as Grand River. Return with main body to-day to Sedalia, sending cavalry force to Lexington to destroy ferry-boats. Be in Sedalia day after to-morrow. Price not 8,000 men; more leaving than going.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP SOUTHWEST OF WARRENSBURG, December 18, 1861.

GENERAL: In addition to the dispatch of this date sent to you I have the honor to submit the following remarks:

The whole account of the enemy being in such force at Lexington and having passed west in large bodies from the Osage is a most gross {p.443} exaggeration. I have been very reluctant from my previous experience in this State to credit such reports, but they were brought from Lexington and communicated to me by persons of undoubted respectability, and asserted with such positive certainty that, although not fully convinced of their truth, I could not without obstinacy refuse to credit them to some extent.

The plain facts are these: A few men detailed from each of the five or six divisions of Price’s army made their way in squads of from 10 to 150 to the neighborhood of Lexington. They were never in the town at all, and did not number altogether more than 800 or 1,000 men. The recruits they were sent up to bring down are largely estimated at 1,200, in rags, without arms, and without supplies. In their march to the south they picked up in all about 70 two-horse wagons. They fled precipitately as soon as they heard of our approach, and when the pursuit terminated, near Johnstown, it is to be doubted if there were 500 men and 10 wagons left together. Only 15 wagons crossed Grand River. The rebel force scattered as they ran; the wagons were driven into farm-yards, and the men, going in small parties, sought refuge in paths and by-ways. The cavalry reconnaissance through Clinton, designed to cover our pursuit, drove in and captured the pickets of Rains’ division, which is encamped this side the Osage, pursuing and capturing them inside the lines.

All information, both from the prisoners and from the people of the country, concurs that Price has not over 8,000 or 10,000 men, and that he is losing many more men than he can recruit. I have no doubt that if it were known that those willing to return home could do so without molestation, by taking the oath not again to take up arms or to aid or abet the rebels, a very large number of his men would leave him at once. I say this after examination of the prisoners and full communication with people of this section entirely acquainted with the condition of affairs in Price’s command.

I do not, of course, know what are your views in relation to Price, but it is certain that as long as he remains in this part of the country there will be excitement and more or less recruiting for him. Compel him to fly, and the inducement is at an end. I have no idea that, with any possible means of surrounding him, his forces could be captured. They would disperse in all directions at the approach of danger, hiding their artillery in the woods and distributing their wagons among the farm-houses, where it would be impossible to identify them. Operations against him as if he commanded an organized army must be futile. I have abundant force to drive his from the country, and should be glad to be allowed to do so.

My command will return slowly to Sedalia and if you think it best will resume their positions at Otterville. I’ shall proceed there and will probably be in Sedalia day after to-morrow. The whole region as far south as the Osage is in a just state of alarm from this expedition, and I think their rest north will not soon be troubled again by Price’s people. The cavalry force I sent in advance encamped in Johnstown last night, and scouted the country south of Grand River on their return to within a few miles of Clinton. I should not be at all surprised to learn that the movement had caused Price to break up his camp and retreat south.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.444}

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CHILLICOTHE, MO., December 18, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I arrived here at 5 o’clock to-day, and received your dispatch ordering me from Carrollton east to Brunswick and Glasgow. After arrival here, being without rations and having over 100 sick with measles, will not be able to move until Friday, to obey your order, which I shall do as early as possible. I am satisfied there is not an organized force of 50 armed rebels north of the Missouri River, and that the State troops could keep the peace if it was not for their anxiety to defend the immediate locality of their homes. Of one thing rest assured, our trip has done much good. Besides driving the rebels south, we have satisfied the community that Federal troops could move without committing depredations. The mounted men with me are State troops. Shall I move from here to comply with your dispatch?

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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ROLLA, MO., December 18, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Captain Wood and command have just arrived from Arkansas line. They chased Freeman to Springfield, and returned by way of the forks of White River and Houston. There are no forces south and west of here this side of Springfield. McBride is at Springfield

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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SAINT LOUIS, December 18, 1861.

Col. B. G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General, Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis:

COLONEL: From your verbal statements and the written communication submitted by you yesterday I am informed that there are some sixteen negro men confined in the city prisons in your charge and advertised for sale under a statute of this State.

You have stated the facts of the case as you understand them; have called my attention to the statute of this State on the subject and to the law of Congress of last session, and have asked my orders as to how you shall proceed in this matter-whether to release these men from custody and to place them outside of your particular jurisdiction as a military officer in charge of the prisons, in accordance with General Orders, No. 3, of this department, or whether the sheriff (who, as I understand, is now under your orders) is to proceed and sell the said negro men as he has advertised and as is directed by the statute of this State, if said statute has not been modified or changed by the law of the last session of Congress.

As I am informed, most of these negroes came with the forces under Major-General Frémont from Southwestern Missouri, and have either been used in the military service against the United States or are claimed by persons now in arms against the Federal Government, but that none of them have been condemned in accordance with the act approved August 6, 1861, and that no proceedings for such condemnation have ever been instituted.

As I understand the matter, the statute of this State creates the presumption {p.445} that these men are slaves, and if not called for within three months of the date of the advertisement of the sheriff they are to be sold as slaves.

It would seem that the act of Congress approved August 6, 1861, if constitutional, overrules this statute so far as this presumption is concerned.

This act of Congress cannot be regarded as unconstitutional until decided to be so by the United States Supreme Court.

It results, then, as it seems to me, that these negroes are held in custody without the authority of law and contrary to General Orders, No. 3, and you are hereby directed to release them from prison. It appears, however, that they have received from the quartermaster’s department certain articles of clothing required for their immediate and pressing necessities, with the promise that they would pay for the clothing so delivered to them with their labor. They will therefore be turned over to the chief of the quartermaster’s department in this city for labor till they have paid the United States for the clothing and other articles so issued to them at the expense of the Government.

This order will in no way debar any one from enforcing his legal rights to the services of these negroes. Such rights, if any exist, can be enforced through the loyal civil tribunals of this State, whose mandates will always be duly respected by the military authorities of this department.

Military officers cannot decide upon rights of property or claims to service except so far as may be authorized by the laws of war or the acts of Congress. When not so authorized they will avoid all interference with such questions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, December 18, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Lancaster, Ohio:

MY DEAR GENERAL: Yours of the 12th* was received a day or two ago, but was mislaid for the moment among private papers, or I should have answered sooner. The newspaper attacks are certainly shameless and scandalous, but I cannot agree with you that they have us in their power “to destroy us as they please.” I certainly get my share of abuse, but it will not disturb me.

Your movement of the troops was not countermanded by me because I thought it an unwise one in itself, but because I was not then ready for it. I had better information of Price’s movements than you had, and I had no apprehension of an attack. I intended to concentrate the forces on that line, but I wished the movement delayed until I could determine on a better position. After receiving Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson’s report I made precisely the location you had ordered. I was desirous at the time not to prevent the advance of Price by any movement on our part, hoping that he would move on Lexington, but finding that he had determined to remain at Osceola for some time at least, I made the movement you proposed. As you could not know my plans, you and others may have misconstrued the reason of my countermanding your orders.

{p.446}

I deem it my duty, however, to say to you, general, in all frankness and kindness, that remarks made by you, both at Sedalia and in this city (if I am correctly informed), about our defenseless condition and the probability that the enemy would take this city, have led to unfair and harsh comments by those who did not know. I say this merely to put you on your guard in future.

I hope to see you well enough for duty soon. Our reorganization goes on slowly, but we will effect it in time.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK.

* See Appendix, p. 819.

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ORDERS, No. 14.}

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, December 18, 1861.

Capt. GEORGE E. LEIGHTON, Provost-Marshal, Saint Louis:

SIR: In obedience to General Orders, No. 24, of the commanding general of this department, you are directed to notify in person or by writing the persons specified in the inclosed list that they are required to pay to you the sums placed opposite their several names; in default of which, you will, at the expiration of the time specified in said order No. 24, proceed to levy on all property held by them or their agents until such claims shall be satisfied. All money so collected shall be duly receipted for by you and an account of same rendered at this office.

Yours, truly,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Chillicothe, Mo.:

You will move with your forces upon Brunswick, Keytesville, and Glasgow till you open communication with troops sent from Jefferson City; also, if necessary to clean out the rebels completely, throw a force in direction of Huntsville. Troops from Jefferson City will return to that place or cross at Booneville or any convenient point on the river, and proceed to General Pope’s camp near Otterville.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CHILLICOTHE, MO., December 19, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I can move with 800 infantry, 200 cavalry, one battery, four field pieces, and, if more is needed, can take 300 infantry from Colonel Tindall, who is 3 miles from here.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

As soon as expedition has carried out orders it will cross at Booneville {p.447} or some other convenient point, and proceed to General Pope’s camp near Otterville.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 19, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The expedition has returned from Glasgow with about two tons of powder and a few prisoners, having ascertained that Brunswick was occupied by United States troops and navigation difficult. Shall the same troops go to Otterville?

THOS. J. MCKEAN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Chillicothe, Mo.:

Movement on Brunswick, &c., countermanded. McKean’s forces have occupied Glasgow, capturing two tons of powder. Randolph, Howard, and Boone well cleaned out. General Pope intercepted the Lexington forces south of Warrensburg, capturing tents, baggage, &c., and a large number of prisoners. Re-enforcements for Price’s army either taken prisoners or scattered.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CHILLICOTHE, MO., December 19, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I shall send the forces with me to their rendezvous (Saint Joseph), with exception of four companies, which will go with me to Palmyra, if it meets your approval. Answer.

B. M. PRENTISS.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Camp Three Miles West of Knobnoster, Mo., December 19, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

My spies having informed me early this morning of the march of a strong body of the enemy from Arrow Rock and Waverly, and that they would camp near Milford, at mouth of Clear Creek, I posted my main body between Warrensburg and Knobnoster, and directed Major Marshall to march on same point from Warrensburg with Merrill’s regiment of horse. Colonel Davis came upon the enemy near Milford late this afternoon, and, having driven in his pickets, assaulted him in force. A brisk skirmish ensued, when the enemy, finding himself surrounded and cut off, surrendered at discretion. One thousand three hundred prisoners, including 3 colonels and 17 captains; 1,000 stand of arms, 1,000 horses, 65 wagons, tents, baggage, and supplies have fallen into our hands. Our loss is 2 killed and 8 wounded. Enemy’s loss not yet known. Will be in Sedalia to-morrow.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.448}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 19, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington City:

GENERAL: The expeditions of Generals Prentiss and McKean through the counties north of the Missouri River have been entirely successful. Every insurgent organization there has now been broken up, and I think it will be safe in a short time to withdraw a portion of the troops from that district. At Glasgow our troops yesterday captured about two tons of powder, which it is said was purchased in Chicago and brought in on the Saint Joseph and Hannibal Railroad among dry goods and in demijohns marked “brandy.” It was carried through in small quantities by rebel country merchants and farmers and collected at Glasgow, to be thence forwarded to General Price. Colonel Marshall’s expedition to Arrow Rock and Waverly prevented its crossing the river, and it consequently fell into the hands of our troops on the north side.

General Pope’s party intercepted a portion of the insurgents who crossed at Lexington. He attacked their camps of 2,200 near Shawnee Mound, between Warrensburg and Clinton, and completely scattered them, capturing their tents, wagons, horses, baggage, &c., and taking 150 prisoners. If General Prentiss had kept me advised of his movements, as I had directed, I would have taken the whole party. Our forces at Sedalia were for several days ready to move at a moment’s warning, and only waiting to hear where Prentiss was. On the whole, however, the result is satisfactory. We have within the last two weeks taken about 500 prisoners, one piece of artillery, a number of arms, wagons, horses, and a considerable amount of ammunition and clothing; and, what is of most importance, we have pretty effectually crushed out the insurrection along the Missouri River, upon which Price placed his main reliance for recruits and clothing. His army is pretty well supplied with provisions and arms, but is greatly in want of clothing and shoes. He has a large park of artillery, and from all I can learn will make a good fight. He and many of his men are virtually outlaws, and, it is said, are determined to win a victory or die. Another retreat would effectually ruin his cause in this State. I had hoped to draw him north to the Missouri River, so that I could effectually cut off his retreat, but his main force has not yet crossed the Osage, and the columns which he advanced on Clinton and Warsaw have been withdrawn. In that position I cannot cut him off by moving from Rolla, as our troops would be compelled to cross the Osage Mountains over narrow and difficult roads, which would make our movements necessarily slow, affording him plenty of time to fall back. It is therefore possible that I may be compelled to attack him in front. The ravages committed by his troops may make it advisable to move against him soon, notwithstanding the great inconveniences of a winter campaign in this climate, which is very much more unfavorable than that of Washington. The roads, too, will probably be almost impassable. I hope, however, to be able to overcome these obstacles. At any rate, I shall not hesitate to act as soon as I can get the troops in anything like organization and discipline.

The conduct of the columns sent through the river counties forms a striking contrast to that of previous expeditions. Citizens from these counties assure me that they have all acted with perfect propriety, committing no depredations, and producing a most favorable impression. This certainly indicates a vast improvement in discipline. By a few {p.449} severe punishments for marauding and pillaging I hope to put an end to these depredations. The conduct of the forces under Lane and Jennison has done more for the enemy in this State than could have been accomplished by 20,000 of his own army. I receive almost daily complaints of outrages committed by these men in the name of the United States, and the evidence is so conclusive as to leave no doubt of their correctness. It is rumored that Lane has been made a brigadier-general. I cannot conceive of a more injudicious appointment. It will take 20,000 men to counteract its effect in this State, and, moreover, is offering a premium for rascality and robbing generally.

I am progressing slowly with the reorganization of the forces here. It is a most difficult task, increased by the injudicious orders of the War Department and the jealousies of the Governors of States. The administration and machinery for the supply of the army is rapidly getting into working order. This was a matter of the greatest necessity, and consequently has absorbed most of my attention. An army is soon disorganized unless properly supplied and its wants provided for. I am discharging most of the steamers formerly in the Government employment, and mustering out of service what is called “Marine Corps,” which are nothing more than hired men on these boats. This will be a great saving of expense. The Home Guards are also being disbanded as rapidly as I can supply their places. The U. S. Reserve Corps, as they are called, are generally regularly-organized Missouri Volunteers, mustered in for three years or the war, without limitation as to place of service. The Pay Department has objected to pay these troops, on the ground that there was some outside verbal or tacit understanding that they would not be ordered out of the State. I cannot recognize any such unrecorded verbal understanding, and must be guided alone by the muster rolls, which are perfectly regular. Moreover General Curtis informs me that he refused to permit them to be mustered in with any reservation whatever. I have therefore ordered them, or rather all of them in actual service, to be paid on their muster rolls. They are not generally very efficient troops, and I purpose to disband a part of them as soon as I can do so with safety. I shall also disband most of the fragmentary and irregular organizations. This I could not do all at once. The condition of the country and the state of public feeling here, resulting from General Frémont’s removal, excited by designing party politicians, rendered it prudent to move in this matter slowly and cautiously. The task imposed on me here in this chaos of incendiary elements is not an easy one, and those at a distance, who cannot understand the real condition of affairs, should not be hasty in judging of my conduct and, above all, they should not embarrass me by unnecessary interference. This I know very well you will not do, for you will readily appreciate the difficulties of my position. I shall obey all orders sent to me, but I hope the War Department will allow me a hearing before it acts hereafter on mere ex-parte statements. My efforts to introduce a system of order and economy and to ferret out frauds will very naturally create opposition, and I shall not be surprised to find myself an object of very bitter abuse in the newspapers and on the floor of Congress. This, however, will not trouble me much, so long as I am sustained by my superiors and feel that I am pursuing the right course of conduct.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General. {p.450}

[Indorsement of President Lincoln.]

DECEMBER 27, 1861.

An excellent letter; though I am sorry General Halleck is so unfavorably impressed with General Lane.

A. L.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kane., December 19, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

GENERAL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your communication, “unofficial,” dated the 11th instant; and, as a main part of my reply thereto, herewith is transmitted a copy of the letter sent to me by the Adjutant-General of the Army and referred to in your letter.*

From this copy you will perceive that the instructions as to the proposed expedition against Northeastern Texas and to secure the Indian territory west of the Arkansas were vague in the extreme-and that far from having been requested to “indicate the necessary force and means for the undertaking,” with a promise, or even suggestion, that these should be forthcoming when called for, I was asked by General Thomas “what troops and means at your (my) disposal you (I) could bring to bear on that point.”

To this question it seemed that my telegram stating the utter inadequacy of the force and means at my command even to guard Kansas against an organized attack was an abundant and proper answer. Your letter conveys the first intimation received that it was expected of me then to state what additions of men and material to my present force would be sufficient for the execution of the services named.

In reference to that portion of your letter in which you state that the step of placing General Halleck in command of the Western Department “was taken from the evident necessity of placing some one there who was in no manner connected, for or against, with the unfortunate state of affairs previously existing in that department” I must protest that I never was, in the sense here apparently used, either “for or against” Major-General Frémont; nor can I admit the expediency of a principle which would practically punish an officer for having truly, though reluctantly, answered certain questions of a professional nature put to him by the Secretary of War and Adjutant-General of the Army.

I can assure you, however, that General Halleck’s appointment was accepted by me without a murmur, there having been in that case at least some semblance of political expediency in my non-continuance as the successor of General Frémont. But when in Kentucky I saw Brigadier-General Buell placed in command of nearly 100,000 men (as stated), and with splendid prospects of usefulness to our country laid open before him, I could not but ask myself what fault I had committed or in what duty failed to be thus overslaughed by an officer whom I rank, and sent to command an immense wilderness of a department with scarcely 3,000 troops for its defense. General Sherman, too, whom you should know, I find in an important command in South Carolina and Georgia. In relation to these matters I must confess that I was hurt, and still feel that my treatment has not been in accordance {p.451} with the established usages of military law. I speak frankly, as you see, in return for the frankness of your letter.

Being now for the first time made aware of what is expected of this department, I shall lose no time in preparing and forwarding exact estimates of the force that will be necessary for the proposed expedition; and at present may say in rough that at least 20,000 men will be necessary, in addition to those already in and ordered to the Department; and as the nearest point in Northeastern Texas is 440 miles from this point and the route through a country entirely destitute of supplies, a large transportation train will be absolutely necessary.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

* “See Thomas to Hunter, November 26, p. 379.

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HEADQUARTERS FRÉMONT HUSSARS, Camp Halleck, near Rolla, Mo., December 19, 1861.

Acting Major-General ASBOTH, Commanding Fourth Division:

GENERAL: In obedience to the order contained in your circular (No. 2)* received this day, I beg to report that on receipt of your Order, No. 23,* communicating General Orders, No. 3,** from the commanding general, ordering fugitive slaves to be excluded from the lines, I caused all negroes in my camp to be examined, and it was reported to me that they all stoutly asserted that they were free. Since that time a woman employed in my own mess as cook has been claimed by one Captain Holland as the fugitive slave of his father-in-law. In compliance with your order to that end, which he produced, she was given up to him. Since the receipt of your circular of to-day I have again caused an investigation to be thoroughly made, which has resulted as in the first instance. I beg now, general, to ask for your instructions in the matter. These negroes all claim and insist that they are free. Some of them I have no question are so. Others I have as little doubt have been slaves, but no one is here to prove it, and I hesitate to take so serious a responsibility as to decide arbitrarily in the absence of any direct evidence that they are such. If I turn them away I inflict great hardship upon them, as they would be homeless and helpless. Furthermore, such a course would occasion much personal inconvenience and sincere regret to other officers no less than to myself. These people are mainly our servants and we can get no others. They have been employed in this capacity for some time-long enough for us to like them as servants, to find them useful and trustworthy, and to feel an interest in their welfare. The commanding general, in his letter to Colonel Blair, as published in the Missouri Democrat of the 16th instant,* says, in explanation of General Orders, No. 3: “Unauthorized persons, black or white, free or slave, must be kept out of our camps.” The negroes in my camp are employed, in accordance with the Army Regulations, as officers’ servants, teamsters, and hospital attendants, and, with the exception of one little child, are such as we are authorized to have in the camp. It seems to me that they are without the pale of the order and the intention of the commanding general, and I trust that I may be excused for awaiting more explicit instructions {p.452} before doing what may be an extra-official act, at which my private feelings revolt.

I recognize the fact that obedience to General Orders, No. 3, is a part of my military duty, and I shall unflinchingly comply with it, in the consciousness that I am in no way responsible therefor; but I am personally responsible for my decision when it is to affect the happiness and security of others.

May I ask you, general, to relieve me of this responsibility by giving me your formal decision at your earliest convenience?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. WARING, JR., Major, Commanding Frémont Hussars.

* Not found.

** See p. 370.

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SEDALIA, MO., December 20, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Just arrived here. Troops much embarrassed with nearly 2,000 prisoners and great quantity of captured property. Unless otherwise directed, to-day I will direct the troops to reoccupy their position at La Mine.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Sedalia, Mo.:

I congratulate you and your command on the brilliant success of your expedition. I hope it will prove the forerunner of still greater success.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ORDERS, No. 16.}

OFFICE PRO. MAR. GEN., DEPT. OF THE MO., Saint Louis, Mo., December 20, 1861.

The following form of notice is hereby ordered to be used in notifying the friends of the enemy of their assessments in aid of the suffering families driven by the rebels from Southwestern Missouri, pursuant to Orders, No. 24, issued from department headquarters.

[Inclosure.]

You will therefore pay the amount so assessed, or its equivalent in clothing, provisions, or quarters, to me within five days after the service of this notice upon you, or in default thereof execution will be issued against your property for sufficient to satisfy the assessments, costs, and 25 per cent, penalty in addition. Should you elect to pay your assessment in clothing, provisions, or quarters, you will give notice of such intention to this office, accompanying the same with an inventory and description of the articles or of the situation and value of the quarters tendered, which will be accepted subject to an appraisement of the same by me.

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

{p.453}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Sedalia, Mo.:

Send prisoners and captured arms to this city; captured property to be turned over to proper department; troops to occupy former positions; will send you additional cavalry. Lookout sharp for a movement by Price; he is pretty certain to make one.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

–––

SEDALIA, MO., December 21, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Prisoners and arms (90) down to-morrow. I found among the prisoners, after telegraphing you, the notorious Colonel Magoffin, who has lately violated his parole. He was conspicuous in the skirmish. I send him, under charge of the guard, in close confinement. Col. J. C. Davis goes in charge. His conduct was distinguished, and will be properly noticed in my report. I hope he will not be detained in Saint Louis, as he is much needed here.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS TENTH MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS, Hermann, Mo., December 21, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

We have information that several parties of secessionists are gathering and committing depredations in Montgomery County, within 10 miles of us. Shall I cross the river to-night with 100 of my command and capture or disperse them? I think good may be done by it.

GEO. R. TODD, Colonel, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 21, 1861.

Col. GEORGE R. TODD, Hermann, Mo.:

Send strong force to cross in the direction of Warrenton. Arrest all secessionists and bridge-burners.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 21, 1861.

Col. RICHARD J. OGLESBY, Commanding Bird’s Point, Mo.:

Understanding that a heavy trade is being carried on between points north of Bird’s Point and Charleston, Mo., and south by means of teams, I am desirous of breaking it up. To this end you will send tomorrow or Monday a sufficient force, say two squadrons of cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Prince, to the neighborhood of Belmont, with directions to proceed back on the main traveled road towards Charleston, {p.454} taking possession of all teams loaded with produce or goods destined for the South and send them back to Bird’s Point. The object of this expedition, it is hardly necessary for me to inform you, should be kept entirely secret.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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PALMYRA, MO., December 21, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri:

Track torn up on North Missouri Railroad near Hudson. Amount of damage not yet ascertained. Two companies of cavalry sent down the road to arrest perpetrators.

B. M. PRENTISS.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, December 21, 1861.

Hon. HANNIBAL HAMLIN, President of the Senate:

SIR: In answer to a resolution of the Senate of the 17th instant I have the honor to inclose to you a report of the Adjutant-General, submitting a copy of a plan, dated Executive Mansion, Washington, November 5, 1861, with a copy of the President’s indorsement, dated November 6, 1861, and a copy of a letter to Charles Gibson, dated Washington, November 7, 1861, from Governor Gamble. These documents furnish all the information on file in this Department in relation to raising and employing volunteer militia in the State of Missouri.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosures]

WASHINGTON, November 7, 1861.

CHARLES GIBSON, Esq.:

SIR: I have made an arrangement with the President for arming, equipping, clothing, subsisting, transporting, and paying troops to be raised in Missouri as Missouri State Militia, and a general order will issue to the different departments of the United States service to carry the arrangement into effect. I appoint you to act as agent of the State to make arrangements with the officers of the United States in the different departments of the military service to carry out the agreement with all possible dispatch, as the safety of the State and the interest of the United States require the utmost diligence in carrying it into effect.

Your obedient servant,

H. R. GAMBLE, Governor of Missouri.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, November 5, 1861.

The Governor of the State of Missouri, acting under the direction of he Convention of that State, proposes to the Government of the United {p.455} States that he will raise a military force, to serve within the State as State militia during the war there, to co-operate with the troops in the service of the United States in repelling the invasion of the State and suppressing rebellion therein; the said State Militia to be embodied and to be held in the camp and in the field, drilled, disciplined, and governed according to the Army Regulations and subject to the Articles of War, the said State Militia not to be ordered out of the State except for the immediate defense of the State of Missouri, but to co-operate with the troops in the service of the United States in military operations within the State or necessary to its defense, and when officers of the State Militia act with officers in the service of the United States of the same grade the officers of the United States service shall command the combined force; the State Militia to be armed, equipped, clothed, subsisted, transported, and paid by the United States during such time as they shall be actually engaged as an embodied military force in service in accordance with Regulations of the United States Army or general orders as issued from time to time.

In order that the Treasury of the United States may not be burdened with the pay of unnecessary officers, the Governor proposes that, although the State law requires him to appoint upon the general staff an adjutant-general, a commissary-general, an inspector-general, a quartermaster-general, a paymaster-general, and a surgeon-general, each with the rank of colonel of cavalry, yet he proposes that the Government of the United States pay only the adjutant-general, the quartermaster-general, and inspector-general, their services being necessary in the relations which would exist between the State Militia and the United States. The Governor further proposes that, while he is allowed by the State law to appoint aides-de-camp to the Governor at his discretion with the rank of colonel, three only shall be reported to the United States for payment. He also proposes that the State Militia shall be commanded by a single major-general and by such number of brigadier-generals as shall allow one for a brigade of not less than four regiments, and that no greater number of staff officers shall be appointed for regimental, brigade, and division duties than is provided for in the act of Congress of the 22d July, 1861, and that whatever be the rank of such officers as fixed by the law of the State the compensation that they shall receive from the United States shall only be that which belongs to the rank given by said act of Congress to officers in the United States service performing the same duties.

The field officers of a regiment in the State Militia are 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, and 1 major, and the company officers are a captain, a first lieutenant, and a second lieutenant.

The Governor proposes that, as the money to be disbursed is the money of the United States, such staff officers in the service of the United States as may be necessary to act as disbursing officers for the State Militia shall be assigned by the War Department for that duty; or, if such cannot be spared from their present duty, he will appoint such persons disbursing officers for the State Militia as the President of the United States may designate. Such regulations as may be required, in the judgment of the President, to insure regularity of returns and to protect the United States from any fraudulent practices, shall be observed and obeyed by all in office in the State Militia.

The above propositions are accepted on the part of the United States, and the Secretary of War is directed to make the necessary orders upon the Ordnance, Quartermaster, Commissary, Pay, and Medical Departments to carry this agreement into effect. He will cause the necessary {p.456} staff officers in the United States service to be detailed for duty in connection with the Missouri State Militia, and will order them to make the necessary provision in their respective offices for fulfilling this agreement. All requisitions upon the different officers of the United States under the agreement to be made in substance in the same mode for the Missouri State Militia as similar requisitions are made for troops in the service of the United States, and the Secretary of War will cause any additional regulations that may be necessary to insure regularity and economy in carrying this agreement into effect to be adopted and communicated to the Governor of Missouri for the government of the Missouri State Militia.

NOVEMBER 6, 1861.

This plan, approved with the modification that the Governor stipulates that when he commissions a major-general of militia it shall be the same person at the time in command of the United States Department of the West, and in case the United States shall change such commander of the department, he, the Governor, will revoke the State commission given to the person relieved, and give one to the person substituted to the United States command of said department.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, December 21 [2], 1861.

I. Brigadier-General Denver, having reported for duty, is assigned to the command of all the troops within the State of Kansas. He will visit the different commands, make a complete inspection of each, and report their condition to department headquarters.

...

By order of Major-General Hunter:

EDWARD W. SMITH, Lieut., and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 22, 1861.

Col. GEORGE R. TODD, Commanding at Hermann, Mo.:

Send additional forces in direction of Warrenton to carry out instructions given yesterday.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 22, 1861.

Col. GEORGE R. TODD, Hermann, Mo.:

Use the means at hand at Hermann. Do not wait for ferry-boat from Jefferson City. General McKean has been ordered to let you know if he has one to spare; if so, he will send it. Be prompt in the execution of the instructions sent you.

By order of Major-General H. W. Halleck:

SCHUYLER HAMILTON, Brigadier-General.

{p.457}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., December 22, 1861.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding, Cairo, Ill.:

A trade being carried on between Jonesborough and the Mississippi River, thence with the Southern Army by the way of Neely’s Landing, I want Captain Stewart’s company to go to the neighborhood of the mouth of Big Muddy and, if practicable, break up the traffic. There is also a number of armed desperadoes in that vicinity that I hope may be broken up. The company will go on the steamer Memphis, taking with them ten days’ rations. Forage for their horses can be procured where they encamp, giving proper vouchers, to be settled by the quartermaster at this place. I would like the company to go today, if practicable; if not, early to-morrow. I will see Captain Stewart before he starts, and give him all the information in my possession on the subject.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

Protect North Missouri Railroad, and capture if possible those engaged in its destruction. You will send your disposable force across the river in the direction of Fulton to break up an encampment and capture all parties and squads moving west. A portion of Merrill’s Horse will be sent to Jefferson City by special train. [George] A. Williams’ company of First Infantry will be halted at Jefferson City, and for the present placed under your orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, MO., December 22, 1861.

General HALLECK, Major-General, Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: Citizens have just arrived from Webster County who inform me that the rebels are collecting hogs and cattle, which they are driving towards Arkansas. Some of the droves go in the direction of Batesville, Ark., others in the direction of Forsyth, Taney County, Missouri. It is rumored the rebels are collecting pork, hogs, and cattle on White River, near the Arkansas line, making that point a depot. The rebels are also robbing dwelling-houses of bed-clothing and wearing apparel. Such is the information from Laclede, Wright, Dallas, and Webster Counties.

Yours, respectfully,

JNO. S. PHELPS.

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OTTERVILLE, MO., December 22, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Department of Missouri:

Troops will occupy their former positions to-day.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.458}

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WARRENTON, MO., December 23, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I arrived with my command, 250 men, yesterday morning. Am repairing bridge above here. Track much injured at Mexico Station and cars at Wellsburg burned. A large force at Danville, 1,500, reported to be moving to Warrenton and Troy to attack our force. Send cavalry with re-enforcements. Bridge above Mexico burned. Paymaster Flynn here; gives information as to the road; says that firing was heard yesterday in the direction of Danville from Florence.

A. KREKEL, Major.

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PALMYRA, MO., December 23, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

On Saturday I ordered Colonel Bishop to send forward detachments of men to punish parties that tore up the track of the North Missouri Railroad. They overtook them, killed 10, took 17 prisoners, and captured 30 horses. Five of our men slightly wounded.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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OTTERVILLE, MO., December 23, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Price withdrew Rains’ division from north side of Osage on Friday. Moved whole camp 8 miles south up Sac River. None of his forces now north of Osage. This news is up to Friday last.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 23, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Major Caldwell came from Fulton this morning with some powder, the rebel band having been dispersed. I hear of others over the river, and design sending his cavalry battalion and five companies of the Eleventh Iowa Volunteers to Fulton to-morrow morning. The ice has interfered to-day. I do this under your former instructions. This will leave but eight companies of infantry here, three of cavalry (partially armed), and two of artillery, without guns. In view of anticipated troubles on this, have you any new instructions in regard to sending troops over the river? The crossing will soon be uncertain.

THOS. J. MCKEAN

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

Will send cavalry as soon as I get arms. Sent you a battalion last week from Jefferson City. Another battalion intended for you must stop temporarily at Jefferson City to operate on Fulton. Obliged to send another battalion of horses to Warrenton to catch bridge-burners. {p.459} Bishop just had a fight on the railroad between Renick and Hudson City. Killed 10, took 17 prisoners, and captured 30 horses. Our loss, 5 wounded.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Palmyra, Mo.:

You will immediately repair to North Missouri Railroad and take command of forces there. Our troops are moving from Jefferson City, Hermann, Warrenton, and Troy against bridge-burners. Kill or capture them. Keep me advised of your movements and force.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 23, 1861.

Lieut. Col. FRANK J. HERRON, Commanding at Pacific City, Mo.:

Look out for bridge-burners. It is reported that concerted attempts will be made to destroy railroads and telegraph lines. Shoot down every one making the attempt.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

[A like telegram was sent to the following places: Commanding officer at Sedalia, Otterville, Syracuse, Tipton, Jefferson City, Hermann, Rolla, Sulphur Springs, Mineral Point, Ironton, Chillicothe, Cameron, and Saint Joseph.]

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OTTERVILLE, December 23, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The cavalry force sent from Warrensburg to Lexington just returned. Burned both steam ferry-boats and foundery at that place. Took 2 captains, 1 lieutenant, and 4 men, horses, &c.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 87.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 23, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman, U. S. Volunteers, is hereby assigned to the command of the camp of instruction and post at Benton Barracks. He will have every armed regiment and company in his command ready for service at a moment’s warning, and will notify all concerned that when marching orders are received it is expected that they will be instantly obeyed. No excuses for delay will be admitted. General Sherman will immediately report to these headquarters what regiments and companies at Benton Barracks are ready for the field.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.460}

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PALMYRA, MO., December 24, 1861.

General HALLECK:

I leave here with 400 cavalry for Paris to-morrow; from thence to Sturgeon. Two companies will leave Hudson for Renick and will communicate with me. Snow 6 inches deep. Secessionists must feed us on this trip.

B. M. PRENTISS

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 24, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have no troops over the river now. Will have four companies of cavalry and five of infantry by to-morrow morning. The ice has prevented crossing since Major Caldwell returned yesterday morning with powder.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Hermann, Mo., December 24, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri:

Colonel Todd effected a crossing with the last of his men about 4 o’clock this morning. He has between 700 and 800 men now on the way to Warrenton, but they cannot have reached there yet.

J. HUNDHAUSEN, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Post.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 24, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I cannot get any troops across the river yet on account of the ice.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 24, 1861.

Brigadier-General POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

Have detachment of 1,000 men ready to move to Jefferson City if required. Three thousand insurgents reported in arms in Montgomery County.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 24, 1861.

Brigadier-General SIGEL, Rolla, Mo.:

You will assume command of all the troops at Rolla and vicinity, including the Fourth Division.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.461}

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OTTERVILLE, MO., December 24, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

My spies just in. Price has retreated to Humansville with his whole force. Part of his command going farther still. Will have full information to-night or to-morrow.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 25, 1861.

Brigadier-General SIGEL, Rolla, Mo.:

Get all your troops ready for the field. The cavalry as soon as possible.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Rolla, Mo., December 25, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have received your dispatch dated 25th, and will make the necessary preparations.

F. SIGEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 25, 1861.

Maj. A. KREKEL, Warrenton, Mo.:

Two pieces of artillery and a regiment of infantry will be sent up the road to-day. There is a regiment of infantry and squadron of horse at Fulton Eight hundred men from Hermann should join you this morning.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

–––

WARRENTON, MO., December 25, 1861.

General HALLECK:

General Henderson and myself will move up the railroad, so as to have possession of it up to Wellsville by Friday evening. We have not heard from the troops that crossed at Hermann and other points. We need 200 or 300 infantry, to protect the road as we pass on. Four hundred cavalry have arrived.

A. KREKEL, Major, Commanding.

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OTTERVILLE, MO., December 25, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Price in full retreat for Arkansas says it is by order from Richmond. Passed Humansville on Saturday.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.462}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 25, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Benton Barracks, Mo.:

Have the battery at the North Missouri Railroad depot at 3 o’clock this afternoon and the Iowa regiment at the same place at 8 o’clock to-morrow morning.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 25, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD:

GENERAL: You will immediately repair to Warrenton, on the North Missouri Railroad, and take command of the troops in that vicinity. One regiment of infantry and two companies of cavalry crossed at Jefferson City last night and will be at Fulton to-night. Seven or eight hundred men crossed at Hermann, and ought to be at Warrensburg to-day. The enemy is supposed to be at or near the railroad between Warrenton and Renick. Birge’s Sharpshooters, about 800, ought to be on the road somewhere about Renick and Centralia. General Prentiss is moving south by Paris with a body of cavalry and another body of cavalry is coming south from Hudson City. General Henderson, with State troops, is supposed to be in Lincoln County. It is hoped that most of the bridge-burners may be surrounded and captured. If possible, keep between them and the Missouri River. As soon as General Prentiss arrives in your vicinity he will have the general command, in virtue of his rank. Keep me advised by telegraph of everything, so that I may direct the movements of other troops in co-operation.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 92. *} HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 25, 1861.

...

III. Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis is assigned to the command of the Southwestern District of Missouri, including the country south of the Osage and west of the Meramec River.

...

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: My telegrams will have informed you of the success of General Pope’s expedition to cut off the forces moving from Lexington, Waverly, &c., to join Price. It is now pretty well ascertained {p.463} that these forces numbered about 5,000. Had the expedition moved twelve hours sooner it would probably have caught the whole. General Pope was held in readiness some forty-eight hours, but the general commanding north of the river failed to keep me informed of his movements. The result, however, is satisfactory, as the enemy was completely broken up and deprived of most of his supplies.

Recent events have proved that the information received soon after I assumed the command, that an insurrection of some 12,000 or 15,000 armed men had been organized north of the Missouri River, was correct. The two expeditions sent from Saint Joseph and Jefferson City through the river counties broke up a part of this organization and forced those who had already taken arms to move south, where they were captured and scattered by Pope’s forces. The insurrection in Lincoln, Pike, Ralls, Monroe, and Adrian Counties broke out before they heard of the capture of the rebels at Shawnee Mound and Milford. The burning of the railroad bridges and destruction of the telegraph lines formed a part of the plan. I had anticipated this, and directed General Prentiss to have the railroad bridges well guarded before he went to Saint Joseph. These orders were probably very imperfectly executed. Had I moved General Pope’s command at Sedalia against Price before partially breaking up these insurrectionary organizations I should have had some 15,000 insurgents in his rear, without the means of re-enforcing him, on account of the destruction of the railroads and telegraphs. As it is, the insurrection is pretty well crushed out; the injuries to the roads will not materially affect our military operations, and Price’s army is completely cut off from all hopes of re-enforcements or supplies. He is believed to be still in the vicinity of Osceola, in such a position that I cannot well reach him or get in his rear, as he is nearer to the Arkansas line than I am, and even than I am to him. I am satisfied that he will retreat the moment I make a move, and as a majority of the people are secessionists, he is kept fully advised of everything I do. It is barely possible that I may throw a large cavalry force in his rear and flank so as to greatly embarrass his retreat, but unfortunately our cavalry is but half armed. I am waiting most impatiently for the 11,000 arms you promised, hoping that they may partly supply the wants of the cavalry arm. The forces at Rolla are ready, and will move the moment that arms are received. Price’s army will certainly be driven out of the State, and possibly, though not very probably, a portion of it may be captured.

These bridge burnings are the most annoying features of the war. They are effected by small parties of mounted men, disguised as farmers, but well armed. They overpower or overawe the guards, set fire to the bridges, and escape before a force can be collected against them. Examples of severe punishment are the only remedies. I shall carry out in this respect my General Orders, No. 32, inclosed herewith.

If I receive arms in time to carry out my present plans in Missouri I think I shall be able to strongly re-enforce Cairo and Paducah for ulterior operations by the early part of February.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 32.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 22, 1861.

I. Insurgent rebels scattered through the northern counties of this State, which are occupied by our troops, under the guise of peaceful {p.464} citizens, have resumed their occupation of burning bridges and destroying railroads and telegraph wires. These men are guilty of the highest crime known to the code of war and the punishment is death. Any one caught in the act will be immediately shot, and any one accused of this crime will be arrested and placed in close confinement until his case can be examined by a military commission, and, if found guilty, he also will suffer death.

II. Where injuries are done to railroads or telegraph lines the commanding officer of the nearest post will immediately impress into service, for repairing damages, the slaves of all secessionists in the vicinity, and, if necessary, the secessionists themselves and their property. Any pretended Union man having information of intended attempts to destroy such roads and lines or of the guilty parties, who does not communicate such intention to the proper authorities, and give aid and assistance in arresting and punishing them, will be regarded as particeps criminis, and treated accordingly.

III. Hereafter the towns and counties in which such destruction of public property takes place will be made to pay the expenses of all repairs, unless it be shown that the people of such towns or counties could not have prevented it on account of the superior force of the enemy.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP OF INSTRUCTION, December 26, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that the Seventh Iowa, Lieutenant-Colonel Parrott commanding, can put into the field about 350 well armed and equipped men, and that the Thirteenth Missouri, Col. C. J. Wright, reports for duty in the field 465 men, armed with Austrian muskets. There are already two detachments absent from their regiments and other disorganizing causes, of which I inclose their colonel’s report, but I have notified him that the general’s orders are he must hold his men ready for immediate service. The two companies of the Third Missouri, Capt. Joseph Indest commanding, have 43 rifled muskets and 69 smooth-bore muskets, and might be used for guard to a bridge or like purpose. The two companies of the Forty-third Illinois, Capt. Joseph Stiffin, 95 men, are armed with foreign muskets, and might also be used for a guard. The above are the only bodies of armed infantry at Benton Barracks. Of the cavalry, the First Iowa, Colonel Warren-aggregates present for duty, 386-is well equipped except in pistols and carbines. They could put in the field the above number of men, of which 200 would have Colt’s pistols. The Third Iowa Cavalry, Col. C. Bussey commanding-aggregate present for duty, 655-is also armed with sabers, and has 340 Colt’s revolvers. All other cavalry without fire-arms.

Fletcher’s battery of artillery is composed of four smooth 6-pounder guns and two 12-pounder howitzers, with horses, harness, and ammunition, but none have been hitched up. I will cause it to be pushed in drill. The men have no swords or pistols, but these are not essential.

{p.465}

Two guns of Spoor’s battery remain here, and will soon be ready. The Minnesota battery has 149 men, but no guns, horses, or anything in the way of equipment. There are two batteries attached to the Second and Third Michigan Cavalry which have not yet been harnessed up, but shall have immediate attention. Of the unarmed regiments, the two regiments of Michigan cavalry have fine material-men and horses; also Curtis’ Horse and the Second Iowa. Ask the general to give as long notice as possible when he orders away any regiment or detachment, for these men are very inexperienced, and say they can start at a given time, when they cannot.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 26, 1861.

General ASBOTH, Rolla, Mo.:

GENERAL: It would seem, from the report of Major Waring to you (referred to these headquarters), that he had, in compliance with your instructions delivered to a Captain Holland a fugitive in his camp, claimed by captain Holland as the property of his father-in-law. This is contrary to the intent of General Orders, No. 3. The object of these orders is to prevent any person in the Army from acting in the capacity of negro-catcher or negro-stealer. The relation between the slave and his master or pretended master is not a matter to be determined by military officers, except in the single case provided for by Congress. This matter in all other cases must be decided by the civil authorities. One object in keeping fugitive slaves out of our camp is to keep clear of all such questions. Masters or pretended masters must establish the rights of property to the negroes as best they may without our assistance or interference, except where the law authorizes such interference. Orders, No. 3, do not apply to the authorized private servants of officers nor the negroes employed by proper authority in the camps. It applies only to fugitive slaves. The prohibition to admit them within our lines does not prevent the exercise of all proper offices of humanity in giving them food and clothing outside where such offices are necessary to prevent suffering.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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PALMYRA, MO., December 26, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Chariton Bridge, two span, 150 feet each, Stockton and Collas burned last night. Force in pursuit. Have here 33 bridge-burners and accomplices. What shall I do with them? Have witnesses against them here.

HENRY BINMORE, Assistant Adjutant-General. {p.466}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

If Merrill’s Horse can be crossed over, send it to Columbia to operate against the bridge-burners.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

Lieut. Col. J. HUNDHAUSEN, Hermann, Mo.:

A small force should be sent to New Haven to guard the ferry-boats and prevent the enemy from crossing over. General Schofield will be at Danville to-night with a large force.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

Insurrection in northwestern counties very serious. If troops can be crossed over at Booneville, send 400 or 500 horse to Fayette to operate against bridge-burners.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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OTTERVILLE, December 26, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Four hundred and fifty cavalry march to Booneville to-day, with orders to scour the country from Booneville and Glasgow to Sturgeon and Renick; to disarm everybody, and arrest all suspicious persons.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

If possible send word by messenger to the commanding officer at Fulton not to move towards Concord before to-morrow morning.

H. W. HALLECK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD, Warrenton, Mo.:

A cavalry force has been ordered to Columbia and another to Fayette, but it is not known yet whether they can cross at Booneville and Jefferson {p.467} City I have telegraphed to the latter place, to direct, if possible, the commanding officer at Fulton not to move on Concord till to-morrow morning. Regiment of infantry will join you to-day. Look out for the bridges in your rear and have them well guarded.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WARRENTON, MO., December 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General HENDERSON, Truxton, Lincoln County, Mo.:

GENERAL: Major Krekel informs me that you will be at Truxton to-night with a force of infantry, and that a part of your command, cavalry, as he understands, marches from Ashley towards Wellsville to-day. I desire you to march your entire command to Wellsville tomorrow to co-operate with me. I shall send aid from Danville and Shamrock towards Mexico. I will either accompany this latter force or go with another column, via Williamsburg, towards Concord. When you arrive at Wellsville communicate with the force near Shamrock, which will have orders from as to its and your future movements. Other columns are moving in various directions, in the hope of capturing the insurgents in the vicinity of Mexico and Concord. Keep me advised of everything of importance. I regret very much that the supplies for your men could not have reached them before this expedition. I have ordered them to be sent to this place, where I hope you will be able to get them in a few days.

Yours, very truly,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 26, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

The messenger I sent to Fulton sent back word that 3,500 rebels were marching from Mexico to attack our forces at Fulton. He thinks his information reliable. Have you any troops near there? I can send none before to-morrow.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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WARRENTON, MO., December 26, 1861.

General HALLECK:

I have information that Colonel Todd, of Hermann, is at Danville, and find from 500 to 1,000 of the enemy between Danville and Williamsburg. Henderson will be at Truxton to-day with a part of his force, while another part will leave Ashley and move towards Wellsville. I will move Henderson from Montgomery City and Wellsville towards Mexico to-morrow. As soon as the infantry arrives from Saint Louis I will move to Danville, reaching that place to-night; thence, via Williamsburg, to Concord to-morrow. Should not a force be sent to Columbia and thence towards Mexico? Who is in command of the force at Fulton? He should not move towards Concord before to-morrow morning.

J. M. SCHOFIELD

{p.468}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 34.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 26, 1861.

I. In virtue of authority conferred by the President of the United States, martial law, heretofore declared in this city, will be enforced. In virtue of the same authority, martial law is hereby declared, and will be enforced in and about all railroads in this State.

It is not intended by this declaration to interfere with the jurisdiction of any civil court which is loyal to the Government of the United States and which will aid the military authorities in enforcing order and punishing crimes.

...

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS., NORTH MISSOURI R. R., Warrenton, Mo., December 26, 1861.

In obedience to orders from the major-general commanding the Department of the Missouri, I assume command of all the troops in this vicinity.

...

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Rolla, Mo.:

Telegram this morning from Sedalia says that information has just been received that main part of Price’s army passed through Springfield on Monday last in full retreat. Too late to reach him, except by cavalry. No infantry movement will therefore be made. Cavalry must get supplies as far as Possible on the road.

HI. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS PILOT KNOB, December 27, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

For two days there have been indications of attempt to destroy railroad above Big River. I have given such orders as I hope will prevent the success of their schemes. I am indirectly informed that two rebels have already been shot at Victoria. I have ordered all taken in such attempts to be shot without delay. I have had Big River re-enforced, and ordered Colonel Murphy, at Sulphur Springs, to move on his whole command whenever convinced that the rebels are in force between him and Potosi. I have sent a cavalry force above Potosi to scout the country. The guards are all watchful.

W. P. CARLIN.

{p.469}

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ROLLA, MO., December 27, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Just arrived. General’s dispatch received. News corroborated here of Price’s retreat. Will send forward cavalry, but cannot expect to overtake him, since he has 120 miles and five days the start. My only hope is to accelerate his flight and embarrass his rear. If, as most likely, he makes a stand at his old station, near Neosho, he can only be routed with a considerable force of all arms.

SAML. R. CURTIS.

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OTTERVILLE, MO., December 27, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Price passed through Springfield on Sunday evening; large part of his army next day. No enemy left in this section. Price destroyed the bridge at Warsaw.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FLORENCE, MO., December 27, 1861-1 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Todd’s force will reach Centreville to-night. The Third Iowa will be at Flint Point and General Henderson at Wellsville I have no intelligence yet from the force at Fulton. The enemy has gone from Williamsburg towards Concord. I expect to move on Concord and Mexico to-morrow. I hear nothing from Prentiss.

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 28, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our troops at Fulton marched on Concord yesterday and made about a dozen prisoners. The rebels dispersed. Our troops are now in Fulton, without having met any of the troops you sent up on the other side.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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ROLLA, MO., December 28, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Will move the cavalry 8 a.m. to-morrow morning. Supplies so scarce this side of Springfield I will expedite progress by sending some. With your leave I will follow in support with artillery and infantry as far as Lebanon, creating a depot for the cavalry to fall back on. This movement will increase the stampede in Price’s army, and the force will be convenient in any emergency.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

{p.470}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., December 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Rolla, Mo.:

Infantry and artillery will not move until further orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., December 28, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have heard nothing official from Fulton The five companies of infantry and four of cavalry were there on the evening of the 26th (Thursday). I did hear yesterday that 6,000 rebels were about Fulton the day before, but it probably was our own men.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, December 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

Send re-enforcements to Fayette-say 500 horse. Insurrection in the north increasing.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., December 28, 1861.

Brigadier-General POPE, Otterville, Mo.:

GENERAL: Major-General Hunter has been requested to send the companies of the Seventh Missouri and Eighth Iowa and Missouri Light Artillery to Kansas City and Independence, to report to you by letter. You will direct the First Kansas Infantry what route to pursue to those places. The five companies Thirty-ninth Ohio cannot be withdrawn from General Prentiss at present. The regiment, however, will soon be united. The cavalry from Rolla are in pursuit of Price. If the report of his flight from the State proves true, a considerable portion of your command will probably be assigned to other duty. You will therefore make arrangements at La Mine Cantonment for a smaller force. General McClellan is now sick. As soon as he is able to attend to business you will probably receive instructions in reference to new operations. This is confidential, and must not be repeated. Let it be generally understood that your troops are all going into winter quarters. La Mine should be made as strong as possible for, say, two or three regiments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.471}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 29.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, December 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. M. Palmer is assigned to the command of the cantonment at La Mine Crossing and of all the troops in the vicinity.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Jefferson City, Mo., December 29, 1861.

Col. LEWIS MERRILL, Commanding Merrill’s Horse:

SIR: In addition to the orders given you on the 26th instant to hold yourself in readiness to proceed to Columbia, the general directs me to instruct you to march to that point as soon as it is practicable to get your command over the river. Your duties, as heretofore made known to you, will be to operate against the rebels generally; to disperse or capture all organized bands; seize all arms, &c., intended for use against the United States. There will be other United States forces at Fulton, Danville, and probably at Mexico, with whom you can co-operate or communicate whenever you may deem it proper to do so.

By command of General McKean, commanding this post:

WM. T. CLARK, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ROLLA, MO., December 29, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Twenty-four cavalry companies, Colonel Carr commanding in my absence, are moving towards Springfield, on a road a little south of the common traveled way. Scouting party drove out rebels from Lebanon Thursday and left there Friday morning. The report there was that Springfield was occupied with 2,200 rebels. Will report by letter.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT, Rolla, December 29, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I arrived here 8 p.m. Thursday night and immediately rode to the camp of Brigadier-General Sigel, about 3 miles from town. I communicated to him the wishes of the major-general in regard to moving the cavalry forthwith, and requested him to order immediate preparation for the movements.

The general not having received the order placing me in command of the district and I not having assumed command (wishing to treat the general with all possible courtesy by conferring with him beforehand), it was with some expressions of doubt as to my rank and authority {p.472} that he finally issued the order to the cavalry to report when they could move.

Yesterday morning your telegraphic copy of Order 92 was received by General Sigel, and at his request I gave him the date of my commission and showed him our relative position in the Army Registers.

I then assumed command (see Orders, No. 1), and immediately issued Special Orders, No. 1, to move the cavalry at 8 this morning, which was, according to my judgment, the earliest moment they could be got ready to start.

Those best acquainted with the road say the route to Springfield has been stripped of everything near the road, and the country being very rough, and side roads, it became necessary to carry some supplies, which were accordingly provided and ready at the proper hour this morning. As a further precaution against scarcity of supplies, the command will go on a road south of the road so often traversed, passing by Cassage’s, crossing Big Piney at McCourtney’s, and the Gasconade at Wisdom’s Ford, aiming to strike the old military road 7 miles this side of Springfield. I send copy of instructions given to Colonel Carr.

The movement of the troops displayed the usual lack of discipline. I had urged exact time and was early in the saddle myself, but it was after 9 before the bright warm sun was reflected from the long line of sabers which were displayed in passing off in form of review.

I left the command 4 miles out, about 1,500 strong, in good spirits, and well equipped for the service.

I will take another occasion to report further details in regard to this command. General Asboth has been very cordial, and so I can say of the officers generally, especially the Iowa and Illinois troops. General Sigel complains of ill health, but seems able for duty. Moving the troops would do them good. They have made very little defense against the cold, and some of them on bleak hills will be ordered into timber valleys for the purpose of better providing against cold. They are generally in tents, most of them very good.

I expressed my desire to occupy Lebanon with forces of infantry and artillery. Some point farther south, where our regular trains could easily transport supplies from the end of the railroad, would not increase the expense of the command, but give us a better stand-point to operate against the enemy. Scattering bands in the counties of Howard and Douglas deserve attention; but the general impression here is Price will make a stand at or near Neosho or retreat beyond the Ozark Mountains. In either event our cavalry movement cannot do much more than embarrass the enemy in his foraging excursions and increase desertions from his ranks, which are now very great.

I am organizing the defense of the railroad between this point and Pacific City. I design to locate a U. S. rifle cavalry regiment on the line, and have log block-houses, such as I had made on the Iron Mountain Road erected on this by the troops themselves. Small cannon, like mountain howitzers, such as they make in Quincy, Ill., and costing about $130 each, would, in my judgment, be an economical addition to these block-houses, and diminish the numbers now required to prevent the mounted bands from burning bridges.

Hoping the general will approve my exertions to organize this district and aid him in expelling the enemy from Missouri, I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.473}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1. 5} HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MO., Rolla, December 28, 1861.

Pursuant to Special Orders No 92, Department of Missouri, the undersigned assumes command of the portion of country in Missouri south of the Osage and west of the Meramec Rivers.

Commanders of divisions, brigades, and detachments will report to me forthwith the strength and position of their forces.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF Mo., Rolla, Mo., December 28, 1861.

Nine companies of Illinois Third Cavalry (Colonel Carr); six companies of Frémont Hussars (Major Waring); four companies of Major Wright’s battalion (Major Wright); four companies of Missouri cavalry (Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis); one company of Thirty-sixth Illinois Cavalry, and Captain Gerster’s company of pioneers, will march to-morrow morning at 8 o’clock. All extra baggage, bands of music, and surplus equipment will be left in charge of proper officers.

Colonel Carr will take command and proceed under special instructions received at these headquarters.

Generals of divisions, brigades, and regiments to which these corps belong will see that proper equipment for sixteen days’ expedition is fully supplied.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MISSOURI, Rolla, Mo., December 28, 1861.

Col. E. A. CARR, Third Illinois Cavalry:

COLONEL: In my absence you will command the cavalry expedition which is ordered to move from this point to-morrow morning at 8 o’clock. At an early period you will ascertain and report to me the strength of your command, which I estimate at 1,700.

You are expected to go beyond Springfield, or as far as to feel the enemy, and, if in broken ranks, fall on him and cut him to pieces. If found in superior numbers, and with artillery and infantry in force, you will not give him battle, but strive to draw him up by cautious and safe retrograde movements.

You will carefully husband your supplies by adopting measures for using whatever you can procure on the way. Let all foraging be done under orders of prudent officers, giving certificates of the amount and value of property taken of good Union men, but giving no certificates to those who are in rebellion against the United States. Persons deserting from the retreating army and surrendering to us may be received, and discharged upon taking the oath of allegiance to the United States and obligating themselves to forfeit their lives property, and honor if they betray our National Government or return to the rebel army.

You will avoid the incumbrance of your command with contraband {p.474} property by sending it back to these headquarters at your earliest convenience. You will advise me frequently of your progress, and avoid undue exposures to the enemy, and the difficulties of procuring supplies.

Approaching near the enemy, leave your train with a portion of your command and dash down upon him with the forage and rations you can carry on your horses, hurrying back to the support of your train.

I am, colonel, very truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, December 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 27th and your telegram of last evening are received. I congratulate you and your command on the affair of Mount Zion. Keep on doing so, and the rebels will soon be broken up. Give me a full report at your earliest convenience.* I hope before you receive this you will have communicated with Generals Schofield and Henderson, and also with our cavalry, about 1,000, in the vicinity of Fayette and Glasgow. Handle these bridge-burners without gloves.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 43.

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WARRENTON, MO., December 30, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

There are now 30 men of my command at Dardenne Bridge; two companies at Perruque; one company at Wellsville; two companies and 60 cavalry here, and three of infantry and one of cavalry at Florence. Our troops are reported as being in Mexico. Road repaired to Wellsville; will be repaired to Martinsburg by to-morrow night. Rebels are reported as disbanding. The country is quiet, but in great fears of the cavalry, who have scouted extensively and dealt out severe blows.

A. KREKEL.

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[DECEMBER 31, 1861.-For return of troops in the District of Cairo, see operations in Kentucky, &c., Series I, Vol. VII, p. 525.]

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[JANUARY 1, 1862.-For Lincoln to Halleck and Halleck to Lincoln, in reference to co-operation with Bud, see operations in Kentucky, &c., Series I, Vol. VII, p. 526.]

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HEADQUARTERS, Jefferson City, Mo., January 1, 1862.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in accordance with directions heretofore received from department headquarters there have been {p.475} sent from this post across the Missouri River the following-named troops, viz: Five companies of the Eleventh Regiment Iowa Volunteers, and four companies of the Third Iowa Cavalry now at Fulton, in Callaway County; also a detachment of Merrill’s Horse, numbering about 300, which will probably be in Columbia, Boone County, tomorrow.

I would recommend that troops be kept at these places during the entire winter or until the bands of rebels infesting that neighborhood are effectually dispersed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Rolla, Mo.:

Information received here that Price does not intend to leave the State, but to return with additional artillery and troops sent him from Arkansas, which he fell back to receive, directing his men to destroy in the mean time all railroad bridges and telegraphs. You will therefore have your forces ready for a movement.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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MARTINSBURG, January 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have thoroughly scoured the whole country as far west as the field of Prentiss’ fight. Have captured about 50 prisoners, among the rest Captain Owen, the leader of the bridge-burners about High Hill, and Col. Jeff. Jones. Colonels Todd and Morton are now coming in towards Danville and Wellsville. Most of the bridge-burners not killed or captured have passed back across the railroad. I am disposing my troops so as to protect the road and clean the country northwest of it. If it is deemed necessary to keep me in this command I would like to return to Saint Louis for a day or two.

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 1, 1862.

Hon. T. EWING, Lancaster, Ohio:

SIR: I thank you for your letter of the 30th ultimo.* I am satisfied that nothing but the severest punishment can prevent the burning of railroad bridges and the great destruction of human life. I shall punish all I can catch, although I have no doubt there will be a newspaper howl against me as a blood-thirsty monster. These incendiaries have destroyed in the last ten days $150,000 worth of railroad property, notwithstanding that there are more than 10,000 troops kept guarding the {p.476} railroads in this State. A plot was discovered on the 20th ultimo to burn all the bridges in the State and at the same time to fire this city. Fortunately a part of the intended mischief was prevented. This is not usually done by armed and open enemies, but by pretended quiet citizens, living on their farms. A bridge or building is set on fire, and the culprit an hour after is quietly plowing or working in his field. The civil courts can give us no assistance, as they are very generally unreliable. There is no alternative but to enforce martial law. Our army here is almost as much in a hostile country as it was when in Mexico.

I have determined to put down these insurgents and bridge-burners with a strong hand. It must be done; there is no other remedy. If I am sustained by the Government and country, well and good; if not, I will take the consequences.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 1, 1862.

I. In carrying on war in a portion of country occupied or threatened to be attacked by an enemy, whether within or without the territory of the United States, crimes and military offenses are frequently committed which are not triable or punishable by courts-martial and which are not within the jurisdiction of any existing civil court. Such cases, however, must be investigated and the guilty parties punished. The good of society and the safety of the army imperiously demand this. They must therefore be taken cognizance of by the military power; but, except in cases of extreme urgency, a military commander should not himself attempt to decide upon the guilt or innocence of individuals. On the contrary, it is the usage and custom of war among all civilized nations to refer such cases to a duly-constituted military tribunal, composed of reliable officers, who, acting under the solemnity of an oath and the responsibility always attached to a court of record, will examine witnesses, determine the guilt or innocence of the parties accused, and fix the punishment. This is usually done by courts-martial; but in our country these courts have a very limited jurisdiction, both in regard to persons and offenses. Many classes of persons cannot be arraigned before such courts for any offense whatsoever, and many crimes committed, even by military officers, enlisted men, or camp retainers, cannot be tried under the Rules and Articles of War. Military commissions must be resorted to for such cases, and these commissions should be ordered by the same authority, be constituted in a similar manner, and their proceedings be conducted according to the same general rules as courts-martial, in order to prevent abuses which might otherwise arise.

II. As much misapprehension has arisen in this department in relation to this subject the following rules are published for the information of all concerned:

1st. Military commissions can be ordered only by the General-in-Chief of the Army or by the commanding officer of the department, and the proceedings must be sent to Headquarters for revision.

2d. They will be composed of not less than three members, one of whom will act as judge-advocate and recorder, where no officer is designated {p.477} for that duty. A larger number will be detailed where the public service will permit.

3d. All the proceedings will be recorded and signed by the president and judge-advocate and recorder, as in the case of courts-martial. These proceedings will be governed by the same rules as courts-martial, so far as they may be applicable.

4th. Civil offenses cognizable by civil courts, whenever such loyal courts exist, will not be tried by a military commission. It should therefore be stated in every application for a commission whether or not there is any loyal civil court to which the civil offenses charged can be referred for trial. It must be observed, however, that many offenses which in time of peace are civil offenses become in time of war military offenses, and are to be tried by a military tribunal, even in places where civil tribunals exist.

5th. No case which, by the Rules and Articles of War, is triable by a court-martial will be tried by a military commission. Charges, therefore, preferred against prisoners before a military commission should be “Violation of the laws of war,” and never “Violation of the Rules and Articles of War,” which are statutory provisions, defining and modifying the general laws of war in particular cases and in regard to particular persons and offenses. They do not apply to cases not embraced in the statute; but all cases so embraced must be tried by a court-martial. In other cases we must be governed by the general code of war.

6th. Treason, as a distinct offense, is defined by the Constitution, and must be tried by courts duly constituted by law; but certain acts of a treasonable character, such as conveying information to the enemy, acting as spies, &c., are military offenses, triable by military tribunals, and punishable by military authority.

7th. The fact that those persons who are now carrying on hostilities against the lawful authorities of the United States are rebels and traitors to the Government does not deprive them of any of the rights of war, so far as the military authorities are concerned. In our intercourse with the duly-authorized forces of the so-called Confederate States and in the treatment of prisoners of war taken from such forces we must be governed by the usages and customs of war in like cases. But the rights so given to such prisoners by the laws of war do not, according to the same code, exempt them from trial and punishment by the proper courts for treason or other offenses against the Government. The rights which they may very properly claim as belligerents under the general rules of belligerent intercourse-commercia belli-cannot exempt them from the punishment to which they may have subjected themselves as citizens under the general laws of the land.

8th. Again, a soldier duly enrolled and authorized to act in a military capacity in the enemy’s service is not, according to the code military, individually responsible for the taking of human life in battle, siege, &c., while at the same time he is held individually responsible for any act which he may commit in violation of the laws of war. Thus he cannot be punished by a military tribunal for committing acts of hostility which are authorized by the laws of war, but if he has committed murder, robbery, theft, arson, &c., the fact of his being a prisoner of war does not exempt him from trial by a military tribunal.

9th. And, again, while the code of war gives certain exemptions to a soldier regularly in the military service of an enemy, it is a well-established principle that insurgents, not militarily organized under the laws of the State, predatory partisans, and guerrilla bands are {p.478} not entitled to such exemptions; such men are not legitimately in arms, and the military name and garb which they have assumed cannot give a military exemption to the crimes which they may commit. They are, in a legal sense, mere freebooters and banditti, and are liable to the same punishment which was imposed upon guerrilla bands by Napoleon in Spain and by Scott in Mexico.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HEADQUARTERS, NORTH MISSOURI R. R., Wellsville, January 1, 1862.

The practice of plundering and robbing peaceable citizens and of wantonly destroying private property has become so prevalent in some portion of this command as to require the most vigorous measures for its suppression.

Any soldier who shall be guilty of either of the crimes above mentioned will be immediately arrested and placed in irons.

Any officer who shall fail to arrest and bring to trial any soldier, whether of his own command or not, whom he shall detect in the commission of such crimes, or who shall fail to use his utmost endeavors to prevent the men of his own command from committing them, will be regarded as particeps criminis and be punished accordingly.

This order will be read and explained to each company of the command on parade.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

H. HESCOCK, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cario, Ill., January 1, 1862.

I. The whole of the forces at Bird’s Point are hereby consolidated into one brigade, commanded by Brig. Gen. E. A. Paine, and will be known as the Second Brigade. The force at Fort Holt, Ky., commanded by Col. John Cook, will hereafter be known as the Third Brigade, and the command at Cape Girardeau, Mo., as the Fourth Brigade.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

[JNO. A. RAWLINS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SEDALIA, January 2, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Two of my spies just in from Springfield humbugged Price completely; went through all his camps safely; saw everything. Train of forty wagons just in from the south with supplies, ammunition, &c., as well as artillery. Has in all sixty-three pieces; none rifled. Horses very poor.

A considerable force at Bolivar. Price’s whole force not over 16,000. {p.479} McCulloch is at Fayetteville, Ark. Price says he is going to Jefferson City as soon as they are organized. At present he has no discipline, no roll-calls, no sentinels, nor picket to prevent passing in and out of Springfield. Rains drunk all the time. Price also drinking too much. No Union men between 8 miles from here and them.

FRED’K STEELE.

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WELLSVILLE, January 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri:

GENERAL: Your messenger arrived with dispatches last night. I will at once institute measures to carry out your instructions as far as is In my power. After sending you a dispatch from Cross Plains on the 28th, finding it impossible to get any information on which to base my operations, I went the next morning with a small force to Mexico, where I obtained the secession account of General Prentiss’ fight. I at once sent three columns, under General Henderson, Colonel Todd, and Colonel Hare, from Mexico, Concord, and Fulton to cut off the retreat of the insurgents. I have not yet heard the result of these expeditions. Being far from any telegraph station and it being no longer possible for you to order other troops to co-operate with me, I did not attempt to communicate with you until my arrival at Martinsburg.

Before leaving Mexico I succeeded in getting news from General Prentiss at Sturgeon. He was about starting for Hudson, and directed me to take charge of affairs along this road. I have left a part of General Henderson’s command at Mexico, and will distribute my command from that place to Saint Charles, so as to give protection to the road and pick up the scattering bridge-burners. Many of them have passed back across the road and seem to be attempting to conceal themselves.

I have no doubt we will be able to arrest nearly all of them in time.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, NORTH MISSOURI R. R., Wellsville, January 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General HENDERSON, Mexico, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have heard nothing yet of the result of the expedition towards Columbia, but presume you returned to Mexico last night or this morning.

I wish you to keep at Mexico a force sufficient for any emergency and to use the remainder in scouting the country to the north and east of you.

I am establishing posts along the road to give it protection and to serve as centers of operations.

It will doubtless soon be necessary to make expeditions into Pike and Lincoln counties. In this I shall require the co-operation of your troops on account of their intimate knowledge of the country and people.

Keep me advised of all your movements and of all important information you get.

I am going to Montgomery-this evening and farther down to-morrow.

I will send you supplies of clothing and ammunition as far as the {p.480} road is repaired and inform you by telegraph, so that you can have men there to receive it.

I inclose copies of General Orders, Nos. 2 and 3. No. 2 is intended chiefly for my German cavalry, but will of course be applied to any case that comes within its terms.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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ROLLA, January 2, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

My cavalry arrived Tuesday night, as I said, 52 miles from Springfield, 15 miles south of Lebanon. Two hundred and fifty rebels reported in Lebanon. A company 6 miles southeast collecting pork; another 4 miles southwest reported. Four thousand in Springfield. Will attack camps about Lebanon. Will concentrate cavalry there. All right here.

SAML. R. CURTIS.

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ROLLA, January 2, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Rebels fled from Lebanon before our cavalry arrived. The forage camp southwest from Colonel Carr was routed from breakfast. The rebels were pursued miles. Some of them will never return. Four prisoners and a lot of cattle and sheep taken.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT, Rolla, January 2, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have telegraphed the substance of news from my cavalry, which halted 52 miles this side of Springfield. Before receiving that news I had ordered the four cavalry companies from Salem to Lebanon, and also two more companies from this place, to support the rear of Carr’s command, and drive out the rebels, who I heard had returned to Lebanon on Monday. Colonel Carr’s news of 40,000 at Springfield was received from Lebanon. There was also a report that 500 more rebel cavalry was hourly expected at Lebanon. Consequently Colonel Carr halted and sent five of his companies to Lebanon. You understand Carr’s command passed east of Lebanon. The messenger which brought dispatches saw no force, and the 40,000 at Springfield is of course an exaggeration, but all accounts concur in the opinion that Price has been considerably re-enforced.

The general’s dispatch directing me to prepare to march was duly received. I have had quartermasters and commissaries waiting night and day, but how this matter stands is not yet ascertained. The country is generally a rough, unsettled wilderness, every road a defile, and supply {p.481} arrangements must be extensive; do the best we can. Some point, either Waynesville or Lebanon, will, in my judgment, have to be made a depot and reserve location in the event of a forward movement. It will lessen very much the amount of wagons necessary for the movement. A large portion of this force could move to such a point very soon-I think any day-but supply trains would have to constantly move to and fro from this place. Captain Sheridan will be able to report more accurately his power to supply in the course of to-day, and I will give more accurate intelligence.

Meantime I have the honor to be, very respectfully, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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FORT LEAVENWORTH, January 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Price, who has only 10,000, is undoubtedly moving towards Memphis. If you will send Sigel to Springfield I can send a force to encourage John Ross and the Union Creeks.

D. HUNTER, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 2, 1862.

Major-General HUNTER, Fort Leavenworth, Kane.:

Price was at Springfield two days ago, and has probably been attacked by 2,000 of our cavalry to-day. If necessary, they will soon be sustained by infantry and artillery. He will leave this either willingly or forcibly. His day is over. Encourage Johnston, Ross, and friendly Creeks.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 2, 1862.

CHARLES C. WHITTLESEY, Esq., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Your letter of the 31st has been received and its contents noted.* You are entirely mistaken in relation to the animus of General Price. The fairest offers have been made to him but he scouts them, and says he will fight the Federal Government to the bitter end. The time for conciliation, I am sorry to say, has passed. Nothing but the military power can now put down the rebellion and save Union men in this State. It is useless now to try any other remedy. Your suggestions about detecting railroad bridge-burners will receive due consideration and be acted on where circumstances will permit.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found. {p.482}

MONTGOMERY CITY, January 3, 1862.

Brigadier-General PRENTISS, Palmyra, Mo.:

GENERAL: I received your letter of yesterday this afternoon as I was about starting from Wellsville I reciprocate most cordially the feelings you express, and do not doubt for a moment that we can co-operate harmoniously in the important work in which we are engaged.

I shall gladly embrace the privilege of writing you freely in respect to the affairs of this district, and hope that ere long I may have the pleasure of forming a personal acquaintance and lasting friendship with a general whom I have already learned to esteem so highly.

I have left General Henderson with his command of State troops at Mexico, with instructions to operate in the country north and east of that point. I presume the force between Mexico and Hudson is sufficient for the protection of the road; if not, please inform me, and I will send a force for that purpose. I am occupying all the important points along the road from Mexico to Saint Charles, and organizing a regular system of scouting, by which I hope to capture the small bands of rebels that are now scattered over this part of the State. I do not think they will make any further attempts at organization, but, as you say, we must give them no rest until we have caught and brought to punishment those guilty of the destruction of the road and their accomplices.

The only cavalry force now at my disposal is a battalion of Germans, utterly worthless for this kind of service. If I trust them out of my sight for a moment they will plunder and rob friends and foes alike. I have arrested two of the officers and have five of the men in irons. I have asked General Halleck to recall this battalion and send me civilized human beings in their stead. If this be done, as I doubt not it will, I shall hope to carry on my operations with success, and without making more enemies than friends to the Union.

I shall go to Saint Louis to-morrow night and return on Monday, when I hope to hear from you again. I congratulate you, general, upon your recent success, and hope that it may be often repeated, until the rebels shall be driven from the State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., January 3, 1862.

Major-General HUNTER, Commanding Kansas Department:

It is the intention of the Government to order me to report to you for an active winter’s campaign. They have ordered General Denver to another department. They have ordered to report to you eight regiments cavalry, three of infantry, and three batteries, in addition to your present force. They have also ordered you, in conjunction with the Indian Department, to organize 4,000 Indians. Mr. Doles, Commissioner, will come out with me.

J. H. LANE.

{p.483}

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HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY EXPEDITION, Camp Ruggles, on Gasconade, Laclede County, Mo., Jan. 3, 1862.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Hdqrs. Southwestern Diet., Dept. of Missouri, Rolla, Mo.:

SIR: I sent off this morning a report by the expressman returning, giving an account of my operations up to last night. The party which I sent out under Colonel Lewis ran 60 of the enemy about 10 miles. They ate the enemy’s breakfast, and took about 100 cattle, 30 sheep, and 50 fat hogs. Some of the cattle escaped. Being in a brushy country and driving in the night, the hogs could not travel. I shall have such as are fit for food killed for this command, and such as are stock cattle I shall send in, if practicable.

The expedition to Lebanon failed on account of a message having been sent from Cook’s Mill, where we crossed the Roubideaux. There was no enemy found in town, but 2 men ran and were caught. The enemy has a hospital in town, where there were 1 wounded and 1 sick man-perhaps more.

The weather turned very bad yesterday evening, with rain and sleet-such weather as none but a soldier would be out in. I had a party ready to send toward Hartville this morning, but it was so very cold and bad and the rains had made the roads so bad that I did not send. One of my parties was at the house of Bowman, a noted secession captain, yesterday, towards Hartville, but he was not at home, and very few men were at home, but there were many tracks of horses, mostly unshod, going west.

About 3 o’clock this afternoon some of my men, who were out getting forage, thought they heard cannon-firing in the direction of Lebanon. It seems very improbable, but the men stick to their story, and say that the woman of the house told them that she had heard that Price was going to attack us before 12 o’clock to-morrow. I have sent a party of 25 towards Lebanon to gain information and shall send out other scouting parties in the morning.

My greatest trouble is with this train, which, now that the roads are bad, can only move very slowly. The mules are weak and the drivers bad. Two scouts towards Springfield, who should have been here yesterday, have not returned, which looks bad, and I have received no message from you except the one started New Year’s Eve. The duplicate arrived here to-day, having been nearly to Lebanon. He does not satisfy me that he is all right.

I hope you will tell the quartermaster to send good men, and also to send our mail whenever a safe opportunity offers.

I have an escort of 20 men left back to escort up the doctor. They are all under the charge of Lieutenant Black, of my regiment, a member of the court-martial in Asboth’s division. If the doctor is not coming I want my men.

I find that instead of being in Wright County, as my guide led me to believe, I am in Laclede, 2 1/2 miles from the line between it and Pulaski, on the Gasconade.

The enemy’s guides are perfect and he is constantly apprised of all our movements, while my guides are bad and means of information uncertain. The enemy knew of our movements before we had been gone twenty-four hours from Rolla.

I have heard from the party sent to Lebanon. It had got 8 miles on its way from that place. Firing had been heard of small-arms in the direction of Chesby’s Mill, which is 10 miles from here.

{p.484}

I have scouting parties in every direction.

The roads are so bad that it would be difficult to move my train rapidly, but I am not sorry I brought it, as the weather has been so bad that many men would be sick, as a few are now.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. CARR, Colonel, Commanding.

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ROLLA, January 3, 1862.

Col. E. A. CARR:

COLONEL: Your communication from Camp Ruggles, 12 miles south of the Gasconade, giving an account of your position and the success of Major McConnell’s expedition to Lebanon and Colonel Lewis’ sally, by which you captured 4 prisoners and a quantity of cattle and sheep, are duly received. I congratulate you on the exact fulfillment of my time, reported at the moment of your arrival at that distance from Springfield, and I heartily approve of your location of your train on this side and your sending out the parties designated to scatter the rebel pickets. Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis is especially entitled to my congratulation for his success. I hope ere this you have come ––– communication with the troops I sent to Lebanon. If ––– concentrates, but try to ––– enemy’s pickets, if you cannot ––– and bring away stock ––– the enemy is trying to -*

You are having very bad weather just now. Exert your efforts to preserve ––– and your stock till the weather moderates. Keep me advised as often as occasion may offer. It is very important to learn the strength and position of the enemy. One messenger sent at the same time I directed you to delay the train has not been heard from. He went by the old road. If he has not reached you it will be well to shift your train location, as the enemy would learn something of our purposes by that accident. I think your force more than a match for any cavalry they can send against you, but it may be otherwise. If they move infantry and artillery towards you, you must move this way. I return your compliments of the season, with my best wishes for further success,

Truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Southwestern District.

* Dashes indicate illegible words.

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U. S. MILITARY HOSPITAL, COR. CHESTNUT AND FIFTH STS., Saint Louis, Mo., January 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

GENERAL: It is required by the terms of the order appointing the Sanitary Commission “that they should from time to time report directly to the commander-in-chief of the department the condition of the camps and hospitals.”

In compliance with this obligation I have now to report that the condition of the general hospitals in this city, with one exception, shows a steady improvement. The nurses and attendants all understand their duties and are discharging them to the general satisfaction of the surgeons.

{p.485}

The number of the sick now in the hospitals is less than it ever has been before since their organization. This is not to be attributed so much to the diminution of sickness in the command as to the policy of the medical director, which is to have the sick of the regiments taken care of by the regimental surgeons in camps and regimental hospitals. It is proper in light cases, which are not likely to continue but for a few days, that they should be taken care of, and they will do well in camp and regimental hospitals; but in serious cases, which are likely to be of long duration, where careful nursing and properly-prepared diet are required, the general hospital is to be preferred.

Where general hospitals have been established, as in this city, there can be no necessity for renting other buildings for the purpose of establishing regimental hospitals. The very sick of the regiment can readily be sent to the general hospital and light cases taken care of in the barracks or camp.

With the hospital accommodations which we now have and with the re-establishment of the convalescent barracks there will be sufficient accommodation for the very sick of this division. There are about twenty-three hundred beds in the general hospitals in this city, with some two or three hundred more which can be had at the City and Sisters’ Hospitals, if required.

Much has been said of the enormous expenditures of fitting up these hospitals and the great cost of maintaining the same. Representations have been made to the Medical Department at Washington to this effect. We desire to correct any such impressions, and will endeavor to give you a concise statement of facts and figures, that will convince any candid mind of the erroneousness of such representations.

The duty of procuring buildings for and fitting up hospitals devolved upon the Sanitary Commission. Under the directions of the medical director six buildings were procured, at a rent of $2,360 per month, or about $1 per month for each bed, or 3 1/3 cents per day per bed. The cost of fitting up and preparing all these buildings for hospital purposes, including alterations, erection of furnaces, bath-rooms, water-closets, heating and cooking stoves, gas-fixtures, with bedsteads, mattresses, tables, and chairs, was about $28,000, which is 3 1/3 cents per day for one year for each bed. Surely this does not look like extravagance.

Another complaint is that civilians are employed as nurses and attendants, when the regulations prescribe that soldiers shall be employed. When these hospitals were first organized our Army was forming. The volunteers were raw and undisciplined, and needed to be drilled and made soldiers of. Besides, our volunteers had offered their services for the field, and not for such duties as are required in the hospital, and if forced to perform them, would do so reluctantly and imperfectly, and consequently the sick would be made to suffer. General Frémont ordered that civilians should be employed as nurses, which has been done at a cost of $15 per month. The soldier employed in the hospital, including extra pay and clothing, would cost $24 per month. The amount paid for attendance of all kinds, including apothecaries, book-keepers, stewards, nurses, cooks, and waiters, is about $7,200 per month. This does not include surgeons and assistant surgeons. Were civilians employed as such, the whole expense per annum would be $70,000 less than it would be for similar hospitals wholly organized under the Army Regulations.

The entire expense per day, including fitting up the hospitals, rents, matrons, and attendants, will not exceed 33 1/3 cents. There were some {p.486} expenditures at the House of Refuge, which were made prior to the appointment of the Sanitary Commission, which were not recommended by the medical director or deemed necessary by the surgeon in attendance, that are not included in the above estimates.

We trust that the present method of employing nurses will be continued, as it is not only more economical, but the sick are better cared for and attended to. Owing to the difficulty of obtaining pay for the nurses and attendants employed, we would recommend that an order be issued authorizing the employment of nurses and directing the payment of the same.

There is great difficulty for surgeons of regiments and regimental hospitals to procure the necessary medicines for the proper care of the sick. It is the subject of universal complaint among them. The fault is in the supply-table, which is entirely inadequate to the present extraordinary development of the Army. Pulmonary and bronchial diseases are very prevalent at this season of the year-almost epidemic-and large quantities of expectorants are required, while the supply-table for regiments in the field furnishes scarcely any. We deem it absolutely essential to the health of the soldier that this should be remedied as speedily as possible. Could you witness the sufferings which I to-day witnessed, to-morrow’s sun would not go down without an order correcting it.

The Sanitary Commission has already had to supply a number of regiments with proper medicines. Others have had to apply to the Governors of the States from which they came; all of which is manifestly wrong and injurious to the service. An order from yourself to supply the regimental surgeons such articles as the Government furnishes the post and general hospitals, and to be furnished in such quantities as may be necessary, will obviate the difficulty. We trust that an order to this effect will be issued at once, as the necessity is most pressing.

We find on examination that there is great deficiency in the supply of ambulances to regiments in the field. Of the regiments examined three have two ambulances each; eight regiments one each, and fifteen were without ambulances. The necessity for supplying the deficiency is apparent, the allowance being twelve ambulances to each regiment.

On the recommendation of the Sanitary Commission General Frémont ordered that each regiment in this division should be supplied with twelve of Irving’s patent cots for the sick. These cots were made with straps and serve the purpose of stretchers. They weigh 20 pounds, and will cost $4.50 each or $54 to supply a regiment. Quite a number of regiments were supplied with them, but for some reason unknown to us the order was suspended. We would recommend that the order be renewed.

From a recent examination of the camps and hospitals at Rolla, made by Dr. Douglas, of the United States Sanitary Commission, we find there are at that post 1,542 sick out of an aggregate strength of 14,762. This includes the sick at post and regimental hospitals and in camp.

At the various posts along the line of the main stem of the Pacific Railroad there were found over 1,300 sick in hospitals alone. How many were sick in camp was not ascertained. Language cannot be found too strong to describe the condition of many of the regimental and some of the post hospitals. They were sickening to behold.

We would recommend, as there is now an abundance of room in our general hospitals, that the very sick and those who are likely to continue {p.487} so for any length of time shall be sent to this city. There are hospital cars provided with beds and all the necessary conveniences for the comfortable transportation of the very sick. An order to this effect would gladden the hearts and greatly ameliorate the condition of many sick and suffering soldiers.

The source of most of the sickness in this division can be traced to the crowded condition of some of the tents and barracks, especially the Wedge tent, which averages five and a half persons to a tent of 8 by 2. Bad as this tent is, the close and crowded barracks are even worse. Two companies are crowded into a barracks 30 by 60 feet, 11 feet high. The air is most foul and breeds disease and death.

At Camp Benton the commander of the post has most promptly complied with the recommendation of Dr. Warriner, the inspector of camps for the United States Sanitary Commission, in improving the ventilation, but with the number of inmates no amount of ventilation will suffice. The regulations allow 225 square feet for 6 men. At these barracks there is but 60 feet for 6 men, which is entirely inadequate.

The small-pox has made its appearance at several posts and in one of our hospitals; every precaution has been taken to prevent its spreading, but, in order to arrest and mitigate the horrors of this dreaded disease it is necessary that some obligatory order be issued to colonels of regiments, holding them responsible for the prompt execution of the same.

Among the other duties which devolved upon the Sanitary Commission was the obtaining from the community at large such additional means of increasing the comfort and promoting the moral and social welfare of the men in camp and hospital as may be needed and cannot be furnished by Government regulations. To carry out this object appeals have been made to the community through the press and have been most generously responded to. The various Ladies’ Aid Societies, as well as individuals, have showered their offerings upon us. From Massachusetts alone we have received over 150 boxes of supplies. We have already distributed over 18,759 articles, consisting of shirts, drawers, socks, comforts, and a variety of other articles of comfort and usefulness, besides over 1,000 books.

The Commission feel the necessity of having another medical gentleman on our Commission, and would respectfully recommend the appointment of Dr. S. Pollok, a gentleman of acknowledged ability and experience as a sanitarian.

JAMES E. YEATMAN, President Sanitary Commission.

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ROLLA, January 4, 1862.

Col. E. A. CARR:

COLONEL: I have very accurate knowledge of Price on Sunday, a week before you moved. He was in Springfield in force, artillery, &c., for winter quarters. I will try to make it warm enough for him if he stops there. Send back train with escorts as far as you can spare it. Your messenger of yesterday, 2.30 p.m. from you, arrived here at 10 a.m. You were then very properly laying quiet during the bad weather. There was a company 10 miles east of Lebanon, at Chesby’s Mill, when my informant passed up from Springfield. Better look into that point. I have no news of six or seven companies which I ordered to Lebanon from this place and Salem. Suppose they are there by this time. I hope you will procure forage in the country and let me know {p.488} your success in this regard, as it is an important part of a difficult problem.

The voucher brought by the bearer of this would have been paid promptly if the person who sold the property had signed the paper. As he has had the trip for nothing, it would be well if you could pay him on his presentation of the proper receipt.

The weather continues very bad. I have ordered to be ready tomorrow my whole force at a moment’s warning. Hope I may soon receive a positive order to this effect.

Truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, January 4, 1862.

Quartermaster-General M. C. MEIGS:

GENERAL: The mortar and tug boats have all arrived from Saint Louis and been assigned to me by Quartermaster Allen. The tugboats are officered and manned, but in some instances not properly officered If it is understood that I am to have charge of these boats, the question of pay and rations requires to be settled. Will you therefore please inform me if I am to pay them? If so, it seems that the better course will be for the acting paymaster of my own vessel the Benton, to enter them upon the books of that gunboat, and we pay and ration them as we do the crew of the Benton.

As the mortar boats (thirty-eight in number) have also arrived, it is necessary that a master superintendent should have charge of them. Under my directions I have appointed Captain Constable for this purpose, a gentleman who held a commission as major in the British East India Company service, and is familiar with the use of mortars, and comes to us highly recommended. I will pay this officer, whose services will be highly valuable if the mortar boats are fitted out, at the rate of $2,000 per annum.

I respectfully request instructions in relation to these tugs and mortar boats, especially the former, as the officers and men are almost clamorous for their pay and subsistence.

I find a great pressure bearing upon me for exorbitant prices for freight and for steamers. I have in one instance in freight cut a bill down $2,000, amid another bill of $300 I paid but $100, and in both cases informed the parties that I should send the bills to the Court of Claims at Saint Louis unless the deductions were made, which were done, the parties regarding that court something like the court of chancery. I believe that in all cases the flotilla in finance has been comparatively well managed.

A careful person should have charge of the mortar boats in this river during the winter season, and I have therefore appointed Captain Constable for this purpose, also with the view of securing his valuable services in case the mortar boats are to be equipped.

The tug-boats were not in good condition when they were delivered in Saint Louis, and, as you will see in the report of the board of officers, the mortar boats are far from being in good condition, as their magazines many of them, leak badly and are otherwise defective. Still they may be made to answer the object of their construction.

I have the honor to be your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

{p.489}

[Inclosure.]

Extract from a letter from Theodore Adams to Flag-Officer A. H. Foote, dated Saint Louis, Mo., January 3, 1862.

I am informed by Captain Wise and Captain Turnley that two of the last four tugs, since their arrival at Cairo, are disabled and in a leaking condition.

The tugs when received here by Major Allen were in a complete and finished condition, and since then have been under his control and in charge of officers under his appointment and pay. They, with the mortar boats, are no longer under any control of mine, and I cannot therefore do anything towards their repair without orders from Major Allen or yourself. I will cheerfully do anything either of you may require at any time, but cannot be responsible for any mishap to any of the craft I have built after they have been taken from my control.

The boats referred to have been ordered to Cairo by direct orders from General Meigs, and were received here by Major Allen, and taken under his control when they left this city.

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ROLLA, January 5, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Reliable news to Monday last 40 miles southwest of Springfield. Price is preparing to fight at Springfield. His re-enforcement was battery of six guns, two of them rifled. His friends estimate his force at 40,000; our estimate at 20,000. Our cavalry have driven in all the rebel pickets to within 17 miles of Springfield. They ran in on Thursday night in great terror. I can hear of none this side. Weather very bad. Have constant rain and snow, but all right. Have written more fully.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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ROLLA, January 5, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

SIR: Went within 8 miles Springfield Thursday. Union man had been in Springfield day before, January 1. Price had received re-enforcements of three regiments and ten cannon, making, as there believed, forty-eight pieces. Colonel Phelps knows Union man and thinks this report reliable. Major Wright’s force is at Lebanon; Colonel Carr’s about 20 miles southeast of the point; Major Waring marching on Marshfield. I want more cavalry.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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[JANUARY 6, 1862.-For Halleck to Buell and to President, of this date, in reference to co-operation with Buell, see Series I, Vol. VII, pp. 532, 533.]

{p.490}

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SAINT LOUIS, January 6, 1862.

Hon. F. P. BLAIR, Jr., Washington:

SIR: Yours of the 3d instant is just received.* Don’t trouble yourself about Orders, No. 24.** It will be rigorously executed in good time. There has been no disposition to relax it in the slightest degree. The growl of secessionists don’t trouble us a particle. I expected it. The delay in its execution has resulted in this way: The first list was not fairly made, and one of the board left without revising it. A new board was ordered, composed partly of citizens, good Union men, such as Hain, Patrick, Greeley, McPherson, &c.; but they did not have the nerve to stand up to it. They backed down, and declined to serve unless their names could be concealed. This I would not consent to. I want no secret boards. Hence the delay. But its effect will not be less beneficial when it is understood to be an act of mature deliberation.

You have no idea of the character of the material I have to work with. The German troops are on the brink of mutiny. They have been tampered with by politicians, and made to believe that if they refuse to obey my orders and demand the return of Frémont the Government will be compelled to yield. Meetings to this effect have been held, and high officers are implicated. They are closely watched, and I have the threads of the conspiracy. Don’t be alarmed at an explosion. I am prepared for it and will put it down. I have already cut off its legs, and will soon get its head. All I ask of my Washington friends is to keep cool and let me work out my plans. I understand the problem, and will solve it in time.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK.

* See Appendix, p. 823.

** See p. 431.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 6, 1862.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding, &c., Sedalia, Mo.:

COLONEL: I have received reliable information from Lexington that Joe H. Nichols and Frank Thomas, released from arrest by you, are the most active and dangerous rebels in that part of the country. The former was a member of the secession band who robbed and fired upon Union men in Lexington, and Thomas, it is said, was one of Joe Shelby’s party, who robbed the steamer Sunshine. Nichols, while on his way from Sedalia in the stage to Lexington, pulled a secession flag from his pocket, and displayed it in every place through which he passed. Moreover, the petition of Union men which was presented to Major Chittenden was mostly a forgery, the few Union men who did actually sign it being forced to do so by the secession friends of Nichols. The evidence is very strong that these are both dangerous men and should never have been released. Greater caution should be observed in such matters, and hereafter no one will be released without requiring of him the oath of allegiance and parole of honor, the violation of which shall be followed by death. I will send you a blank form for such oath and parole.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.491}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. M. PALMER, Commanding Officer at Otterville:

Four hundred rebels, under Poindexter, are seeking to make their way from vicinity of Renick across the river at Glasgow or Brunswick. Send messenger to Glasgow and Fayette, with directions to our forces to intercept them and scour the country.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT, Saint Louis, Mo., January 6, 1862.

In obedience to orders from the headquarters of the Department of the Missouri, the undersigned enters upon the command of the Saint Louis District, which will include the country bounded by the Missouri, Mississippi, and Meramec rivers, including the line of the railroad from Pacific to Rolla as far as Lindsey’s Station and a line drawn through that point from the mouth of the Osage River to the Meramec River, except the camp of instruction at Benton Barracks.

...

SCHUYLER HAMILTON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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ROLLA, January 7, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

My cavalry entered Marshfield, 22 miles from Springfield, yesterday. Found no rebel force, and fell back to Colonel Carr’s camp at Widow Stark’s, on Gasconade, near main road to Lebanon. Will direct for few days’ rest at Lebanon. Weather too severe to operate. Will dispense with hospital, as directed by the general. It was to be rough and plain, and much needed. Real sick cannot go in cars, and convalescents will soon be turned out in the streets of Saint Louis. But for want of room here I will send many forward.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF Mo., Rolla, Mo., January 8, 1862.

This district and my command is modified so as to conform to the modification presented in the following extract from Orders, No. 14, Present series, from headquarters Department of the Missouri:

The District of Saint Louis, under command of Brig. Gen. S. Hamilton, will include the country bounded by the Missouri, Mississippi, and Meramec Rivers including the line of the railroad from Pacific to Rolla as far as Lindsey’s Station and a line drawn from that point to the mouth of the Osage, with the exception of the camp of instruction at Benton Barracks.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

{p.492}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 9, 1862.

Brigadier-General PRENTISS, Palmyra, Mo..

General Schofield expects to encounter a rebel force between Renick and Huntsville about noon on Saturday. Send a force from Hudson to the west of Huntsville to cut off their retreat.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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[JANUARY 9, 1862.-For Halleck to McClellan, in reference to co-operation with Buell, see Series I, Vol. VII, p. 539.]

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ROLLA, January 9, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The needless amount of stores in this command are being turned over to the post quartermaster. The amount transported around from Tipton via Springfield is surprising. The difficulty of procuring supplies induced every officer to hold fast all he procured, and this army had thus become immovable. Over 200 wagon loads have already been brought in and safely deposited in buildings. I have appointed an ordnance officer to look after ammunition, and I find large quantities unprotected from moisture and in volume unnecessary for a march of double this command. Some of it I will send to the arsenal and the rest will be put in proper buildings. While stores are being thus removed from the field, I am trying to have distributed and equalized the proper amount for convenient use, and by this means the mobility of my command will be vastly improved. The arrest and trial of officers by courts-martial embarrass the command, and I hope the commanding general will not object to some apparent irregularities in courts-martial, designed to get rid of endless quarrels by summary disposition of vexatious prosecutions. The enemy is in force at Springfield, but he can be and must be driven to the wall. These bickerings, with corps changes among officers, employ too much time, which they should devote to the enemy.

My cavalry is overworked, and yet I do not like to draw it in, because it greatly annoys the enemy in his means for procuring supplies. I earnestly desire to move infantry and artillery forward to support the cavalry. An effectual force against the rebels in Springfield would close them out in Missouri. Three more batteries, three regiments of infantry, and three of cavalry would be desirable for that purpose, but I would risk it with less. Price could be driven out of Springfield with a much smaller force, but he could find a plain a few miles out to stand upon, and it would therefore require more to induce a surrender or entire departure from the State. As a means to such an end I must again recommend a depot in front or at rear of Lebanon. From that point we can go beyond Springfield without a wagon train, and it is easy to hold a point like Lebanon, because it can only be approached through rough defiles.

I hope the general will excuse suggestions, which seem somewhat needless, since he has the matter in contemplation, but my proximity {p.493} to the enemy and the obstacles to overcome induce me to present the general with whatever occurs to me.

Respectfully, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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MEXICO, MO., January 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: It is represented to me by many of the most respectable citizens of this part of the State, who have, as they confess, sympathized with the rebellion, but have, I think, unquestionably been opposed to all such acts as bridge burning, &c., that they now desire to pledge themselves in the most solemn manner that they will hereafter discharge to the fullest extent their duty as loyal citizens, by discouraging all rebellious organizations and by giving information to the United States authorities of every movement of the kind that shall come to their knowledge, provided they can be secured in their persons and property from molestation by United States troops.

It appears to me that by exercising a wise discretion in granting such assurances of protection to men of well-known respectability and influence much good may be done. If you approve of this proposition I will carry it out in such cases as I am perfectly satisfied are worthy of it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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MEXICO, January 11, 1862.

Brigadier-General PRENTISS:

GENERAL: I find that the rebels are still attempting to keep up their organization in this part of this State. As you are doubtless aware, Merrill’s cavalry routed Poindexter on the 8th. I am informed they were to have attacked Cobb’s force, said to be several hundred strong, on the 9th or 10th. I have not heard the result. There is also a considerable rebel force in the vicinity of Paris. I am satisfied we can keep down their organizations only by permanently occupying those portions of the State which are favorable for rendezvous by post of infantry and cavalry so near together as to continually scour the entire country and strike them the moment they make the first attempt to organize.

If this plan be adopted immediately after breaking up the bands that now exist only a small force will be required at any one point. Scarcely any place will require more than two companies of infantry and one of cavalry, while at most points even a less force will be sufficient. I will send a portion of General Henderson’s command to break up the gang about Paris and remain in that vicinity. I can also easily take care of the country south and east of this point.

I think there should be a force permanently in Randolph County, say at Huntsville or Renick. If a few companies of mounted men could be added to Colonel Birge’s command, he would be quite strong enough for the purpose. With infantry only he can do little more than hold a single point, and must be quite strong even to do this, for he cannot prevent the enemy from concentrating. I am satisfied that we can {p.494} restore quiet to North Missouri only by occupying a large number of points, at least one in every county, by cavalry as well as by infantry. In this manner we can always strike the rebels before they can collect in numbers sufficient to meet us, and by keeping our troops continually in their sight so demoralize them as to compel them to give over the attempt at organization. We must at the same time seize and hold all the men of influence who are aiding the rebellion.

Please inform me whether you approve of my suggestions. I shall be glad to co-operate with you in any plan you may adopt.

Yours, very respectfully,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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ROLLA, January 11, 1862.

Col. E. A. CARR:

The question as to whether you shall fall back with cavalry or I move forward other arms to support you is pending at headquarters, Saint Louis, but you will, at your own discretion, move back to avoid ambuscade or superior force, which must be avoided also by scouts or pickets in front of you. You must still have an excess of teams and material that might be sent in. The train with provisions arrived safely, and I will retain what cavalry comes in for service here, desiring to diminish rather than increase your force at present, and needing cavalry for various duties here. To prevent trouble, I will either call in Major Wright or order him to report to you, as the two separate commands conflict in plans and purposes. I am sorry to hear of depredations committed by our volunteers, but it would be strange indeed if some crimes were not committed in a community of over a thousand active men. You must exert your best judgment and restrain as far as possible the men under your command.

I have very late news from Price’s army. It is much demoralized and poorly equipped. I think, too, it is melting away by desertions and discharges. Your dispatch (XI) by Lieutenant McPhail was the last, and I think all have arrived. I do not usually send the same messenger back, as he and his horse need rest. It is desirable to procure all you can in the country. Those who are stripped too closely can buy if we pay them for what we take, but we should not deprive the poor of the necessaries for the families. The mills should be required to run and this flour should be taken away. Otherwise, if we fall back, the enemy will procure it. The weather continues too bad for any movement, but you must not allow yourself to be surprised.

Very truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS.

Since writing the foregoing I have directed Wright to move to Ralph, or that vicinity, to scout in - County, and support you on that angle.

SAML. R. CURTIS.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. E. A. PAINE, Commanding Bird’s Point, Mo.:

I understand that four of our pickets were shot this morning. If this is so, and appearances indicate that the were citizens, {p.495} not regularly organized in the rebel army, the whole country should be cleared out for 6 miles around, and word given that all citizens making their appearance within those limits are liable to be shot. To execute this, patrols should be sent out in all directions, and bring into camp at Bird’s Point all citizens, together with their subsistence, and require them to remain, under pain of death and destruction of their property, until properly relieved. Let no harm befall these people if they quietly submit, but bring them in, and place them in camp below the breastworks, and have them properly guarded. The intention is not to make political prisoners of these people, but to cut off a dangerous class of spies. This applies to all classes and conditions, age and sex. If, however, women and children prefer other protection than we afford them, they may be allowed to retire beyond the limits indicated, not to return until authorized. Report to me as soon as possible every important occurrence within your command.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 11, 1862.

The system of passports by local provost-marshals in this city and State is hereby abolished. No passports will be issued except in places in the vicinity of the enemy’s forces, and then by the commanding officers of such places, and only for passing the lines. No passport will exempt suspected parties from arrest outside of the particular jurisdiction of the officer by whose authority it is issued, nor will persons without passports be arrested except on well-grounded suspicion.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 12, 1862.

General E. A. PAINE, Commanding Second Brigade, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

The citizens brought in under directions of yesterday may be put in tents, as suggested by you. They can use the tents of troops who do not go out with you or such surplus tents as may be in the hands of troops at Bird’s Point. If you have reason to believe that the parties guilty of shooting our pickets are discovered, inform me, and I will order a court or commission that will act without delay.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 12, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Rolla:

GENERAL: In preparing your command for the field you will observe as far as possible the inclosed memorandum with respect to transportation.* All additional wagons attached to companies and regiment. {p.496} should be turned into the general train. You must be very rigid in this matter, as every organization will claim double the authorized amount of transportation. The Ninth Iowa will be sent into the field with you as soon as possible. It cannot be spared just now, as many of the bridges would be left unguarded.

Lieutenant-Colonel Herron reports that many of the Reserve Corps left their stations and refused to guard the bridges. It will not do to leave this road unprotected. Every available man here is under orders for Cairo and Paducah. Orders from Washington required three divisions (24,000 men) to be sent down instantly, which would have stripped both you and Pope. I begged and protested for time, in order that you might drive Price from the State. Orders and protests have been repeated, and the matter is still undecided. I have detailed one regiment from Carlin, four from Benton Barracks, and two from Prentiss’ command. A part of Pope’s will be withdrawn as soon as the new insurrection north of the Missouri is suppressed. If the Government insists upon sending more troops immediately, I fear your expedition must be given up for the present. I really hope not. I expect to know by to-morrow or next day. Nearly all the organized forces in Indiana and Illinois have been ordered to other commands. I have no troops just now to relieve the Second Iowa. Will do so as soon as possible.

I fully approve your plan as to a depot and the immediate movement of infantry, but I must wait further orders from Washington. If they do not come by Tuesday I shall telegraph you to move. I will send a reserve of several regiments as soon as possible. The Forty-third Illinois have been ordered here for arms, which are just received. They will be restored to Sigel’s division as soon as properly armed. The Reserve Corps should not be taken into the field; a part can be used for depot at Rolla, and a part sent to Pacific to replace Herron if he can trust them for that purpose. I have directed that he replace his regiment with them as far as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS Mo. STATE GUARD, Camp at Springfield, January 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding U. S. Forces in the Western Department:

GENERAL: I have received information that, as major-general commanding in this department, you have either ordered or allowed the arrest of citizens in the pursuit of their usual and peaceful avocations; that men, officers and privates, belonging to this army have been taken prisoners on the Kansas border and conveyed to Fort Leavenworth, and as such, and for no other established offense or crime, have been shot. In some cases I have learned that my discharged soldiers have been seized whenever and wherever they have shown themselves, and that they have been by military coercion forced into a servitude unknown to international and civilized usages in such cases. I have obtained information that individuals and parties of men specially appointed and instructed by me to destroy railroads, culverts, and bridges, by tearing them up, burning, &c., have been arrested and subjected to a general court-martial for alleged crimes, which all the laws of warfare heretofore recognized by the civilized world have regarded as distinctly lawful and proper. I have learned that such persons, when {p.497} tried, if convicted of the offense or offenses as stated, are viewed as lawful subjects for capital punishment.

These statements, brought to me in various ways, I cannot believe to be correct. It is upon this subject that I now propose to address you. It is necessary that we understand each other and have some guiding knowledge of that character of warfare which is to be waged by our respective Governments. This understanding should be given at once. It is desirable both by you and me. Both armies desire it, and the exigencies of the war demand that some certain rules should be the basis of our conduct and control. Delay is vital. It cannot be allowed. We must understand each other. Do you intend to continue the arrest of citizens engaged in their ordinary peaceful pursuits and treat them se traitors and rebels; if so, will you make exchanges with me for such as I may or will make for similar causes? Do you intend to regard members of this army as persons deserving death whenever and wherever they may be captured, or will you extend the recognized rights of prisoners of war by the code of the civilized world?

Do you regard-and state as such the law governing your army-the destruction of important roads, transportation facilities, &c., for military purposes, as the legal right of a belligerent power? Do you intend to regard men whom I have specially dispatched to destroy roads, burn bridges, tear up culverts, &c., as amenable to an enemy’s court-martial, or will you have them to be tried as usual, by the proper authorities, according to the statutes of the State? It is vastly important to the interests of all parties concerned that these momentous issues should be determined. No man deplores the horrors of war more than I do; no one will sacrifice more to avert its desolating march. Each party must be heard. Each must have a kind of common protection. I am willing to afford this. It remains with you to decide the question with that frankness which attends your official communications. I await your reply.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding Mo. S. G.

SPRINGFIELD, January 14, 1862.

P. S.-A facsimile of the above was dispatched to you on the day of its date. Kindred to the same subject-matter allow me to call your attention to an extended system of spoliation carried on in many parts of the State; I mean the firing of private houses, barns, mills, &c., as also the burning of towns. It does seem to me that the necessities of neither party requires nor should admit of such vandalism, and although I am loath to believe such acts were perpetrated by your authority, I have seen no condemnation of them from yourself or the commanders of any posts within the neighborhood so desolated. Do you condemn this system or do you intend to continue it, either by express orders or allow it to be continued by your silence on the subject? I trust that it is unnecessary to urge upon you an explicit and prompt reply to this communication in all its several points.

I am, &c.,

STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding. {p.498}

ROLLA, January 13, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

A slip comes in from Major Wright, dated 12th, saying one of my scouts has just returned and reports 5,000 cavalry moving this way from Springfield. They report they are moving against us. He says they started yesterday; that would be Saturday. Shall I move infantry and artillery forward to support cavalry? My cavalry is mainly at the Gasconade, 15 miles this side Lebanon.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 13, 1862.

Brigadier-General CURTIS, Rolla, Mo.:

Direct your cavalry to fall back. Support them with your infantry and artillery. Prepare for a general advance movement. Will write you this evening. I am sick with camp measles, but will write you fully to-night, sending you additional forces.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, January 13, 1862.

Col. E. A. CARR:

COLONEL: I send you a copy of letter sent to Major Wright, who I hope has not moved east, as I ordered him on Saturday. You will make your arrangements to move back if necessary, but I hope it will not be necessary. You will see Major Wright is directed to report to you for orders. My object is to secure unity of action and the utmost caution. This bad weather will probably check the rebels, but I hope you will not allow them to slip up on you. I have started provisions yesterday. The train is below or 15 miles out. If further news of the enemy requires great caution, you will send back and stop the provision train.

I have telegraphed for permission to move infantry and cavalry and artillery forward.

Truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Southwestern District.

[Inclosure.]

ROLLA, January 13, 1862.

Maj. CLARK WRIGHT:

The slip which you sent in relating to the approach of cavalry induces me to change the order relating to your movement. You will send back your heavy artillery to the camp of Colonel Carr and all your command except your own proper command, and report to Colonel Carr for further orders. My design is to unite all your force to secure unity of action and proper success. You will see the necessity of this, and unite with Colonel Carr in all necessary preparation to resist assault and fall back if necessary. This very bad weather will probably check the rebels, but we must be ready.

Yours, truly,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

{p.499}

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SAINT LOUIS, January 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, Rolla:

GENERAL: Your telegram of this evening has determined me to order an advance without waiting any longer for advices from Washington. I am quite sick with camp measles, but do not mean to let the public service suffer on that account if I can help it.

Your suggestions about officers in arrest are approved. You are authorized to suspend their arrest and order them into the field. The court-martial will close its proceedings and adjourn sine die. Fletcher’s battery will leave here for Rolla Wednesday morning. You now have twenty-four pieces. This will give you thirty. When the Ninth Iowa joins you you will have six more. Dodge’s battery will also be sent to Rolla as soon as General Schofield can spare the section now with him. The Forty-third Illinois will be sent to you as soon as they are better armed; also the Second Iowa the moment I can relieve them. Perhaps I may be able to spare two other regiments in course of the week. At any rate, your forces will be superior to any reliable estimate I have received of Price’s army. As your advance will necessarily be slow, the additional force will reach you this side of Springfield and will serve as a reserve.

With regard to routes three have been proposed-that by Lebanon, that by Hartville, and a middle road. Colonel Phelps thinks the middle road the best; others say not. You will act from the best information you have there, which is better than I can get here.

Accounts are so contradictory that I am unable to advise you. Lebanon is certainly the best military line if the road is equally good.

Distribute transportation as directed in my letter of yesterday, except, if you deem advisable, give a limited number of provision wagons to each brigade or division. This is generally preferable to making the provision train entirely separate from the troops. Ten days’ provisions will in that case go with each command.

Care should be taken about having provisions cooked in the morning for the day’s march, and also, when in the vicinity of the enemy, to have at least two days’ cooked provisions in the haversacks. If officers neglect this, the men suffer. Make marches at first short, so that the men may be kept in order and not overfatigued.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, January 14, 1862.

Col. E. A. CARR:

COLONEL: Fall back cautiously with the cavalry, keeping rear guard very strong, and a stationary picket, with no baggage except what they can carry on their horses, in rear, as long as you can safely. To cover your retiring movement, I send out infantry amid artillery to meet and support you. Unless you are pressed by the enemy in force move slow, as I do not contemplate any further movement than enough to keep you out of danger of superior force. I think the storm must have checked the enemy, but I am now authorized to move other forces, and intend to bring different arms in proper proximity to each other. Keep the commanding officers of infantry and artillery and myself advised of your movements. You perceive the counter move which you make will cause a forward move here. Weather still very cold, but clear and moderating {p.500} a little. I take it for granted Major Wright is incorporated in your command and cordially co-operating with you.

Very truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Southwestern District.

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ROLLA, January 14, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I am in receipt of the general’s autographic letter of the 12th and his telegraph half past eleven of last night. The excessive cold weather has checked the forward movement of the rebels, but the day is bright and wind shifting, so I look for better weather and consequent danger to my cavalry. Three regiments of infantry and two batteries are about moving forward. I have at the same time ordered the cavalry to fall back slowly and cautiously to meet the other arms. In this way I shall keep matters in reach of the full instructions which are promised in the general’s letter.

In relation to transportation, I send my Special Orders, No. 15. I shall earnestly labor to keep within the general’s rule in this respect. I would consider the U. S. Reserve Corps safe at Pacific. They are coming down and I think will soon be all right. I would indulge a good many in leaves of absence to go for five days to visit their families. Those who have gone to Saint Louis without Leave before I came here should be severely treated, so as to discourage such insubordination.

I wish two or three companies of Almstedt’s fort artillery could come and take charge of this fort, with a field officer as commander of the fort.

The train is waiting.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: Advices received from scouts and spies who have been in the enemy’s camps lead to the belief that Price’s pretended retreat was a ruse, intended to deceive us. He fell back rapidly from Osceola to Springfield, giving out the report that he was intending to retire to winter quarters in Arkansas. It was expected that on receiving information of this retreat we would withdraw the mass of our forces at Rolla and Sedalia for operations against Columbus. As soon as this had been done Price was to return with re-enforcements from Arkansas and march rapidly to Lexington and Jefferson City. In the mean time his emissaries were to destroy all railroad bridges and telegraph lines, so as to prevent our sending troops against him. This city was at the same time to be set on fire at different places, and a general insurrection was to break out here and in all the northern counties of this State. The time of the burning of the bridges was determined by private signals, of which we have discovered thousands scattered through the {p.501} country. Fortunately I was warned in time to protect this city and the principal bridges. Much damage, however, has been done at places where it was least expected, as near Quincy, Palmyra, Hudson, Mexico, &c., almost under the noses of our troops. At other places my telegrams were received in time to save the bridges. Evidences of this plan of the enemy have been received from so many sources as to leave very little doubt of its correctness.

The arrangements made to break up the bands of bridge-burners in the northeastern counties of the State have been very successful. Immediately after the burning had commenced a small force of cavalry started in the cars from Hudson City. In this way they surprised a large party of secessionists, killed 8, took a number of prisoners, horses, &c. On the 28th ultimo General Prentiss, with 240 of Colonel Glover’s cavalry and 200 of Colonel Birge’s Sharpshooters, attacked a body of rebels under Colonel Dorsey, about 900 strong, at Mount Zion, Boone County, and dispersed them. Enemy’s loss reported 150 killed and wounded, 35 prisoners, 95 horses, and 105 guns captured. Our loss 3 killed and 11 wounded. This disparity resulted from the long range of the rifles of our sharpshooters.

Several other skirmishes have taken place and some 200 prisoners taken, Brigadier-General Schofield captured about 50 in the vicinity of Mexico. The enemy has scattered in every direction, but as our troops are scouring the country thoroughly I think many of the bridge-burners will eventually be caught. Most of them are from Price’s army, and have returned home under the pretense that they were Union men impressed into Price’s service. No reliance whatever can be placed upon these pretended refugees from military impressment.

A body of some 1,800 cavalry was sent some days ago to make a forced reconnaissance in the vicinity of Springfield and to ascertain the position and numbers of the enemy and so far as possible his intended movements. The commander, Colonel Carr, was directed not to attack the enemy if in force, but to cut off scouting parties and to hang on his rear if he should be still retreating. A depot of supplies is established at Lebanon, and the infantry and artillery at Rolla are held in readiness to move if the enemy should manifest a disposition to give battle. If it should be found that Price’s and McCulloch’s forces are as strong as represented and that they are disposed to dispute the possession of Southwest Missouri a portion of the troops at Sedalia must also be sent against them. If not, a part will be withdrawn for service elsewhere.

One of the greatest difficulties with which we still have to contend is the want of arms. Of the 11,000 rifled arms reported by you some weeks ago to have been sent to me, the first (only about 1,800) arrived to-day. Where the remaining 9,000 are and when they may be expected, I am still ignorant. Those which have arrived will be immediately issued and two additional regiments put into the field. Cavalry is almost the only effective force which can be used in the interior counties to keep down insurrections and prevent a renewal of bridge burning.

I regret very much that the two regiments of Illinois cavalry have been sent to Kansas. There can be no pressing necessity for their services there, while here they would have been invaluable, and, moreover, would have enabled me to send five or six infantry regiments to Cairo and Paducah, to co-operate with General Buell by a demonstration in the enemy’s rear. The order, I understand, was sent directly to {p.502} the Governor of Illinois, without giving me any notice. I am unwilling to believe that this measure was either advised or approved by you.

Another serious difficulty is the organization and character of many of the troops heretofore raised in this State. Some of these corps are not only organized in a manner entirely contrary to law, but are by no means reliable. On the contrary, being mostly foreigners, officered in many cases by foreign adventurers or perhaps refugees from justice and having been tampered with by political partisans for political purposes, they constitute a very dangerous element in society as well as in the army. I have endeavored to remove the causes of complaint for want of pay and clothing as much as possible by mustering them for pay even in their present illegal organizations, and I am supplying their places as fast as possible by other troops. The Body Guards, Marine Corps, Telegraph Corps, Railroad Guards, and Benton Cadets have already been mustered out of service. The Home Guards at Booneville and Jefferson City have been forcibly disarmed, and a number of other bodies of these irregular troops will be discharged in a few days. Some of these foreign troops are most excellent men, while others are without discipline or subordination, and in the field are little better than armed barbarians. Wherever they go they convert all Union men into bitter enemies. The accompanying letter of General Schofield is a fair specimen of what is reported of them in other places. Indeed, strong Union men in Southwestern Missouri (and among them Colonel Phelps, a Member of Congress) have begged me not to permit General Sigel’s command to return to that part of the country, as they robbed and plundered wherever they went friends and enemies alike. I shall, however, be obliged to employ his division, as I have no other forces to send against Price. If I could withdraw them entirely from this State and send them to Cairo to operate in the enemy’s country in more compact masses, perhaps I might reduce them to better discipline. I purpose doing so as soon as possible.

As a specimen of the kind of reliance which can be placed upon some of the foreign adventurers who have been placed in high positions in our volunteer service I will mention the fact, which has been reported to me from very reliable sources, that a number of officers held a meeting, and agreed that if the Trent affair should result in a war with Great Britain they would leave our service in a body and go to Canada.

The officers and men of these regiments go wherever they please, and although I have issued the most stringent orders on this subject, the colonels will neither enforce discipline nor report their officers and men for trial by courts-martial for military offenses daily committed. The men, if properly officered, would make good soldiers, but with their present commanders they are little better than an armed mob. I do not pretend to doubt their fighting qualities, but they are utterly deficient in the first quality of a good soldier-discipline. I hope, however, in time to infuse a little of this essential element, without which any army is worse than useless.

I have used my best endeavors to reform some of the abuses here in regard to expenditures and the waste of public property, but with such officers as I have to command it is almost a hopeless task. As soon as one leak is stopped a new one is discovered in another place. If the Government will commission such officers, the country must pay for their incompetency and rascality.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.503}

[Inclosure.]

WELLSVILLE, MO., January 2, 1862.

Col. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to urgently request the immediate action of the commanding general upon a matter which I regard of vital importance.

Upon my arrival at Warrenton I found a battalion of Reserve Corps Cavalry, under command of Major Hollan, the only cavalry at my disposal. These men had preceded me only a few days, but they had already murdered one of the few Union men in that vicinity and committed numerous depredations upon the property of peaceful citizens. Since that time their conduct has been absolutely barbarous-a burning disgrace to the army and to the Union cause. In spite of all my efforts to the contrary they have plundered and destroyed the property of citizens (many of them the best Union men in the State) to the amount of many thousands of dollars. Their officers either connive at it or else have no power to restrain their men. I cannot trust them out of my sight for a moment, and of course they are of no use to me as cavalry so long as this is the case. I have succeeded in detecting five of the robbers and have them in irons and have arrested the major and one of the captains and placed them in close confinement.

I have placed Lieutenant Sheldon, of my staff, in command of the two companies in this place, but I cannot long spare him from his proper duties, and there are still three companies at other posts, and it is beyond my power to prevent their acts of robbery if I make any use of them. No doubt there are some good men in this battalion, but as a class they are well-mounted and well-armed barbarians.

I am told there is at Benton Barracks a considerable force of good mounted men without arms. I therefore urgently request that a battalion of them be sent to me without arms or horses, and that I be authorized to dismount and disarm Major Hollan’s battalion and send it to Saint Louis. If something of the kind is not done soon there will be very few Union men in this part of the State.

I will as soon as possible forward charges against Major Hollan, Captain Winkel, and the men I have arrested.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: I have received a dispatch from General Smith at Paducah, dated the 11th, saying that he has reliable information from Columbus to the 10th that no troops have left that place for Bowling Green save the two regiments reported two weeks ago, except part of a regiment of cavalry which has crossed into Missouri.

The demonstrations which General Grant is now making I have no doubt will keep them in check till preparations can be made for operations on the Tennessee or Cumberland. I sent three infantry regiments to Cairo yesterday and have two more ready for to-morrow, but the ice {p.504} in the river will probably prevent. All the cars on the railroad have been sent to Cincinnati, to bring forward a regiment of cavalry, destined, as I am informed, for Fort Leavenworth. This will probably delay the movement till Friday.

Our cavalry sent to Springfield found Price in strong force. They have been obliged to fall back to Lebanon and-probably to the Gasconade. I have ordered General Curtis to move forward with all his infantry and artillery. His force will not be less than 12,000. The enemy is reported to have between thirty-five and forty guns. General Curtis has only twenty-four, but I send him six pieces to-morrow and will send six more in a few days. I also propose placing a strong reserve at Rolla, which can be sent forward if necessary. The weather is intensely cold and the troops, supplied as they are with very inferior clothing, blankets, and tents, must suffer greatly in a winter campaign, and yet I see no way of avoiding it. Unless Price is driven from the State insurrections will continually occur in all the central and northern counties, so as to prevent the withdrawal of our troops.

JANUARY 15.

Since writing the above I have learned that one of the transport steamers got aground near Sulphur Springs and is frozen in. The troops are being landed to-day, and will be sent forward by railroad. Nothing has been heard of the other steamer, and it is presumed that she got through. All water transportation to Cairo must cease for the present.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, January 15, 1862.

Colonel OSTERHAUS:

COLONEL: I have written Colonel Carr to hold on at Waynesville (unless hard pressed) till you come up, as I think we will make a depot or supplies at that place or that vicinity. The proximity of streams and the convergency of common roads must be important elements in considering the propriety of such a location, and I am now favorably impressed with Lebanon. But temporarily you may keep an encampment at or near Waynesville. Keep me advised of your progress. Do not hurry forward, and try to camp early, so as to give time for preparing the best the men can to contend with the inclement season these cold nights. General Halleck writes that your name has been presented for promotion, which I hope you may continue to deserve and ultimately secure.

I am, colonel, very truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding District Southwest.

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CAIRO, January 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. M. C. MEIGS, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: To-day I had a trial of the Benton, to ascertain if her speed and power were sufficient to enable her to be handled in the strong current in different parts of the river with her bow downstream {p.505} and also in turning and maneuvering in action, and I regret to inform you that her speed did not, in the judgment of Commanders Pennock and Stembel, who I appointed to make this trial, exceed 2 1/2 knots per hour by the land in an adverse current of 3 miles, making 5 1/2 miles per hour in slack-water; so slow and unwieldy in turning, and not being able to back against the current, from want of power in her engines, that these gentlemen came to the conclusion that she is altogether too deficient in steam power to be considered at all available as a gunboat without a heavier engine. Under these circumstances I do not feel authorized to accept the Benton without having further direction from you, as the vessel, with her present engine, could not be handled near the rebel batteries at all effectively.

The Benton is so strong a boat, well plated, and with so large a battery, that I concur most heartily with those two gentlemen in strongly recommending that a new engine and boilers be placed in her immediately.

The seven gunboats built by contract I have accepted, after an examination of the vessels and contract by Commanders Pennock and Stembel, and will commission them to-morrow, although some work yet requires to be done before they are fully completed.

I respectfully call your attention to a former letter, in which I requested instructions about the mortar boats, all of which are here; but their magazines leak badly, and I learn from Colonel Symington that but one mortar and no beds are now prepared in Pittsburg, the mortars and beds which were originally designed for these mortar boats having been transferred to New York.

The report of Commanders Pennock and Stembel will be forwarded to-morrow.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

P. S.-Original sent yesterday by Mr. Eads.

Please telegraph me what to do in relation to and with the Benton. I have to-day telegraphed you for authority to buy a steamer and fit her up as a magazine boat for $18,000, in case we [go] down the river any distance, as the gunboats will hardly carry 100 rounds, and I am procuring 300 rounds. Lieutenant Sanford, the ordnance officer, also considers this important. Will you please telegraph me directions also in reference to this matter of the magazine boat. I have commissioned the gunboats to-day, except the Benton.

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HDQRS. OF THE ARMY ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, January 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the Commanding General to acknowledge the receipt of the report of the Board of Army and Navy Officers ordered by you to examine into the condition of the gun, tug, and mortar boats destined for service in the Western waters.

From the information received from the Navy Department it appears that the efficiency of a large portion of the flotilla is destroyed by the want of crews (gunners). Efforts have been made for some time past to ship the men required, but these efforts have entirely failed, and at {p.506} this late hour it becomes necessary to resort to other means to utilize the great expense that has been already incurred. The flotilla, together with the naval officers on duty with it,is completely under your orders and it is expected that you will devise the means of overcoming the obstacles that have presented themselves. It will be more economical, and it seems quite proper, to use volunteer troops to supply the deficiencies in the gunners, and it is suggested that if there is any difficulty from a surplus of officers one remedy would be to detail a portion of the volunteer officers on other duty, while a portion of the uninstructed officers hired by the Navy might also be discharged.

Your early attention is called to this subject, and it is expected that some means will be devised to render the flotilla efficient at a very early day. The matter is placed in your hands, and it is thought that a full interchange of views between Commodore Foote and yourself will result in a solution of the difficulty.

Your views as to the best employment of the flotilla are invited.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 18, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, Rolla:

GENERAL: Yours of the 16th is just received.* I shall immediately order the Ninth Iowa to report to you. I find it impossible to get the Curtis Horse ready in time, and the larger detachments sent from here to Cairo will prevent my giving you any more regiments from this place; but I am determined to give you force enough to render it certain that you will drive Price from the State. I have therefore ordered an entire division to march from Otterville to join your command. They will either go by Linn Creek or Warsaw; if the former, they will direct their march on Lebanon; if the latter, on Buffalo. I will know by Monday which route is deemed best. General Pope will consult with officers who have been over both, and report their opinions. Major Allen will send you 50 teams, and 50 extra will be sent from Otterville with that division. The Pacific Railroad cannot bring them without interfering with supplies.

Major Allen expects 10,000 mittens in a few days. You will be the first to be supplied.

Cut down regimental transportation as much as possible. Get as many hand-mills as you can for grinding corn. My great fear is that the Pacific Railroad will break down, and there may be a delay of a few days before the company can be reorganized. They are greatly distressed for money to pay their operatives and fear a strike. Captain Sheridan will receive $10,000 from Major Allen. It is all the money we can rake and scrape together. We hope to get some from Washington soon. If necessary, fix a fair schedule of prices for forage, &c., and take it: giving Union men quartermasters’ orders for payment. Take the bull by the horns. I will back you in such forced requisitions where they become necessary for supplying the forces.

We must have no failure in this movement against Price. It must be the last.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

{p.507}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 18, 1862.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of a letter from Colonel Steele, commanding at Sedalia, in relation to depredations committed by Jennison’s men in Western Missouri. Similar accounts are received of the conduct of the First Kansas Regiment along the Missouri River, in the counties of La Fayette and Jackson.

These men do not belong to this department, and have no business to come within the State. I have directed General Pope to drive them out, or, if they resist, to disarm them and hold them prisoners. They are no better than a band of robbers; they cross the line, rob, steal, plunder and burn whatever they can lay their hands upon. They disgrace the name and uniform of American soldiers and are driving good Union men into the ranks of the secession army. Their conduct within the last six months has caused a change of 20,000 votes in this State. If the Government countenances such acts by screening the perpetrators from justice and by rewarding with office their leaders and abettors it may resign all hopes of a pacification of Missouri. If Kansas troops are again permitted to come into this State to commit depredations, the State can be held only by the strong arm of military power. The bitter animosity created against these troops is naturally transferred to the Government which supports them and in whose name they pretend to act.

I hope this matter will be brought to the attention of the Secretary of War and the Commanding General of the Army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

[Indorsement.]

The Secretary of War has read and considered the within letter of General Halleck, who, as general in command of his department, has all the requisite power, and whose duty it is to exert that power to prevent robbery and plunder within his district. But the Secretary is not aware of any act of the Government that warrants the hypothesis that it would “countenance such acts or screen the perpetrators from justice.” If General Halleck will specify anything of that nature that has been done by the Government the attention of the President will be directed to it, and he no doubt will strive to remove any occasion for such an imputation.*

* This indorsement is in the handwriting of Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

SEDALIA, January 14, 1862.

Col. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Department of the Missouri:

COLONEL: J. W. Smith, clerk in the Department of the Interior, in Washington, is just in from the neighborhood of Rose Hill, and reports that Jennison’s men, under Major Anthony, are there, committing depredations upon Union men and secessionists indiscriminately. They have burned forty-two houses in that vicinity and robbed others of valuables and driven off stock.

{p.508}

Mr. Smith says they took his wife’s silverware, furs, &c. He estimates the value of property taken from loyal citizens at $7,000; and, to cap the climax, they shot to death Mr. Richards, a good Union man, without cause or provocation.

He further states the people, except the strongest Union men are going to Price’s army for protection. The force engaged in this business is estimated at 300 or 400. At last accounts these banditti were about 50 miles from here. On my advice Mr. Smith started for Kansas to report these circumstances to General Hunter and request him to take measures for the recovery of the stolen property.

I saw a letter from a lady this evening, which was full of taunts, and no doubt many people believe that Jennison is carrying out the policy of our Government.

I would send out all my cavalry to bring in all these marauders, but we are in the midst of a very severe storm, and it is probable that they could not be overtaken within the limits of this State.

Very respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

FRED’K STEELE, Colonel, Commanding at Sedalia.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., January 20, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel ANTHONY, Seventh Kansas Regiment, Leavenworth City:

SIR: I am instructed by the general commanding to inform you that he has read with surprise your reports of the 4th and 13th instant, detailing (that of the 4th) the burning of the town of Dayton, Mo., and (that of the 13th) the burning of the town of Columbus, in the same State.*

The general commanding finds no evidence in either report of a state of facts sufficient to warrant these extreme measures. Your reports therefore are disapproved and held in reserve for further consideration and action.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See pp. 45, 46.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 20, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: The cavalry sent to vicinity of Springfield found the enemy in force and were obliged to fall back to Waynesville. The whole force at Rolla was ordered in advance to re-enforce them and attack Price. Additional troops were ordered from here to Rolla, increasing General Curtis’ army to about 12,000. I have just received a dispatch informing me that a council of Generals Curtis, Sigel, and Asboth had decided that they required six regiments in addition to those ordered. I can send no more at present from Saint Louis, and consequently have ordered General Pope to dispatch one division from {p.509} near Sedalia to join General Curtis at Lebanon. This will make his effective force over 15,000.

This winter campaign will be a hard one on account of the weather and roads, but they will either beat Price or drive him from the State. Of the two divisions left at La Mine I purpose sending one across the Missouri at Booneville to march through the secession counties of Howard, Boone, Callaway and Montgomery to Saint Charles and this city for transportation to Cairo. They cannot be brought here by railroad, and the road north of the river is much the best. Moreover, their presence in the counties named is important to break up secession bands and to assist the Union men in organizing as State Militia. The condition of ice in the river is such that I have been able to send only three of the five regiments ordered from here to Cairo. I hope to dispatch some more this week. I hear nothing of the two regiments ordered from North Missouri to Cairo more than a week ago. It is very probable that they cannot cross the river at Hannibal. General Schofield hopes to be able to spare me two regiments from his command on the North Missouri Railroad in a week or two. These will also be sent to Cairo.

I have received no information in respect to the general plan of campaign, and I therefore feel much hesitation in recommending any line of operations for these and other troops which I may be able to withdraw from Missouri. Of course this line must be subordinate to some general plan. I take it for granted, general, that what has heretofore been done has been the result of political policy rather than military strategy, and that the want of success on our part is attributable to the politicians rather than to the generals.

So far it seems to me the war has been conducted upon what may be called pepper-box strategy-scattering our troops so as to render them inferior in numbers in any place where they can meet the enemy. Occupying the circumference of a great circle, with the enemy within that circumference and near the center, we cannot expect to strike any great blow, for he can concentrate his forces on any one point sooner than we can ours. The division of our force upon so many lines and points seems to me a fatal policy. I am aware that you, general, are in no way responsible for this, these movements having been governed by political expediency and in many cases directed by politicians in order to subserve particular interests; but is it not possible with the new Secretary of War to introduce a different policy and to make our future movements in accordance with military principles? On this supposition I venture to make a few suggestions in regard to operations in the West.

The idea of moving down the Mississippi by steam is, in my opinion, impracticable, or at least premature. It is not a proper line of operations, at least now. A much more feasible plan is to move up the Cumberland and Tennessee, making Nashville the first objective point. This would turn Columbus and force the abandonment of Bowling Green, Columbus cannot be taken without an immense siege train and a terrible loss of life. I have thoroughly studied its defenses; they are very strong. But it can be turned, paralyzed, and forced to surrender. This line of the Cumberland or Tennessee is the great central line of the Western theater of war, with the Ohio below the mouth of Green River as the base and two good navigable rivers extending far into the interior of the theater of operations. But the plan should not be attempted without a large force, not less than 60,000 effective men.

{p.510}

In connection with this movement I would move a small column of, say, 10,000 men from from Ironton on Pocahontas and Jacksonport in Arkansas, to cut the armies of Price and McIntosh from their depots of supplies at these places. Price would be thus compelled to fall back on Fort Smith or to advance to the relief of these towns. In either case Southwestern Missouri would be relieved of his presence. The forces I have sent against him will drive him out of this State, but they cannot pursue him into Arkansas on the line of his retreat; that would be folly on our part. I would also take and hold New Madrid, so as to cut off river communication from the South with Columbus. The occupation of New Madrid would entirely relieve Cairo, and almost the whole garrison could be withdrawn from that place. This plan would require the occupation of Green River with only a small force. Johnston and Buckner would not venture to cross that river with a large army in their rear on the Cumberland. If they did, their fate would be sealed.

I am ignorant of General Buell’s forces or plans. If he is strong enough to fight the enemy at Bowling Green or to turn that place and force him to fall back in the direction of Nashville the same object may be accomplished; but to operate both on Green River and on the Cumberland with the enemy at Bowling Green is to move on converging exterior lines with the enemy inside of the angle-always a most hazardous operation, unless each of the exterior forces is superior to the enemy. Under any circumstances it is bad strategy, because it requires a double force to accomplish a single object.

To carry out the plan proposed would make it necessary to suspend all minor operations. I understand troops are being concentrated at Fort Leavenworth to move on Western Arkansas and Texas. Such a project, if it be contemplated, is contrary to every military rule. Troops must be sent to a base hundreds of miles from any enemy at an immense cost of transportation. The line of operation is exterior and beyond relief, and the expense of supplies must be enormous. It can lead to no possible military result, unless made so large as to cripple or paralyze any movement on a truly strategic line. It certainly is not a military operation. It may, however, be intended to gratify some political partisan. If it be intended to check Price’s army, that can be much better accomplished by a line parallel to or near to the main one, viz, on Pocahontas and Jacksonport, the depots of his supplies.

The main central line will also require the withdrawal of all available troops from this State; also those in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Ohio, which are armed and still to be armed, and also the transfer to that route or near it of all the Kentucky troops not required to secure the line of Green River.

The force at Cairo and on the Ohio River below the mouth of Green River is now about 15,000. Seven regiments have just been ordered there from Missouri. By the middle or last of February I hope to send about 15,000 more. If 30,000 or 40,000 can be added from the sources indicated there will be sufficient for holding Cairo, Fort Holt, and Paducah, and to form the column proposed. The troops at Ironton could threaten Pocahontas until a sufficient force could be detached from Curtis’ army at Springfield to take and hold New Madrid and Jacksonport. So long as the enemy controls the Mississippi below Columbus it might not be safe to attempt the occupation of New Madrid before moving up the Cumberland or Tennessee, as otherwise a large force might at any time be thrown across the river from Columbus to retake that place if once captured by us.

{p.511}

These suggestions are hastily written out, but they are the result of much anxious inquiry and mature deliberation. I am confident that the plan, if properly carried out, would produce important results. I also believe it to be feasible.

I have not designated any particular line or lines of movement. That must be a matter of farther study if the general idea should be approved. Perhaps the main column should move from Smithland, between the rivers, by Dover, &c. Perhaps the line east of the Cumberland or that west of the Tennessee would be preferable. These questions, however, are matters easily determinable.

I have been sick for more than a week with the measles, and several members of my staff are unable to attend to any duty. Under these circumstances some delay must occur in answering the communications from the Adjutant-General of the Army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 21, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Rolla:

GENERAL Yours of the 19th is received.* I have already informed you that the Ninth Iowa and a division from General Pope’s command have been ordered to report to you. This will make your force over 15,000 men. Should the Benton Hussars and the Forty-third Illinois be prepared in time for the field they may be sent to your command. If not, they must go elsewhere. The Second Iowa cannot be relieved before the last of next week, and it is still uncertain when the Curtis Horse will be ready for the field. We have neither horses nor arms for them at present. Brigades and divisions must be made up according to the circumstances of the particular case and the exigencies of the service. If I were to attempt to gratify the wishes of particular commands I should be obliged to transfer half the troops in this department at an enormous expense, at a time when the Quartermaster’s Department has not a single cent to pay necessary expenses. It cannot be done and will not be attempted. I doubt very much whether I can send you any more artillery than that taken by the division from Sedalia. If possible I will send you Mann’s or Spoor’s, as I best can. I find it utterly impossible to unite fragments of regiments so as to satisfy either men or officers and Governors of States.

I must call your attention to certain irregularities. Your dissolution of the general court-martial was contrary to law. When the officers composing the court are ordered into the field the court ceases to act as such, but it cannot be dissolved or the prisoners released except by the authority ordering it.

Again, your Special Orders, No. 41, ordering men from General Sherman’s command, is entirely irregular. You cannot give any orders to troops at Benton Barracks. You should have made a requisition on me for the corporal and men wanted. These may appear small matters, but they create difficulties and annoyances which it takes much of my time to arrange. It is just as easy to follow the law and regulations as it is to violate them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

{p.512}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 21, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE:

The division to be organized and sent to General Curtis’ command should not exceed 4,000.

Telegraph me which route is preferable, and when it will be ready to start.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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OTTERVILLE, January 21, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Have determined to send Second Division, under J. C. Davis. It will consist of five strong infantry regiments, two batteries and four cavalry companies, with ten days’ rations. Route by Linn Creek, but to Lebanon. Wrote you last night, supposing that the extra hundred wagons would accompany division from here. The division will be ready to move any day you name.

Advise me what instructions to give to commanding officer.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CHIEF ASST. QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, DIST. OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 21, 1862.

Capt. LEWIS B. PARSONS, Assistant Quartermaster, Saint Louis:

CAPTAIN: What does Government intend to do? This department has been neglected in every way. No funds; no nothing, and don’t seem as though we ever would get anything. Everybody, high and low, in this district is discouraged, and I assure you I had rather be in the bottom of the Mississippi than work night and day as I do without being sustained by Government. I have written to Saint Louis and Washington and it avails nothing, and if my whole heart and soul was not in the cause I would never write another word on the subject, but let matters float, I assure you; and a few days will prove my assertion, that unless Government furnishes this department with funds, transportation, &c., the whole concern will sink so low that the day of resurrection will only raise it. Laborers have not been paid a dime for six or seven months; don’t care whether they work or not. If they do, don’t take any interest in anything. Government owes everybody and everything, from small petty amounts to large. Liabilities more plenty than Confederate scrip and worth less. Regiment after regiment arriving daily. Nothing to supply them with, and no funds to buy or men to work. No transportation for ourselves or any one else.

To tell you the truth we are on our last legs, and I have made my last appeal in behalf of Government unless it’s to a higher power, for it will kill any man and every man at the head of departments here the way we are now working. Is it possible that General Halleck does not know the situation of affairs here? If you think not, I hope you will inform him at once, for if he should come here he will be astonished and annoyed to find us in such a condition. The general commanding {p.513} and myself have done our best to bring about better results, but our wants are not supplied or even noticed.

Respectfully, your friend, in haste,

A. S. BAXTER, Assistant Quartermaster.

[Indorsements.]

JANUARY 25, 1862.

Respectfully referred to Major-General McClellan for his perusal. Unless the quartermaster’s department here is furnished with funds soon it will be impossible to organize the expedition from Cairo. These letters show the condition of affairs not only at Cairo but throughout the department.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

JANUARY 30, 1862.

Respectfully referred to the honorable Secretary of War for his information.

I know the fact that in the spring (April and May) there was a great deficiency of funds at Cairo. The public interests require as prompt action as possible in this case.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 22, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

No complete returns for December have been received. Whole number in department will probably amount to 105,000 on paper. Several irregular corps have been mustered out since 1st instant. More will be as soon as money is received to pay them. Large percentage now sick.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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ROLLA, January 22, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: On the receipt of the general’s letter of the 18th, giving me further assurances of ability and determination to push this column through, I immediately ordered Colonels Carr and Osterhaus to move forward to Lebanon, and ordered other troops to Waynesville to guard my stores there and support the Lebanon position. The Lebanon depot will now be the main one, and I shall follow the general’s order to receive supplies peaceably, if I can; forcibly, if I must. The only thing I fear in regard to the troops coming from Tipton is delay, but this I suppose is unavoidable. The opinion here is that the route by Linnville is most certain of success. I shall be anxious to know when they start and how they progress and who commands. Supplies being the main question in moving armies in America, especially in a sparsely settled portion, my main efforts are devoted to that matter, and my {p.514} teams, means, and men that can aid in it will be pressed with the utmost energy.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 22, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Rolla, Mo.:

GENERAL: The Second Division, under Col. J. C. Davis, will leave Tipton on the 24th instant, taking the road by Versailles and Linn Creek to Lebanon. They will carry ten days’ provisions. An extra train of 75 wagons, also loaded with provisions, will accompany the expedition. On reaching the Osage the division will be under your orders. It consists of five strong infantry regiments, two batteries, and four cavalry companies. The Benton Hussars will be sent to Rolla as soon as they can be armed. These ought to be sufficient. Don’t ask for any more if you can possibly help it, as everything else I can rake and scrape together is wanted in another direction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 22, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: I wrote you in November respecting the health of Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman and my reasons for giving him a leave of twenty days. He returned and reported for duty at the end of that time, greatly improved, but not, in my opinion, entirely in condition to take the field. I therefore placed him in command of the Camp of Instruction at Benton Barracks, where he has rendered most excellent service, while at the same time his health has gradually improved. I think in a very short time he will be fully prepared to resume his duties in the field, either in this department or in any other to which he may be assigned.

I have made this explanation as I deemed it due to both General Sherman and myself, inasmuch as some of his friends may not understand why younger officers have been placed in more active commands. I know that General Sherman himself is perfectly satisfied with the arrangement, and will cheerfully do duty either in this department or in any other to which he may be assigned. I should be very sorry to lose his services here, but will oppose no obstacle to the wishes of himself or friends if a transfer should be desired.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 22, 1862.

General STERLING PRICE, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your letter, dated Springfield, January 12, is received. The troops of which you complain on the Kansas frontier and at Fort Leavenworth are not under my command. In regard to them I respectfully {p.515} refer you to Maj. Gen. David Hunter, commanding Department of Kansas, headquarters at Fort Leavenworth.

You also complain that “individuals and parties of men specially appointed and instructed by you to destroy railroads, culverts and bridges, by tearing them up, burning, &c., have been arrested and subjected to a general court-martial for alleged crimes.” This statement is, in the main, correct. Where “individuals and parties of men” violate the laws of war they will be tried, and if found guilty will certainly be punished, whether acting under your “special appointment and instructions” or not. You must be aware, general, that no orders of yours can save from punishment spies, marauders, robbers, incendiaries, guerrilla bands, &c., who violate the laws of war. You cannot give immunity to crime. But let us fully understand each other on this point. If you send armed forces, wearing the garb of soldiers and duly organized and enrolled as legitimate belligerents, to destroy railroads, bridges, &c., as a military act, we shall kill them, if possible, in open warfare, or, if we capture them, we shall treat them as prisoners of war.

But it is well understood that you have sent numbers of your adherents, in the garb of peaceful citizens and under false pretenses, through our lines into Northern Missouri, to rob and destroy the property of Union men and to burn and destroy railroad bridges, thus endangering the lives of thousands, and this, too, without any military necessity or possible military advantage. Moreover, peaceful citizens of Missouri, quietly working on their farms, have been instigated by your emissaries to take up arms as insurgents, and to rob and plunder and to commit arson and murder. They do not even act under the garb of soldiers, but under false pretenses and in the guise of peaceful citizens. You certainly will not pretend that men guilty of such crimes, although “specially appointed and instructed by you,” are entitled to the rights and immunities of ordinary prisoners of war. If you do, will you refer me to a single authority on the laws of war which recognizes such a claim?

You may rest assured, general, that all prisoners of war not guilty of crime will be treated with all proper consideration and kindness. With the exception of being properly confined, they will be lodged and fed, and where necessary clothed, the same as our own troops. I am sorry to say that our prisoners who have come from your camps do not report such treatment on your part. They say that you gave them no rations, no clothing, no blankets, but left them to perish with want and cold. Moreover, it is believed that you subsist your troops by robbing and plundering the non-combatant Union inhabitants of the southwestern counties of this State. Thousands of poor families have fled to us for protection and support. They say that your troops robbed them of their provisions and clothing, carrying away their shoes and bedding, and even cutting cloth from their looms, and that you have driven women and children from their homes to starve and perish in the cold. I have not retaliated such conduct upon your adherents here, as I have no intention of waging such a barbarous warfare; but I shall, whenever I can, punish such crimes, by whomsoever they may be committed.

I am daily expecting instructions respecting an exchange of prisoners of war. I will communicate with you on that subject as soon as they are received.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding Department.

{p.516}

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SAINT LOUIS, January 23, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Rolla, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am induced to believe, from information received from spies just from Springfield, that Price will not wait to give battle even to 8,000 or 10,000 of our forces. I therefore wish you to move your command as soon as possible to Lebanon and in advance, without waiting for the division of Colonel Davis. That division should not cross the Osage at Linn Creek unless you absolutely require it. It, however, will serve as a reserve. Colonel Davis will be instructed to make preparations for crossing, and if you find on moving from Lebanon towards Springfield that Price will wait to give you battle, you can draw in this reserve by forced marches.

As the authorities at Washington are exceedingly urgent to have troops sent elsewhere, I feel very unwilling to send you any more than may be necessary, while at the same time I wish you to have all that really are necessary to the success of the movement; but really I do not believe that Price will fight you even without Davis’ division. If you find this to be so, that division can be withdrawn for other service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 23, 1862.

Brigadier-General POPE, Commanding, &c., Otterville, Mo.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 21st is received. General Curtis has been instructed precisely as you recommend, that is, not to order Colonel Davis’ division across the river at Linn Creek unless his services are absolutely required. It will serve as a reserve, and, if necessary, will re-enforce him by forced marches. You will so instruct Colonel Davis.

As soon as you can make the proper arrangements I wish one division of your command to cross the river at Booneville or Jefferson City, and march for Saint Charles. Small garrisons of cavalry will be left at Glasgow, Fayette, Columbia, and Fulton, to be quartered in the public buildings. You will dispose these garrisons so as to bring, if possible, entire regiments to Saint Charles. This movement should be organized and commenced at once. You will either accompany it or remain in command of the district, as you may prefer. There are six 24-pounders and four 6-pounders at Jefferson City. I think you can safely withdraw two or three of the 24-pounders for arming the batteries at La Mine. Do you hear anything of our troops ordered from Kansas? They ought to have been at Lexington before this.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, January 23, 1862.

Col. FRED. STEELE, Commanding at Sedalia:

The general commanding directs that you send as large a cavalry force as you can spare, not less than five companies of your force at {p.517} Sedalia, who, when joined by four companies from this place, under Major Torrence, First Iowa Cavalry, will proceed to the neighborhood of Lexington, thence to Waverly, thence across to Arrow Rock, and from thence to return directly to Sedalia, so as to make a thorough scout of the whole region, but not to be absent over eight days, and to report regularly by messengers to Sedalia. Reports reach the general commanding from department headquarters, from Glasgow, and from Brunswick that the enemy is crossing in considerable numbers at Brunswick and Waverly. Perhaps it will be best to send a section of artillery; the whole to be under command of some responsible officer, without reference to the corps to which he belongs. The four companies of Iowa cavalry will report to you at Sedalia to-morrow night.

You will keep General Pope advised constantly of the movements and operations of this force.

By order of General Pope:

––– –––, Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, January 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant.* The Second Division marches to-morrow morning for Linn Creek. I fear there is a mistake about fords near that place which can be crossed at any season. Any ford over 3 feet in depth will render the passage of wagons loaded with baggage or supplies impracticable without great difficulty. No doubt Colonel Davis will find means to cross, but it will require time.

Before receiving your letter I had directed a scout to be made in the direction of Lexington and Waverly. I have sent nine companies of cavalry and a section of artillery to go to the neighborhood of Lexington, thence to Waverly, thence to Arrow Rock, and from the latter place to return direct to Sedalia. The expedition will be absent about eight days.

I receive frequent letters from Glasgow in relation to posting troops at that place. Unless the system of occupying every considerable or inconsiderable town in the State is to be adopted I do not see that Glasgow has any claims not advanced by Lexington, Booneville, &c. Glasgow is important in some respects as a military position, but I think not as much so as Brunswick. As neither place, however, is within the limits of my command, I can only refer the matter for your consideration.

Posting troops in the towns has very much the same effect as issuing sugar and coffee to Dutch and Irish soldiers: what they never felt the want of before immediately becomes a necessity, and cannot possibly be dispensed with. Once station troops in these towns and it becomes nearly impossible to get them away for any service without great clamor from the inhabitants, who profit in more ways than protection from their presence.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See Appendix, p. 827.

{p.518}

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 23, 1862.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Inclosed find copies of certain papers, showing an unfortunate condition of affairs in Fremont County, the southwestern county in this State. I am fully satisfied of the correctness of the facts stated in the report of Colonel Nutt, and that the, if not the only, way to put down the feeling there that now endangers the public peace is, as he suggests, to arrest the rebels who have fled from Missouri into our State and some of these sympathizers on our side of the line and to also seize the property of those men brought into our State from Missouri. The secession feeling is strong in Fremont County, and, as the State authorities have no power to act in this class of cases, I request that you will give such full power and instructions to United States officers in this State and Missouri as will result in prompt and decided action. The United States district attorney for this State, Mr. Gurley, is, and for some time has been, in Washington, by reason of which the marshal, Mr. Hoxie, is deprived of his counsel.

If the marshal shall be directed to take any action in this matter, it will be necessary either that he be directed to act without consultation with the district attorney or that the district attorney return to the State.

Permit me again to impress upon you that, in my judgment, the safety of the people in the county of Fremont, from a troublesome border warfare, requires the prompt arrest of the rebels who have fled from Missouri and some of their sympathizers in this State and to seize the property of rebels in this State.

Very truly,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD

[Inclosure No. 1.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 8, 1862.

Lieut. Col. H. C. NUTT, Aide-de-Camp, &c., Council Bluffs, Iowa:

SIR: I have just received a communication from citizens of Fremont County, of which the inclosed is a copy.*

You will immediately proceed to Sidney, in said county, and fully investigate the matters therein set forth. Consult Judge Sears and Colonel Hedges, and if you shall be satisfied the preservation of the public peace so requires, call into the service such of the volunteer companies of the county as may be necessary to that end and keep them in service as long as their services may be required. If, in your judgment, it shall be necessary to call out any military force, make them call first upon the company at Sidney.

Call for no more troops than in your best judgment will be necessary and keep them in service only so long as may be necessary. In this matter I must trust to your discretion, and I will hold you responsible for its sound exercise. Procure proper quarters for such troops as you may call out and make the best arrangements you can for their subsistence. You must make all your arrangements as economically {p.519} as possible. No extravagant charges for quarters or subsistence will be allowed.

You will preserve the public peace and protect the prisoners at all hazards.

I desire full information on the following points:

I. Have rebels or rebel sympathizers from Missouri come into Fremont County, bringing with them their property, or have such persons sent their property from Missouri into the county? If so, give the names of such persons, a description of the property brought or sent, and the names of the persons, if any, of our own citizens who have such property in possession.

II. Does the bringing or sending of the property of such persons into the county tend to endanger the public peace?

III. I desire a full detail of all the facts connected with the attack on Mr. Fugitt and of the capture of those under arrest with the causes of all the acts done, so far as you can ascertain them.

IV. It has been stated to me that one or two persons, supposed to be of the party that attacked Mr. Fugitt, were shot by some of our citizens near Hamburg upon refusal to surrender. You will investigate the facts of this transaction and report to me fully thereon. I am determined to preserve the peace of our State and to protect the property of our citizens, but I am also determined that our State shall not be made an asylum for rebels who have been compelled to flee from their own State in consequence of their outrages on Union men there, if affording such asylum is to peril the peace of our own people. I am also determined that those of our own citizens who sympathize with and protect these fleeing rebels shall not make the consequences of their own acts the pretext for a breach of the public peace.

The peace must be preserved, and those persons afforded full protection and a fair and impartial trial.

You will report to me in writing as soon as possible, and keep me advised at intervals of the situation of affairs.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

* Subinclosure omitted. Its substance indicated hi Colonel Nutt’s report, Inclosure No. 2.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA, January 17, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa, Des Moines:

SIR: I received your letter, dated January 8, 1862, inclosing a communication from citizens of Fremont County, and in accordance with your instructions I proceeded on to Sidney on the morning of the 13th instant, for the purpose of carrying out said instructions, and have to report my action as follows:

I found the statements contained in the communication above referred to to be true in all material points. I will answer the four interrogations propounded in your letter in order:

1st Yes. Rebels to the number of thirty families, at least, with a large amount of horses, mules, cattle, hogs, &c., have left Missouri, came into Fremont County, and many of the same class have sent their property who have not come into this State themselves. These persons have come themselves or sent their property to save the same from seizure by the Government that they have outraged for the past year. I was able to find the whereabouts and names of but a portion of these persons, but such as I have found I append below, and will {p.520} give you further information upon this point at an early day. The parties named below are all either rank secessionists or rebel sympathizers, and I will make no distinction between them. It is enough to know that they are “not with us”-are not Union men.

Mr. John Pugh has 5 horses, owned in Missouri; owner’s name unknown. Mr. Freeman has 2 horses; owner unknown. Mr. Baldwin has 2 horses; owner unknown, H. G. Bowen has 15 horses and mules, owned by Nichols and Schouler Nichols lives at Saint Stevens, Nebr., and has furnished the rebels in North Missouri with arms, and is a prominent rebel. Milton McCartners has 8 or 10 horses and mules; owner unknown. Mr. Welty has 8 or 10 horses and mules, owned by Mr. Holland, who lives near Rockport. The Heatt brothers have 6 horses, 60 hogs, and 25 or 30 cattle; owners’ names unknown. They had consulted Mr. Cornish as to whether they could lawfully keep stock which belonged to secessionists in Missouri, for if they could they could make a large amount of money by so doing, as the secesh were willing to pay high prices. These men (Heatt) have 6 horses, owned by one Hall, who left Missouri in the night to save his property. Mr. Hollaway brought 25 horses and mules into this State, and has them scattered around at several places. Mr. Davis has 8 horses, belonging to a man in Rockport, name unknown; can be found and identified, as he is well known in Iowa. Mr. English (senator), some three weeks ago, went to Missouri and brought the personal property of one Poindexter, either the officer in Price’s army or a brother; at all events a rabid rebel, and it is reported and believed in Sidney that Poindexter himself is about McKinsock’s Grove. Mr. English has a horse belonging to Poindexter now in his possession, but has sent him away from his own farm to a brother-in-law’s for fear of jayhawking.

The above property has all of it been sent from Missouri to avoid seizure and confiscation by the Government. There have also been horses sent from Missouri lately by rebels who dared not leave their goods in Fremont County, and one lot of 40 went on, the man saying he was too near home in Fremont. I think that there are at the present time 100 to 125 horses in Fremont County, brought there by rebels to save them. Many place the number much higher, but from all my information I place the number as above.

In reply to your second question, I will say that by these acts I think the public peace is endangered, and I find all the Union men in Fremont are very certain it does, and say that unless it is stopped bloodshed will be the result. My reasons for thinking that it does endanger the public peace are that there is great danger of this property being pursued by jayhawkers and others, which would be almost certain to bring on a collision and bloodshed. Second, the accession of these rebels to the number of the same kind and their sympathizers in Fremont County increases the bitter feelings between the two parties, and which now requires but a word to bring on a civil strife in that county. As a sample; one John Cooper, of McKinsock’s Grove, has, he says, 25 Missouri friends with him, and he will keep them there as long as they will stay; that they are well armed, and will shoot the first man who tries to arrest any of their number or seize a horse.

Questions 3 and 4 I will answer together. On the night of December 30 a body of armed men from Missouri and Nebraska, under Capt. Warren Price, who is said to be the leader of a band of jayhawkers, came to the house of T. F. Fugitt, between 10 or 12 p.m., for the purpose, as they avowed on their way, of seizing some horses which had been taken from Missouri and owned by rebels in Missouri. Several of {p.521} the party entered the house and others went to the barn for the horses. Fugitt got up and ran into another room and seized a double-barreled shot-gun and instantly fired at the crowd. Then, instead of firing the other barrel, he clubbed his gun and knocked down another. At this Price drew his revolver and fired four shots at Fugitt, all of which took effect, one in the neck, which is a serious but not dangerous wound. Fugitt is rapidly recovering. The party then left Fugitt’s and went to several other places in the Grove and took in all 11 horses. These Captain Price sent in charge of two men to Missouri, but the men lost their way and at daylight were in sight of Sidney. They at once retraced their steps and tried to reach Missouri via Hamburg.

In the mean time a party of some 40 men were in pursuit of the robbers, and when these two men with 11 horses came to Hamburg they were hailed by C. McKinsock and Giles Corrlis. The men paid no attention to the hail, when McKinsock and Corrlis both fired their rifles. Corrlis killed his man dead, and McKinsock wounded the other, who was taken prisoner, and is now in Fremont jail. He says that himself and the dead man were at Fugitt’s’s, and that they reside in Nebraska. The horses taken from the prisoner were left at Hamburg and proved up and taken away by avowed rebels. No Union man has been molested, as I could learn.

The news of course spread like wild-fire, and early the next morning the sheriff and county judge started with a posse of 100 men to arrest the horse thieves, and the sheriff said he would follow them to Arkansas if he did not get them. On their way an incident occurred worthy of note. These 100 men left Sidney in three parties, and it is asserted that when on the road persons in one party were heard to hurrah for Jeff. Davis. The sheriff denies this, but I think it can be proven, although it was not in the party in which the sheriff was at the immediate head. Arriving at McKinsock’s Grove this party stopped and another one from the Grove, under the lead of H. English, went into Missouri and arrested 12 men and brought them to the Grove to lynch them, but as there was great doubt as to whether these were the men who were at Fugitt’s, after keeping them at the Grove one day they were given over to the sheriff, who took them to Sidney, where they were guarded by an armed force for three days, when, upon a legal examination before the county judge, they were all discharged except one, who had waived examination and given bail before, and the wounded man from Hamburg, who is now in jail.

The Missourians complain bitterly of not only the arrest, but of the men under whom it was done and under whom they were placed as prisoners. They say that if they could have seen the face of one single Union man, either among their captors or guards, they would have attributed it to a mistake and said nothing, but now it looks as if their rebel enemies had run away to Iowa and sent rebel sympathizers from Iowa and given them Union men’s names, to be arrested, maltreated, and nearly lynched.

There are many men whom I have seen from Atchison County who say that there is a large number of Union men sworn to shoot Han. English at sight, as they think him to be the leader of their enemies in Iowa while these prisoners were in the hands of Fremont authorities. The military at Rockport hearing of the manner of the arrest, started to rescue them. At the line they left all but 20 men who went to Sidney and demanded the release of the prisoners, which was refused, and there was danger of violence, but upon the assurance of Union men that the prisoners should have a fair trial and would at once prove {p.522} themselves innocent of the crime charged, they were induced to return home, which they did, and on their way arrested in Iowa a young man who bad been in Price’s army as a cook. The captain of Missouri troops claimed to have made this and other arrests which he made in Missouri the same day by order of the commanding officer at Saint Joe. The truth of this I do not know. What became of the prisoners taken from Iowa by the Missouri troops I was unable to learn.

In the mean time, on Saturday, January 4, a report having gone to Rockport that the civil authorities were going to give up the prisoners to the mob to be lynched, some 200 men from Atchison County and thereabouts started for the rescue. They crossed the line and came to Hamburg, where they were met by some 50 Iowa troops, who tore up the bridge and refused to let them pass. Here again was a very near approach to open hostilities between Iowa and Missouri citizens, but a flag of truce passed, and upon mutual explanation the Missouri men went home; did not go to Sidney at all.

The Union men of Missouri say that all the party who went into Missouri were secessionists, and that Iowa allows rebels to flee into her State to avoid punishment, and then allows secessionists to come to Missouri and arrest Union men without a shadow of law or right. I was able to disabuse them of this idea, or at least all I had a chance to talk with.

This feeling is particularly bitter between Union men in Missouri and the secesh sympathizers in McKinsock’s Grove, who are nearly all that kind and being so near the line increases the danger of collision. An armed guard is kept out now in many neighborhoods to warn them of approach of enemies. I find, further, that many men who have been avowed rebels and hooted at all soldiers as Lincoln thieves are now very clamorous for armed protection and now there is organized a company which has memorialized you for commissions and arms that are not safe to arm.

The board of supervisors of Fremont are secesh and they, at their last meeting, passed a resolution instructing their chairmen, Mr. Sipple and Mr. Cornish, to transmit to you what they wanted. They got Mr. Cornish in to have some Union influence. The chairman of supervisors proposed a paper which did not suit Cornish, and he refused to sign it. Sipple then proposed another, which he would not show Cornish, and sent the same to you. It is supposed to be a request to commission, arm, and call in service their men at McKinsock’s Grove. They are not the men to have State arms. I also telegraphed you not to commission Fremont militia. I found the infantry were all good men, with sound Union officers, but the mounted company was formed by Judge Rector, and is not sound.

One officer, Mr. Bovine, has since his election said that he was a secessionist, and he did not care who knew it. We want no such men with either arms or authority. I told Colonel Hedges that it should be disbanded and an infantry company put in its place, and told him that it was not legally organized, and it is not, as there has been no special authority granted, as is necessary, to organize any but infantry. I presume you will get the organization of another infantry company, which will make Colonel Hedges’ regiment to a maximum, when it should be commissioned at once.

I did not call out any State troops, and will not, unless there should be an immediate necessity for their service, until I hear from you again. My reasons are, 1st, the immediate danger of collision I believe to have passed, and, 2d, that I doubt the policy of keeping an armed {p.523} force of State troops in Fremont County unless for immediate use. They should be commissioned and armed and ready to go at an hour’s notice, but I think should be called into camp only as a last resort.

The best way to preserve the peace and remove the danger of collision I believe to be in sending a small force of Federal troops, say one or two companies of cavalry, from Saint Joe or Leavenworth, under some prudent, reliable Union officer, and clothe him with power to arrest armed secessionists either in Missouri or Iowa and seize their effects, to be sent at once to headquarters for adjudication. This will avoid increasing the personal hatred among the two classes of our own citizens, which would be increased by arming and calling out any State troops either from Iowa or Missouri, and lessen the danger of bloodshed if any arrests are to be made, and the State troops would have no place to send prisoners even if they have authority to make arrests. I feel certain that calling out any State troops would bring on a collision, and the aim is to preserve the peace more than to conquer rebels, as I understand it.

I am sustained in this view by all the Union men in Fremont except Colonel Hedges, who is very anxious to drill his regiment, but I would prefer sending an armed force in command of some Federal officer who would have no personal enemies to deal with, and I think the arrest of a very few men, and the seizure of the property belonging to rebels, who have sent the same to Iowa for safety, will not only quiet the present troubles, but remove the danger of a recurrence in future.

If I have been lengthy in this, it is because there was a good deal of ground to go over. I find that in all facts I have stated the Union men from whom I receive my information are supported by the statements of the other side, so far as I had an opportunity to inquire, in all material points. Many of the facts in regard to Fugitt’s case and the prisoners arrested were received from one who was with the sheriff, and is called a secessionist by Union men. I refer to W. C. Sipple. He claims to be a good Union man now. The Union men from whom I received most information were Judge Sears, Colonel Hedges, Mr. Cornish, Mr. Linkinfitter, Mr. Warren, formerly sheriff, and Squire Fanner, who lives at McKinsock’s Grove, all of whom agree upon the case as I have presented it.

Since my return I have received your letter of 14th instant. I will proceed at once to Rockport, and on my return report such other facts as I may come in possession of. In the mean time I hope to receive further instructions in regard to an armed force in Fremont County.

I remain, your most obedient servant,

H. C. NUTT.

[Indorsement.]

Referred to the War Department, with explanation to be made by Colonel Key verbally.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

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ROLLA, January 24, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The general’s letter of the 22d, informing me of the movement of Colonel Davis yesterday from Tipton and the force he brings, was duly and gladly received. My force now occupies Lebanon, and {p.524} will be preparing to feed our concentrated force, which will be so moved as to come there as soon as the Tipton force can reach them. I shall send a messenger to the Osage to meet the division and send from that point intelligence of matters.

I have trouble with pioneer companies that I have set to work on the road. I wish these companies had been included in the recent order concerning the U. S. Reserve Corps, for a New York paper has taken up the cause of Gerster just in time to put the deserters who were thrown out of the U. S. Reserve Corps. [?] I will, however, find little or no difficulty, if extra-duty bills are paid that are justly due for work done last fall.

Bridges and boats will be made when it is necessary, for I have among the volunteers men who can work at every trade, and mud and water can only delay but never stop an onward movement. I shall go myself, sending Captain Sheridan, my chief quartermaster and commissary, to aid the supply business and direct matters in front. The remainder of the force will be moved as fast as necessary, to combine at Lebanon.

Since writing the foregoing I have received the general’s letter of the 23d, in which he expresses the belief that Price will not wait to give battle, and recommending me to press forward, without waiting for Davis’ division, if found expedient, saying this force must not cross the Osage unless it is absolutely necessary.

I had, as the general will see, already anticipated the general’s wishes so far as occupying Lebanon and pressing forward troops to commands. The general will understand that it is the food that delays, and my progress now must depend on procuring or hauling supplies. My information of Price is by two surrendering parties; one left Saturday and the other Sunday last. The men who left Sunday are apparently intelligent, communicative and Mrs. Phelps writes may be depended on. They say Price and the army supposed I had fallen back to Rolla; that some efforts were going on to recruit; and this is corroborated by the fact that the rebel Capt. Tom Craig that our men killed in Lebanon Wednesday had the inclosed card on his person, and had come to recruit at Lebanon immediately after my force retired from there.

One report says that Rains had gone to Granby, with 400 men, to work the lead mines, and that some cavalry had gone out of Springfield south, but this does not look to me like leaving; as he would, if he designed to retreat, move his artillery first and his cavalry last, as bad roads retard his retreat with artillery as it does my advance. I also fear he may escape, but he stood against Sigel at Carthage. He fought you with no very insignificant force, and it was said he would stand against Fremont with his 40,000. Although he has not much force in and about Springfield, he has men scattered through the country ready to come at his call, and I see no great necessity elsewhere that should prevent us having at least an equivalent to his probable force, when our success must depend on our ability to procure and take his thirty-five or forty-two pieces of artillery.

My advanced posts are now within 35 or 40 miles of Springfield, ready to act if occasion shall offer; and I shall press forward all this force just as fast as supplies can be procured for them. When at Lebanon I am within a day and night’s forced march of Springfield. Colonel Davis’ division to be available as a reserve, should be this side of Osage; otherwise the distance is too great for forced marches at this season of the year. All estimates put Price’s force above 10,000, while my force without Davis will not. I fear, exceed 8,000 when I concentrate all I {p.525} can at Lebanon. I will try to squeeze out of the hospitals all I can, and more or less, I will do the best I can, but I think Colonel Davis should be allowed to participate in the effort to avoid such hazards as we have before had occasion to deplore in that ill-fated region. With a fair, fresh force at Lebanon, horses well shod, and men confident of even chances, I can see Price will find it hard to move his wagons and artillery out of our way. Rather than a long, dangerous retreat, the chances are he will prefer a battle; but of this there must be uncertainty, as he will also feel disposed to increase his chances of escape by falling back to the support of McIntosh at Fayetteville.

If deemed necessary I can stop Colonel Davis at any moment, as I shall feel it my duty to do under these instructions if his services do not appear necessary, but in the mean time I calculate on his force as most likely to unite in the final venture.

With great respect, I remain, very truly, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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ROLLA, January 24, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Advance of cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel Wright reoccupied Lebanon on 22d. Some 20 rebels fled. Lieutenant Pratt, First Missouri Cavalry, in pursuit; killed Capt. Tom Craig in running fight and took 1 prisoner and found some rebel pork.

We have taken several prisoners within last week, and two or three a day have come in and surrendered.

Price and his generals quiet at Springfield.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, January 24, 1862.

Major-General HUNTER, U. S. A., Commanding Department Kansas, Fort Leavenworth:

GENERAL: By direction of the General-in-Chief I have respectfully to inform you that Brig. Gen. J. H. Lane, U. S. Volunteers, has urged upon the President and Secretary of War an expedition to be conducted by him from Fort Leavenworth against the region west of Missouri and Kansas [Arkansas]. The outlines of his plan were stated by him to be in accordance with your own views. The following force, with supplies therefor, has been ordered to Kansas to operate under General Lane:

Seven regiments cavalry, three batteries artillery, four regiments infantry, and he has been authorized also to raise about 8,000 to 10,000 Kansas troops and to organize 4,000 Indians.

The General-in-Chief, in conveying to you this information, desires it to be understood that a command independent of you is not given to General Lane, but he is to operate to all proper extent under your supervision and control, and if you deem proper you may yourself command the expedition which may be undertaken. Under these circumstances the General will not give you a formal leave according to your application, {p.526} but he authorizes you to absent yourself from your command for twenty days, at your own discretion.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL: Rolla, January 25, 1862.

GENERAL: General Halleck has intelligence which makes him believe Price will escape us, which of course we have great reason to fear. I cannot, however, see how he can have later intelligence than mine, since I see men every day direct from Springfield, and have supposed by my backward movement of cavalry I have quieted the nerves of the enemy as to an attack.

We must not, however, delay a moment, and I leave to-morrow for Lebanon, with a view of procuring all I possibly can in the way of supplies, watching the movements of the enemy, and being ready for a final blow.

General Halleck thinks we best not wait for Colonel Davis, but allow him to wait at Osage. We can tell better when we get in the immediate presence of the enemy as to the need of that force, but if occasion arises I wish you would give the general the benefit of your experience in regard to the force of Price. It always will be underrated by our friends, who are over-anxious for us to come to their relief, and by our enemies, who are anxious we should not come too strong. Besides, his force is never in camp except when a battle is anticipated, when they come in from all the hills and hollows of the surrounding country.

My object is to have you come on at your earliest convenience, and move the remainder of your forces at least as far as we can feed them with regimental trains.

I hope as little as possible will be made public of our movement, as the staffing of generals is more likely to give the alarm to the enemy, who I hope to keep ignorant of our purpose as long as possible previous to our concentration at Lebanon.

I hope Davis will not move one way and look the other. As at present advised he should keep his eye on a union with us at Lebanon.

I am, general, very truly, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, January 26, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding:

Information came yesterday, corroborated to-day, that M. Jeff. Thompson, with cavalry variously estimated up to 500, was between Commerce and Price’s Landing. I immediately ordered detachment of cavalry and infantry from Bird’s Point and Cape Girardeau under instructions to co-operate for the purpose of cutting him off.

More anon.

The Fifteenth Illinois arrived and going to Smithland.

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND Brigadier-General, Commanding District of Cairo.

{p.527}

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HEADQUARTERS, Lebanon, Mo., January 26, 1862.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Hdqrs. Southwestern Dist., en route from Rolla to Lebanon, Mo.:

SIR: I received the general’s letter of the 25th this evening. I am very glad he is coming for many reasons.

I inclose letter from Lieutenant-Colonel Wright, giving his views.* The lieutenant-colonel is evidently anxious for an advance to Springfield. As I previously have remarked, I do not believe in taking that place (even if we can) for the purpose of giving it up again, and if the enemy has 30,000 in Arkansas he will send them to keep the war out of that State without inquiring whether Price’s appointment is confirmed or not. Meantime, with 12,000, all that I can yet hear from at the disposal of the general (perhaps less), and they far behind and we far away from our supports, how can we sustain ourselves, even if we can take Springfield.

In case there are forces from the north or other supports, of which I am not informed, it will be different. I have ordered out a battalion of cavalry to take post at Bennett’s Mill, 12 miles a little north of west from here, and one on or near the Osage Fork, 11 miles southeast. This will control the sources of supply and form a front of 23 miles, by which I hope we can conceal our movements and make the country tributary.

I had already sent a company to Bennett’s Mill, and have reports that it can furnish 15,000 pounds per day and do the custom-work. I am afraid I have overestimated the capacity of the two mills, but hope, with the aid of what we can get from the Osage, to fill out what I said. I send Colonel Phelps to Osage Fork with a few of his men, mounted. He will talk with the people and start the system of collecting supplies, and be able to report to the general on Tuesday.

Colonel Osterhaus had a fine brigade drill to-day, but discipline is still very bad. As relates to plundering, it will be very disagreeable to the general to use the necessary means to stop it, but I hope he will do so, as I feel it a disgrace to myself to be connected with people who commit such crimes as some of these.

I will make the best arrangements I can to find quarters for the general and his staff, but they must not expect the luxuries of Rolla.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. CARR, Colonel, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 27, 1862.

Col. W. P. CARLIN, Commanding, Ironton, Mo.:

COLONEL: Your letter of the 24th is received.* You will immediately throw forward a regiment of infantry, supported by cavalry and artillery, to Greenville, and also with cavalry threaten Poplar Bluff and Doniphan. It is important that these pillaging bands should be broken up. Arrest and hold all persons in arms or who give aid and assistance, especially those who are robbing and driving out Union men.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

{p.528}

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SAINT LOUIS, January 27, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, to, Rolla, Mo.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 24th is received. I am well satisfied that Price will not stand if you press on with the forces under your command. The Benton Hussars and Forty-third Illinois will be sent to you as soon as they can be armed, probably to-morrow or the day after. Davis’ division should not be required to cross the Osage unless it is absolutely necessary for your success. It is wanted elsewhere, on the most urgent representations from Washington, and I have sent it to the Osage only to make your success absolutely certain. If you can dispense with it, as I really think you can as soon as you advance and feel Price, it should be relieved, so as to return to Jefferson City; unless absolutely necessary, to hold it as a reserve is a dead loss to us. Think of this, and if possible relieve it; if not, of course you must have it.

There is a strong pressure on us for troops, and all that are not absolutely necessary here must go elsewhere. Pope’s command is entirely broken up; 4,000 in Davis’ reserve and 6,000 ordered to Cairo.

Push on as rapidly as possible and end the matter with Price. A detachment leaves Ironton to move in the direction of Pocahontas, Ark., as a diversion. If you move rapidly and energetically Price must fall back, at least I think so; if not, you can draw in reserves.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 27, 1862.

Brigadier-General POPE, Commanding, &c., Otterville, Mo.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 24th is received. I approve all your dispositions, except that I do not see that any garrison is provided for Lexington. I think that should be occupied, at least for the present. I had hoped that the detachment of our troops in Kansas would arrive there by the time the Kansas regiment left. General Denver assured me that they had been ordered back while he was at Leavenworth, but I can hear nothing of them.

If General Curtis can dispense with Davis’ division it will march to Jefferson City, and be sent south if the condition of the country should then admit of their withdrawal. In regard to yourself, general, perhaps it will be best for you to remain in charge of the district till it is fully organized, as you can readily rejoin the division brought here or when it reaches its destination. You will certainly have a suitable command if I can give it to you.

Accounts from Washington indicate that the new furore, “On to Richmond!” is abating. If so, we will get time to concentrate and organize our forces for the new campaign.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 27, 1862.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Commanding, &c., Springfield, Mo.:

GENERAL: A man calling himself L. V. Nichols came to my headquarters {p.529} a day or two since with a duplicate of your letter of the 12th instant. On being questioned, he admitted that he belonged to your service; that he had come in citizen’s dress from Springfield, avoiding some of our military posts and passing through others in disguise, and without reporting himself to the commander. He said that he had done this by your direction. On being asked for his flag of truce, he pulled from his pocket a dirty handkerchief with a short stick tied to one corner.

You must be aware, general, that persons so sent through our lines and past our military posts to these headquarters are liable to the punishment of death. They are no more nor less than spies, and probably are sent by you to this city as such. I shall send Mr. Nichols back to your camp, but if you send any more persons here in the same way they will be regarded as spies and tried and condemned as such. You must know, general, that the laws and usages of war require that a bearer of a flag of truce should report at the nearest post and should not pass the outer line of sentinels without permission. He should not even approach within gun-shot of a sentinel without displaying his flag and receiving a signal to advance. If he have dispatches, he should send for an officer to receive and receipt for them, which officer should direct the flag of truce to immediately leave our lines. Answers to such dispatches should immediately be sent to you by us in the same way.

In a postscript to the copy of your letter of the 12th instant, just received, you call my attention to the fact that a band of men are “firing private houses, barns, mills, &c.” I presume you refer to a band of outlaws on the Kansas frontier. They do not belong to my command, and they entered this department without my authority. As soon as I heard of their depredations I ordered General Pope to either drive them out of the State or to disarm and confine them. Be assured, general, that no acts of wanton spoliation, such as “firing private houses barns mills, &c.,” and “burning and destroying railroad bridges, &c.” will be countenanced by me. On the contrary, I propose to punish with the utmost severity every act of wanton destruction of property, public or private, and every act of pillage, marauding, robbery, and theft committed in this department, no matter under whose authority or orders the guilty parties may have acted.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LEAVENWORTH, January 27, 1862.

Hon. JOHN COVODE, House of Representatives:

Arrived last night. Before communicating with General Hunter he issued this order:

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., January 27, 1862.

1. In the expedition about to go south from this department, called in the newspapers General Lane’s Expedition, it is the intention of the major-general commanding the department to command in person, unless otherwise expressly ordered by the Government.

2. Transportation not having been supplied, we must go without it. All tents, trunks, chests, chairs, camp-tables, camp-stools, &c., must be at once stored or abandoned. The general-commanding takes in his valise one skirt, one pair drawers, one pair socks, and one handkerchief and no officer or soldier will carry more. The surplus {p.530} room in the knapsack must be reserved for ammunition and provisions. Every officer and soldier will carry his own clothing and bedding.

3. The general commanding has applied to the Government for six brigadier-generals, that his command may be properly organized. Until their arrival it is necessary that he should appoint acting brigadier-generals from the senior colonels. To enable him to do this, in accordance with the order on the subject, each colonel will immediately report the day on which he was mustered into the service of the United States.

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

See the President, Secretary of War, and General McClellan, and answer what I shall do.

J. H. LANE.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 27, 1862.

Hon. WM. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I inclose herewith copies of a letter from myself to Colonel Nutt, dated January 14, 1862, and his reply, dated January 24, 1862, concerning the same subject touching which I wrote you on the 23d instant. I am strengthened in the opinion there expressed, that some of the rebels escaped from Missouri and some of their aiders and abettors in our State should be arrested by military authority, and that the property brought into our State to escape the officers of the United States in Missouri should be taken possession of and legally dealt with. I am also satisfied this should be done by United States officers, supported by United States troops. The secession feeling is, as I am credibly informed and fully believe, very strong in Fremont County. The Union men there and in Missouri are greatly exasperated that rebels from Missouri who have been compelled to fly from that State because of these outrages on Union men should find an asylum and protection in this State, and I am well satisfied that if these people cannot be dealt with in some way legally, the jayhawkers will take the matter in their own hands and a small border war will ensue.

I have sent copies of the correspondence between Colonel Nutt and myself to General Halleck, with the request to lay them before the Governor of Missouri, as I do not know where to address him.

Please consult the Iowa delegation in Congress on this subject, and permit me to suggest that prompt and decided action will have a decidedly beneficial influence.

If arrests be made, the officer should be supported by United States troops.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, IOWA, January 14, 1862.

Lieut. Col. H. C. NUTT, Aide-de-camp, &c., Council Bluffs, Iowa:

SIR: Since writing you a few days since in regard to the difficulty in Fremont County I have learned that troops from Missouri have been to Sidney and demanded the surrender into their hands of the persons arrested on suspicion of having assaulted Mr. Fugitt; that the authorities in charge of the prisoners very properly refused to surrender {p.531} them; that the Missouri troops, on their return, arrested in this State and took with them to Missouri one or more citizens of this State, and that such a state of feeling exists in Fremont County and in Atchison County, Mo., that there is imminent danger of collision between people. In addition to the duties required by my former order, you will proceed as soon as possible to Atchison County, and call upon the person who may be in command of the State or United States troops there. You will exhibit to him my former letter of instructions to you and this letter. A system of reprisals between the States must not be allowed to grow up. Our people must not enter Missouri, as was done a few days since, arrest persons and bring them to this State for trial, and people from Missouri must not demand prisoners in the hands of the civil authorities of this State or arrest persons in this State and carry them to Missouri for trial. Such state of things can produce but one result, and that is a border war.

If the person arrested by the men from Iowa, and who has not been discharged, is not in the hands of the civil authorities, I would at once order his discharge. If the man or men arrested by the returning Missouri troops are not in the hands of the civil authorities of Missouri, you are instructed to ask his or their discharge.

Men in Iowa who have violated the laws of Missouri in that State can be reached in this State by requisition from the Governor of Missouri. All men may rest assured the authorities of Iowa will not make their State an asylum for rebels and traitors, and that all such will be promptly surrendered when legally applied for. The action of Iowa has thus far, I think, given the loyal men of Missouri no ground to doubt the good faith of her authorities.

You will present these views plainly, but kindly, to the officer in command in Atchison County and to other loyal citizens there, and communicate as freely with them as you can in conversation. Inform all that jayhawking expeditions into our State cannot be permitted under the claim of taking the property of rebels. The evil result of such course must be apparent. All information showing that such persons are in our State and in regard to their property will be placed at once in the hands of the United States officers for legal action, and they can thus be legally dealt with. Nothing herein contained is intended to countermand anything contained in my former letter. You may show both letters in Sidney, so that all may know what I intend. As soon as I receive your report I will write to Governor Gamble. Your early attention to these matters and your speedy report is expected.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

COUNCIL BLUFFS, January 24, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa, Des Moines:

SIR: In obedience to your letter of instructions, dated January 14, 1862, I went to Atchison County, Mo., last Monday, and have spent several days there, and will now give you such additional particulars as I gained while there. I found the prisoner who had been arrested by the Missouri troops in Iowa released on parole. He is a Hungarian of more than ordinary intelligence. I saw him, and learned he had been in Price’s army, having been induced to go there by wealthy rebels, who agreed to support his family whilst he was away. He says {p.532} he soon saw he was on the wrong side. When General Frémont’s proclamation of amnesty was issued he left for home, but fearing violence from the loyal Germans in Rockport, went to Iowa. He says he was glad to be arrested, as he can now be with his family and be protected by troops. I told him if he desired I could have him released and he could return to Iowa with me, which he declined. I afterwards learned from the officer in command he had orders for his release from Saint Joseph upon taking the oath. He is now at liberty.

I also saw the officer in command of the State troops, and had a very free and plain conversation with him and other loyal men in regard to the invasion of Iowa. I do not think these troops have done much to stop jayhawking, but have not taken sides with them. These troops have now gone below to be mustered out, as they are six-months’ men. Whether they will be replaced by Federal troops I did not learn.

On my way to Missouri I found at Sidney an intense excitement. There was said to be a reliable report that the jayhawkers had met on Sunday near Sidney Landing, and had agreed upon Monday or Tuesday night as the time to “clean out” McKinsock’s Grove. I was met by a petition, signed by nearly every one along the line, calling for immediate help. A messenger had been sent for me, and the prominent Union men were in council at Judge Sears’ to decide what should be done. I told them I was there on my way to Missouri, and if I saw or heard anything to justify me, I would return at once. I was in doubt in regard to these reports, and would call out the militia only as a last resort to repel invasion or preserve the public peace.

On my way to Rockport I became satisfied that the danger was not so imminent as had been represented, and I learned from those that I thought knew that there was no armed force in Atchison County at least. As soon as I had completed my business at Rockport I procured conveyance and took with me a good loyal farmer and proceeded to visit several of the men who had been arrested and taken to Iowa. I saw four of these men who were arrested by English and his party, one of them, William Lewis, a man who is called by the secessionists of Fremont County a jayhawker. I am satisfied, from all I can learn, he has been and perhaps still is cognizant of all the movements of the jayhawkers, but I am equally well satisfied he never goes with them and was not at Fugitt’s, but I think he knew they were going to Fugitt’s. He is the leader and controlling spirit among the loyal men in Northern Missouri. He is a man of wealth, a little hard and rough, perhaps, but is loyal. He says boldly a jayhawker is a better man than a secessionist. He is very bitter against English and the leaders in kidnaping.

I had a long interview with this man. He says he has been outraged by men from Iowa and says he shall have his revenge. I told him plainly what were your views and that no invasion of Iowa would be permitted for any purpose, but that any one who had violated the laws of Missouri could be reached in Iowa in a legal manner. He seemed pleased, and said if the authorities of Iowa would act in that spirit it was all he and his friends desired. He seemed to be well aware of the result of the invading of either State, but such men he said must be reached, and the jayhawkers were the only ones who had reached them as yet. I told him you had not been aware, until the attack at Fugitt’s, that rebels had left Missouri and gone to Iowa, and that you were now taking steps to stop it. This seemed to put a new face on matters, and he said plainly that they would try legal means first, and pledged himself to me that he would use his influence to prevent Kansas {p.533} jayhawkers or any others from invading Iowa. He further intimated that many of these jayhawkers have gone south to join General Lane. He says four or five of these kidnapers must be punished, and if civil law will do it it will suit him, but if not, he knows what will. He told me that he would at once take the legal steps to reach these men, and that no further invasion of Iowa should take place in the mean time if he could prevent it. I was satisfied while there that he was in earnest, and could and would do as he agreed, and on my return to Sidney Judge Sears says he can and will make his word good in every respect, and I am satisfied there will be no more jayhawking in Iowa for the present.

C. McKinsock, who shot the man at Hamburg, went through Missouri to Bloody Island, in the Missouri River. This island is claimed by Iowa, Nebraska, and Missouri, and by the United States. He was seen to go there; was followed, taken, and brought to Sidney Landing, in Missouri, where he was arrested by a civil officer for kidnaping and taken to Rockport, and bound over in $2,000 to appear for trial, and released. I found all the loyal men in Missouri particularly bitter against English, and say he shall smart for the treatment he gave these men he arrested. He cannot go 4 miles in Missouri by daylight a live man, I don’t believe.

On my return to Sidney I found Colonel Hedges and Captain Harvey very anxious that I should call out the militia for thirty days at least for drill. Captain Harvey very plainly told me he had no fear of immediate invasion, but that they might be needed in future, and were very much in need of drill. He says the military companies there have labored under many adverse circumstances; men had been hooted at for joining companies and injured in their business, and something was needed,to infuse proper spirit in the men. I told him that it would be very expensive; I suggested it would be poor patriotism that needed $13 a month to keep it up, but that I would state the case to you fairly, and leave the responsibility with you.

In conclusion, I think immediate danger of trouble in Fremont County has passed, but I still think there should be some Federal troops sent here, more to arrest secessionists and secession property that has made Iowa an asylum than to protect us from invasion, but the officers placed in command should be No. 1 in every respect. An inefficient or improvident officer would do much harm, but one of the right kind, by making a few arrests of men and property, would in my opinion not only end the present difficulty, but prevent forever its recurrence.

Judge Baldwin has shown me your dispatches, and we have consulted fully in regard to the best course to pursue. He has promised to write you to-day. I will present our views briefly for your commendation, and then, if you think best, I will go to Saint Joe and do the best I can. The troops at Saint Joe are to my knowledge much demoralized, and none that I know to be there are fit for this service. I refer only to the Sixteenth Illinois, Colonel Smith, who is in command there, and were I to go there he would send some of his own regiment and I could not object. I think the best plan is for you to write General Halleck at Saint Louis, get cavalry-one company will do-and stipulate for a superior man to take charge of them; give this officer full power to arrest men and property, to be immediately sent to headquarters at Saint Joe or Leavenworth for trial. This takes the matter from the border, and will prove a wholesome lesson for those who are not arrested. If you still think best I will go to Saint Joe, Leavenworth, or Saint Louis, as you may direct, and see what can be done.

{p.534}

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Awaiting further orders, I remain, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. C. NUTT.

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FORT LEAVENWORTH, January 28, 1862.

To our Great Father, the President of the United States:

FATHER: We are told by our friends that there is some doubt as to whether the great war chief; General Lane, will command the expedition to our country.

Our object in having this letter sent to you is to beg that General Lane be placed in command of that expedition, as we believe no warrior can place us in possession of our country again as effectually as he can. Our people have heard of General Lane many seasons ago. They have heard how with but a handful of warriors he beat back the enemy when they were as numerous as the leaves of the forest and restored peace and quiet to Kansas.

Our people have been told that he would come with an army to restore them to their homes and to avenge the great wrongs they have suffered.

It has made their hearts glad to hear it.

Our people have suffered a great deal. They have been driven from their homes in the dead of winter when the earth was clothed with white. Many of them have frozen to death. All of them have lost all they possessed.

There are now 6,000 women and children in Southern Kansas without tents, but scantily clothed, and exposed to all the horrors of a severe winter.

Our agents have done and are now doing all they can to relieve us, but we leave comfortable homes in our own country and we wish to be restored to them.

General Lane is our friend. His heart is big for the Indian. He will do more for us than any one else. The hearts of our people will be sad if he does not come. They will follow him wherever he directs. They will sweep the rebels before them like a terrible fire on the dry prairie.

We beg our Great Father and our great war chief, General McClellan, that they will listen to the prayers of their children.

HO-PO-EITH-LE-YO-HO-LA, his + mark, Head Chief of the Creek Nation. A-LUK-TUS-TE-NU-KE, his + mark, Head Chief of the Seminole Nation.

Attest:

GEO. A. CUTLER, United States Agent for the Creek Indians.

[Indorsement.]

EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 4, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

MY DEAR SIR: The President directs me to send you the inclosed, with his respectful salutations.

JOHN HAY, Assistant Private Secretary.

{p.535}

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CAIRO, January 28, 1862.

Quartermaster-General M. C. MEIGS, U. S. A.:

GENERAL: Since forwarding my report to you that I had accepted the seven gunboats built by contract by Mr. Eads, in which was contained a report of Commanders Pennock and Stembel that the engines of the Benton were so much wanting in power that I did not feel authorized to accept her-in fact I concurred in their report and suggestions to place a new engine in her-I have, however, since then, on consultation with several practical men and in view of our pressing want of the Benton, come to the conclusion that by raising the wheel of that vessel 18 inches, widening her buckets, and giving 12 inches more to her rudder at the water’s surface, she will handle sufficiently well to answer our purpose. All this can be done in less than three weeks after I get authority to do it and for less than $2,000, including a new donkey engine.

I have telegraphed twice for permission to accept the Benton, but as the wires have been out of order or for some other cause I have had no answer.

Will you please answer by telegram immediately on receiving this, as we are waiting to make a demonstration.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, January 29, 1862.

The following movements of troops will be made in this district:

I. The Iowa Fifth, the Illinois Forty-seventh, five companies of the Ohio Thirty-ninth, and the Eleventh Ohio Battery will march from Syracuse and La Mine to Booneville, Mo., where Col. W. H. Worthington will assume the command and make immediate arrangements to cross the Missouri River with his whole force.

II. The Nebraska First, the Ohio Twenty-seventh, the three companies of Fourth Regular Cavalry, the companies of Regular infantry, and one of the batteries of the Missouri Light Artillery at Sedalia to be designated by Colonel Steele, Eighth Iowa Volunteers, will take up the line of march immediately for Jefferson City, and will be joined at Smithton by the Forty-second Illinois and the battery of Missouri Light Artillery stationed at that place. This column, under command of Colonel Thayer, First Nebraska, will proceed by the direct road to Jefferson City, where they will receive further orders.

III. The nine companies of Merrill’s Horse will immediately proceed, under command of the senior officer of that regiment present, to Booneville Mo., and cross the Missouri River.

IV. The Eighth Iowa Regiment, one battery of Missouri Light Artillery, to be designated by Colonel Steele, and the four companies of the First Iowa Cavalry, under Major Torrence, will constitute the garrison at Sedalia, to be commanded by the senior officer present for duty.

V. The Seventh Missouri Regiment, one company of the First Iowa Cavalry, to be designated by Captain Leffingwell, and one battery of Missouri Light Artillery, to be designated by the major commanding at La Mine, will proceed as soon as practicable to Lexington, Mo., and take post at that place.

VI. The commanders of the moving columns and of the garrison at Sedalia will receive written instructions from these headquarters.

{p.536}

VII. Ten days’ rations (two days’ cooked) will be carried with each column, and a supply train of 25 wagons will accompany the columns to Booneville and Jefferson City, and a train of 10 wagons the command of Colonel Stevenson to Lexington. The garrison at Lexington will draw its supplies from Sedalia. The chief quartermaster and chief commissary of the district will see that these trains are furnished, loaded with supplies, and sent to join their respective columns.

The train for the column marching on Jefferson City will join it at Tipton and be loaded with supplies at Jefferson City. The train for the command which crosses at Booneville will be loaded at Tipton and sent to that place under escort of a company of Merrill’s Horse, which Colonel Steele will send to Tipton immediately for that purpose. Two-sevenths of salt meat only will be taken; the remainder of the meat ration will be fresh beef on the hoot; to be turned over to the acting commissaries of the respective columns. A supply train will also be sent with the nine companies of Merrill’s Horse, which train, as soon as its supplies are delivered at the points specified in written instructions to the commanding officer of this cavalry, will return to Tipton.

VIII. The chief quartermaster of the district will take immediate measures to have all quartermaster’s stores at Sedalia and Otterville not needed for the garrisons of these posts to be removed to Jefferson City, and will instruct the depot quartermaster at that place to receipt for and take charge of them.

The only wagons left in this district along the line of railroad will be a small supply train of 25 wagons at Tipton and the regimental trains. Such number of ox-wagons as may be necessary to keep the post at La Mine supplied with forage will be left at Otterville.

IX. Captain Brown, assistant quartermaster at Sedalia, after sending the quartermaster’s stores not absolutely needed for that post to Jefferson City, as directed, will repair to Otterville, and relieve Capt. J. A. Swain, acting quartermaster, who upon being relieved will report to these headquarters.

The post quartermaster at Sedalia will be designated by the commander of the post and will receipt to Captain Brown for all quartermaster’s stores at that place.

X. The commissaries of subsistence at Sedalia, La Mine, Tipton, and California will draw their supplies from the depot at Jefferson City; the assistant commissary of subsistence at Sedalia keeping stores enough on hand to supply the garrison of Lexington.

XI. The commanding officer at La Mine will, as soon as the movements of the troops are completed, designate some artillery officer to take charge of the ordnance stores now in the hands of the quartermaster at Otterville, and have them deposited and cared for in the magazine to be built at La Mine Cantonment.

XII. The companies of Merrill’s Horse designated in the letter of instructions to the commanding officer of that regiment will draw supplies from Tipton for the present, and the assistant commissary of subsistence at that post will accordingly keep on hand the necessary subsistence stores for 500 men for fifteen days, exclusive of the garrison at that post.

XIII. The sick of the regiments thus put in motion will be sent to Saint Louis, Mo., in charge of a medical officer, to be designated by the division surgeon at these headquarters, who will specify and have detailed such hospital attendants as may be necessary to accompany them.

The division surgeon will notify the medical director in Saint Louis {p.537} two days in advance of the time the sick will arrive in Saint Louis and their number.

Commanders of regiments will be held accountable that a separate descriptive roll be furnished to each sick man thus sent. The men too sick to be moved will be taken charge of by the post surgeons, who will send them forward to Saint Louis as soon as they are able to travel.

By order of General Pope:

[SPEED BUTLER,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, January 30, 1862.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER OF MERRILL’S HORSE:

You will cross the river at Booneville and march to Glasgow with your whole command. It is reported that young Price and Colonel Jackson are recruiting in that neighborhood. As soon as you are satisfied that you have broken up all such parties in vicinity of Glasgow you will establish five companies of your command in comfortable winter quarters at that place, using such public buildings, store-houses, and stables as are best adapted for that purpose. Your other four companies you will in like manner post at Fayette. A train of wagons will be at Booneville on the 5th of February, on which day you will have at least one company on the opposite side of the river to receive and escort the train to Glasgow.

You will establish your headquarters at Glasgow, Fayette being considered an outpost of your command. The train will carry you supplies for one month. You will move as rapidly as possible to Glasgow, as the presence of forces is much needed there.

I send you a note for Colonel Worthington at Booneville, so that you may have no delay in crossing the river.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., January 30, 1862.

J. P. SANFORD, U. S. N.:

SIR: You will immediately proceed to Cincinnati and examine thoroughly several steamers, with a view of purchasing one large or rather two small steamers for the mortar boats and gunboats. These steamers must be less than four years old, of great strength, of good engines, and not less than 1,000 tons burden, and not to exceed in cost $15,000 for each vessel.

You will also have these steamers fitted for the purpose of carrying ammunition, provisions, and the men to be attached to the mortar boats. This must be done at as little expense as will prepare them to answer the object of their purchase.

You will also select for each of these steamers one first master, one fourth master, two pilots to be paid as first masters, one carpenter at $40 per month, one chief engineer, who will furnish three assistants and run the engine, including his own pay, for $275 per month. You will also direct the first master to procure twelve firemen at $215 per month, cook and steward at $20 per month, three cabin boys at $14 per month. You will also select twenty flat-boat pilots at $90 per month for each pilot, and four flat-boat men for each boat, independently of the pilot, at $18 per month.

{p.538}

In the selection of these steamers, manning and equipping them for service, great judgment and economy will be necessary; but you have a safe guide from the information we have of the character of the vessels and the rate or amount for which in these times of trade depression they can be purchased. The steamers themselves must be ready to leave for Cairo in ten days after you have selected and taken possession of them.

You are hereby authorized to sign a document stating that my approval of the sale will be given on the delivery of the steamers to you.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE.

Procure a chain of 1 1/2 inch and 90 fathoms in length, and one anchor of 1,800 to 2,000 pounds. Obtain from Haggerty 600 hammocks and 600 bags; latter 6 inches longer and 4 inches less in diameter than the last.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, January 31, 1862.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: It is my wish that the expedition commonly called the “Lane Expedition” shall be as much as has been promised at the Adjutant-General’s Office under the supervision of General McClellan and not any more. I have not intended and do not now intend that it shall be a great, exhausting affair, but a snug, sober column of 10,000 or 15,000. General Lane has been told by me many times that he is under the command of General Hunter, and assented to it as often as told. It was the distinct agreement between him and me when I appointed him that he was to be under Hunter.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, Mo., January 31, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Nothing of great importance has transpired since my last dispatches sent from Wet Glaze.

My messenger sent to Colonel Davis arrived, giving accurate intelligence of the progress of that division. It seems the colonel did not leave Tipton till the 26th, and the roads so much delayed him as to make but 10 miles in two days. He hoped, however, to arrive at Linn Creek last night, which at this stage of weather and roads is probably better than can be expected.

It is very cold; about 4 inches of snow on the ground; so the crust will not form hard enough to bear the teams, while it forms a terrible resistance to wheeling. Some teams will probably have to stop; but generally they will work forward slowly.

There is a steamboat and flat-boat at Linn Creek, guarded by 20 men on this side, which I sent, and some on the other side, sent by Colonel Davis; but I trust they will form a junction on the other side, for my messenger met a small band of rebels 5 miles this side of Linn Creek, and heard of 500 being at Warsaw 40 miles off, threatening to retard the crossing.

A picket southeast from Springfield has been drawn in by the enemy; {p.539} it was supported by artillery. This does not look like running away, as the picket was on one of the roads I apprehend he would take to go off on. I have ordered a strong picket of cavalry to stand 12 miles forward, and I am trying to increase my means of gaining intelligence from the enemy, which is now very meager. The wheat is in stacks and corn on the stalks. To make it available is no small matter and a great tax on cavalry.

I wish we had some of that surplus of which we hear so much and see so little. My men are in good health and spirits.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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Abstract from return of the Southwestern District of Missouri for January, 1862.

Command.Present for duty. Aggregate present.
Officers.Men.
Col. G. M. Dodge’s brigade861,6251,863
Col. P. J. Osterhaus brigade791,9152,200
Col. E. A.. Carr’s cavalry brigade711,4351,506
Brig. Gen. F. Sigel’s brigade501,1001,558
Brigadier-General Asboth’s brigade531,3631,685
Post of Rolls, Col. J. B. Wyman309131,069
Unattached671,2651,843
Total4369,61611,724

Organization of the troops in the Southwestern District of Missouri, Brig. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis commanding, January 31, 1862.

  • FIRST BRIGADE.*
    Col. GRENVILLE M. DODGE.
    • 35th Illinois.
    • 4th Iowa.
    • 24th Missouri.
    • 1st Iowa Battery.
  • SECOND BRIGADE.
    Col. PETER J. OSTERHAUS.
    • 36th Illinois.
    • 3d Missouri.
    • 12th Missouri.
    • 17th Missouri.
    • Batteries A and B**
  • THIRD BRIGADE (cavalry).
    Col. EUGENE A. CARR
    • 3d Illinois.
    • 1st Missouri (battalion).
    • 4th Missouri.
  • FOURTH BRIGADE.
    Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL.
    • 25th Illinois.
    • 44th. Illinois.
  • FIFTH BRIGADE.
    Brig. Gen. A. ASBOTH.
    • 2d Missouri.
    • 15th. Missouri.
    • 1st Flying Battery.
    • 2d Ohio Battery.
  • UNATTACHED.
    • 13th Illinois.
    • 9th Iowa.
    • 4th Missouri (battalion).
    • Bowen’s cavalry (battalion).
    • Phelps’ Missouri volunteers.
    • Dubuque battery.

* The brigades are not numbered in the original return.

** Welfley’s and Hoffmann’s batteries.

{p.540}

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 1, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: My forward pickets are now located 37 miles from Springfield, and my scouts will continually approach much nearer. One arrived during last night, giving news direct from Springfield. All was quiet there; Price still occupying Mr. Graves’ house, and no signs of running away. This was Thursday last, day before yesterday.

I am in receipt of the general’s letter of the 27th, expressing the belief that Price will not fight, but retreat, and urging the return of Davis’ division before his crossing the Osage at Linn Creek.

I cannot go on the presumption that an enemy that has heretofore so successfully fought and held Springfield will not fight for it now; although I think also, in the fear of a superior force, he may retreat.

I have now in this vicinity about 6,000 men, and I am sorry to hear that my orders to move all forward from Rolla has not started the remainder of General Asboth’s and Sigel’s divisions before yesterday. Other forces which the general had ordered had not yet arrived at that point. At present, therefore, the Davis division is nearer, and if he crosses the Osage he may arrive before the Rolla force. He thinks it will take two days to cross it now; I think at least three. If; then, he stays on the north side, he is less accessible than at Rolla. As now situated, I cannot decide that his force is not “absolutely necessary;” but on the contrary I think it is. As fast as my force and supplies will permit I shall press closer on the enemy; but I cannot draw myself into a general battle till I get more force, and for active reconnaissance and supply gathering I am overworking the 1,366 cavalry, which is all I have in my command.

The supply trains that started about the 24th from Rolla are now beginning to arrive, and as fast as unloaded many will return to help forward other troops. They are getting on quite as well as I expected during the worst of weather. I wish the Rolla troops had started, as ordered, about the 6th; they would have got to this point by this time.

I find the men’s shoes so miserable, they have worn them entirely out in six days’ marching. Some of my force, too, are so improvident I have to constantly order and watch these items of necessity to keep them fit to move. It is peculiar to our service that officers seem to be satisfied when they publish without enforcing the execution of orders.

These little things had been especially and carefully itemized by me in a printed order, and yet shoes, cartridges, haversacks, and little necessaries are every day found wanting.

But in the main my force is in good health and spirits, and I trust the general will find them giving a good account of themselves. They contend with mud, water, and snow and ice manfully, and I trust they will not falter in the face of a more active foe.

I am, general, very respectfully, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 1, 1862.

General FRANZ SIGEL, Commanding Third Division:

GENERAL: Yours of the 20th, informing me of your return to Rolla, and that of the 29th, connected with the report of General Asboth {p.541} concerning the road, deferring your movement till the 31st ultimo, are duly received.

The roads are indeed very bad, but they are worse for the enemy than for us if he attempts to retreat. I hope the teams will keep moving forward and the troops can easily keep up. Trains are arriving quite as well as I expected. I am very glad to have the troops come by different routes, if they can, but my fear of high water induces me to rely mainly on the north route. By coming on different routes the enemy will not so readily count and determine our force and the roads are not so much injured by wheels.

The men should help the teams out of difficulty when necessary, and all must understand that the elements are to be considered serious obstacles which we have to encounter and overcome in this campaign.

Your approach will now be better, since the hard freezing of the last two nights must have dried up the mud and to some extent made it solid. We must, however, soon expect another thaw, and constant bad roads will be the rule and a change for the better a rare exception.

I am, general, very truly, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 14.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 1, 1862.

I. Col. G. W. Deitzler, commanding First Kansas Regiment, who so nobly distinguished himself in the battle of Wilson’s Creek, fought last August, is hereby appointed acting brigadier-general.

II. On his arrival at Fort Scott he will assume command of his brigade, embracing the First, Fifth, and Sixth Kansas Regiments, and such other troops as may hereafter be assigned to him.

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 2, 1862.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Although I get very accurate reports of the location of the enemy, it is not easy to estimate his force. Colonel Wright, whose men were in and out, according to his account, estimates the force from 10,000 to 15,000. Colonel Phelps, who reported to me yesterday, estimates it at from 20,000 to 25,000, and both these men have similar opportunities of judging. His available force, in my judgment, is 15,000.

Of course I interrogate scouts, deserters, and all kinds of witnesses. Price has called for fifteen-day volunteers. A large train, 80 or 90 wagons, reached him with supplies from the south last week. A large lot of mules, which were a few miles out, have been drawn in; yet Price and all are quiet in Springfield. This is a summary of my latest news from the front. My trains and troops are coming forward slowly.

The stormy weather continues and waters have been high. Some hesitation and delay in starting from Rolla has occurred, but at last {p.542} advises all were about starting, and I am urging them not to stop for storms. Colonel Davis was expected to reach Linn Creek to-day, and my officers that best understand the enemy unhesitatingly express their conviction that this force is absolutely necessary. I therefore suppose he is crossing, as my picket held the ferry-boats safe till his advance arrived there. The Ninth Iowa has gotten over the worst of the road, having been out in the worst of the weather. The storms continue, but our men and animals so far bear up with great fortitude and success. Delay is inevitable, but it will be as little as possible. While I shall urge great energy and perseverance, I try to avoid breaking down teams and overworking animals; and so far I have heard of no accidents or losses of any moment. The safe arrival of quartermaster’s funds will enable Captain Sheridan to accelerate his supply business, which is still the great matter of anxiety with me.

I remain, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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ROLLA, February 2, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK:

No forces at Salem. General Curtis ordered them all away. I have only my own regiment to hold this post. One thousand sick left behind for me to take care of.

J. B. WYMAN, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 28.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 2, 1862.

Several companies of the Fourth Regiment of Missouri Volunteers, lately called the Third U. S. Reserve Corps, having shown themselves mutinous and disobedient of orders, have been disarmed and placed in confinement at Benton Barracks. The privates and non-commissioned officers of these companies will be sent under a suitable guard to Cairo to work on the fortifications at that place until further orders. The commanding officer of that post will see that these companies are made to work faithfully on the fortifications, and will report to these headquarters the names of any who, by their repentance and obedience to orders and discipline, deserve pardon and restoration to military rank and respect.

The officers of these companies have not joined in this mutinous demonstration, but they have failed or neglected to enforce order, obedience, and military discipline. They will therefore be mustered out of service and discharged.

The major-general commanding this department is always willing to listen to complaints and ready to redress well-founded grievances; but at the same time he is determined to enforce discipline and obedience to orders, and any companies, regiments, or corps which shall hereafter disobey orders or exhibit a mutinous disposition will be dealt with in a most summary manner. The Rules and Articles of War in respect to mutiny will be rigorously enforced.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.543}

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 3, 1862.

Col. JEFFERSON C. DAVIS, Commanding Division:

COLONEL: I was glad to receive your note of to-day, informing me of your progress.

Your former dispatch was destroyed by my messenger for prudential reasons, having been in danger of detention by bands through which the messenger passed.

I fully appreciated the efforts and energies you must have exerted to proceed thus far. Other troops are about the same distance behind me on other routes.

The enemy, at the very latest advices, was still awaiting our coming. I hope he will not have to wait many days longer, but the roads are a great hinderance to our progress.

I am, colonel, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 5, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of last evening* from the California House was quite a surprise. You are getting on finely.

Colonel Davis’ force must be one or two days behind yours in time; so there is no need of great haste to-day.

You are beyond the danger of high water, and I feel sure in that regard as to all the force. It was a subject of some anxiety.

The enemy is still in Springfield. McIntosh, successor to McCulloch, arrived there last Saturday.

I presume he and Price will consent to a union of their forces, which we must prevent, if possible.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 5, 1862.

Capt. J. O. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: In my last I stated that McBride had reached Springfield. It should have been McIntosh. He arrived on Saturday with some force, but as to numbers my information is too vague to be worth naming. McIntosh commands the Confederate force in Northwestern Arkansas which is variously estimated at from 5,000 to 25,000. Generals Sigel and Asboth are this side of Waynesville, and I have such arrangements for crossing the Gasconade as render their arrival to-morrow quite certain.

{p.544}

Colonel Davis expected to complete his crossing last night, so as to resume his march this morning.

Some horseshoeing and overhauling of stores may be required here, which will be hurried on as fast as possible.

Colonel Osterhaus will move forward 6 or 8 miles with his brigade to-day.

For a change, we have a little sunshine this morning.

I remain, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 29.

HDQRS. DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Otterville, February 5, 1862.

A column, to consist of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Illinois, the Twenty-fourth Indiana, and Powell’s battery of Missouri Light Artillery, all under command of Col. A. P. Hovey, Twenty-fourth Indiana, will march from this camp for Jefferson City on Friday morning, the 7th instant, at 8 o’clock. Rations for eight days (two cooked) and carried in the haversacks and six in the regimental wagons) will be carried with the command. A supply train of 25 wagons will accompany the command, empty as far as Jefferson City, where they will be loaded with subsistence. Fresh beef will be taken on the hoof from Tipton for twelve days.

Every preparation will be made so as to assure the march of the column at the time specified.

The major of the First Missouri Light Artillery on duty at La Mine Cantonment will report in person to these headquarters.

Written instructions will be furnished to the commanding officer of the forces ordered to march.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Lebanon, Mo.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 2d is just received. I am glad to hear you are getting on so well. I knew what a winter campaign would be and advised delay, but the administration have “On to Richmond” fever, and we must go ahead.

Advices from General Pope state that Davis had got all his forces across the Osage on the 4th, so he will soon be with you. I was sorry to lose trim, but if necessary you must have him, of course. I am greatly pressed for troops, and am raking and scraping all I can find to send south.

The Union flag is again flying in Tennessee and we are bombarding Fort Henry. Beauregard, it is said, arrived there last night at 10 o’clock.

I leave Price to you. I have Johnston, Polk, Beauregard, and Hardee to deal with. My movement up the Tennessee forced the enemy to detach 10,000 men yesterday, and if General Buell moves forward at {p.545} the same time they must abandon that place and fall back in the direction of Nashville.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 6, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I send forward 29 prisoners, including 2 captains and 1 quartermaster, taken at different times and places in this vicinity.

A small party went into Marshfield and secured 3,000 pounds of flour belonging to the rebels.

Generals Sigel and Asboth have crossed the Gasconade and are within 14 miles.

No further news from Colonel Davis. A picket 12 miles northwest, at Bennett’s Mill, was menaced last night, and I sent out more force. No news from it this morning.

Reports come in that Price is intrenching himself 10 miles this side of Springfield. Doubtful.

Very respectfully, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, SOUTHWESTERN DIST. Mo., Camp Vernon, February 6, 1862.

General SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding S. W. Dist., Department of the Mo.:

GENERAL: In connection with my report of yesterday, numbered 397,* I have the honor to state that I have arrived with my whole command, and am now encamped at the eastern end of the town of Lebanon, on the hills north of the Waynesville road.

Despite the overladen wagons and hardly practicable roads and the many river crossings, I occupied but six days from the time of my departure from Rolla to that of my arrival here. At the Little Piney and Roubidoux Rivers I was obliged to construct bridges for the infantry. At the Big Piney I had to unload the commissary train and bring the infantry over by wagons. At the Gasconade they were transported in a ferry-boat of your providing.

The cavalry, artillery, and trains everywhere forded the rivers, with the exception of the Big Piney, where I considered it proper to transfer the ammunition to regulation wagons.

My force consists of the remainder of the Fourth Division, which I had the honor of commanding for the last five months, viz: The First Brigade of Acting Brigadier-General Albert, now temporarily commanded by Colonel Joliat, comprising the Fifteenth Missouri Infantry, the First Flying Battery, and Company A of the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, and the Second Brigade of Acting Brigadier-General Carr, temporarily commanded by Colonel Schaefer, comprising the Second Missouri Volunteers, Second Ohio Battery, and a company of the Third Illinois Cavalry. {p.546}

The balance of the two cavalry regiments preceded the division upon a cavalry expedition under Acting Brigadier-General Carr.

The First and Second U. S. Reserve Corps were left behind by your orders to guard the railroad beyond Rolla, and two pioneer companies, under Captains Gerster and Krausnick, are building, under directions of Lieutenant Hoeppner, the bridge across the Gasconade at the mouth of the Little Piney River.

To restore the division if not to its original strength, as promised by Generals Frémont and Hunter, at least to that numerical force with which I conducted it from Springfield to Rolla, I would respectfully ask that the cavalry here and near Lebanon be returned to it and the two Reserve Corps infantry regiments replaced by others, and that Captain Gerster’s pioneer company be restored to the division, to repair roads and construct bridges when required.

I left Rolla with 85 regulation teams, 7 two-horse teams, 5 ambulances, and 2 apothecary wagons. Twenty-seven regulation teams were loaded with commissary supplies. The balance of the teams are apportioned to the respective commands in accordance with their numerical strength.

As Captain McKay, late quartermaster of the Fourth Division, was ordered to transfer more than 70 six-mule and four-horse Government teams to the post quartermaster at Rolla at the beginning of January, 25 of the teams used on the march were ordered by the post quartermaster at Rolla from General Sigel’s Third Division, and 10 were given, in accordance with your orders, by Colonel Wyman from his regiment, under my obligation to return them, and in this relation I would beg also your orders.

For the troops with me I am still provided with five days’ rations, but have no forage, and my acting quartermaster Captain Bensberg, was directed by the post commissary, Captain Winslow, to collect forage for himself.

The health of the troops is remarkably good and they are ready to march to-morrow, but I have lost several horses and mules by overexertion and cold, and shall have to replace them.

In closing, I beg to mention the zeal, activity, and indefatigable exertions of both commanders of my batteries, Captain Elbert, of the First Flying Battery, and First Lieutenant Chapman, in command of the Second Ohio Battery. They worked day and night, and it is to heir merit that the batteries are here.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ASBOTH, Brigadier-General, Commanding Fourth Division.

* Not found.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, February 6, 1862.

Hon. THOMAS L. PRICE, Hon. JAMES S. ROLLINS, Representatives from Missouri:

GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt last evening of your letter of that date* respecting the outrages alleged to have been committed against Union men in Missouri by a force under Colonel Jennison.

Your communication will be submitted to the President without delay, and I beg you to be assured that no effort on the part of the {p.547} Government will be spared to protect the Union men and loyal citizens of Missouri from all illegal force and lawless violence, come from what quarter it may.

Your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 8, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

CAPTAIN: Most of my force has arrived. The Benton Hussars (cavalry) at last accounts were at Rolla and I suppose they are en route. The Forty-third Illinois, promised in the general’s letter, and the Curtis Horse I have given up, although by following and supporting my line of communication they will probably be very useful. Colonel Davis sent the steamboat from Linn Creek down to Jefferson City with a request that General McKean would send a boat load of commissary stores back to Linn Creek.

There are Home Guards enough to hold that place, and supplies would be much more accessible to this place or Springfield if located there; meantime the supplies of the country are coming in, so that rivers and bad roads are not going to starve us back. Although each division has a terrible narrative of trying events of “flood and field” on their way, our stock have not broken down and we have lost nothing.

Some dysentery has broken out. I was right sick yesterday myself, but I am well to-day, and the general health and spirits of the troops continue good. I am busy overhauling matters-shoeing horses and mules-expecting to resume the forward march as early as Monday. It has again turned cold and the roads are frozen quite solid.

The enemy was quiet at Springfield at last accounts; probably receiving some re-enforcements from their call for volunteers for twenty days, but not many.

I remain,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, February 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Your energy and ability receive the strongest commendation of this Department. You have my perfect confidence and may rely upon the utmost support in your undertakings. The pressure of my engagements here prevented me from writing, but I shall do so fully in a day or two.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 8, 1862.

I. The civil authorities of Kansas being manifestly unable to preserve the peace and give due security to life and property, and having in various instances notified the general commanding of their inability {p.548} to uphold the laws unassisted by the military arm, and the crime of armed depredations or jayhawking having reached a height dangerous to the peace and property of the whole State and seriously compromising the Union cause in the border counties of Missouri: Now, therefore, martial law is declared throughout the State of Kansas and will be enforced with vigor.

II. It is not intended by this declaration to interfere with or supersede the action of the civil authorities in cases of the ordinary nature with which said civil authorities may be competent to deal, but it is the resolve of the general commanding that the crime of jayhawking shall be put down with a strong hand and by summary process, and for this purpose the trial of all prisoners charged with armed depredations against property or assaults upon life will be conducted before the military commissions provided for in General Orders, No. 12, of this department, current series, and the interference of the civil authorities in such cases is prohibited.

III. A suitable provost-marshal, with the necessary officers and force, will immediately be appointed to carry out the terms of this order.

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Jefferson City:

If troops have crossed the river, send any regiments that remain on this side by railroad. They are greatly wanted on the Tennessee. Telegraph, and I will send you as much transportation as possible.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Lebanon, February 9, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Paymasters arrived last night and may delay my movement till Tuesday. Shall consult my officers as to the propriety of moving when some are paid and some not.

The flouring-mill of this place was stopped yesterday by the breaking a cog-wheel. To avoid scarcity of flour, I immediately gave an order to reduce the flour ration 4 ounces; also that of salt pork 12 ounces, and in lieu of this and other reductions ordered double rations of fresh beef and pork, meat being abundant in the country.

I also ordered forward cavalry to occupy Marshfield and start the mill in that place to grinding for us. I will inclose a copy of my order in relation to the change of ration, which seems to me necessary to avoid possible necessities and consequent occasion for irregular foraging.

We have just heard of the taking of Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, by our troops, and rejoice at the news of another victory in the Department of the Missouri.

The telegraph wires reached Waynesville yesterday.

I remain, very truly, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

{p.549}

[Inclosure No. 1.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 75.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MO., Lebanon, Mo., February 7, 1862.

The commanding general tenders to the troops in this command his hearty commendation for the energy and endurance manifested on the march to this place.

You have moved during the coldest and most stormy period of a cold winter, and so far brought your trains and equipments through snow, mud, floods, and frost without his hearing of a murmur and without the loss of property or men.

But the success of this winter campaign now requires a further draught on the patience and fortitude of this army. We must strip for a forced march and final conflict.

Six days’ light rations and necessary covering must be condensed in a special train, to be ready for the occasion. This ration must be hard bread, flour, hominy, rice, desiccated potatoes, and mixed vegetables, sugar, coffee, and salt. Pinole (ground parched corn and sugar) ought to be procured.

The commissary will provide on the way whatever extra rations of fresh pork and beef the soldiers may need, so as to save these transported rations.

The rations can only be cooked of nights, and some beef should be jerked (dried over a slow fire) to carry in the haversack, to be eaten with pinole. If officers and men will carry out this order in good faith they will avoid danger of suffering and greatly enhance the efficiency of our force.

The camp equipment, most of the cooking utensils, change of clothing, and most of the tents, trunks, and boxes must all be left with the remainder of the regimental wagons, which, with full supplies of provisions, will be pressed forward by the quartermaster as fast as circumstances will allow.

On the forced march the commanding general will limit himself to these restrictions of food and clothing.

The teams for this train for the forced march should be selected and each wagon not loaded over 2,000.

Thus arranged, the trains will be separated and inspected by regimental officers, and the number for each properly reported through commanders of divisions to these headquarters as soon as completed.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 78.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MO., Lebanon, Mo., February 8, 1862.

During the present winter campaign the difficulty of procuring flour and the abundance of fresh meat in the country justifies, in the opinion of the commanding general, a reduction of the flour ration 4 ounces and in the salt meat ration 12 ounces, and in lieu of this reduction and such other articles as the men do not need or cannot procure double rations of fresh beef and pork will be furnished by the commissary department.

A pound of corn meal costs about one-fifth of a pound of flour, and {p.550} when meal can be procured and the troops desire it the commissary will issue 3 pounds in lieu of a ration of flour.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 80.}

LEBANON, MO., February 9, 1862.

For the purpose of reorganizing and properly arranging the force in the District of Southwestern Missouri the following assignment of troops is prescribed:

I. The Benton Hussars are attached to what has formerly been known as the Third Division, and this division will hereafter be denominated the First Division.

II. The Fourth Missouri Cavalry, Colonel Waring commanding, is attached to the division heretofore denominated the Fourth Division. Colonel Schaefer is appointed commander of the First Brigade of the division, and Brigadier-General Asboth commanding division.

III. The two divisions thus designated are placed under the general command of Brigadier-General Sigel.

IV. The First Missouri Cavalry, under Colonel Ellis, is assigned to the division of Col. Jefferson C. Davis, which will be designated as the Third Division.

V. The Third Illinois Cavalry, the Ninth Iowa, and Dubuque Battery will constitute a brigade, to be commanded by Col. William Vandever; the brigade now commanded by Colonel Dodge and the brigade thus organized under Colonel Vandever will constitute the Fourth Division, to be commanded by Colonel Carr.

VI. The remaining troops of this command, the Thirteenth Illinois, commanded by Colonel Wyman, Colonel Phelps’ regiment, Bowen’s battalion, the Curtis Horse, and other troops not here designated will report to these headquarters until otherwise ordered.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 81.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MO., Lebanon, February 9, 1862.

The troops of this command will resume their march forward to-morrow morning as early as commanders of divisions can complete their arrangements.

The First and Second Divisions, under the command of Brigadier-General Sigel, will proceed by the usual road leading to Springfield as far as the forks west of Tindall’s farm, 1 1/2 miles west of Faulkner’s Hill, when he will take the left-hand road, proceeding to Marshfield.

The Third Division, Colonel Davis commanding, will proceed from his present camp, intersecting Springfield road at Benton and Hughart’s, thence following the Springfield road to Ozark to Saint Luke, diverging from that vicinity so as to arrive at Pleasant Prairie, north of Marshfield.

The Fourth Division, Colonel Carr commanding, will proceed to the {p.551} left by way of Jericho, leaving Woodburn to the left and taking position on the left of Marshfield.

All the commands will try so to arrange their marches as to arrive in the vicinity of Marshfield Tuesday at 4 o’clock. The men should have one day’s rations in their haversacks and six days’ rations as prescribed in my order, No. 75.

The quartermaster and commissary will exert their utmost to procure supplies of forage for their animals at each encampment, especial attention being given to the trains of the batteries.

The double rations of fresh beef and pork is also specially directed to be procured by the proper commissary of division or regiments if the arrangements of contractors do not seem certain and adequate.

Special attention is also again directed to Order, No. 3, concerning pilfering and plundering. There is no need of this when the proper officers are thus empowered and expected to secure all requisite supplies.

Each division will provide proper advance guards and flankers, but being in three parallel lines, instruct their scouts-so as to avoid attacks of their own friends.

Commanders of divisions will report to these headquarters as often as convenient, headquarters being movable on the central line.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, February 10, 1862.

Major-General HUNTER and Brigadier-General LANE, Leavenworth, Hans.:

My wish has been and is to avail the Government of the services of both General Hunter and General Lane, and, so far as possible, to personally oblige both. General Hunter is the senior officer and must command when they serve together; though in so far as he can, consistently with the public service and his own honor, oblige General Lane, he will also oblige me. If they cannot come to an amicable understanding, General Lane must report to General Hunter for duty, according to the rules, or decline the service.

A. LINCOLN.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Marshfield, February 10, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The Iowa cavalry are not needed at Rolla; they are needed here. I wish the general would allow them to come forward. Van Dorn is moving up to join Price. Shall try to prevent junction. My columns are arriving here. Let the cavalry re-enforce me. Van Dorn has promised 30,000 or 40,000 at Springfield very soon. Expects to be there with 10,000 by the 15th. These are the hopes and expectations of the enemy. I move on to attack in detail.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

{p.552}

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SAINT LOUIS, February 11, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Colonel Foster has captured in Chariton, North Missouri, 19 rebels, 18 horses, and 142 kegs of powder.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 11, 1862.

Col. W. P. CARLIN, Pilot Knob, Mo.:

What additional forces do you require to occupy Doniphan and to capture Pocahontas? When can you move? I have two regiments of cavalry ready to send you if you can say so. Colonel Callender is preparing the light artillery you asked for. What more will you want for such an expedition?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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PILOT KNOB, February 11, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Your dispatch received. I require one regiment of infantry and one of cavalry more than I now have to occupy Doniphan and capture Pocahontas. Two companies of artillery and two of cavalry can occupy this post while I am on the expedition. I can use the two regiments of cavalry with advantage, but want at least one regiment more of infantry. I will also require transportation for all the additional force, say 60 wagons and teams more than I have. I want the light artillery and horses and a supply of ammunition for the guns. The roads are improving rapidly. I wish to undertake expedition.

W. P. CARLIN.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 11, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I would respectfully submit to you the following extracts taken from the report of Maj. A. Baird, assistant inspector-general, U. S. Army, on the inspection of the Kansas troops, viz:

If the practice of seizing and confiscating the private property of rebels, which is now extensively carried on by the troops known as Lane’s brigade, is to be continued, how may it be managed so as to prevent the troops being demoralized and the Government defrauded?

The practice has become so fixed and general that I am convinced that orders arresting it would not be obeyed, and that the only way of putting a stop to it would be to remove the Kansas troops to some other field of action.

The fact that the property of citizens seized and confiscated by the troops engaged in the service of the United States is substantiated by both official and reliable private evidence, and from the frequent repetition of these acts the commanding officers in Kansas appear to have assumed its legality. The authority under which it is done is unknown to me, further than such destruction of private property as is unavoidable from a state of war, conducted according to the established usages {p.553} of civilized nations. I would therefore request the policy of the Goverment for my guidance in dealing with questions of this nature.

To what extent can the right of confiscation legally be carried, and by what tribunal, civil or military, are the questions that will naturally arise to be decided, that the innocent will not suffer while punishing the guilty, and that the dignity and justice of the Government may not be at the mercy of individuals governed by cupidity or revenge? This question has assumed such proportions that it will require vigorous means and well-defined authority to suppress or direct its application.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Jefferson City:

A train leaves to-night to bring down one regiment to-morrow; another must be ready for Thursday, and the Third Battery for Saturday. No delay must occur; they must be ready to start immediately. We have stirring times in Kentucky and Tennessee, and want every man we can get.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 12, 1862-3 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

It is reported that Van Dorn, with a large force, is marching from Fort Smith to re-enforce Price, and that General Frost is moving from Pocahontas in the same direction. I shall immediately move the forces at Ironton to Doniphan, to either force Frost to return, or attack and destroy the depot at Pocahontas. Please answer about Ohio battery and other troops ordered from this department to Kansas. Can I use them? I greatly need them at this moment.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Camp at Pearson’s Creek, February 12, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I received the general’s approving letter of the 6th at Marshfield this morning, just as I started on this weary day’s march. It relieved me from anxiety in regard to the Davis division and flushed me with new hope in the coming crisis.

My advance was fired on at 10.30 a.m. by scouts. One of the rebels was wounded, probably mortally. As we advanced the enemy occasionally appeared in force and was fired on by my mountain howitzers and pursued. One of our men is wounded, probably mortally, and one or two are missing at last accounts.

Price was still very quiet in Springfield at 10 a.m. to-day. Frost’s {p.554} battery and a train of supplies arrived yesterday. General Van Dorn was expected, but had not yet arrived, and I do not therefore believe his force is very near, for I think at such a time he would most likely come a few days before his force. Price must therefore rely on his present resources, variously estimated at from 10,000 to 30,000, with about forty-two pieces of cannon.

I send you abstract of my effective force here, which foots up as follows:

Infantry9,585
Cavalry2,510
12,095

Artillery (including four mountain howitzers), fifty pieces.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 13, 1862-3 a.m.

As I finished the foregoing a brisk firing was heard in front, where the enemy in small force had attacked pickets, forming across the road and in the thick brush adjacent. I ordered up two pieces of artillery and fired three rounds, scattering them, and inducing me to advance my pickets to Hancock’s, on the edge of prairie. After that all quiet during the remainder of the night. The Fourth Division is now moving forward. The morning is bright and the men move out again in good spirits.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 84.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF MISSOURI, Marshfield, Mo., February 12, 1862.

I. The First, Second, and Fourth Divisions of this command will move forward at 7 o’clock to-morrow morning by the direct road, and camping near the head of Pearson’s Creek, 9 miles this side of Springfield.

II. The Third Division, commanded by General Davis, will move forward at 6 a.m., following the road by Leslie’s store and camping near Piper’s farm, about 8 miles this side of Springfield.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 13, 1862.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, Comdg. Dept. of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Hans.:

GENERAL: Your very kind letter of the 8th is this moment received.* I must write you a very hasty answer to-day. You arc entirely mistaken about my having received any information, official or unofficial, from Washington about the “great jayhawking expedition.” Not a word or hint has been communicated to me. Orders were sent by General Thomas direct to various regiments in this department to immediately {p.555} repair to Fort Leavenworth and report to General Hunter as a part of General Lane’s expedition. No notice of such orders was given to me. To put a stop to these irregularities I issued General Orders, No. 8, and protested both to General Thomas and General McClellan against such an irregular and unmilitary proceeding. No reply. I stopped some of the troops on their way, and reported that they could not move till some order was sent to me. No reply.

I am satisfied that there have been many of such orders issued directly by the President and Secretary Cameron without consulting General McClellan, and for that reason no reply could be given without exposing the plans of the great jayhawker and the imposition of himself and Cameron on the President. Perhaps this is the key to the silence of the authorities at Washington. I know nothing on the subject except what I see in the newspapers.

In regard to my own plans, they are very simple. I have sent some 16,000 or 17,000 men, under General Curtis, against Price at Springfield. He has been re-enforced by McIntosh, and it is said that Van Dorn and Frost are also marching to his relief. If it would be possible for you to move a cavalry force rapidly by Fort Scott to threaten Price’s right flank it would have a most excellent effect. This possibly was the original intention of Lane’s expedition, but I protested to Washington against any of his jayhawkers coming into this department, and saying positively that I would arrest and disarm every one I could catch.

The remainder of all my available force will be sent to the lines of the Cumberland and Tennessee. Who will take the immediate command there is not yet determined.

Yours, in haste,

H. W. HALLECK.

* Not found.

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FEBRUARY 13-7 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Lane had no authority to give any orders. Countermand all that did not come from the Adjutant-General of the Army. But three Wisconsin regiments of infantry were authorized for Kansas; all other troops for there were cavalry. In your discretion suspend movement of any troops en route or under orders for Kansas and report the fact to me. How many batteries have you and how many more do you need? I am anxious about Fort Donelson. Will send 600 sailors for gunboats in the next week.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 37.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 14, 1862.

I. Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant is assigned to the command of the District of West Tennessee and Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman to the command of the District of Cairo.

II. Commanders of districts, divisions, brigades, and posts, in the State of Missouri are directed to have an immediate inspection of all their troops, for the discovery of stolen and contraband property and {p.556} fugitive slaves. General Orders, No. 3, series of 1861, will be strictly enforced, and any officer who has permitted it to be violated by his command will be arrested and tried for neglect of duty and disobedience of orders.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 39.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 14, 1862.

I. Information having been received that certain judicial officers intrusted with the administration of the criminal laws and ordinances in this department have misunderstood the objects and purposes of the establishment of martial law in this city of Saint Louis, and in consequence of such misunderstanding have failed to enforce all those laws and ordinances; and as crimes and misdemeanors should at all times be strictly suppressed, it is hereby enjoined upon all such civil officers, whether as judges, attorneys, sheriffs, marshals, coroners, clerks, justices of the peace, presiding officers of police courts, constables, or members of the police, to strictly enforce all criminal laws and ordinances to have arrested, tried, and punished in the courts established in the State, and in the manner prescribed by the laws of the State, all persons guilty of any violation of such laws and ordinances, in the same manner as if martial law had not been declared to exist.

II. And it is especially enjoined upon the judge of the Saint Louis criminal court to have a full complement of grand jurors at every sitting of the court, to strictly charge said grand jurors to diligently inquire into all crimes and misdemeanors under the laws of the State that may come to their knowledge, and present for trial such offenders known to them. And the assistant circuit attorney for this county is particularly required to faithfully aid and assist the said grand jurors and officers of said court in the discharge of their duties, and to strictly perform all charges devolving upon him by the laws of the State.

III. By the establishment of martial law in the city of Saint Louis it is not designed to interfere with or suspend the operation of the laws and ordinances of the State or city with reference to crimes and misdemeanors nor the remedies and process of the civil courts, except so far as the interests of the Government imperatively require. The civil authorities who attempt to interfere with the execution of military orders emanating from these headquarters will be punished for military offense, but in all other cases it is their duty to enforce the laws and punish crimes and misdemeanors.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Springfield, Mo.:

Be careful in your pursuit of Price. Don’t separate or divide your forces. Keep them together and well in hand. Sigel’s detour lost the battle of Wilson’s Creek. Don’t let him lead you into the same error.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.557}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, February 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: Major-General McClellan directs me to say that within the past three weeks 4,000 revolvers have been sent to you at Saint Louis, together with about 25,000 Prussian muskets, 2,000 single-barreled pistols, 5,000 sabers, and some other arms, of which you have had notice. Three thousand French rifled muskets and 3,000 sabers have been sent to the Governor of Illinois, and 5,000 Springfield rifles are ordered to you as fast as they are manufactured. Other good arms of all kinds will be sent to you as fast as they are manufactured.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. V. COLBURN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 41.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 15, 1862.

I. At the request of the Acting Governor of Missouri, it is hereby ordered that at all future elections in this State, whether for State, municipal, county, or town officers, every voter will be required to take the oath of allegiance prescribed in article six of the ordinance of the Convention dated October 16, 1861. Officers of the polls will see to the execution of this order, if they receive votes of persons not taking the oath, they will be arrested and tried for military offense and the election will be declared null and void.

II. It was not intended by General Orders, No. 39, current series, to cast any reflection upon the loyalty and good intentions of the civil officers named therein, but simply to point out their duties during the existence of martial law in this city and State.

...

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT, Saint Louis, Mo., February 15, 1862.

In compliance with Special Orders, No. 140, current series headquarters Department of the Missouri, I hereby assume command of the District of Saint Louis.

...

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Volunteer..

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 100.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 15, 1862.

Col. Charles Doubleday, commanding Second Ohio Cavalry, is hereby appointed acting brigadier-general, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

His brigade will consist of the Second Ohio Cavalry, Twelfth Wiscousin {p.558} Regiment of Volunteers, Ninth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, and such other troops as may hereafter be assigned to him.

The commanding officers of the Ninth and Twelfth Wisconsin Regiments will report to Actg. Brig. Gen. Charles Doubleday by letter.

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPRINGFIELD, February 16, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: My advance of cavalry overtook and attacked rear guard of enemy at Little York. Three rebels killed. More straggling prisoners are being taken than I know what to do with. Fifteen wagon loads of supplies captured at Little York. I move forward this morning, with most of my force on short rations. Price’s order for retreat is dated February 13, and directs that the troops of his command shall prepare immediately to move at a moment’s warning.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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FLAT CREEK, NEAR CHARITON, February 16, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON:

This is a strong defile. The enemy made a stand across it and established batteries, which attacked my advance of cavalry at 3 yesterday. My mountain howitzers responded to their fire till other artillery came up, when we drove them from their intrenchments and they resumed their flight. By this time it was dark, and my troops bivouacked and rested till 4 this morning, when the movement forward again commenced.

The First and Second Divisions, under General Sigel, are coming by a different route, and will join me here early this morning.

We continually take cattle, prisoners, wagons, and arms, which they leave in their flight.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Post Rolla, February 16, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The telegraph of General Halleck last night is at hand.

I had an interview with Major Wood this morning, and find he has received sabers sufficient to arm his command, and also has made requisition for carbines, which is being filled by Colonel Callender as fast as possible. This will make him effective. I am satisfied from present appearances that I shall be obliged to keep at least half of his force at or near Salem to support Major Drake. The counties of Dent, Texas, Shannon, and Howell are infested with three or four bands of outlaws, who are stealing and destroying all the Union property they can find; {p.559} would attack Salem and this post if they dared, and will try and tear up the railroad track unless closely watched.

I am still of the opinion there should be more force at this post, particularly a battalion of cavalry and one company (100 men), with two good officers to man the post and finish it up. A battery of four guns, well manned, would be the best to take possession of the fort, as they could be used both in the field and fort. There is an immense amount of Government property here which I do not want the rebels to get or destroy, and do not intend they shall while I command here.

I have sent Major Wood with 200 of his best mounted and armed men to the support of Major Drake at Salem, with the orders to exterminate or drive out of the State any marauding rebels they can find.

I am, captain, respectfully, yours,

J. B. WYMAN, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis. February 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Stop every man that comes to you for the Tennessee or Cumberland. All you do not want send to Commerce. Report as to the character of Commerce as a depot for advance against New Madrid.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SUGAR CREEK CROSSING, Six Miles from Arkansas Line, in Arkansas, Feb. 18, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The general’s dispatch of the 14th is received. We rejoice again at the success of our comrades in the East.

The enemy was re-enforced yesterday by the troops of McCulloch, and made another stand at this place. His batteries opened fire upon us and were very soon replied to by mine. After a few rounds of shot and shell I ordered a cavalry charge, which drove them from the high grounds they occupied, with the loss of many killed and wounded and scattered. My loss is 13 killed and 15 to 20 wounded. Among the latter are Major Bowen, of my escort, in the wrist; my assistant adjutant-general, Captain McKenny, severely but not dangerously; Captain Switzler, not dangerously.

My advance camped at the battle ground. General Sigel’s command is 4 miles back and will reach me this morning. Have sent forward cavalry to annoy and explore. Cross Hollow is their next point, 12 miles ahead. I shall await the arrival of the First and Second Divisions, as this is their great boasted trap for the Federal army. Hope also the Third Iowa will arrive to-day.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.560}

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SAINT LOUIS, February 18, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

The flag of the Union is floating in Arkansas. General Curtis has driven Price from Missouri, and is several miles across the Arkansas line, cutting up Price’s rear and hourly capturing prisoners and stores. The Army of the Southwest is doing its duty nobly.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 90.}

HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DIST. OF Mo., Sugar Creek, Ark., February 18, 1862.

The general commanding directs me to announce to the soldiers of this district tidings of success, which he has received through Major-General Halleck, by our comrades elsewhere.

Our gunboats have triumphantly penetrated Florence, Ala. A great victory has been won by the Army and Navy in taking Roanoke Island, in North Carolina, where 300 of the enemy were killed, 1,000 wounded, and 2,500 taken prisoners.

The general also expresses his great satisfaction to the troops of this command for their courage, fidelity, and endurance manifested in this campaign.

You have moved in the most inclement weather, over the worst of roads, making extraordinary long marches, subsisting mainly on meat without salt, and for the past six days you have been under the fire of the fleeing enemy. You have driven him out of Missouri, restored the Union flag to the virgin soil of Arkansas, and triumphed in two contests, the last with a portion of the combined forces of Price and McCulloch in their stronghold, and I trust you will receive the gratified thanks of your friends and your country.

In your rapid pursuit of the foe and the cravings of actual hunger, the peaceable citizens through whose country we have passed should forgive some acts of spoliation which are incident to war under such pressing circumstances, but the commanding general will again call the attention of his officers and men to his General Orders, No. 3, and express his hopes that soldiers that have done themselves much honor will not soil it by acts of folly, cruelty, or dissipation.

Let us show the people everywhere that our tents and knapsacks are not disgraced with plunder, and that the old flag of the Union is the only emblem of power, peace, and safety to society, and the only flag that deserves their regard and affection.

And let the people of Arkansas rally to a banner raised by our fathers as the emblem of civil and religious liberty, and restore to our whole country that peace and prosperity which have so long distinguished us among the nations of the earth.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TUE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Commerce is selected as the depot for General Pope’s command. He {p.561} will immediately go there to receive his troops which you do not require for the defense of Cairo.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Sugar Creek Hollow, Ark., February 20, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I move to Osage Springs to-day in order to get nearer to the Cross Hollow. I will then be 7 miles west of the enemy and on better ground for artillery and cavalry. McCulloch has joined Price and Van Dorn is expected to-day. Infantry and cavalry re-enforcements are also reported. I made some progress in my reconnaissance yesterday, but not yet enough to satisfy me as to the best approaches. I must attack him soon or he will assume the offensive.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 44.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862.

I. In consideration of the recent victories won by the Federal forces, and of the rapidly-increasing loyalty of citizens of Missouri, who for a time forgot their duty to their flag and country, the sentences of John C. Tompkins, William J. Forshey, John Patton, Thomas M. Smith, Steven Stott, George H. Cunningham, Richard B. Chowder, and George M. Pulliam, heretofore condemned to death, are provisionally mitigated to close confinement in the military prison at Alton. If rebel spies again destroy railroads and telegraph lines, and thus render it necessary for us to make severe examples, the original sentences against these men will be carried into execution.

II. No further assessments will be levied or collected from any one who will now take the prescribed oath of allegiance.

III. Boards or commissions will he appointed to examine the cases of prisoners of war who apply to take the oath of allegiance, and on their recommendation orders will be issued from these headquarters for their release.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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[FEBRUARY 21, 1862.-For Halleck to McClellan and McClellan to Halleck, in reference to operations in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee, see Series I, Vol. VII, pp. 645-647.]

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CAMP HALLECK, ARK., February 22, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

My flank movements command Cross Hollow. The enemy evacuated, and my cavalry drove the pickets and camped on the ground. All the {p.562} traps have now been taken. I shall camp here till my commissary train comes up, my left resting on Cross Hollow and my right on this spring, extending from road to road 6 miles. I will send my cavalry forward to take Fayetteville, which is only 10 miles from their front pickets. The Arkansas hills echo the shouts of my troops, who rejoice at the glorious news from Fort Donelson

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP HALLECK, ARK., February 22, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

McCulloch and Price expect to unite their entire force and have fallen back for that purpose. I need 800 artillery horses and 400 new sets of artillery harness, to shift some poor, broken-down stock from the artillery to other service; also 10,000 pairs of pants. I should also be re-enforced, if I am to cope with the enemy, as follows: Four good batteries, complete; 3,000 cavalry, well equipped, and 7,000 infantry. With such an accession of force I could hold against all probable force or go as far as supplies could be obtained.

I started my force at Lebanon and I have been compelled to distribute considerable along the line.

By holding the enemy below the Missouri line the people of Missouri immediately abandon the idea of continuing the effort to make Missouri a part of the Southern Confederacy.

Most of the Missouri force may be spared, and could do more out of Missouri to settle the difficulty in Missouri. The roads on this side of Springfield are good, and sugar, salt, and coffee are all the rations that should be hauled through. The best point for their team embarkation is Linn Creek.

My force is estimated by the enemy at from 20,000 to 40,000, and I still hold a definite hostile attitude, sending out my cavalry in force to feel and annoy him.

Cross Hollow was an extensive cantonment. The buildings were better than ours at Benton Barracks. He burned most of them, together with stores of provisions and arms, which in his haste he could not carry away. Long rows of brick chimneys show where the barracks were nicely arranged. His sick and wounded who were left say my flank movement induced the sudden evacuation. Considerable he did not burn and we are using it. Most of our provisions for the last ten days have been taken from the enemy.

Very respectfully, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Camp Halleck, Ark., February 22, 1862.

Brigadier-General ASBOTH, Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: You are to assume command of all the cavalry and artillery force which has been or may be ordered to report to you at Mud Town to-morrow morning, with a view of making a reconnaissance in force against the enemy. You will, if not obstructed by formidable {p.563} force, proceed as far as Fayetteville and take that place; but you will avoid any serious engagement with the enemy. You will, in taking the town, try to get position on high commanding ground, and send in a judicious officer to reconnoiter the premises and take and bring away flags, arms, and other military articles if occasion offers.

You will not allow private houses to be entered unless it may be previously ascertained or reasonably believed arms, spies, or force be concealed within. If you can find any of the leading citizens ask one or two of them to come with you, as it is my earnest desire to prevent damage to private property. You will especially place a guard over the printing-office while our troops are there, and inform the owners, if they can be found, that I desire the use of the press to publish orders, which are intended to prevent my troops from doing mischief.

Restrain your troops from acts of cruelty and folly, and avoid surprise or ambuscade. If you hear of suitable roads, make a detour to the right and return to these headquarters at your earliest convenience.

I am, general, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 22, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding Army of Southwest, Arkansas:

You will not advance any troops farther south than Fayetteville. Occupy with artillery and infantry one or more of the most important passes. The main force should encamp at Bentonville or some point in supporting distance of the passes occupied, which passes should be well secured by intrenchments, abatis, &c. The advanced post, say Fayetteville, should be occupied with cavalry and some light artillery, which can move with it. Notify me promptly of your proposed dispositions. I will soon turn Price and relieve you of his presence.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 46.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., February 22, 1862.

I. The major-general commanding the department desires to impress upon all officers the importance of preserving good order and discipline among their troops as the armies of the West advance into Tennessee and other Southern States. Let us show to our fellow-citizens of these States that we come merely to crush out rebellion and to restore to them peace and the benefits of the Constitution and the Union, of which they have been deprived by selfish and unprincipled leaders. They have been told that we come to oppress and to plunder. By our acts we will undeceive them. We will prove to them that we come to restore, not to violate, the Constitution and laws. In restoring to them the glorious flag of the Union we will assure them that they shall enjoy under its folds the same protection of life and property as in former days. Soldiers, let no excesses on your part tarnish the glory of our arms.

{p.564}

II. Orders heretofore issued in this department in regard to pillaging, marauding, the destruction of private property, and the stealing and concealment of slaves must be strictly enforced. It does not belong to the military to decide upon the relation of master and slave. Such questions must be settled by the civil courts. No fugitive slave will therefore, be admitted within our lines or camps, except when specially ordered by the general commanding.

III. Women and children, merchants, farmers, mechanics, and all persons not in arms are regarded as non-combatants, and are not to be molested either in their persons or property. If, however, they aid and assist the enemy they become belligerents, and will be treated as such. If they violate the laws of war, they will be made to suffer the penalties of such violation.

IV. Military stores and public property of the enemy must be surrendered, and any attempt to conceal such property, by fraudulent transfers or otherwise, will be punished, but no private property will be touched, unless by the orders of the general commanding. Wherever it becomes necessary to levy forced contributions for the supply and subsistence of our troops, such levies will be made as light as possible and be so distributed as to produce no distress among the people. All property so taken must be receipted and duly accounted for, as heretofore directed.

V. These orders will be read at the head of every regiment, and all officers are commanded to strictly enforce them.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Commerce, Mo., February 23, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

I arrived here last night with 140 men of the Forty-seventh Illinois, having given orders to the Fifty-ninth Indiana and the three companies of the Forty-sixth Indiana, together with the Forty-seventh Illinois, to follow me immediately. These regiments and companies were on board steamers War Eagle, Atlantic, and New Golden State, and ready to push out when I left. None of them have reached here, and I presume they neglected to obey their orders. I am here with a very small force, and I dislike to land the stores, &c., for fear of accident, until I have a force sufficient to make them secure. Will you please order the boats to leave at once for this place.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 35.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, February 23, 1862.

The Thirty-fourth, Forty-third, Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh, and Fifty-ninth Indiana Regiments will constitute the First Brigade of the Second Division of this army, and will be commanded by Col. J. R. Slack, Forty-seventh Indiana Regiment.

{p.565}

Brig. Gen. John M. Palmer is assigned to the command of this division, the Second Brigade of which will be hereafter designated.

The brigade under Colonel Slack will prepare to move forward to the town of Benton to-morrow morning. Capt. J. A. Swain, assistant quartermaster, has been instructed to make up the transportation of this brigade for temporary purposes to 50 wagons. Such baggage and supplies as are needed for immediate use will be transported with the brigade; the remainder of its baggage and supplies will be forwarded to Benton after the brigade is in position at that place.

Each commander of a regiment will detail a commissioned officer, with a sufficient guard, to remain behind in charge of the regimental baggage and supplies which cannot be transported with the brigade. At least three days’ rations will be carried with the brigade.

The brigade commander will establish his command in camp in the neighborhood of the town of Benton, and will be held strictly accountable to these headquarters that his force is in camp, his grand guards, pickets, outposts, and police guards are mounted strictly in accordance with Army Regulations; that his forces discharge their duties in all respects according to military requirements; that proper vigilance is observed, and all the usual precautions common to a force in presence of an enemy are carefully and closely attended to.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 24, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Send troops to General Pope till his command amounts to 10,000, the infantry, artillery, and cavalry being in due proportion. I cannot ascertain what he has got or what he is doing. Why don’t he report by Cape Girardeau?

R. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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COMMERCE, MO., February 24, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

There are now here nine regiments of infantry, one battery Eleventh Ohio, and six companies of the First U. S. infantry, about 6,500 men.

In accordance with my understanding with General Cullum am stopping every boat coming down the river and unloading the troops. No cavalry yet here.

I occupied Benton to-day with one brigade of four regiments. I shall brigade the troops as fast as they arrive and establish them by divisions at points here and Benton.

If all troops designed for this command can be thrown here in three days I could march on 7th. They come in slowly. I took off six companies of the First infantry from the Meteor and Sunshine.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.566}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, Mo., February 24, 1862.

The undersigned, having been instructed by the general commanding the department to assume the command of the army assembling at this place, announces the following as his staff officers:

All communications to these headquarters will be addressed to the chief of the staff department to which the communication relates:

Maj. Speed Butler, assistant adjutant-general.

Maj. E. F. Noyes, aide-de-camp.

Maj. C. A. Morgan, aide-de-camp.

Capt. Louis H. Marshall, aide-de-camp.

Maj. J. M. Corse, inspector-general.

Capt. J. W. Taylor, chief quartermaster.

Capt. J. A. Swain, assistant quartermaster.

Lieut. J. W. Mott, acting assistant quartermaster.

The chief commissary and medical director will be announced in a few days.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, Camp Halleck, Ark., February 24, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I send by one of my aides, Major Schaeffer, the last newspaper published in Fayetteville, which shows the trials of different factions and the efforts making to raise volunteers. It is a curious fact that no idea of my approach was expressed, although that very day Price was driven through Crane Creek defile at the mouth of our guns almost in the hearing of Fayetteville.

I also send letters taken from the post-office at Bentonville, showing some of the plans and position of the rebels; among other things the order to protect and carry on the lead mines in Granby. I also send a large secession flag, taken from the court-house at Bentonville.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 25, 1862-11 a.m.

Brigadier-General POPE, Commerce:

All troops at Cape Girardeau, except one battery and one company of cavalry, have been ordered to join you. Cavalry is going down the river to-day and more will go to-morrow. Move on your advanced guard and working parties to repair the roads. Your force will be at least 10,000 in a few days. The movement must be prompt, as it is reported that the enemy is preparing to evacuate Columbus. Send me a dispatch every day and, if important, oftener. Number them and state the hour. Two batteries go down to-day.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.567}

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HEAL QUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 25, 1862-1 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Price’s army has been driven from his strong post at Cross Hollow. The enemy left his sick and wounded and such of his stores as he could not destroy. He burned the extensive barracks at that place, to prevent our troops from occupying them. General Curds says: “Most of our provisions for the last ten days have been taken from the enemy.”

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 37.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, Mo., February 25, 1862.

The Twenty-sixth and Forty-seventh Illinois Regiments and the Fifth Iowa, with another regiment hereafter to be designated, will form the Second Brigade of the Second Division, to be commanded by Col. William H. Worthington, of Fifth Iowa Volunteers.

This brigade will march to-morrow morning as early as practicable to Benton, and there report to Brig. Gen. John M. Palmer, commanding the Second Division.

Such of the sick of this brigade as are likely to be unfit for duty for some time and cannot be cared for in their regiments will be shipped to Saint Louis by the first steamer.

Commanders of regiments will in no case send off any sick man without his descriptive papers.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 38.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, February 25, 1862.

The Twenty-seventh, Thirty-ninth, and Sixty-third Regiments Ohio Volunteers, with another regiment to be hereafter designated, will constitute the First Brigade of the First Division of this army, to be commanded by Col. John Groesbeck, Thirty-ninth Ohio Volunteers.

The regiments designated will therefore immediately report through their colonels to Colonel Groesbeck.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., February 26, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN:

I am in receipt of the general’s telegraphic order of the 22d, and shall conform to its directions as far as possible. I am camped so as to rest my left flank on Cross Hollow and the White River Mountains, and my right on Osage Springs, 5 miles due west from the Hollow. Sugar Creek Hollow (12 miles) is stronger, and on using up my forage here I may fall back with my main force to Sugar Creek. Fayetteville is too {p.568} far from me and too near the enemy for a regular outpost, as it is 25 miles out, and the stand of the enemy at Boston Mountains is only 24 miles in advance of Fayetteville, with strong pickets much nearer. It will be within my circle of frequent reconnaissances, and Elm Springs, some 10 miles in front, will be my outpicket. Further knowledge of the country may induce modifications. It is said Van Dorn will move a force by Roaring River to cut off my line of communication. It is also said he has joined the main army at Boston Mountains and arrested McCulloch. All accounts agree in saying the main army is distracted with internal feuds among their forces.

Respectfully, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS:

Pants will be sent, but cannot now send more troops or horses. As you are not to move again at present, you must wait. Draw after you your rear guards and garrison; neither your rear nor flanks are exposed. Our cavalry has cleared out all Southern Missouri, and Hunter is advancing to support your right flank. Price’s army will be completely turned very soon.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 48.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., February 26, 1862.

I. The public press has given circulation to the following correspondence:

Yesterday (February 8) several companies of our cavalry, with one company of Roes’ infantry, scoured the country west, bringing in 50 prisoners. Our cavalry also encountered a large force of rebel cavalry 15 miles beyond Bloomfield. They succeeded in routing them, killing 7, wounding many, and taking 20 prisoners. We had 2 missing and 1 wounded. They found 5 bodies, known to be Union men murdered.

W. P. KELLOGG, Colonel, Commanding.

General E. A. PAINE, Commanding, Cairo.

CAIRO, February 8.

Colonel KELLOGG, Commanding, Cape Girardeau:

Hang one of the rebel cavalry for each Union man murdered, and after this two for each Continue to scout, capture, and kill.

E. A. PAINE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General Paine, in explanation of the foregoing, says that at the time he received the dispatch of Colonel Kellogg he supposed they caught the rebel cavalry in the act. The major-general commanding takes the earliest opportunity to publish his disapproval of this order. It is contrary to the rules of civilized war, and if its spirit should be adopted the whole country would be covered with blood. Retaliation has its limits, and the innocent should not be made to suffer for the acts of others over whom they have no control.

II. Again, by whom was this official correspondence furnished to the {p.569} press, in violation of the Army Regulations and repeated general orders? The imputation must rest upon the two officers concerned until they account for the publication.

III. Information is almost daily furnished to the public press respecting army movements which should be known only to the general giving the orders and to the officer receiving them. Knowledge thus given to the enemy may sometimes cost us the lives of thousands. Moreover, the contents of official letters, which should have been known only to the writer and to those superior in rank, have been published, together with ex-parte statements and misrepresentations. The law and Army Regulations afford a remedy for all personal grievances, no matter by whom they have been caused, and when military officers carry their complaints to newspapers the inference is that they are without foundation. Hereafter any officer who publishes, without proper authority, any information respecting the movements of our armies, even of battles won or any official papers will be arrested and tried by a court-martial, and the Secretary of War has directed that the whole edition of the newspaper publishing such information be seized and destroyed.

IV. It is officially represented to the commanding general that certain parties in this city and elsewhere have been negotiating with companies and regiments originally, perhaps, irregularly organized, to obtain for a certain price their disbandment or discharge, and encouraging expressions of dissatisfaction and mutinous conduct as a means to accomplish that end. An investigation of this matter will be made immediately, and the provost-marshal-general will arrest guilty parties and confine them in the military prison until they can be tried and punished as prescribed by the Rules and Articles of War.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 42a.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, Mo., February 26 [28], 1862.

Brig. Gen. Schuyler Hamilton, U. S. Volunteers, is assigned to the command of the First Division of this army.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 27, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Pope has fourteen pieces of artillery. Should have two batteries more. Will they reach him from Saint Louis to-morrow? If not, must spare some from here. He wants Steele with a force to cover his flank at Oak Grove.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

{p.570}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, February 27, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I march to-morrow morning with a force about 10,000 strong and will be in front of New Madrid on Sunday evening or Monday morning. Have requested General Cullum to advance strong force, under Steele, as far as Oak Grove, to cover my flank and serve as a reserve in case of need. Most of the regimental baggage left here for want of transportation. Hope wagons will be sent here to bring it forward. Would suggest movement of gun and mortar boats toward Columbus on Sunday, to operate until I have occupied New Madrid.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 27, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM:

General Pope should be flanked as he desires, but General Steele must be sent here, as he is ordered.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 27, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, Commerce, Mo.:

Wagons and everything else are being sent to you as rapidly as possible; also re-enforcements. Move on as fast as possible; a reserve will sustain you. You have 10,000. If necessary I will sustain you with five, ten, fifteen, or even twenty thousand. The object must be accomplished if it requires 50,000 men.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 49.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., February 27, 1862.

Official information has been received that the rebel troops, in evacuating Mud Town, Ark., poisoned the provisions which they were obliged to abandon, and that 42 officers and men of one of our regiments were poisoned by eating these provisions. One brave officer and several men have died and others have suffered terribly from this barbarous act-an act condemned by every civilized nation, ancient and modern.

We cannot retaliate by adopting the same barbarous mode of warfare, nor can we retaliate by punishing the innocent for the acts of the guilty. The laws of war forbid this. But the same code authorizes us to retaliate upon the guilty parties. Any person guilty of such acts, when captured, will not be treated as ordinary prisoners of war; they will not be shot, but will suffer the ignominious punishment of being hung as felons. Moreover, all officers are in a measure responsible for the acts of the troops under their command. Officers of troops guilty of such acts, although not themselves the advisers or abettors of crime, will therefore, when captured, be put in irons, and conveyed as criminals {p.571} to these headquarters. The laws of war make it their duty to prevent such barbarities; if they neglect that duty they must suffer the consequences.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, Mo., February 27, 1862.

The following movements of this army will be make:

The First Division, under Brig. Gen. Schuyler Hamilton, will march from this place at 8 o’clock to-morrow morning, the 28th instant, and in camp in the neighborhood of Colonel Hunter’s to-morrow night. On the succeeding day, the 1st instant, the division will occupy Sikeston, where further instructions will be given by the general commanding this army in person.

The Second Division, under Brig. Gen. J. M. Palmer, will march on Saturday morning, the 1st instant, and encamp 5 or 6 miles north of Sikeston, where further instructions will be received.

Under no consideration will any ambulances or wagons be permitted to move in the columns, except such as are needed to carry the necessary ammunition.

Division trains of the several divisions will move in the rear of their respective divisions in the order in which the brigades are posted in the column. A sufficient rear guard will march in front of the trains, with orders to prohibit any officer or soldier from passing to the rear of the column, and regimental quartermasters will be held responsible that no one be permitted to ride in the wagons except with a written certificate of the surgeon that he should do so.

Rear guards of not less than three companies of infantry will be placed in the rear of the division trains, and mounted patrols will be kept out upon the flanks to prevent any straggling from the ranks, with positive instructions to shoot down any person belonging to the army engaged in depredation or outrages upon the people of the country.

It is enjoined upon division, brigade, and regimental commanders to give their personal attention to the march of their respective commands, to see that they are kept well closed, and no straggling whatever from the ranks be permitted.

The utmost attention to the posting of all necessary guards will be given by the commanders above designated and the utmost vigilance be observed.

It is enjoined upon division and brigade commanders to be careful to move at the hours and to the places designated; without such exactness it is impossible to move so large a force without confusion and difficulty. The headquarters of the army will be in Sikeston on Saturday night, the 1st instant, and will habitually accompany the leading division.

The artillery not attached for temporary service with divisions will be massed under the command of Capt. Henry Hescock, First Missouri Light Artillery, and will habitually march between the First and Second Divisions. The officer commanding it will report for orders to the general commanding as soon every day as his command arrives at its place of encampment. The parole and countersign will be furnished {p.572} to division commanders for ten days from these headquarters, and under no circumstances will any other be used. When detachments are made from either of these divisions, the division commander will furnish the parole and countersign to the commanding officer if the detachment is to be absent more than twenty-four hours.

The general commanding takes occasion to notify the army under his command that they are marching to meet the enemy within a few lays, and he exhorts them, by all their hopes of distinction and success, to be prompt and attentive to their duties and careful to comply exactly and cheerfully with every detail of service and with every order for this movement.

This order, immediately or its receipt by the division commanders, will be published to their commands.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 41.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, February 27, 1862.

The First Division of the Army in the Field will be constituted as follows:

First Brigade, Col. John Groesbeck commanding: Twenty-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Fuller; Thirty-ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Groesbeck; Forty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Smith.

Second Brigade, Col. J. B. Plummer, Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, commanding: Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, Col. J. B. Plainer; Twenty-sixth Illinois Volunteers, Colonel Loomis; Sixty-third Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Sprague.

Eleventh Ohio Battery, Battalion First U. S. Infantry, Seventh Illinois Cavalry, two companies Engineer Regiment are for the present assigned for duty with this division.

Brig. Gen. Schuyler Hamilton is assigned to the command of the division.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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COMMERCE, February 28, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

My whole command is on the march. I join it to-morrow night at Sikeston. Further instructions will reach me here to-day. I would be glad to know when the demonstration on Columbus and the movement of Steele to Oak Grove will be made. Steele ought to move certainly to-morrow morning or sooner. Enemy re-enforcing New Madrid from Randolph. I will be upon them before they can make much preparation. Have only eighteen pieces of artillery, of small caliber Hope to meet more from Cairo. Please order forward wagons, &c.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.573}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 28, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Paducah:

Send Ohio regiments as fast as armed to General Pope’s command, to land at Bird’s Point or Commerce, as General Cullum may direct. Also all available field artillery. No danger now of an attack on Paducah.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 42.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Commerce, Mo., February 28, 1862.

Col. Gordon Granger, Second Michigan Cavalry, is assigned to the command of all the cavalry of this army, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

All reports and returns will be made through him.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, February 28, 1862.

General HALLECK:

General Paine, just from Bertrand, reports that Jeff. Thompson passed north through Sikeston with 250 cavalry and six pieces of artillery this morning at daylight. He is in a trap, Pope’s advance guard being at Benton, and Colonel Morgan, with 750 infantry and 60 cavalry, reached Sikeston at daylight this morning in Thompson’s rear. Four hundred infantry and 600 cavalry will re-enforce Morgan to-night. Repairing railroad rapidly.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 28, 1862.

Col. GEORGE W. DEITZLER, Acting Brigadier-General, Fort Scott, Kane.:

SIR: Immediately on receipt of your express dispatch, dated 26th instant and received but an hour since (12 m.), I have directed the concentration by forced marches of the following troops at Fort Scott, where they will report for duty.

Colonel Doubleday’s brigade, consisting of Second Ohio Cavalry, Ninth and Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, also First Kansas, now at Lawrence, forming portion of your own brigade.

The orders to these regiments to move by forced marches were peremptory, of which copies will be sent as soon as possible, and should any of the regiments fail to report within due time you will not fail to hold the commanding officers to their strict military responsibility.

Should you require the services of Colonel Jennison’s brigade (he ranking you), you will use your discretion in sending for him if you think it necessary.

I will endeavor to send you a field battery at the earliest possible moment, as I am organizing it now.

{p.574}

You will report the concentration of these troops under your command and prepare to take the field immediately.

You will also employ some good Indian scouts, acquainted with the country south of you, in the direction of General Curtis’ command, and obtain all the information from them you can, which will be transmitted to these headquarters by express.

I have telegraphed these proceedings to General Hunter, who is in communication by telegraph with department headquarters.

I have also telegraphed the substance of your communication and the re-enforcements sent you to headquarters Department of the Missouri.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Fayetteville, Ark.:

Carry out the general instructions of the 22d. Vary the details as circumstances may require. General Hunter will soon move with 5,000 men on your right flank. All you have to do now is to hold your position and keep the enemy south of Boston Mountains. I will turn them in a few weeks and cut off their supplies. I have kept Colonel Wyman at Rolla. It will not do yet to weaken that post.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION, Camp Halleck, Cross Hollow, February 28, 1862.

Capt. T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Colonel Dodge came in this morning with all the men and teams he had at the Eagle Mills; he regretted very much to leave them, and says the inhabitants begged him to stay. Blackburn, the owner, is very fearful that the mills will be burned.

The Texans camped not far from the mills, both going and returning. They report about the same that our own people do, viz, that they burned 4 wagons and got about 40 horses. They sent word to Colonel Dodge that if he did not leave the mills by 12 m. yesterday they would come and hang every d-d Yankee there. Dodge, however, was not quite ready to leave and the Texans thought better of it.

Dodge says that there are but two passages through the country from Huntsville towards Crossville, one by Blackburn’s and the other by Van Winkle’s, 3 miles off. He says the whole country can be controlled by a picket at the mills, supported by a regiment at White River Crossing.

I have just returned from a reconnaissance as far as the crossing of White River, 7 miles from here, from which place I sent my aide direct to Sugar Creek (Trott’s), said to be 5 to 10 miles from there. He has not returned.

Colonel Vandever has returned from reconnoitering the road from Camp Benjamin towards Sugar Creek. It comes into the Telegraph {p.575} road about half way from here to the battle ground, making it a distance of about 7 miles from Camp Benjamin to that place.

Owing to the scarcity of the water and its bad quality, caused by its being constantly disturbed and the changes contemplated by the general, I would respectfully recommend that he permit me to move my camp to the vicinity of the mills, near the rebel camp, leaving one regiment and two or more pieces here and sending one regiment and two pieces to White River Crossing, and retaking possession of the Eagle Mills. The mills near the rebel camp have been turned over to General Sigel, though it seems to me that there are as many mills on his side as on ours, now that the Eagle Mills are abandoned.

Forage also is becoming very scarce, and we have now to send over 10 miles for it.

With the approbation of the general I propose to send Colonel Vandever on a reconnaissance in the direction of Huntsville. He is very anxious to go, and wishes to take 500 infantry, two pieces, and 200 cavalry. Colonel Dodge says that the mountains are so precipitous that it is impossible for any one to flank us and that the enemy has nothing but cavalry in that direction, and to prevent him from harassing us we must worry him. Unless the general objects, Colonel Vandever will start to-morrow morning.

Both Colonel Dodge and Colonel Vandever agree with me in the project of moving camp, except they do not wish to leave so strong a force here. We would be glad to have the general move his headquarters nearer to us.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. CARR, Colonel, Commanding Division.

P. S.-As Dodge left the mills, a fire, which he thought a signal, was lighted on a hill. I send some letters which got into my camp to-day. Two of my men killed one Texan and wounded another day before yesterday.

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JEFFERSON CITY, February 28, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Rebel recruits cut off from joining Price, reported 1,000 strong, are committing depredations on left bank of Osage near Osceola.

THO. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Jefferson City:

Take such forces as you require and capture the rebels at Osceola. You have them fast between you and Curtis. Don’t let them dodge you. Move rapidly and promptly.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.576}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., February 28, 1862.

Hon. HANNIBAL HAMLIN, President of the Senate:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith copies of two letters, one from the office of the Adjutant-General to the Surgeon-General ordering medical supplies and blanks, and the other from the Adjutant-General to General Hunter, in relation to his command over the troops for General Lane’s expedition,* which contain all the information bearing on the resolution of the Senate of the 4th instant calling for information in relation to the military command in Kansas in possession of this Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

* See Thomas to Hunter, January 24, p. 525.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, A. G. 0., Washington, D. C., December 31, 1861.

Surg. Gen. C. A. FINLEY, U. S. A., Washington:

SIR: I have respectfully to inform you that four regiments of infantry, seven regiments of cavalry, three batteries of artillery, besides Kansas troops, from 8,000 to 10,000, and about 4,000 Indians, forming an aggregate of about 27,000 troops, are ordered to be concentrated near Fort Leavenworth, for whom medical supplies, blanks, &c., will be required at an early day.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, February 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have received from the army about 600 soldiers; some of them volunteers and some detailed or drafted for the gunboat service. No regular list of them has been sent, but a bundle of descriptive lists, with a statement of their accounts, have been heaped together.

The soldiers are very much dissatisfied, as they were not paid up by the army to the date of their transfer, which I desired to be done.

I have therefore directed the several commanders of the gunboats to have these men put on the muster roll of their vessels as seamen, paying them at the rate of $18 per month, without any reference to their army accounts, which I hope will meet with your approval. At the same time it is desirable that these men should be paid up to the time they volunteered for this service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Commanding Naval Forces Western Waters.

{p.577}

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP HALLECK, March 1, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The enemy’s cavalry is crowding my flanks and attacking my foraging parties. A lieutenant and 6 men of Carlin’s battery were captured about 9 miles west of me by Texan Rangers yesterday, although I had two cavalry patrols as far forward as Fayetteville. My cavalry seems weary and worn down. I need 1,000 cavalry horses and double my cavalry force. The quartermasters should constantly furnish a supply for natural depletion of stock in the field, which is estimated at 1 per cent. per month. Foraging here needs cavalry protection. The main force of enemy is at last stated. I have lost no train. My express comes in regularly, but rebel bands are numerous in the country.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 1, 1862.

I have received a private communication from an intelligent writer, a citizen of Arkansas, who says:

We, as citizens, have left our homes and firesides for the purpose, as we supposed, of having to defend ourselves against a brutal soldiery, that would lay waste our humble homes and outrage the chastity of our wives and daughters and place our own lives in jeopardy. We have organized what is called Home Guard companies, partly of Union men and partly of Southern men, all of whom are anxious to return to their homes. We are happy to find you and your men are not composed of that class of persons commonly called jayhawkers, who do not regard the rights of citizens and property, but confine the war to its “legitimate object.”

The falsehoods circulated concerning us have driven thousands from their homes, and I take the liberty of responding publicly to the sentiments expressed by the writer, because these falsehoods have involved the whole community in the troubles which he seeks to mitigate.

The only legitimate object of the war is peace, and the writer only does me justice when he says I adhere to this legitimate object. Peaceable citizens shall be protected as far as possible. I act under strict orders of Major-General Halleck. The flight of our foes from their camps, and the imitation of their conduct by the citizens, in fleeing from their homes, leaving their effects abandoned as it were for their victors, has much embarrassed me in my efforts to preserve discipline in my command, as these circumstances offered extraordinary temptations.

The burning of farms and fields of grain in Missouri and extensive barracks and valuable mills in Arkansas by the enemy has induced some resentments on the part of my troops, which I have severely punished. Necessary supplies for my command could not keep up with my rapid movements, and peaceable citizens not being at home to sell them to my quartermasters, I am compelled to take them without purchase, making settlement difficult and doubtful, occasioning irregularities which I have labored to counteract. If peaceably-disposed citizens will stay at home or return home and check the clandestine, stealthy warfare that is carried on under the cover and cloak of peaceable citizens, much of the havoc of war will be avoided and many poor families can be protected from distress and misery. I have followed the war-path {p.578} through the entire State of Missouri; have seen the havoc and devastation surrounding it, and I deplore the prospect of these disasters in the virgin soil of Arkansas.

Armed men in the garb of citizens are concealed by citizens, and the unfortunate condition of Missouri will be transferred to Arkansas if you allow this complicity of yourselves in the struggle. If you do not discriminate by requiring soldiers to wear some distinctive badge, you must not complain if we cannot discriminate.

There is no honor, no glory, no good that can be gained by taking up arms in this way to defend your homes, for we do not wish to molest them if you are peaceably disposed. We only wish to put down rebellion by making war against those in arms, their aiders and abettors. We come to vindicate the Constitution, to preserve and perpetuate civil and religious liberty, under a flag that was embalmed in the blood of our revolutionary fathers. Under that flag we have lived in peace and prosperity until the flag of rebellion involved us in the horrors of civil war.

We have restored the Stars and Stripes to Northwestern Arkansas, where I am glad to find many who rejoice to see the emblem of their former glory and hope for a restoration of the peace and happiness they have enjoyed under its folds. A surrender to such a flag is only a return to your natural allegiance, and is more honorable than to persist in a rebellion that surrenders to the national power at Forts Henry and Donelson, at Nashville and Roanoke, and throughout the most powerful Southern States. Why, then, shall the West be devastated to prolong a struggle which the States of Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Tennessee cannot successfully maintain?

Disband your companies; surrender your arms; for in all instances where men in arms have voluntarily surrendered and taken the oath of allegiance to our common country they have been discharged. No prisoners have, to my knowledge, been shot or hung or cruelly treated by us.

I know of no instance where my troops have treated females with violence and I have not heard of a complaint of the kind. I enjoin on the troops kindness, protection, and support for women and children. I shall to the best of my ability maintain our country’s flag in Arkansas and continue to make relentless war on its foes; but shall rejoice to see the restoration of peace in all the States and Territories of our country; that peace which we formerly enjoyed and earnestly desire, and I implore for each and all of us that ultimate, eternal peace, “which the world cannot give or take away.”

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Army of the Southwest.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRED. STEELE, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: You will immediately proceed to Pilot Knob and take command of all the troops in Southeastern Missouri west of the Saint Francis River. Additional troops will be immediately assigned, so as to increase your command to from 4,000 to 5,000 men. Your first object will be to drive back or capture the enemy’s forces at Pitman’s Ferry, near the Arkansas line: then proceed to Pocahontas and destroy all enemy’s stores not required for your own use; then go to Jacksonport {p.579} for the same purpose. It is reported here that the enemy has stores at Batesville. If so, you will send a party to that place to destroy them. If you succeed in accomplishing these objects and, the country is open for farther advance south, proceed to Helena, occupy and fortify that place, so as to cut, off steamboat communication with Memphis. It is probable, how ever, that by that time I shall have succeeded in turning Memphis by the east bank of the river.

On an expedition of this kind you can carry with you but very few supplies except small stores. For forage meat, and flour you must depend upon the country passed over. The quartermaster will be supplied with money to pay for these. When the money is exhausted he will give certificates. If the people will not sell at reasonable prices or if you have no money to pay, you will make forcible requisitions. It is reported that the country is well supplied with cane, which will serve as forage for your animals. Moreover, it is believed that you may partly supply yourself from enemy’s stores at Pocahontas, Jacksonport, and Batesville. The success of your expedition will depend in a great measure upon the rapidity of your movements. Your train will therefore be made up partly of wagons and partly of pack-mules. Extra pack-saddles should be taken with you, for use in case you are obliged to abandon your wagons. It will be necessary for you to move with great caution and to keep your forces well in hand and together. The militia force at Pilot Knob will be left to guard that depot.

I have marked in red on the map sent herewith* the probable route, as derived from the best information I can obtain here. You will get better from your own guides, and can vary from it wherever you deem best Possibly you may be able to get steam transportation from Jacksonport to near Lawrenceville, and cross over from that point to Helena. The land route, however, appears to me the preferable one. The route marked between the Saint Francis and White Rivers is said to be a dry, sandy ridge, with no streams to cross, but with plenty of good water and an abundance of canes on each side for forage.

If you find the enemy in too large force to attack at any place, you will fall back for re-enforcements. If Columbus and Randolph should be evacuated and the enemy makes his stand at Memphis, we can land a force above that city and re-enforce you by Mount Vernon.

Keep the objects of your expedition a profound secret. Do not communicate it even to officers of your staff. Give it out at first that you are to move on New Madrid, and after you pass that place that Pocahontas is to be the only object, and so on as you advance. Be careful in selecting your guides, and make inquiries about roads in every direction, so as to deceive them. The object of expeditions often leaks out through guides. Moreover, they are frequently spies, who are with you for a time, and then escape to the enemy with valuable information. Watch your guides very closely and permit none to escape.

Keep me informed of all your movements by sending messengers to nearest telegraph station. The line will soon be extended to Saint Francisville. In your dispatches merely state what you have done and what the enemy is doing, but not a word as to what you intend to do, lest they fall into the enemy’s hands. In these dispatches you will call Pitman’s Ferry “Harper’s,” Pocahontas “Virginia City,” Jacksonport “Nashville,” Batesville “Saint Louis,” and Helena “Salem.”

{p.580}

This expedition, if fully successful, will be one of the most important of the whole campaign. It will require all your activity, energy, tact, and perseverance, and very likely will test the fighting qualities of your command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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SIKESTON, March 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

A portion of our advance guard, consisting of six companies Seventh Illinois Cavalry, encountered reconnoitering force of the enemy 3 miles south of this place this afternoon. After a short skirmish the enemy fled precipitately towards New Madrid, leaving in our possession three pieces of rifled artillery. One captain, one lieutenant, and several privates were taken prisoners. From the prisoners I learn that New Madrid is occupied by four brigades of infantry, numbering about 10,000, 900 cavalry, and four batteries of field artillery. Another brigade is expected to-night. The prisoners also state that the enemy is rapidly evacuating Columbus and occupying Island No. 10. My command is all well up to this point and well in hand. I shall push forward to-morrow, and unless the enemy is more re-enforced than is now expected I think we are more than a match for him. If consistent with your arrangements, I would be glad if a considerable force could be advanced from Bird’s Point as far as Oak Grove, so as to assure my communications.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY IN THE FIELD, Sikeston, March 1, 1862.

General G. W. CULLUM:

I reached here to-night with my command. This afternoon, about 2 o’clock, a portion of my advanced guard, consisting of six companies of Seventh Illinois Cavalry, encountered reconnoitering party of the enemy about 3 miles south of this place. This party had been drawn up to engage a company of the First Illinois Cavalry and a portion of the Tenth Illinois Infantry. These troops, being so much exhausted by long pursuit of the enemy in the direction of Benton, gave place to the six companies of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, which charged the enemy and completely routed him. The enemy had occupied a narrow causeway, pursued by the road, with three pieces of rifled artillery of small caliber. This battery was carried handsomely by the charge of the Seventh Illinois, and has fallen into our possession. The enemy fled precipitately towards New Madrid, and was pursued to within 4 miles of that town. One captain, one lieutenant, and several privates were captured. The pieces of artillery are of small caliber, breech-loading, beautifully rifled, and handsomely mounted on four wheels, drawn by two horses each. They have an ingenious repeating apparatus at the breech, and were undoubtedly made for service in this swampy, low region. From the prisoners I learn that New Madrid is occupied by four brigades of infantry, numbering about 10,000, 900 {p.581} cavalry, and four batteries of field artillery; another brigade is expected to-night. The prisoners also state that the enemy is rapidly evacuating Columbus and occupying Island No. 10. My command is all up to this point and well in hand. I shall push forward to-morrow, and, unless the enemy is more re-enforced than is now expected, I think we are more than a match for him If consistent with your arrangements, I would be glad if a considerable force could be advanced from Bird’s Point as far as Oak Grove, so as to assure my communications. I was surprised on my arrival here, in view of your letter of the 28th, to find that all the force sent forward by you from Bird’s Point have returned, for reasons which I am unable to understand.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, March 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Morgan’s regiment and two companies First Illinois-Cavalry pushed north, pursuing Jeff. Thompson, who is fleeing towards Indian River. Captured three rebel guns. Met General Hamilton’s advance cavalry, and whole in pursuit of enemy. Light visible all the evening in direction of Columbus.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 1, 1862.

Colonel CARLIN, Pilot Knob:

Push forward another regiment on Greenville and cavalry to Saint Francisville. Jeff. Thompson is between Sikeston and Benton; we occupy both places. His only avenue of escape is by Bloomfield.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

Transportation is going down the river for General Pope as rapidly as we can collect it. If he can reach the river a little above New Madrid and out of the reach of their guns, he may cut off all re-enforcements from Columbus. Consult Commodore Foote, and with Pope fix a day for the attack on New Madrid and a mortar bombardment of Columbus. My idea of the demonstration on Columbus is to anchor the mortar boats near the bank on the Belmont side, so as to be covered and use the gunboats mainly to defend them. The gunboats should not be much exposed, but should reserve themselves for the real attack.

Send copy of this to General Pope.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.582}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Saint Louis, Mo., March 1, 1862.

Gen. T. J. MCKEAN, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I have received information from officers recruiting for the State service that the rebels are gathering in considerable force in Johnson and Henry counties, particularly about Clinton, producing a reign of terror and rendering it impossible for the militia to organize for their own defense. I have no troops under my command which I can dispose of for the purpose of giving the protection necessary in those counties nor would I desire to order a movement of troops in your district if I had them ready for service, my policy being to direct militia companies to report for duty to the district commander as soon as they are in my judgment ready for service.

I hope to be able to place under your command several battalions of militia in a very short time. Meanwhile, if you can use any force at your disposal in giving the protection which seems so much needed in Johnson and Henry counties, I have no doubt the organization of the State troops will be much facilitated. I have addressed a letter to the commanding officer at Sedalia on the subject, having been informed that you were absent from your headquarters. I presume, however, he will not feel at liberty to act without your orders; hence I trouble you with this communication.

Will you be so kind, general, as to inform me what you can do in the matter, and greatly oblige, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General, Commanding Missouri Militia.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 3, 1862-11.30 a.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

It is officially reported that General Jeff. Thompson, with a large party of cavalry and artillery, came north from New Madrid. Our forces advanced from Bird’s Point and cut his force at Sikeston. He was pursued into the swamps by the cavalry of General Hamilton and Colonel Morgan’s brigade, and three pieces of artillery captured. General Pope pursued the other detachment south, capturing three more artillery, 1 captain, 1 lieutenant, and a number of privates.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAMP TWO MILES NORTH OF NEW MADRID, March 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Arrived before this place with my whole force at 1 p.m. Pushed skirmishers of two divisions into the town, and occupied the upper part of it immediately. There is only a small square earth redoubt near this place. The river is high and level with the banks-so high, that the gunboats, of which there are six, sweep the ground for a mile in front of the town. I think the enemy’s whole force does not exceed 5,000 men, all of whom are kept carefully out of sight. I can take the work by much loss and without the result desired, as the gunboats, owing to the extraordinary high water, could drive us out immediately. {p.583} I ought to have siege guns, but in the absence of them I shall to-morrow night line the river banks above the town with narrow rifle pits and sink four pieces of rifled and Parrott batteries of single pieces between the pits. In this way I think we can hold our own along the shores against the gunboats and absolutely close the river to transports.

I shall to-morrow occupy strong position with my command, so as to support the rifle-pit batteries. I do not know if this will succeed, but it seems the best I can do without heavy artillery. The river is so high that the hulls of the gunboats are plainly visible, and their guns look over the bank, with a sweep at least a mile and a half. Stopped no small-arms of any kind at Commerce, and shall order them to Cairo if any are there. My regiments all came armed. If the gunboats leave here I take the works.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN and Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

Re-enforce General Pope at once with all available forces from Bird’s Point, Cairo, and Paducah. There is now no danger of an attack upon either of these places. Move a force on Oak Grove, to protect Pope’s flank. I am sending down everything I can collect here. Re-enforce Pope with everything you can find. There must be no failure in his movement. Attack Columbus as soon as possible. Say to Commodore Foote that time now is everything.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAMP HALLECK, ARK., March 3, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Nothing important here. The main force of the enemy is still in Boston Mountains, gathering re-enforcements as he says, to march against me. Since my last I have learned that he burned the mills and cotton factories at Cane Hill and a large mill 9 miles south of Fayetteville.

Respectfully,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, March 3, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL, Commanding Division:

GENERAL: Yours of this morning is duly received.* I shall remain here at Cross Hollow till you move around to Sugar Creek, when we must intrench ourselves. I hope your movement will secure a thorough knowledge of the country and roads passing around our Sugar {p.584} Creek station. The Third Iowa reconnoitered within 5 miles of Fayetteville to-day; there was no sign of any movement; but the people speak of continued augmentation of the enemy’s forces.

The mill ran by Colonel Dodge-Blackman’s Mill, 16 miles southeast of this place-was burned last night by the rebels, and they also burned considerable forage in that region.

Other matters of interest will be communicated when we meet at Sugar Creek, which must be soon, as I desire our camp to be arranged in view of some defenses.

I am, general, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 3, 1862.

To the POLICE COMMISSIONERS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENTLEMEN: The city policemen are in the habit of arresting negroes “as runaways,” and frequently arrest, or attempt to arrest, the servants of the army officers, who are put to the trouble of obtaining orders to prevent their servants from being taken from them on the very eve of their leaving the city. This is exceedingly annoying to officers under marching orders. They do not desire to be considered as resisting any civil process. It is not their intention nor the intention of the military authorities to interfere with or prevent the owner of a slave from pursuing his legal remedies to recover his slave, but I have to request that hereafter the city police be confined in their arrests of negroes as “runaways” strictly to such negroes as may be in a legal manner claimed by his or her owner. Negroes must be arrested “as runaways” or fugitives from labor by a writ issued from a court having jurisdiction of the case. This is necessary in order that the slave may have the opportunity to plead the act of Congress of July, 1862.

I am, very respectfully, gentlemen, your obedient servant,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 52.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

I. In order that commerce may follow, with the post-office, close upon the advance southward of the Armies of the Union, the following regulations are established for the present conduct of the restored intercourse between the loyal sections of the Department of the Missouri and the country on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers:

1st. Steamboats and other water craft running in the trade and travel of those rivers to or from the port of Saint Louis, or any other port within this military department, must, in addition to the customary registration and enrollment required by the revenue laws of the United States, take out the special license for this renewed intercourse which is now provided in the regulations established in January last for the trade and transportation of the Mississippi River.

2d. Such special license must be issued by the superintendent of transportation in the city of Saint Louis, but can be applied for to any surveyor of customs within this department, whose certificate that all the requisite conditions have been complied with by the applicants {p.585} must accompany the application when forwarded to the superintendent aforesaid.

3d. Boats engaging in this trade and transportation under such license are, of course, subject to the revenue laws of the United States, and must comply fully and faithfully with the regulations and instructions of the Treasury Department, now in force or which may hereafter be adopted, for the control of the commercial and personal intercourse of the sections under view.

II. To render uniform the customs now in a measure governing the trade and travel of the interior and to subserve the ends of order and law it is further directed-

1st. That the permit system, made necessary by the persistent efforts of persons in the loyal States who sympathize with those engaged in the rebellion, and by peddlers and corrupt traffickers, many of whom have come from disloyal States and sections expressly for this purpose, to smuggle goods medicines, and other supplies through to the insurrectionists, shall Le enforced on the Tennessee and the Cumberland as it is on the Ohio and Mississippi.

2d. That the examination and sealing of baggage of travelers, introduced mainly by reason of the frequent and illegal conveyance of packages of letters to and fro between the North and the South after the rebellion had destroyed the postal facilities of the latter section, be extended by the custom-house officers so as to embrace the country on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers; and

3d. That water craft, railroad cars, and all ordinary wheeled vehicles be, until otherwise ordered, prohibited from conveying into the country on the Tennessee and Cumberland baggage not sealed and merchandise not covered by custom-house permits or shipped by military authority.

III. These orders are issued only as a measure of safety, to guard against illegal or improper intercourse and exchanges of commodities, and are not intended to impose additional expenses or burdens of any kind upon trade, or to impede or in any manner interfere with the freedom of legitimate and proper transportation or travel. Consequently-

1st. No charge will be made by the superintendent of transportation for the special license required to be taken out for the time being.

2d. Blank forms will be supplied to the several surveyors of customs within this department for use without cost to parties making application for license; and,

3d. The surveyors aforesaid will use liberally, though cautiously, the discretion with which they are intrusted in the issue of permits to cover goods, wares, and merchandise going forward for commerce or family supply.

IV. Surveyors and other officers of the customs, if resisted in the proper discharge of their unties, will call for aid upon the commander of the nearest military post or encampment, and at places where there are no custom-house officers or agents such commanders are authorized and required to exercise all necessary precautions to prevent the transmission of letters and other mail matter by any other than the regularly-established post-office channels and agencies, or the transportation of merchandise or supplies of any description not covered by a custom-house permit or going under the sanction of military authority.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.586}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 53.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

I. With a view to the present safe-keeping of property arrested on its way to States, places, or persons in insurrection against the United States Government, or taken in situations and under circumstances such as justify a reasonable suspicion that it is destined ultimately to be forwarded to such States, place, or persons, and with the further view of accounting for the same at a proper time and in a satisfactory manner, it is hereby directed that all persons, military as well as civil, making arrests as aforesaid, within the Department of the Missouri, of goods, wares, and merchandise, of whatever description, at once take an inventory of the same, and forward it without delay to this city in duplicate, one copy being addressed to these headquarters, the other to W. D. Gallagher, special agent of the Treasury Department; that all such arrests may be made of one common record.

II. Parties making such arrests will be particular to specify in their return by whom each arrest is made, at what place, upon what day, and under what circumstances; also with whom the articles so arrested are deposited. And such parties will be careful to deposit with safe and responsible persons, taking receipts specifying the articles deposited, and they will make every deposit subject to the order of the United States marshal for the judicial district in which the arrest is made.

III. When it becomes necessary or advisable to appropriate to military uses any part or parts of goods, wares, and merchandise arrested as aforesaid, in addition to the inventory directed in the first section a separate list should be forwarded, also in duplicate, accurately describing the articles so appropriated, naming the company or regiment for whose uses taken, and specifying the place and person with whom the residue is deposited.

IV. Military officers who have made arrests of the nature of those described in the first section, in either the Department of the West or the Department of the Missouri, at any time since the organization of the former or its modification into the latter, will, as far as they can, report at their earliest convenience, as directed in that and the subsequent sections.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 54.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

...

The board of assessment in the city of Saint Louis for the benefit of suffering families driven by the enemy from Southwestern Missouri having completed its labors, and rendered its final report is hereby dissolved.

...

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 55.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 3, 1862.

On the recommendation of the Governor and several of the judges {p.587} of this State, it is directed that all licensed attorneys, counselors, and proctors be required to take the oath of allegiance prescribed in the sixth section of the ordinance of the State Convention passed October 16, 1861. The judges of all State courts will refuse to permit any one to practice in their courts who refuses or neglects to take such oath.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, March 4, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Have just received copy of Pope’s dispatch to you of yesterday. He estimates enemy’s force at New Madrid at 5,000. Gave orders late last night to have strong re-enforcements sent here to General Pope. Five regiments of infantry and one of cavalry have left to-day. More going. General Paine, who I sent out to-day to hurry forward troops and push railroad to Sikeston, brings rumor of New Madrid being evacuated and troops going to Point Pleasant and Island No. 10.

Is it your wish to evacuate Columbus? It is too large to be held by a smaller force than present garrison. You have presented me with an elephant by way of aides, who have no military information. I am quite unwell. Will it be possible to let Sherman take my place for a week and allow me to visit Saint Louis to wind up my affairs?

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hear Hew Madrid, March 4, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Upon examination of ground north of the bayou where I had intended to establish batteries and rifle pits, I find that during the night the river rose so rapidly as to overflow the whole of it. It is somewhat lower than the ground south of the bayou and is now untenable I send tonight at dark a column of 2,500 infantry, with artillery and cavalry, to Point Pleasant, 9 miles below, to effect the same purpose. This operation must of necessity take off some of the gunboats from here, in which case I will carry the intrenchments. I find on close reconnaissance that there are intrenchments hastily constructed within the town from the mouth of the bayou half a mile above. There are about four regiments of infantry and some field artillery now in it, and the gunboats anchored so that their guns look into every part of the intrenchments at very short distances. I will interrupt the navigation at Point Pleasant, and if the opportunity presents I will carry their works. I do not know what re-enforcements can be thrown here from Island No. 10; probably not enough to endanger us if the island is threatened by the gunboats. If I had troops it would be easy to interrupt entirely the navigation of the river by transports by establishing a large central force south of this place and having small movable columns of 500 men and two pieces of artillery each to be posted just outside of range of gunboats habitually and to move in on the river whenever a steamer passed and sink her. Half a dozen or a dozen points on the river within 25 miles could stop navigation or compel at least seven or eight {p.588} gunboats to watch that extent of river line. By having a strong central force within supporting distance of these small columns, and upon which they would retreat if menaced by the landing of forces above or below them, the operation would be safe. It would, however, require 30,000 men effectually to put it in operation. While the enemy can hold New Madrid by means of gunboats (as can be done with this high stage of water on the river), it would be easy to land troops and threaten our communications, if not endanger our whole force, if it were separated into small detachments. I will, if possible, maintain the blockade at Point Pleasant until the heavy artillery can be sent. I can, as I have informed you, carry the works here, but it would be done with heavy loss while the river is so high that the guns of the boats look over the bank and with our artillery it would be nearly impossible to hold them without great loss. I presume you are thoroughly informed concerning affairs at Island No. 10; but from what I know it will be easy for the gunboats to shell the troops out of the island altogether and pass down to this place. If not able completely to stop the navigation of the river, I will at least make it very dangerous from to-morrow.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM and Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo:

The gun and mortar boats should not wait for repairs, but make an immediate demonstration on Island No. 10, and, if possible, assist General Pope at New Madrid. This is of vital importance, and there should be no delay. I have much better information than you have of the condition of affairs, and, where possible, my instructions should be obeyed.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 4, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Columbus:

All available force at Columbus, Cairo, Fort Holt, Bird’s Point, and Paducah should re-enforce Pope. If he takes New Madrid, then send everything up the Tennessee to Maj. Gen. C. F. Smith.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 4, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I am in receipt of the general’s dispatch of the 28th. I regret the delay of Wyman’s regiment for many reasons. The enemy is said to {p.589} be receiving large re-enforcements. A little would help me. They burned Blackman’s Mill, a fine one, 16 miles southeast of me, night before last, and were burning all the forage in that region. Have sent a force to rout them, with directions to go as far as Huntsville if superior force does not check me. The Indian regiments have joined the enemy at Boston Mountains. The only strong point to intrench is Sugar Creek, and Cross Timber, beyond this. Cross Hollow is easily turned by an open campaign country a little west of the crossing.

Sugar Creek Hollow extends for miles, a gorge, with rough, precipitate sides, the road crossing it at nearly right angles. I shall keep an outpost here and in the vicinity of Bentonville, with pickets and patrols still farther south. Forage is becoming scarce by the consumption of my troops and the burning by the enemy. Nothing could be more injurious to the country than this burning of mills, and the people are indignant. Shall be on the alert, holding as securely as possible. Shall expect Hunter on my right soon, and hope also to hear of the general on the Arkansas. I shall not report in detail on my movements from Lebanon here for prudential reasons.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 4, 1862.

Col. CLARK WRIGHT:

COLONEL: You were sent to re-enforce Captain Montgomery at Keetsville, and drive the enemy that assailed him. You are not to command at Cassville. Take care of the enemy in the vicinity of Keetsville and see that the trains are not interrupted. If you have scouts with you who know the country in front send them here, where I am much nearer the foe.

There is a great set of rogues about Keetsville, and I hope you will find and arrest and send back the most of them. March and follow up any force that offers to come within 20 miles of the road. The parties are small, as that was that attacked Captain Montgomery.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Camp 2 miles north of New Madrid, Mar. 4, 1862.

I. The following organization of this army is hereby announced as a temporary arrangement:

II. All the cavalry is brigaded under Col. Gordon Granger, except the three companies Fourth Regular Cavalry.

III. The artillery will be under the command of Major Lothrop, and the First Regular Infantry is detailed as a support to the artillery.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Camp near Hew Madrid, March 4, 1862.

I. In compliance with Special Orders, No. 162, from the headquarters of the department, the undersigned assumes the command of this district.

II. The following officers will for the present constitute the staff of the general commanding:

Maj. Speed Butler, assistant adjutant-general.

Maj. C. A. Morgan, aide-de-camp.

Capt. Louis H. Marshall, aide-de-camp.

Maj. J. M. Corse, inspector-general.

Capt. J. W. Taylor, chief quartermaster.

Capt. J. A. Swain, chief assistant commissary of subsistence.

Lieut. J. W. Mott, acting assistant quartermaster.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, March 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

In reference to my telegram of yesterday, referring to Flag-Officer Foote not going to attack Island No. 10 and New Madrid, as I suggested, he, with his officers, were fully impressed with the fact the pilots would decline going into pilot-houses, as the iron plating is either off {p.591} or in a condition rendering them unsafe, from injury received at Forts Henry and Donelson. Also that the machinery and hull of the vessels are not in a condition to attack forts and batteries. That the result would be not only doubtful but almost a certainty, provided the rebels made the resistance which they have done thus far in every attack. If my telegram* of yesterday has been published, please give this equal publicity.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

* See Series I, Vol. VII, p. 436.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 5, 1862.

General CULLUM:

I was in hopes that you could remain till the result of Pope’s expedition and Foote’s demonstration was determined. Only a small garrison at Columbus will be required, and none at Fort Holt or Bird’s Point and Paducah, except to guard stores. All other troops should be ready for the field. If necessary, re-enforce Pope and send him siege guns; they can be transported with oxen. General Sherman takes your place for the present at Cairo. He will take the field as soon as I can find a successor. Show him this.

H. W. HALLECK.

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CAIRO, March 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Am better to-day, but far from well. Will stay for the present, as it is very important that Sherman should go to Paducah to get his troops ready for the field. Pope has 18,000, including troops sent from here. He says the enemy is but 5,000. I do not therefore think he requires further re-enforcements, and will send no more without your orders till the railroad to Sikeston is finished. It will be impossible to get the siege guns to New Madrid. Two hundred men at work on railroad. Find more repairs to make than anticipated.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 5, 1862.

Generals SHERMAN and CULLUM, Cairo:

If Pope has 18,000 men, they are sufficient. Send all others up the Tennessee to Savannah, to report to Maj. Gen. C. F. Smith. I have been duly notified by Secretary of War of his promotion. Orders were issued some days ago for building telegraph lines from Bird’s Point to Pilot Knob.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, Hear Hew Madrid, March 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

By great labor succeeded in making road through swamp to Point Pleasant out of range of gunboats, and occupied that place to-night at {p.592} dark. By morning the rifle pits and sunk batteries will be complete, and I think by 12 o’clock to-morrow I shall know whether they can be maintained against the gunboats. I am confident of the result, as guns and artillery of the gunboats are unsheltered and cannot approach within rifle range. If successful, everything is ours except the gunboats. No transports will be able to pass my battery. Three thousand men constitute force sent to Point Pleasant, and I will maintain that position against any land force whatever. I have lined the route with cavalry, so that no movement, either by land or water, can be made from above without my knowledge.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 5, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL, Commanding Division:

GENERAL: One of my spies fell in with some rebels who stole our wagons 10 miles out on the Fayetteville road The spy pretended to be secesh, and they told him (the spy) that Price was moving on us; that his artillery passed through Fayetteville yesterday; that some of his force would camp on the Burnt Mill to-night.

This may be only a feint, but we had better unite our forces at Sugar Creek, and be ready for any occasion.

This place can only be useful as an outpost with a small force. Our stand must be at Sugar Creek, where I hope to join you to-morrow.

Respectfully, yours,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 5, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL, Commanding Division:

GENERAL: A deserter, apparently a very reliable man, has arrived since I sent you dispatches, who left Price’s army at Fayetteville this morning at 8 o’clock. They are coming sure, he says. Make a night march, if need be, so as to join me at Sugar Creek early to-morrow.

The enemy claims to have 20,000, with seventy pieces of cannon; of course Schaefer should move immediately.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Sugar Creek, Ark., March 5, 1862.

General SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Commanding:

GENERAL: I have just received your notification of the approach of the rebel forces and shall commence making preparations accordingly. I shall try and communicate with Vandever, and would suggest the propriety of a messenger being sent to him from Cross Hollow also.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JEFF. C. DAVIS, Colonel, Commanding.

{p.593}

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SAINT LOUIS, March 5, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Rolla, Mo.: Colonel Wood’s cavalry, with Major Drake’s detachment at Salem, will proceed to Houston and Marshfield scouring the counties in the southwest and breaking up any rebel bands he can find. Another regiment of cavalry will be sent from here in a few days for Rolla and Salem.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 6, 1862.

General CULLUM:

There is something wrong about the telegraph. Yours of yesterday in regard to re-enforcements to Pope is just received. They might remain at Sikeston as a reserve, subject to Pope’s orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 6, 1862.

General CULLUM:

Colonel Plummer, who was sent with 3,000 men to occupy Point Pleasant last night, has not yet been able to effect a lodgment on the banks for his rifle pits and batteries on account of finding two gunboats at that place. A third has joined them since from below. Plummer’s sharpshooters occupy the town, and were attempting, when I last heard, to drive the artillerymen of the gunboats from their pieces. How they will succeed I cannot yet tell. I made a strong demonstration upon the works here this afternoon, driving in the enemy’s skirmishers and his whole force below the bank and down upon the water. The enemy’s loss was about 25 killed; ours 1 killed and 4 wounded. There are now here and at Point Pleasant eight gunboats, which we cannot take of course, and which render the town here untenable, even if in our possession. I hope to see our gunboats in a day or two, in which case everything here will fall into our hands. I hope Plummer by to-morrow morning will effect his lodgment. Meantime the practice here is excellent for the troops. I give them a smart skirmish every day. The importance of making a lodgment at Point Pleasant instead of this place will be apparent to you when you examine the peculiar bend of the river and the position of Island No. 10. It is only 5 miles across by land from the island to a point on the river below and nearly opposite to Point Pleasant, to which boats can come up and take off the garrison without being molested by us at New Madrid. I shall use all possible exertions. Will you communicate the substance of this letter to General Halleck?

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, March 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Pope writes that extreme high water cuts off all communication from {p.594} him except by Sikeston. Will send General Paine to-morrow to direct the five infantry regiments which left here yesterday to move over the trestle to Sikeston and join General Pope immediately, carrying four days’ rations in haversacks, though Pope does not ask for re-enforcements. Have directed Paine to employ the largest possible force to push forward the railroad. Telegraph any orders immediately, as Paine leaves early in morning.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 6, 1862.

Maj. CHARLES G. HALPINE, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

Yours of the 28th ultimo just received.* I think it very important that the Kansas troops should advance rapidly south and support General Curtis’ right flank. He will not cross the Boston Mountains, but hold his present position in rear of Fayetteville. The two forces can therefore co-operate against any Indian movement. If Price has fallen back on Fort Smith he will soon be starved out. Curtis’ force is about 22,000.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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LEBANON, March 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Three hundred rebels are herded 3 miles south of Vera Cruz. They have run off cattle from within 12 miles of here. Captain Bowman was at Hartville yesterday with 25 men. I have 40 men near Vera Cruz to-night, and I send 50 more to-morrow to re-enforce them.

Shall I continue these long reaches with my small garrison? Is it safe to let them collect within 40 miles of me?

GEO. E. WARING, Lieutenant-Colonel.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 57.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 6, 1862.

Surveyors and other custom-house officers and agents in this department, as well as those on the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers or elsewhere, are expected to respect permits issued by the surveyor of either of the ports on the Ohio River and bearing his official signature and seal. Military officers commanding posts or encampments where there are no such custom-house officers or agents, or acting temporarily in concert with such officers or agents, will in like manner respect those permits. Sealed baggage, while the seals remain unbroken, will also be respected by both classes of officers.

II. Goods, wares, or merchandise in transitu, thus covered by permits and baggage thus sealed, will be allowed to go forward to their respective places of destination without further examination, unless there is good and satisfactory reason for their detention, founded on local information obtained from reliable sources. And when, for such reason, any detention takes place, the fact should be immediately communicated {p.595} to the surveyor whose permit covers the merchandise or whose seal is affixed to the baggage so arrested, and also to the special agent of the Treasury Department in this city.

III. Until further orders the transportation of this department is not open to munitions of war, except under special regulations with the military authorities. And whisky, for the time being, is prohibited in the resumed commerce of the Cumberland and the Tennessee.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 7, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

I did not wish Commodore Foote to attack Island No. 10 with his gunboats. On the contrary, I directed that they should not be exposed to enemy’s batteries. All they were to be used for was to protect the mortar boats from sharpshooters and field batteries. I believe that a few hours’ bombardment with mortar boats would have caused the enemy to evacuate. If not, it would have served as a demonstration and reconnaissance. If my instructions had been obeyed in the bombardment of Columbus we should have saved much of the enemy’s guns and property. I repeat, I do not want the gunboats to fight till they are ready.

As Commodore Foote declines to co-operate, General Pope’s army will be immediately withdrawn except so much as may be necessary to secure the road against any advance of the enemy. I will telegraph him orders, to be immediately forwarded from Cairo. Provide transportation as rapidly as possible and send them up the Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 7, 1862.

General POPE, in the Field:

After securing the roads, so as to prevent the enemy’s advance north, you will withdraw your remaining forces to Sikeston, and thence to Bird’s Point or Commerce, for embarkation. They will proceed up the Tennessee to re-enforce General C. F. Smith.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL, March 7, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Pope’s messenger just in. Plummer went Wednesday night to make lodgment at Point Pleasant, but had not yet effected his object, being annoyed by the fire of three gunboats. Pope made strong demonstration on enemy’s works, driving in skirmishers and whole force to water below bank. Our loss, 1 killed and 1 wounded; enemy’s, 25 killed. Nothing important will be done till our gunboats brush away the enemy.

{p.596}

Only two transports here. Twenty boats at least required from Saint Louis, as none came down Ohio.

Cavalry went within 3 miles of Sikeston to-day.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 7, 1862.

General SAMUEL R. CURTIS:

Newspaper correspondents speak of Sigel’s division being separated from you. Keep your forces together and in hand. Don’t let the enemy fight you in detail. Throw out your cavalry carefully like fingers to the hand, so that they can be drawn in on the main body. Hold your position till I can turn the enemy.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, March 7, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Please send to me the limits of a military department that would place all the Western operations you deem expedient under your command.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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CAIRO, March 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Sent first telegram to Pope at 10 and at 2 a special messenger, with your last instructions. Have urged Foote again and again to go down with gun and mortar boats, but cannot induce him to move before Wednesday. Will have railroad so far completed to-morrow as to send the whole re-enforcements to Pope, unless you direct otherwise.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 8, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM:

The forces under Colonel Plummer at Point Pleasant have made good their lodgment, and the gunboats, after repeated efforts, have failed to make any impression upon them. Two 10-pounder Parrotts and two 13-pounder English rifled guns are now in position at that place and to transport vessels the river is effectually closed. Two attempted to pass up last night, but were driven back, one of them badly crippled. Supplies for the enemy are now completely cut off from this part of Missouri or from below. They can get none in the narrow space to which they are circumscribed. I made another strong demonstration here yesterday, forcing my skirmishers into the middle of the town and driving the enemy’s infantry down to the shore. The troops are in fine spirits and are improving wonderfully. The enemy is reenforcing {p.597} heavily from above, two large steamboats having arrived in the course of the night heavily loaded with troops.

Please hurry forward the five infantry regiments as rapidly as possible, as I must assure Plummer’s position against any attack whatever. I thank you heartily for your friendly congratulations upon my promotion.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, March 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Pope’s messenger just in. Lodgment at Point Pleasant made where gunboats cannot dislodge them. River closed to transports from below.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Commodore Foote says it is impossible for fleet to be ready before Wednesday, and I hope General Pope can maintain position until then.

Can you arrange to meet General Buell in Louisville on Monday? If you leave Saint Louis Sunday evening by way of Mitchell’s you can reach Louisville on Monday morning. General Buell can reach Louisville Sunday night or Monday morning. It seems to me important that an interview should take place, and thus fully understand the work before both. Please answer.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 8, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Cairo, Ill.:

Two additional gunboats (unarmored will do) should be sent up the Tennessee. I have just received General Pope’s dispatch of the 5th saying that he occupied Point Pleasant on the evening of the 4th and could hold it. If so, perhaps he had better hold on and not withdraw his forces. I am anxiously waiting for further information.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 8, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

I have this moment received General Pope’s dispatch of the 5th, saying that he had taken and could hold Point Pleasant. This may change the programme and it may be advisable for him to remain. {p.598} Send messengers to him and get latest news as soon as possible and telegraph. His last dispatch was three days in reaching here. The retrograde movement of his forces should not be made till further advices.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 8, 1862.

Maj. CHARLES G. HALPINE, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

The Indians have joined Price in Boston Mountains. The Kansas troops should move without delay to support the right flank of General Curtis, in Arkansas. It will have an important effect upon the campaign.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Halleck, Ark., March 8, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRANZ SIGEL, Commanding Division:

GENERAL Yours saying you are camped at the forks of the road in the Cross Timber Hollow, asking me to send other detachments and your provision wagons, is received.

I regret exceedingly that so much force separated from this position; and Colonels Schaefer and Greusel and General Asboth must account to me for neglecting my instructions not to go down the hill. I have already ordered the provision wagons to follow you. I have ordered details to collect and bury the dead, and intend to camp on the battle ground, which cannot be abandoned, to-night. The enemy retreats on the Bentonville road, passing near me, and I certainly need all the force I have to maintain my position. A cavalry pursuit is all we can make available against an enemy who we know by experience will run all night to avoid embarrassment.

I am, general, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 9, 1862.

Col. J. B. PLUMMER:

The commanding general directs me to say to you that he has received your letter this morning, and is much gratified at your success in establishing and maintaining your position. He sends to-day your tents and baggage, with 10,000 rations of coffee. Six of your wagons have returned to Sikeston for the knapsacks of your regiment and will join you as soon as practicable. The general directs that you send to this post Lieutenant Gaw, of the Engineers. He also suggests that you dig {p.599} wells, as this command has succeeded in getting pure water in that way.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. MORGAN, Major and Aide-de-Camp

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 9, 1862.

General CULLUM:

I send Col. J. W. Bissell, Engineer Regiment, to Cairo, to see you in relation to the siege guns. If we can get them here matters will soon be settled. Colonel Bissell can get as many as are necessary to me in three days. Of course I prefer such as are mounted on carriages, but I should prefer the rifled 32s if they could be had. One or two shell guns of large caliber will be very useful.

I have the honor to request that four Parrott guns, 24-pounders, now at Saint Louis Arsenal and belonging to the Missouri Light Artillery, be sent here at once. If I had had these guns I should not have been delayed here as I have been, and if you can get these four and any other field guns of large caliber for me our operations on the river will be greatly advantaged both here and elsewhere. I hope you will use your influence in the matter. Requisitions for ammunition for the field batteries have been sent to Saint Louis, which I hope will be hastened forward to us. No further news from below.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 9, 1862.

General CULLUM:

The occupation of Point Pleasant has been entirely successful. A Large quantity of stores and supplies have fallen into our hands and the passage of transports up and down the river entirely prevented. I will be much obliged to you if you will send the siege guns, with a full supply of ammunition, forward to Sikeston as soon as possible. When they arrive and are placed in position we will be able to drive off the gunboats, and it will then require but a short time for us to carry the intrenchments.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 9, 1862.

DEAR PLUMMER: First let me congratulate you upon your confirmation by the Senate as brigadier-general. The news has just reached here. I have sent urgently for the siege guns, and will send you some se soon as they reach here; also two regiments of infantry. You must {p.600} hold on if possible. If necessary, I will transfer my whole force to Point Pleasant. Fire away with your artillery at transports, but do not waste ammunition, especially artillery ammunition, on the gunboats. I think the battery on the opposite shore can do you no harm. Strengthen your camp by every possible means. Surround it with rifle pits, and put every possible obstruction in the way of an enemy. You may rely upon every assistance I can give.

Respectfully and truly, yours,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Just received dispatch from Pope. Rebel gunboats after repeated efforts failed to disturb Plummer in a lodgment at Point Pleasant. Two transports attempted to pass up Friday night, but were prevented and one badly crippled by Plummer’s two Parrott and one 13-pounder English rifled guns. Supplies completely cut off from below, but heavy rebel re-enforcements arriving from above. Pope made strong demonstrations Friday, driving enemy to shore. Our troops in fine spirits. Have sent forward five infantry and one cavalry regiment to re-enforce Pope this morning. Will arrive at New Madrid Monday. Paine is very anxious to go to the field. Do let him go.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, March 9, 1862

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The expedition sent against rebels returned to Sedalia yesterday with some 40 prisoners captured under arms in Bates County, some ammunition, arms, &c.

THOS. J. MCKEAN, Brigadier-General.

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WARRENTON, March 9, 1862.

General SCHOFIELD:

The rebels have taken Troy, Lincoln County, and robbed Union men and sworn the clerks of courts and taken their property. They are about 400 strong.

Captain Warrens has left with his command for Wellsville. He could be stopped if so ordered.

F. MORSEY, Colonel, Commanding.

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CAIRO, March 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General, Washington, D. C.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: Your letter referring to the payment of soldiers $18 per month was received this evening, and as Assistant {p.601} Secretary Scott is here, who fully understands the peculiarities and embarrassments of our condition, I asked him if he would explain it, and have given him your letter for that purpose.

Situated as we are here, and having at times received men from Saint Louis who were discharged from the Army after shipping in the flotilla, I naturally, even if not properly, applied the same rule or rate of pay as to them. It would be difficult, indeed, to go on with the flotilla, or even to keep the men, if we made a difference in persons performing the same duty now. It would lead to a stampede among them if we attempt to reduce their pay; and if it is to be charged against me by the Government, I must see the flotilla is not rendered ineffective, or keep up the rate of pay which I have instituted. Still the loss of half or all my pay would in itself be a slight consideration to the mental agony and physical exhaustion which I have suffered for the last six months. No results, however successful, would at all compensate me for what I have suffered in the progress of our work. Although results which can tend to vindicate our right to retain all the States in the Union would be cheaply purchased at my sacrifice, and that of dozens like me, with a wounded foot keeping me on crutches, in great pain, leads me to say that whenever the Department is disposed to send any officer in my place I will willingly surrender my position to him.

The changing of crews, for want of men, from disabled to sound ships, with other difficulties, have rendered it impossible to keep the financial as well as all other departments of the flotilla in that strict and correct form that in a regular service, belonging exclusively to either War or Navy Departments, would do; still, I write rather to explain why I consult Secretary Scott, and trust that you will appreciate my motives.

We move on Island No. 10 and New Madrid on Wednesday, and expect a fight at both places. I have sent Captain Wise to stop repairs on the Essex till the estimates are sent to you for approval.

I am required to send Lieutenant Wise a telegram daily, which is read to the President, all of which I presume you understand, which, with my absence and great pressure of business, has prevented my writing to you much of late.

In a great hurry, I am, respectfully and truly, yours,

A. H. FOOTE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 108.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Pea Ridge, Ark., March 9, 1862.

I. Brigadier-General Sigel will forthwith move his entire command on the Bentonville road west of the field where Colonel Osterhaus met the enemy with our left wing, leaving a picket at his present camping ground. On arriving at that point further instructions will be imparted.

II. Brigadier-General Asboth, Colonel Schaefer, of the Second Missouri Volunteers, and Colonel Greusel, of the Thirty-sixth Illinois, will report in person at these headquarters.

By order of Brigadier-General Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.602}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 10, 1862-7 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Reserves intended to support General Curtis will now be drawn in as rapidly as possible and sent to the Tennessee. I propose going there in a few days. That is now the great strategic line of the Western campaign, and I am surprised that General Buell should hesitate to re-enforce me. He was too late at Fort Donelson, as Hunter has been in Arkansas. I am obliged to make my calculations independent of both. Believe me, general, you make a serious mistake in having three independent commands in the West. There never will and never can be any co-operation at the critical moment; all military history proves it. You will regret your decision against me on this point. Your friendship for individuals has influenced your judgment. Be it so. I shall soon fight a great battle on the Tennessee, unsupported, as it seems, but if successful, it will settle the campaign in the West.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, March 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Pope calling loudly for siege guns, which I am just ready to send as I received your telegram to send them up Tennessee. Telegraph immediately whether to send them to New Madrid or Tennessee.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 10, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Send all siege guns to Pope he wants. I understand you have six-enough for both lines. Why can’t Commodore Foote move to-morrow? It is all-important. By delay he spoils all my plans. Persuade him to go see Scott, and have him assist you.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, March 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Dispatch from Pope just in. Persistent efforts of gunboats to dislodge Plummer, but don’t succeed. Has lodgment in rifle pits at Point Pleasant for his four guns and thousand men. Immense quantity of supplies fell into Plummer’s hands. Transport mashed by gunboat passed Point Pleasant yesterday. Reliable information that 16,000 coming from Memphis to re-enforce Island No. 10. Enemy established two heavy guns opposite, but Pope thinks Plummer cannot be dislodged by them and 16,000 men. If possible will send siege artillery to-morrow, without waiting for horses and harness. Can’t coax Foote to stir with gunboats before Wednesday.

G. W. CULLUM.

{p.603}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 10, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Cairo:

Flotilla should go down the river as far as possible without engaging any batteries below Point Pleasant. Forts Randolph and Pillow will be turned. No use to engage them; but I want the navigation of the river as far down as possible. General Curtis has just gained a great victory on Sugar Creek, Ark. Our loss 1,000. I now hope soon to be able to go to the Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 59.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 10, 1862.

I. The attention of all officers is called to the Army Regulations and orders relating to uniforms. Officers wearing gray or mixed uniforms or overcoats in the field will be arrested and tried for disobedience of orders and neglect of duty.

II. Commanders of divisions, brigades, and regiments will see that no men under their command wear any gray or mixed clothing. Where articles of these proscribed colors have heretofore been duly issued they will be immediately turned into the Quartermaster’s Department and others of the proper color issued in their place, without any expense to the soldier.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 52.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Camp near Hew Madrid, March 10, 1862.

The following disposition of troops will be made in this district:

The Twenty-second Illinois Volunteers, now at Bird’s Point, will be distributed as follows: Four companies at Charleston, two at Bertrand, and four at Sikeston, where the headquarters of the regiment will be established.

One company of the First Illinois Cavalry will take post at Sikeston, the other at Charleston, the major in command fixing his headquarters at Charleston.

The commanding officer at Bird’s Point will attend carefully to the security of the railroad from that point to Charleston, keeping such necessary patrols moving backward and forward on the road as will be sufficient to insure its safety.

The garrison at Bird’s Point at present will consist of the Eighteenth Missouri Volunteers, and will be re-enforced by four companies of the Twenty-second Missouri Volunteers, now at Commerce, as soon as the depot can be broken up at that place. The depot at Commerce will be immediately broken up by the officers in charge and all the stores transferred to Bird’s Point, where the staff officers now on duty at Commerce will immediately take post, and put themselves in communication with the chief of their respective departments at these headquarters. The brigade surgeon at Commerce will take immediate {p.604} steps to have the sick in his charge removed, if possible, to Saint Louis; if not, to Cairo or Bird’s Point, and so soon as this is done the four companies of the Twenty-second Missouri Volunteers will repair to Bird’s Point and report to the commanding officer for duty. Colonel Foster, of this regiment, will report in person to the assistant adjutant-general at Saint Louis, to superintend the reorganization and filling up of his regiment.

All troops in this military district, excepting those named above, and the garrison at Cape Girardeau, will repair without delay to these headquarters.

All transportation whatever within this district will be brought forward by the forces en route for this place. A proper staff officer will be sent from these headquarters to direct and superintend the movements.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LEBANON, March 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

My patrol, under command of Captains Warfel, Ludlow, and Heiden, has returned. They struck the nucleus of the force which Price is organizing in the southern counties under the avowed name of guerrilla force of the Fifth and Seventh Military Districts, killed 13, wounded 5, and took over 20 prisoners; only two escaped. The commander of the district guerrillas, General E. Campbell, was taken with his written authority from Price to raise guerrilla bands. He is now in my hands. This is the body which attacked my patrol on Friday. The engagement was 2 miles from the Montreal. We lost none in this engagement. One killed and 5 wounded on Friday.

GEO. E. WARING, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 11, 1862.

Brigadier-General MCKEAN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

It is reported that secessionists are committing great outrages about Clinton. A regiment of cavalry should be sent to Clinton and Osceola, and perhaps farther south to break up these bands. I will send another expedition from Rolla through Lebanon, Buffalo, Bolivar, &c. to co-operate.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, New Madrid, March 11, 1862.

General CULLUM:

I received last night your letter of yesterday morning. You have doubtless seen Colonel Bissell since. I am anxious to get the siege guns as soon as possible. With them I can settle matters without the {p.605} aid of the gunboats from Cairo. The enemy, finding he could make no impression on the force at Point Pleasant, has withdrawn his batteries from the opposite shore and ceased to pass up and down the river.

Transports are only able to pass when masked closely by at least two gunboats for each steamer, and then only by passing close to the opposite shore. He is landing troops 4 miles below Point Pleasant, on the opposite shore, and marching them across the neck of land and then recrossing to Island No. 10. In this way considerable re-enforcements have been thrown on to the island within a day or two. From the island this place has also been considerably re-enforced, until the enemy’s force here cannot be much short of 11,000 men. As soon as I can drive off the gunboats all the forces there will be taken.

I am very anxious (for service on the river) to have larger field guns. The 20-pounder Parrotts are exactly the gun we want, and by having several batteries of them our efficiency would be a thousand times increased. Our smaller guns have not range enough to cover the whole breadth of the river with certainty. With enough of the 20-pounder Parrotts we can pass below and mask every work the enemy can erect or has erected on the river. I am sure you will aid me in the matter. I send an open order for the disposition of troops within this district. General Paine, for some singular reason, has sent fragments of regiments here, detailing two companies from one, four from another, &c., where one single regiment taken together would have been sufficient, and have given us full regiments here. I have endeavored, in the order inclosed, to correct this, but before having it executed submit it to you, that I may not interfere with arrangements of yours. I wish the whole affair at Commerce broken up. The sick ought to be sent somewhere to be taken care of. I need staff officers, especially medical officers, more than I can tell.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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Telegraph the following order to Major-General Halleck, at Saint Louis, Mo.:

PRESIDENT’s WAR ORDER, No. 3.}

EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, March 11, 1862.

Major-General McClellan having personally taken the field at the head of the Army of the Potomac, until otherwise ordered he is relieved from the command of the other military departments, he retaining command of the Department of the Potomac.

Ordered further, That the two departments now under the respective commands of Generals Halleck and Hunter, together with so much of that under General Buell as lies west of a north and south line indefinitely drawn through Knoxville, Tenn., be consolidated and designated the Department of the Mississippi, and that until otherwise ordered Major-General Halleck have command of said department.

Ordered also, That the country west of the Department of the Potomac and east of the Department of the Mississippi be a military department, to be called the Mountain Department, and that the same be commanded by Major-General Frémont. That all the commanders of departments, after the receipt of this order by them respectively, report severally and directly to the Secretary of War, and that prompt, full, and frequent reports will be expected of all and each of them.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

{p.606}

Major-General Hunter whose date is senior to yours, has been relieved from his command, and the Secretary of War directs that you place some other officer at Fort Leavenworth. Acknowledge receipt of this by telegram.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 12, 1862.

Brig. Gen. E. A. PAINE, Commanding Fourth Division.

GENERAL: I have directed Colonel Elliott to report to you at daylight to-morrow morning with the Second Iowa Cavalry, and also a battery of four pieces, now encamped with General Hamilton’s division. I desire you to hold your division in readiness to march at daylight tomorrow morning, with one day’s cooked rations, full supply of ammunition, and everything in complete order for fighting. As soon as you perceive Hamilton’s division (on your right) in motion, you will march your division to the road leading into New Madrid, through the center of our lines, and down that road until you are barely out of range of the enemy’s gunboats. You will there remain until further orders. You will be careful to keep your pickets on the bayou road as far towards the enemy as possible, that our left may not be turned without due warning. Form your command in columns of division, doubled on the center, on each side of the road leading into New Madrid, and keep them well in hand, so that you can advance against the enemy at the shortest notice, being careful always to march well to the rear, so as to be quite out of range, and not to draw the enemy’s fire. I wish you, an hour after dark to-night, to re-enforce the lower pickets along the bayou with four companies of sharpshooters, and direct them to feel their way in towards the town and drive in the enemy’s pickets, so as to distract his attention from the work on the battery on our right. They had best keep up the enemy’s alarm on our left in this way the greater part of the night. Orders will be sent to you in time for further movements.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 12, 1862.

Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo:

You will not make an attack on Island No. 10 until further orders. I wish to wait until General Pope gets his heavy guns in position to cut off the enemy’s retreat.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 12, 1862.

Lieut. H. A. WISE, U. S. N., or Assistant Secretary Fox:

I send you copy of my telegram forwarded at noon this day for General H. W. Halleck:

{p.607}

I am ready to move with seven gunboats and ten mortar boats upon Island No. 10 and New Madrid, but the troops and transports are not here, and I consider it unsafe to move without troops to occupy No. 10 if we capture it, as we cannot take prisoners with gunboats. Hence, should we pass No. 10, after its capture the rebels on the Tennessee side would return and man their batteries, and thus shut up the river in our rear, as we should be short of coal and tow-boats to get back to reattack No. 10 or the opposite shore.

Can we proceed below, leaving these places unoccupied, without endangering Columbus, where, I believe, no guns have been mounted to sweep and protect the river below from the eleven gunboats of the rebels?

I wait your reply after these suggestions, which the exigencies of the service lead me thus fully to express.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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HEADQUARTERS, DISTRICT NORTH Mo. R. R., Saint Louis, Mo., March 12, 1862.

Captain WARRENS, Fifth Missouri Cavalry, Warrenton, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: An order has been sent you through Colonel Morsey to proceed with two companies to Troy, in Lincoln County, and occupy that place.

I want you to use your utmost exertions to ferret out and bring to justice the insurgents and jayhawkers in that region.

The general order, a copy of which is inclosed,* will be your general guide in the discharge of your duty. You will observe that a certain kind of property only is to be seized and that only from a particular class of persons. Even this to be restored if the owner voluntarily gives himself up and is found to be such a one as should be released on bond and oath.

It is of the greatest importance that you prevent your men from committing depredations upon private property. The object is not so much to punish the rebels for what they have done as to prevent them from doing injury in the future.

This is to be done by putting the incorrigible out of the way, either by death or imprisonment, and by securing the good conduct of others through the obligation of a bond and oath, while many may be reclaimed by justice mingled with kindness.

It is reported that there is an extensive organization in Lincoln and adjoining counties of men who are determined to continue their insurgent operations, apparently for the purpose of plunder and revenge. Let none of these escape you, and be careful not to release improper persons on any conditions.

I hope to hear the best reports from your command.

Yours, very truly,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 61.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 12, 1862.

Official notice having been received that the Secretary of the Treasury has adopted regulations for commercial intercourse with States heretofore {p.608} in insurrection against the United States, those of a military character promulgated in General Orders, No. 52, of March 3, and 57, of March 6, current series, from these headquarters, are hereby revoked.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 111.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Pea Ridge, Ark., March 12, 1862.

I. The First Division will move forward and take position as near the Third and Fourth as convenience will permit.

The Second Division will concentrate at Elkhorn Tavern, and be ready to move forward at any moment.

Supply trains and stores will be shifted to the advanced position.

II. Ample details for the sick and wounded will be provided by each regiment or company. As far as possible, they will be sent to Keetsville or home, as the surgeon in general charge may think proper.

Wounded officers and men, disabled for duty by wounds in the recent battle, on surgeon’s certificate, are hereby granted leave to visit headquarters at Saint Louis and procure extension of their leave to recruit their health.

By order of Brig. Gen. S. R. Curtis:

T. I. MCKENNY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo:

You will proceed to-morrow morning with the gun and mortar boats to attack the enemy’s batteries on Island No. 10. Brigadier-General Strong will be directed to send transports with infantry to occupy and hold any positions which you may take. I think the main work should be done with the mortar boats, and that the gunboats should not be unnecessarily exposed to a close fire, as they will immediately be required in other operations, which will not admit of delay for repairs.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 13, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your instructions to attack Island No. 10 are received, and I shall move for that purpose to-morrow morning. I have made the following telegram to the Navy Department, which you will perceive will lead me to be cautious, and not bring the gunboats within short range of the enemy’s batteries. Generally, in all our attacks down the river I will bear in mind the effect on this place and the other rivers which a serious disaster to the gunboats would involve. General Strong is telegraphing Paducah for transports, as there are none at Cairo: {p.609} G. V. Fox or Lieut. H. A. WISE, Washington:

The iron-clad boats cannot be held when anchored by stern in this current, on account of the recess between the fan-tails forming the stern yawing them about, and as the sterns of the boats are not plated, and have but two 32-pounders astern, you will see our difficulty of fighting down-stream effectually. Neither is there power enough in any of them to back up-stream. We must therefore tie up to shore the best way we can and help the mortar boats. I have long since expressed to General Meigs my apprehensions about these boats’ defects. Don’t have any gunboats for rivers built with wheels amidships. The drift-wood would choke the wheel, even if it had a powerful engine. I felt it my duty to state these difficulties which could not be obviated when I came here, as the vessels were modeled and partly built.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Commanding Flotilla.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, Hear Hew Madrid, March 13, 1862.

General CULLUM:

I established last night the heavy guns in position and opened at daylight. At this hour (2 o’clock p.m.) the gunboats are still holding on, though several of them are injured. Our loss has been 1 officer killed and 6 men wounded. The heavy guns are established within 800 yards of the enemy’s lower redoubt, and I shall, under the circumstances, be obliged to work on towards the river by trenches, so as to establish the heavy battery directly on the bank. This will require a day or two. The enemy will not be able to dislodge us from our present position nor from any other, as they depend and must depend altogether on the gunboats. There are now nine gunboats here, and it is apparent that the enemy means to make a stand here as long as possible. I will commence to-night to push approaches towards the river and move forward the battery as soon as I can. The enemy continues to re-enforce from above, but I think not heavily. If the gun and mortar boats were here to drive off the gunboats of the enemy, we could easily deal with his land forces. The 20-pounder Parrotts will help us greatly. We must also have more 24-pounder and 8-inch howitzer ammunition as soon as possible. Also two or three more heavy guns, if possible. The troops are in fine spirits and exhibit wonderful gallantry.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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PILOT KNOB, March 13, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Colonel Carlin writes me from Rives’ Station that the rebels are 3,000 strong at Pitman’s Ferry and have about 2,000 more near at hand. Jeff. Thompson is at Pocahontas. The water is so high that the troops cannot cross from Greenville at present. I hear nothing of the Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry yet.

FRED’K STEELE, Brigadier-General.

{p.610}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRED. STEELE, Pilot Knob:

You will not advance so as to endanger your command. You will soon be re-enforced, either from General Pope or Saint Louis.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

It is reported that the enemy has about 5,000 men at Pitman’s Ferry and Pocahontas. Can you spare the two regiments of Michigan cavalry? If so, send them to re-enforce General Steele, who is now at Greenville, moving on Martinsburg, with a detachment at Poplar Bluff. It is said that with slight repairs the road from Sikeston by Bloomfield and Saint Francisville will be practicable. Answer.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEAR NEW MADRID, March 13, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your dispatch of this date received. The enemy have been so largely re-enforced as to be very nearly equal in numbers to myself. He is quite so in the absence of one brigade of four regiments at Point Pleasant. The large detachment required to work in and guard the trenches makes my security depend upon the cavalry force here. The unaccountable delay of our gunboats has forced me to establish batteries and push regular approaches to the bank of the river, so that I can establish the heavy guns necessary to drive off the gunboats. The details for such work and of the guards for the trenches are so large necessarily that I fear to detach any portion of this force, especially the cavalry. It is evident that the enemy design to defend this place desperately. Their whole force, except gunners, has been sent here from Island No. 10.

I am very sorry, and, as you know, not disposed to be overcautious, but I should regard it as very unsafe to detach a man from this place. I have called forward everything I had in the district except the guards necessary for the railroad.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Near Bentonville, March 13, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER U. S. FORCES, En route for Kansas:

SIR: I have routed the combined forces of Van Dorn, Price, McCulloch, and Pike in a three days’ encounter at Pea Ridge. My advance of cavalry is at Bentonville. There is a good place to camp 2 1/2 miles west of Bentonville. Also at any point on Little Sugar Creek.

{p.611}

I desire to secure an early junction of our forces, if your orders are consistent with such a movement.

I have the honor to be, sir, &c.,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Army of the Southwest.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, In the Field, via Springfield:

The Department of Kansas having been added to this, you will assume command of all Kansas troops in your vicinity.

You will see that they are kept under discipline and will punish any attempt at jayhawking.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, in the Field, Arkansas:

Be careful to keep your main force together and well in hand. Ascertain the enemy’s movements by throwing out cavalry. Be careful of Van Dorn. He is a vigilant and energetic officer, and will be certain to strike any exposed point. Keep me well advised of the enemy’s movements, as I must be prepared for him on other points. This is important.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

I. In compliance with the orders of the President of the United States the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Department of the Mississippi, which includes the present Department of Kansas and the Missouri and the Department of the Ohio and country west of a north and south line drawn through Knoxville, Tenn., and east of the western boundaries of the States of Missouri and Arkansas, Headquarters of the Department of the Mississippi will remain, until further orders, at Saint Louis, Mo.

II. Commanding officers not in the Department of the Missouri will immediately report to these headquarters the strength and positions of their several commands.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862.

I. Martial law has never been legally declared in Missouri, except in the city of Saint Louis and on and in the immediate vicinity of the railroads {p.612} and telegraph lines; and even in these localities military officers are specially directed not to interfere with the lawful process of any loyal civil court. It is believed that the time will soon come when the rebellion in Missouri may be considered as terminated, and when even the partial and temporary military restraint which has been exercised in particular places may be entirely withdrawn. By none is this more desired than by the general commanding.

II. It must, however, be borne in mind that in all places subject to the incursions of the enemy or to the depredations of insurgents and guerrilla bands the military are authorized, without any formal declaration of martial law, to adopt such measures as may be necessary to restore the authority of the Government and to punish all violations of the laws of war. This power will be exercised only where the peace of the country and the success of the Union cause absolutely require it.

III. Evidence has been received at these headquarters that Maj. Gen. Sterling Price has issued commissions or licenses to certain bandits in this State, authorizing them to raise “guerrilla forces,” for the purpose of plunder and marauding. General Price ought to know that such a course is contrary to the rules of civilized warfare, and that every man who enlists in such an organization forfeits his life and becomes an outlaw. All persons are hereby warned that if they join any guerrilla band they will not, if captured, be treated as ordinary prisoners of war, but will be hung as robbers and murderers. Their lives shall atone for the barbarity of their general.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General

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SPECIAL ORDERS, 54.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, March 13, 1862.

...

4. Brig. Gen. J. W. Denver is relieved from duty in the Department of the Mountain, and will report in person to Major-General Halleck, commanding Department of the Mississippi.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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NEAR NEW MADRID, March 13 (via Cairo, 14), 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Cannot more and larger size artillery be sent me; also ammunition for the 24-pounders and 8-inch howitzers? There is none at Cairo, and only 100 rounds were sent; also the 20-pounder Parrott guns at Jefferson Barracks.

Nine gunboats are here carrying over fifty heavy guns, besides the heavy guns in the intrenchments. Unless our gunboats are sent here at once, more and heavier artillery ought to be sent me. I have very little ammunition for those I have.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

{p.618}

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, Near New Madrid, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

To my utter amazement the enemy hurriedly evacuated the place last night, leaving everything. They were landed in the woods opposite and dispersed. They have been landing troops here ever since we arrived, and I am sure almost that they have withdrawn all their troops from Island No. 10. I can send you the cavalry for Steele, but would prefer to send other regiments. Please inform me as to your wishes about my further operations. I shall reconnoiter Island No. 10 to-day.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, March 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN POPE, New Madrid:

I congratulate you and your command on the success which has crowned your toils and exposures. You have given the final blow to the rebellion in Missouri and proved yourselves worthy members of the brave Army of the West.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

New Madrid is in our possession. Our lines were drawn closely around the works all day yesterday under furious cannonading from nine gunboats and from heavy batteries on land. Last night the place was hurriedly evacuated under cover of the furious storm which raged all night. All of their artillery (field batteries and siege guns), an immense quantity of military stores, all their tents wagons, mules, &c., have fallen into our hands. The enemy carried off nothing except his men, who were landed immediately opposite on the wide bottom and dispersed. Hamilton’s division is now entering this place.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSISSIPPI DISTRICT, New Madrid, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our success has been even greater than I reported. Twenty-five pieces of heavy artillery, 24-pounders and rifled 32s, two batteries of field artillery, an immense quantity of mixed ammunition, several thousand stand of small-arms, with hundreds of boxes of musket cartridges, 300 mules and horses, tents for an army of 12,000 men, and an immense quantity of other valuable property of not less value than a million of dollars, have fallen into our hands. The men only escaped, but the enemy’s whole force is demoralized and dispersed in the swamp on the opposite side of the river. The enemy abandoned the works so hurriedly as to leave all the baggage of officers and knapsacks of men, their dead unburied, their suppers on the tables, and the candles burning in {p.614} the tents. The furious thunder-storm which raged all night enabled them to get across the river without being discovered.

Our heavy battery was established during the night of the 12th within 800 yards of the enemy’s works and opened at daylight on the 13th, just thirty-four hours after the guns were delivered to us at Cairo.

During the whole day yesterday our lines were drawn closer and closer around their works under the furious fire of sixty pieces of artillery. The fear of an assault upon their works at daylight induced them to flee precipitately during the night. Many prisoners have been taken and the colors of several Arkansas regiments. I believe that there are no troops at Island No. 10, but shall know certainly during the night. Our forces behaved admirably. Our loss has been about 50 killed and wounded. Commodore Hollins was in command of the fleet, and Generals McCown, Stewart, and Gantt of the land forces The gunboats went down the river. I have twenty-five heavy guns in the two works of the enemy, which command every foot of the river.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 14, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

After several days’ skirmishing and a number of attempts by the enemy’s gunboats to dislodge General Pope’s batteries at Point Pleasant the enemy has evacuated his fort and intrenchments at New Madrid, leaving all his artillery, field batteries, tents, wagons, mules, &c., and an immense quantity of military stores. Brig. Gen. Schuyler Hamilton has occupied the place. This was the last stronghold of the enemy in this State. There is no rebel flag now flying in Missouri.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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FORT LEAVENWORTH, March 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Commanding Department:

Colonel Deitzler, First Kansas, left in command of department, has 5,000 available troops at and around Fort Scott, with one battery of artillery; last heard from preparing to re-enforce General Curtis-probably not yet left. Has 200 wagons for regimental and commissary purposes; 135,000 complete rations.

Jennison at Humboldt, three days’ march from Fort Scott. Eighth Kansas distributed as provost guard for the State. Second Kansas Cavalry, twelve companies, now being organized, armed, and equipped, near Lawrence. Colorado Volunteers, 600 strong, gone to re-enforce Colonel Canby. These, with post garrisons, aggregate 1,500, making proximate department aggregate only 8,000 available troops. Fort Scott within twenty-two hours’ communication daily by express. Jayhawkers murdering and pillaging in Jackson County and border; consequently all Fourth Kansas, six companies, sent to Independence and Westport, Mo., today.

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.615}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, March 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Comdg. Dept. of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor, in reply to your telegram, received late last evening, requesting to be furnished immediately with a correct statement of the number and position of troops in this department, to transmit herewith copy of General Orders, No. 26, of this department, reorganizing the Kansas troops, now in process of being carried out; and further to state that the only regiments in Kansas at present in effective condition for active service are the First and Eighth Kansas, the former at Fort Scott, the latter distributed through the disturbed counties of the State as provost guard. The Seventh Kansas (Jennison’s), with a field piece and mountain howitzer, at Humboldt, 70 miles from Fort Scott; and the Ninth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Wisconsin Regiments (infantry) and Second Ohio Cavalry and Rabb’s Indiana Battery of six rifled pieces, all at Fort Scott or now moving south from there, under command of Col. George W. Deitzler, left by General Hunter in command of the department, to whom your communications announcing the position of General Curtis were duly forwarded by express immediately on their arrival.

Of the regiments at Fort Scott the following, from last report, is the effective strength for the field, there being much sickness now in this department: First Kansas Infantry, 600; Ninth Wisconsin Infantry, 750; Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, 750; Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, 800; Second Ohio Cavalry, 850-140 men having been detailed from this regiment to form a battery now being organized at this post under command of Lieut. George S. Hollister, Seventh U. S. Infantry, which battery is not completed yet, owing to the non-arrival of carriages, caissons, and equipments for the guns; and Rabb’s Indiana Battery complete.

The Seventh Kansas Cavalry (Jennison’s) have 830 men in effective condition at Humboldt, and the Eighth Kansas Infantry, until recently commanded by Major Wessells, of the regular service, and distributed through the State to protect its peace, is a full regiment, 1,000 strong, and in good condition.

Believing that, owing to various causes, the condition and resources of this department have been misrepresented and grossly exaggerated by the press and in public speeches, I would most respectfully submit the following statement as to the condition of the other Kansas troops:

Nothing could exceed the demoralized condition in which General Hunter found the Third and Fourth Kansas Infantry and Fifth and Sixth Kansas Cavalry, formerly known as “Lane’s brigade,” on his arrival in this department. The regimental and company commanders knew nothing of their duties and apparently had never made returns or reports of any kind. The regiments appeared in worse condition than they could possibly have been in during the first week of their enlistment, their camps being little better than vast pig-pens, officers and men sleeping and messing together; furloughs in immense numbers being granted, or, where not granted, taken; drill having been abandoned almost wholly, and the men constituting a mere ragged, half-armed, diseased, and mutinous rabble, taking votes as to whether any troublesome or distasteful order should be obeyed or defied.

Vast amounts of public property had been taken from the depots at Fort Scott and Fort Lincoln without requisition or any form of responsibility, and horses in great quantities and at extravagant prices had {p.616} been purchased under irregular orders and paid for by the United States; these horses being then turned over to men and officers who were then drawing 40 cents extra per day for them as private property.

Without troops from other States or of a better kind to hold the mutinous in subjection General Hunter had a difficult and most laborious task in the administration of the department. The few officers willing to do right, if they knew how, had to be instructed in nearly every branch of their duties, and this was the more difficult, as for the first two months the department was almost entirely destitute of blanks and has never had a proper supply.

To remedy these things mustering officers were sent to remuster the regiments of Lane’s brigade and consolidate the companies to the minimum standing, mustering out the surplus officers and all who could prove they had been enlisted as Home Guards under General Lyon’s call. These mustering officers found that the companies ranged from 25 to 60 men each, but the average about 50, each having a captain and two lieutenants, and in some instances more; and had the department, as previously, been without troops from other States, there is every probability that a general mutiny of the regiments named would have taken place, instead of the partial mutinies which have been suppressed.

The mustering is now, I believe, complete or will be in a few days; but the rolls have not yet been received, and until they are no reliable returns of Lane’s brigade or Clark’s cavalry battalion (formerly Tenth Kansas Regiment) can be prepared. Four or five companies have been mustered out as Home Guards, who should have been mustered out last-October; and when the remuster rolls are received no doubt the Third and Fourth Kansas Infantry will be consolidated into one regiment, their overplus, if any, being needed to fill the ranks of the First Kansas, which has lacked its full complement by several hundred since the battle of Wilson’s Creek. This will leave the State but three infantry regiments-the First, Third and Fourth consolidated, and Eighth.

The Fifth and Sixth Cavalry, too, can be consolidated into one regiment, absorbing a portion of Clark’s battalion and turning over the balance to fill the incomplete companies of the Kansas Ninth, hereafter, by Governor Robinson’s order, to be known as the Kansas Second. This last-named regiment, of twelve companies, is now being armed, mounted, and equipped in camp near Lawrence, about 200 of its men belonging to the old Kansas Second (disbanded after the battle of Springfield), and six companies of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, with other cavalry companies drawn from infantry regiments. This will give three full regiments of cavalry, of twelve companies each, as the complement of the State-the Second, and Fifth and Sixth consolidated and Seventh (Colonel Jennison’s.) Meantime the State had recently twelve regiments nominally, ten quasi regimental organizations, and attempts were in progress to raise two more Kansas regiments for service in New Mexico. This no doubt has caused the exaggerated opinions as to the strength of the department. It was represented that all Kansas had flocked to arms, whereas, in fact, no State has been more backward.

In the posts of the State there are distributed altogether 1,600 troops, 1,000 at this post, of whom 200 cavalry have been dispatched to-day to Independence, Jackson, and Johnson Counties.

In Colorado there are about 700 troops, the Colorado Volunteers now re-enforcing Colonel Canby in New Mexico.

In Nebraska two volunteer companies have been authorized, but have never reported; and in Dakota one.

{p.617}

Finally, I have the honor to submit that Colonel Deitzler has now under his command at Fort Scott the effective troops already set forth and could raise 500 more cavalry by selecting the least badly mounted and armed of the Fifth and Sixth Kansas Cavalry, who all have old smooth-bore muskets, most of them pistols-their private property-but no swords. It was the intention to have armed and equipped them properly on the roll of their remuster, when it could be seen what men and companies were mustered out as Home Guards and what retained. I may add, however, that General Hunter entered a respectful remonstrance against raising in and sending to this department so many cavalry regiments, Kansas, except in spring and summer, being more destitute of forage than any other of the States.

In conclusion, I would state that it was General Hunter’s opinion, and that of all the experienced regular officers at the post that until the more objectionable of the Kansas regiments can be reofficered to a great extent and removed from local influences they can never assume a respectful position in the service of their country.

Pardon me for having intruded at such length on time so valuable as yours, my motive having been an eager desire to place you at the earliest possible moment in possession of information that might possibly be important to your plans.

I have the honor to be, general, with sincere respect, your most obedient servant,

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Forwarded to Secretary of War, March 18, 1862.)

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 26.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPT. OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 28, 1862.

I. Pursuant to instructions from Headquarters of the Army, dated Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, D. C., February 1, 1862, and by and with the consent of His Excellency the Governor of Kansas, the following reconstruction of the volunteer forces of the State of Kansas is hereby made, in accordance with the acts of Congress heretofore promulgated in General Orders, series of 1861, from the War Department.*

...

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* The remainder of this order, in detail, recognizes the existing First and Fourth Infantry, the Seventh Cavalry, and Clark’s battalion; and reorganizes the Third and Eighth Infantry, and the Fifth, Sixth, and Ninth Cavalry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 14, 1862.

General CURTIS, Arkansas:

Re-enforcements and ammunition have been sent and will reach you in time. Hold your position. If the enemy should attack you again you will be relatively much stronger than before.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.618}

CAMP STEVENS (via Springfield, March 15, 1862).

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

A few cartridges have arrived. Flour said to be within one day’s drive. I hear of Hunter’s troops this side of Fort Scott. All quiet here. Near Bentonville found large quantity of arms concealed in a cave, probably the arms of Colonel Rector’s regiment. Have horses been started to supply those killed in battle?

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 25.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 16, 1862.

The following dispatch from Major-General Halleck, commanding this department, has been received, and with this order will be published at the head of every regiment and detachment of this command:

HEADQUARTERS, Saint Loads, March 14.

Major-General POPE:

I congratulate you and your command on the success which has crowned your toils and exposure. You have given the final blow to the rebellion in Missouri and proved yourselves worthy members of the brave Army of the West.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

Much as the general commanding this army desired to shield the forces under his command from unnecessary suffering and loss of life, the success of our operations required unusual courage and fortitude and an exhibition of the highest qualities of the soldier.

The general commanding had expected much from the gallant men of this army, but he is proud and gratified to say that his anticipations have been more than realized, and that he has been impressed with a confidence in the officers and men of this army which foreshadows for them a most brilliant future.

To be the commander of such troops is an honor to any man, and the general commanding assures them that in their future operations he will endeavor to so conduct them that their gallant and soldierly qualities shall secure for them that honor and fame which are their due.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General STRONG, Cairo, Ill.:

Steamer Nebraska will join Commodore Foote’s expedition, the siege guns to be used in reducing the enemy’s works. Send the following with all possible haste to General Pope:

You will immediately construct a road across the swamp to the river below Saint James, so that your forces can assist the flotilla against Island No. 10. The heavy siege guns and siege ammunition and ferry-boats will meet you on the river. I think had better strike nearly straight across the peninsula, as it will be the shortest line.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.619}

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CAIRO, ILL., March 17, 1862.

Lieut. H. A. WISE, Bureau Ordnance and Hydrography:

Dispatch received from squadron 3 o’clock last night. We have had some beautiful practice to-day with rifles at their upper battery. Mortars firing also. No special result. Rebels very strong. Hard for us to get at them. The upper battery about 2 miles above No. 10, on Kentucky shore. General Pope’s guns at New Madrid command the river, preventing rebel gunboats and transports from passing, they being between New Madrid and Island No. 10.

A. M. PENNOCK, For Flag-Officer Foote.

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CAIRO, March 17, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Expedition heard from up to 5 o’clock last evening. The Benton, with her two stern guns, and eight mortar boats were attacking first fort on the Kentucky shore, 2 miles above Island No. 10. Enemy driven out several times, but returned. His fort reduced. More extended operations will be undertaken this morning. Fortifications on Kentucky and Tennessee shore extend 2 miles, strongly fortified, and enemy in large force. General Pope had sent message to flag-officer that his heavy guns command the river from New Madrid, so that neither steamers nor gunboats of the enemy can escape by the river.

WM. K. STRONG, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 17, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your dispatch of this date received. Will take immediate steps to obey your instructions. Think I shall get up with less trouble than you suppose. River blockaded by heavy guns here, between here and Point Pleasant and 5 miles below Point Pleasant. Have caught six large transports and five gunboats above my lower battery of heavy guns, which will be ours or destroyed. Very few troops on Island No. 10; all on main-land. My spies opposite Island No. 10 reported to me yesterday and day before that enemy were leaving island for main-land, which led me to believe that they were evacuating.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 17, 1862.

General CULLUM:

If Commodore Foote can run past the batteries of Island No. 10 with two or three gunboats and reach here I can cross my whole force and capture every man of the enemy at Island No. 10 and on the main-land. I shall send a messenger to him suggesting it; but for fear of accident {p.620} you had perhaps best send him this letter. He had best be careful in approaching this place, in case he gets past the battery, and display a white flag some distance off.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 17, 1802.

General PALMER:

On no account permit the 24-pounder gun to be fired at Point Pleasant. You will defeat my whole object by letting the enemy know the gun is there. I was surprised to learn from Colonel Bissell that you had thought even of firing it at gunboats or any other boats. Once for all, my object is to establish this heavy battery, without the knowledge of the enemy, at a point below or nearly opposite Tiptonville, so as to command the place where troops can be shipped. By getting the guns quietly into position near the lower Riddle farm to-night the gunboats will be above you and can be dealt with. The transports lying there can be destroyed at daylight, before they can get out of the way. If you fire the 24-pounder at Point Pleasant my whole purpose is defeated.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, March 17 (via Cairo, 18), 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Commodore Foote arrived near Island No. 10 at 12 m. on 15th. Have heard no bombardment nor anything of him since the island was being evacuated, on the 15th, by the few troops there. I have no means to cross the river, or I could intercept all the troops which left here and the island. They are trying to get off in steamers 4 miles below Point Pleasant and opposite. I occupied a point 5 miles below Point Pleasant, immediately opposite the beginning of the swamps, on the east side of the river, with four regiments and two 24-pounder guns, last night. As the movement was secret and was made in the night we shall undoubtedly cut off some of their gunboats, which are opposite and above Point Pleasant, and prevent any shipment of troops down the river.

With some transports to pass round the swamps I can move down the river, flanking and forcing the evacuation of any batteries that they may have on the river.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP BENTON, March 17, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: Leaving Cairo on the 14th instant with seven iron-clad gunboats and ten mortar boats, and being joined at Columbus on the {p.621} same day by Colonel Buford, in command of some 1,200 troops, I reached Hickman that evening with the flotilla and transports, where the Louisville, Commander Dove, was found leaking in her boilers, and was sent back to Columbus for repairs.

On the 15th instant, at daylight, the flotilla and transports moved down the river, arriving in the vicinity of Island No. 10 at 9 a.m. The rain and fog prevented our getting the vessels in position other than two mortar boats for the purpose of ascertaining their range. Early on the morning of the 16th instant I placed the mortars in as good position as the circumstances would admit, when they shelled several regiments out of their encampment, and at extreme range reached the batteries at No. 10, the floating battery, and the five batteries on the Tennessee shore. The mortar boats are in charge of Captain Maynadier, U. S. Army, as ordnance officer, assisted by Acting Lieutenant-Commander Sanford, U. S. Navy, who volunteered his services.

This morning, the 17th, some time after daylight, the mortar boats being in position, I had the Benton lashed between two other steamers Cincinnati and St. Louis, and with the remaining three iron-clad steamers made an attack on the forts at the distance of 2,000 yards or more on account of the rapid current rendering the boats too unmanageable to come within a shorter range without endangering their being carried under the enemy’s guns. We opened upon the upper fort on the Tennessee shore at meridian, and continued quite a brisk fire until darkness obscured the forts from view. The ten mortars in the mean time shelled the troops out of range, excepting those in the forts manning the batteries. The upper fort was badly cut up by the Benton and the other boats with her, and the men at times ran from their guns. Colonel Buford has been busy and, I trust, profitably engaged in making reconnaissances, and is preparing to mount his siege guns.

In the attack of to-day this vessel received five shots, while a rifled gun burst aboard the St. Louis and killed and wounded 14 officers and men, and the Cincinnati has had her engine injured by a shot, which may render it necessary for me to send her to Cairo for repairs. I hope to be able to silence the upper battery to-morrow; after which we can plant the mortars in a position where we expect to be able to shell the rebels out of their batteries.

This place is stronger and even better adapted for defense than Columbus ever was. Each fortification commands the one above it. We can count forty-nine guns in the different batteries, where there are probably double the number, with 10,000 troops. Exhaustion, arising from continuous service and want of sleep, will excuse this incoherent discursive report.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Comdg. U. S. Naval Forces Western Waters.

P. S.-Our shells bursting prematurely, I have had to drown them before loading the guns; the fuses many of which I am told were made before the Mexican war, ought to have been condemned.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Camp Stevens, Ark., March 17, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN:

CAPTAIN: I am glad to hear troops are expected through Kansas. If quartermasters would furnish supplies or competent men with means {p.622} to purchase, jayhawking could be controlled. So far from our usual source, some exertion is required to avoid the alternative which is constantly presented, starve or steal. This dilemma could be avoided by an efficient quartermaster, and I hope I will be supported in my efforts to secure reform in this regard.

The killed, wounded, and missing at the battle of Pea Ridge is near 1,400.* My accommodations for the wounded are very meager, and they suffer in consequence.

All quiet this side the Boston Mountains except some mischief to the people, committed by the Indians near Cane Hill.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

* See p. 206.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 18, 1862.

General PLUMMER:

It is possible that the enemy, who is moving his whole infantry force from Island No. 10 to Tiptonville, may attempt to cross in force and attack the lower battery, now supported by General Palmer. In that case you will at once march to his aid, leaving only your guns in battery and your sharpshooters in the rifle pits. The enemy’s whole force is only about 8,500 infantry, with perhaps two batteries of light artillery; no match for Palmer and yourself united. I send down a full regiment of cavalry to report to you. Send three companies to General Palmer and keep open constant and frequent communication with him and with me. There are two regiments of Michigan cavalry here, many of the companies armed with revolving rifles, who can serve admirably on foot, and can re-enforce you, if necessary, in an hour. It is beyond measure important to maintain the heavy batteries below Point Pleasant. As long as they are there supplies are cut off and there is no escape for the enemy. They cannot get off by land. Below Tiptonville the swamps begin, and it will not be possible to ship troops any lower down than that place. I rely much upon your skill and vigor, which if fairly exhibited for a few days will secure us most important results.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 18, 1862.

General PALMER:

I judge from what was stated to me by the officer of engineers who came up this morning that the 24-pounder siege gun which was placed in battery last night is too high up the river to accomplish the purpose for which it was designed. I have directed Lieutenant-Colonel Adams to place the other guns in position about 1 1/2 miles below where the other gun is, if a suitable place can be found there. The object is to command Tiptonville and the shore for a half a mile below, so as to prevent the embarkation of troops. It may be that the enemy will attempt to cross and come up on you from below. I send three companies of cavalry to you, to enable you to keep out scouts and keep {p.623} yourself fully apprised of what is going on for some distance below you. You will use all vigilance, and be ready to support the guns with your whole force if necessary. Keep up constant communication with General Plummer and advise him immediately of any movement of the enemy. He is instructed to move with his whole force to your assistance if necessary. It is of the last importance to the operations here that the battery of the two 24-pounder guns be maintained in its present position, and I will move the whole force from here for that purpose if necessary. If there be no suitable point below the gun in position for the one which I sent down last night, you will cause it to be placed in position near the other. But I must impress upon you that it is the landing at Tiptonville and for a half a mile below it which must be commanded by our guns to effect the purpose contemplated. Keep your mounted scouts along the river for at least 4 or 5 miles below you, to watch carefully whether the enemy make any attempt to cross. Their whole force in this vicinity, at Island No. 10 and elsewhere, does not exceed 9,000 infantry, with perhaps two batteries of light artillery; no match for yourself and Plummer united. Write to me regularly and fully two or three times a day.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, March 18, 1862. (Received March 19.)

Major-General HALLECK:

As soon as daylight unmasked my heavy battery below Point Pleasant the enemy moved with five gunboats to within 300 yards and attempted to dislodge us. A furious cannonade was kept up for an hour and a half, when the gunboats rapidly retreated out of range. One gunboat was sunk and several badly damaged. Many of the gunners were shot down from our rifle pits. We lost a single man. Our lower battery is so placed that it commands the upper end of the overflowed lands on east side of river, and no communication from below with the enemy is now possible. They are shut up in the bend of the river with no egress whatever except by a road from Tiptonville to Union City, which crosses Reelfoot Lake, 2 miles wide, and with only one small flat-boat. If I had the means to cross the river with my command I could bag the whole of them.

I made reconnaissance across peninsula to-day towards Island 8. Party not returned. Will write fully by mail, to reach you day after to-morrow.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL, March 18, 1862.

Lieut. H. A. WISE, Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography:

News received this 9 a.m. from flag-ship Benton, dated near Island No. 10, March 17. We had hard work this afternoon with the upper battery. Of all at this point four shots struck us only out of the fire of some five forte. One shot, after striking the upper deck twice and the lower one once, breaking some half dozen beams, finally lodged {p.624} in the flag-officer’s desk, depositing itself in the drawer as quietly as possible. We have battered the fort all to pieces, dismounting one gun; but night came upon us, and we had to leave without finishing the work, but will to-morrow go at him again. A rifled gun burst on board the St. Louis and killed 2 outright, wounded mortally 2 more, and wounded 10 others. These are the only casualties. The mortars are doing their work well. I shall to-day, by direction of Flag-Officer Foote, send down six more mortar boats, making sixteen in all.

A. M. PENNOCK, For Flag-Officer Foote.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, March 18, 1862 (via Springfield).

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The enemy again approaching in force. Will have to fall back to near Keetsville; otherwise my supplies will be in danger. Besides, we must have cartridges. Hurry them forward; also re-enforcements. This move is the unanimous opinion of my officers in council.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, D. C., March 19, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

GENERAL: Numerous complaints have been made to this Department on behalf of persons representing themselves to be aggrieved by military outrages, especially in Jackson County, Missouri, O. G. Cates, esq., an agent of these persons, has been here for some time. Your orders from time to time have manifested your purpose to afford all the protection in your power, and you are best able to judge what should be done in the premises. The whole subject is therefore referred to you, and if any aid can be rendered by this Department it will be furnished.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, D. C., March 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding the Department of Mississippi:

GENERAL: It is the desire of the President, on the application of the Secretary of the Interior and the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, that you should detail two regiments to act in the Indian country, with a view to open the way for the friendly Indians who are now refugees in Southern Kansas to return to their homes and to protect them there. Five thousand friendly Indians will also be armed to aid in their own protection, and you will please furnish them with necessary subsistence.

{p.625}

Please report your action in the premises to this Department. Prompt action is necessary.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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NEW MADRID, March 19, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Have had the country examined between here and Islands 8 and 10. Had to be done in skiffs, as the whole region is under water. River rising rapidly and threatening to overflow this place. For the present it is impossible to get troops to Foote’s assistance this side of the river. They could not aid him even if there. The only way to attack the works opposite Island No. 10 is by crossing the river here. Nearly the whole of the enemy’s force now encamped at Tiptonville, 5 miles below Point Pleasant, and a little above my lower battery. Am having an examination made, to see if by digging across one or two ridges I cannot connect Island No. 8 with river below Island No. 10 by connecting two bayous. If so, the work will be done by as large a force as necessary to complete it in twenty-four hours. All the roads leading northeast from here are under water-in many places 6 feet deep and rising. It is impracticable for the present to build a road across the peninsula-utterly so. Rebels are shut up in bend of river, with only outlet across Reelfoot Lake by flat-boat. Impracticable now, as the lake is 4 miles wide in cypress timber.

Capture of the enemy, I think, only a question of time. They have small supplies of provisions, and can get no more. Is it not possible for a couple of gunboats to run past Island No. 10 so I can cross my command over the river? Have urged Foote to try.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Hew Madrid, March 19, 1862.

Col. J. W. BISSELL:

Your two communications of yesterday have been received.* If it indeed be impracticable to get a gunboat or two past the enemy’s batteries, some other mode of dealing with him must be devised. I desire you, therefore, to make an examination of the peninsula opposite Island No. 10, to ascertain whether a short canal, not to exceed 2 miles in length, cannot be dug, so that boats can enter above Island No. 10 and come out into the river below it. A mere ditch, through which the water of the river can be started, will at this stage of the river wash into a deep channel in one night. I think, from the character of the ground and the high condition of the river, it may be feasible to do this in twenty-four hours, so that gunboats at least could pass through and enter the river below the island. Show this letter to Colonel Buford, who will furnish you every assistance. If the work can be done lay off the line of it and call on Colonel Buford for all his {p.626} available men to do the digging. Of course you will begin below, and not open the upper end to the river until the whole ditch is completed. Affairs below are in such condition that the presence of this force here is necessary. It is not possible, from your report, to get any part of it up to Island No. 10 or to Island No 8 nor do I see what good result could be effected by carrying it there. Colonel Buford has men enough to establish and work his heavy guns if it be desirable to establish them in position. Write fully.

Respectfully, colonel, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 19, 1862.

General CURTIS, Commanding Army of the Southwest:

GENERAL: I was by no means surprised at General Sigel’s conduct before the battle of Pea Ridge. It was precisely in keeping with what he did at Carthage and Wilson’s Creek. After your expedition started I received documentary proofs from Generals Sturgis, Schofield, and Totten, and a number of other officers, in regard to his conduct on those occasions, which destroyed all my confidence in him. It was for that reason that I telegraphed you so often not to let Sigel separate from you. I anticipated that he would try to play you a trick by being absent at the critical moment. I wished to forewarn you of the snare, but I could not then give you my reasons. I am glad that you prevented his projects and saved your army I cannot describe to you how much uneasiness I felt for you. You saved your army and won a glorious victory by refusing to take his advice. I do not believe he has been made a major-general. If so, I shall ask to have him sent to some other department.

A large number of extra teams have been sent you from Tipton and Sedalia via Linn Creek, and horses and wagons will be sent to Rolla as fast as possible. The drafts for transportation in Tennessee have been so urgent as to greatly embarrass us. We are doing everything in our power to supply you.

It is not intended to advance across Boston Mountains on any consideration. My instructions are not to advance to Fort Smith, but to keep the enemy south of Boston Mountains till he can be turned and cut off from his main source of supplies. He has already evacuated Pocahontas, and we hope soon to hear of his leaving Jacksonport. If Van Dorn does not fall back for the defense of White River and leave Arkansas he will be obliged to retreat south of the latter river. In either case you will be relieved of his presence.

Yours, in haste,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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PILOT KNOB, MO., March 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department:

GENERAL: We have reliable information from Pocahontas. There are 2,000 State troops and Jeff. Thompson with 100 of his men there.

{p.627}

They have also seven or eight pieces of artillery, not all serviceable. The roads are in such a state that the supply train sent to Carlin could not make over 6 miles a day. Carlin has succeeded in getting some flour, meal, pork, and, bacon, and considerable forage in the neighborhood where he now is; thinks he can get all the forage lie wants. It is his opinion that we can safely calculate upon getting half rations of meat and flour anywhere in this State or in Arkansas. If the marauding bands should be broken up and the people feel assured of our protection they will bring in everything we want that they can spare for the money. As I supposed, the rebels have removed all the ferries on Current River, Carlin is building a bridge across Black River. I will direct him to move forward to Doniphan or Pitman’s Ferry and establish a depot there. Supplies of forage, &c., will be more easily procured from the country at either of those points. I sent a man down who is well acquainted with the people, and who assured me that he could get a plenty of corn. The roads south of Rives’ Station are reported good. The mules we have are all so small that I sent my wagon-master to Saint Louis to get some larger ones for wheel mules. It is reported at Pocahontas that at the battle of Pea Ridge McCulloch was dangerously wounded, Price wounded, and McIntosh killed.

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

FRED’K STEELE, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHOFIELD:

Information is just received that there is a body of organized insurgents at Florida, in Monroe County, of from 1,000 to 1,500. Numbers probably exaggerated. I think that Colonel Huston’s regiment and perhaps a part of Merrill’s Horse should operate to break them up. You are authorized to give all orders deemed necessary.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 20, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

Enemy’s flotilla, hemmed in between Commodore Foote and General Pope, has made another attempt to escape down the river. Gunboats cannonaded General Pope’s batteries on the 18th for an hour and a half, but were driven back with severe loss. One gunboat was sunk and several badly damaged. They are completely hemmed in, and can escape only by fighting their way out.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 20, 1862.

E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

Dispatches just received from Colonel Canby, New Mexico, begging for re-enforcements. Deitzler’s command of five or six regiments near Fort Scott, intended to re-enforce General Curtis, can be withdrawn {p.628} and sent to New Mexico, if you approve it. This will compel me to re-enforce General Curtis from this place with troops intended for Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 20, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your suggestion is approved. Re-enforce Canby by all means. We have felt great anxiety about him.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 20, 1862.

Major PRINCE, Fort Leavenworth, Kans.:

Send dispatch to Colonel Mitchell, Second Kansas Cavalry, at Lawrence, to prepare immediately for orders to move to New Mexico; also Hollister’s battery of the Second Ohio Cavalry. Quartermaster’s department will supply them with transportation; also will be prepared to fit out other regiments for same destination. An agent should be sent immediately along the line of the railroad to Hannibal and Quincy to hurry forward all Government freight for Fort Leavenworth. This must have the preference of all other freight.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 20, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Rolla:

Send forward immediately to General Curtis all troops that can be spared from your post.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Head of Cross Timber Hollow, March 20, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN:

My cavalry movement forward has not yet returned, but at last accounts was driving back the advance of the enemy. It is cavalry and Indians. Meantime I have a much better position, commanding roads and nearer our supplies. The enemy has received five regiments from Texas and three from below Van Buren. They are also recruiting from surrounding country. Two regiments, Benton’s and Hill’s, disbanded after the battle, and 5,000 or 6,000 of his forces have been killed, wounded, and dispersed. He had from 35,000 to 40,000 when he marched against me, and now hopes to secure a larger force for another onset. Van Dorn has gone to Pocahontas, taking no troops from Western Arkansas. Price commands in Western Arkansas. I, {p.629} get this from a reliable Union man who left the vicinity of the enemy Monday night. I sent a party to Pineville Tuesday; all quiet there. Captain Stephens, of Bowen’s body guard, surrounded and attacked a party of rebels in arms on Indian Creek, wounding 1, taking 17 prisoners, including 3 captains.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 21, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN POPE, New Madrid, Mo.:

GENERAL: Your telegram in relation to canal (without date*) is just received. I heartily approve of your plan. Impress all the negroes you can find to assist in the work. If you can in this way turn and capture the enemy, it will be one of the most brilliant feats of the war.

When occasion requires you will assume command of all the forces under Colonel Buford on the other side of the river, and also those at Columbus. Colonel Buford has a number (five, I think) of large siege pieces. Use them wherever you think they will be of the most advantage. I will not attempt to hamper you with any minute instructions. The great object, you know, is to cut the enemy off from any chance of retreat by water. I leave you to accomplish this according to your own judgment, having full confidence in your ultimate success. Buell will effect a junction with Grant and Smith by Monday. We shall then have 70,000 men at a single point on the Tennessee with which to cut the enemy’s center, destroy their railroad connections, and thus cut off the retreat by land of Polk, McCown, &c. Unless the enemy is much stronger at Corinth than reported, I can see no chance of failure. There will probably be a big battle somewhere in that vicinity.

Unfortunately, just as I am preparing additional re-enforcements for the Army of the Tennessee, to make everything still more certain, I have received official dispatches of new troubles in New Mexico and the condition of Colonel Canby’s forces. This compels me to immediately fit out a column of 5,000 men for Canby’s assistance. I do it most willingly, for the Government has shamefully neglected him, but at the same time it seriously interferes with my plans.

Yours, truly,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* March 19, p. 625.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, March 21, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

I will immediately organize and send to New Mexico a column of from 4,000 to 5,000, From all the information I can obtain, Maj. Benjamin W. Brice, Pay Department, now in Kansas, is the most suitable officer for the command if he can be made brigadier-general of volunteers, but he would rank Colonel Canby. I therefore recommend Colonel Canby for same rank. Both would be excellent appointments.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.630}

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NEW MADRID, March 21, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Have found place for canal across peninsula. Two bayous head near together, one running into the Mississippi at Island 8, the other about 2 miles above New Madrid. A canal 500 yards long through Cypress Swamp will connect them. Work will be commenced tomorrow. By Monday night will have two steam-tugs and five barges here if all goes well. Route has been carefully examined and is practicable. If enemy are opposite here Wednesday next they will be ours. Gunboats have made no impression and I think will not. Commodore Foote positively declines to run any of his gunboats past enemy’s batteries. They are firing at long range, with only enemy’s artillerists in sight. River still rising rapidly; whole country northeast of us overflowed, except causeway to Sikeston.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 21, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I transmit inclosed a very rough sketch of the situation here.* What is on the other side of the river is of course from hearsay. My great object is to get across the river, which I shall do as soon as possible. I expect the tugs and barges here by the canal on Monday.

The value of our gunboat flotilla has been altogether overestimated. As an auxiliary merely to land forces, to escort transports, to reconnoiter in advance of our movements, and to cover the landing of troops, gunboats can do admirable service. They cannot take any sort of battery on the shore, as I think you will find. The enemy’s gunboats have wholly failed to dislodge even the hasty batteries and rifle pits I have made. After five days’ bombarding Commodore Foote has made no sort of impression. Nothing but the gunners and a few infantry have been left opposite Island No. 10. My impression is that the enemy is trying very hard to get off by river from Tiptonville. They have a very small supply of rations, and the country in the bend is very sparsely settled. One of their transports was sunk yesterday by our lower battery in attempting to make a landing just below Tiptonville. It is a bare possibility that the men, by paddling down the swamps on logs and wading where they can, may get off on boats below, but it will be without anything whatever. I have closed every exit from the bend by way of the river as far as guns will do it. The means of crossing are all I need. It would be of immense service for such operations on this river if you would send me the 20-pounder Parrotts. There are four at Jefferson Barracks and I suppose more in the city. One battery of them is at Sedalia or Lexington, and can well be spared from there. The 20-pounder Parrotts are better and more effective than the siege twenty-fours, and can be used as field batteries. The river is high and rising and is nowhere less than a mile wide; in most parts it is at least a mile and a quarter. I will do all that is possible to keep things going.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

{p.631}

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SAINT LOUIS, March 21, 1862.

Flag-Officer ANDREW H. FOOTE, Commanding Naval Forces, &c.:

SIR: I have just received your report (without date)* of your operations against the enemy’s batteries in the vicinity of Island No. 10. While I am certain that you have done everything that could be done successfully to reduce these works, I am very glad that you have not unnecessarily exposed your gunboats. If they had been disabled, it would have been a most serious loss to us in the future operations of the campaign, whereas the reduction of these batteries this week or next is a matter of very little importance. Indeed, I think it will turn out in the end that it is much better for us that they are not reduced till we can fully cut off the retreat of their troops.

Everything is progressing well on the Tennessee River towards opening your way down the Mississippi. The reduction of these works is only a question of time, and we are in no hurry on that point. Nothing is lost by a little delay there. I am directing all my attention now to another object, and when that is accomplished the enemy must evacuate or surrender.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Probably that on p. 620.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, March 21, 1862.

E. M. STANTON:

Forces to New Mexico and Overland Mail Route will be sent with all possible dispatch. These detachments and the necessity of re-enforcing General Curtis seriously interfere with military plans on the Tennessee River, but I think they will merely delay the result. To fit out these expeditions we must make large purchases of cavalry, artillery, and quartermaster’s horses. Vouchers are greatly depreciated, and we must have money to make these purchases. Major Allen should be supplied immediately.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 21, 1862.

Maj. W. E. PRINCE, Fort Leavenworth, Hans.:

You will immediately send a courier to Colonel Deitzler at Fort Scott with orders to move to Lawrence, Kans., the First Kansas Infantry, Seventh Kansas Cavalry, and two regiments of Wisconsin infantry. The Second Ohio Cavalry, one regiment Wisconsin infantry and Rabb’s battery will remain at Fort Scott. If Colonel Deitzler and his command have joined General Curtis in Arkansas this order will be suspended. Every exertion should be made to organize and prepare for the field all Kansas troops, requisitions being made here for whatever cannot be supplied there. A dispatch will be sent to your care for Governor Robinson) which please forward immediately.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.632}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, March 21, 1862.

Capt. K. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The enemy’s cavalry retired beyond the mountains. My advance was in Fayetteville yesterday. Indians retired also; probably scattered in the nation. General Van Dorn was at Van Buren on the 15th. Lieutenant-Colonels Herron and Chandler have been sent to me for exchange under flag of truce; came by Col. Clay Taylor, which I accept according to General Halleck’s tariff, and send for all my men in the rebel army to be exchanged on the same terms. Colonel Taylor thinks they will be forwarded. If they are, I shall send for some of those I have forwarded to Saint Louis as equivalents. A severe snowstorm is going off. I am starting new mills, and hope soon to have flour. The move of the enemy was probably for the purpose mainly of capturing my foraging parties, but it terrified the citizens, who brought news of the former movement, and they came again with exaggerated reports of the enemy. I shall continue to keep a force in readiness, but the entire absence of forage this side of the mountains makes it necessary to hold my main force near my source of supplies. Paymasters and a few more cartridges are said to be en route this side of Springfield. No news from Leavenworth troops or any others.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 21, 1862.

Col. S. H. BOYD, Rolla, Mo.:

Send forward to General Curtis all available forces and ammunition without delay. Additional troops will be sent from here as soon as they can be armed.

If any of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry refuse to go forward immediately arrest them for mutiny and place them in confinement.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 21, 1862.

Brigadier-General TOTTEN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am receiving numerous complaints of depredations of rebel bands in Jackson, La Fayette, and Johnson counties. Your troops should immediately take the field and effectually break them up. I hope to hear soon some good results from prompt and efficient operations in your district.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE FRONTIER, Rolla, Mo., March 21, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JAMES TOTTEN, Comdg. Second Div., Army of the Frontier, Camp on Elk Creek:

GENERAL: It is still reported that Marmaduke intends making {p.633} another raid in some direction; what, does not appear. He may possibly attempt to pass between your division and White River, for the purpose of attacking Forsyth in the rear. This would be comparatively easy, now that the Third Division has moved east. It will be necessary for you to watch that region of country carefully. You are authorized to move your division for forage whenever it shall become necessary and in whatever direction you find it expedient, keeping in view, however, the necessity I have mentioned of guarding the passes between the position you may occupy and White River.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 22, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

The Secretary of the Treasury is making arrangements to borrow money in New York, and hopes to supply you and pay off your troops in a few days.

It will be necessary to report the state of your command and the number of troops in order to make the estimates, so as to keep you supplied. I have requested the Treasury Department to give you the preference over all other claims to the payment of troops and procurement of supplies.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo., March 23, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: A telegram from General Curtis some days ago stated that the enemy was returning to attack him with a very large army, and that he required large re-enforcements. I immediately sent him several additional regiments, but another telegram, received last evening, stated that it was a false alarm, and that the enemy had now withdrawn all his forces to the south of Boston Mountains.

I am organizing a column for New Mexico as rapidly as possible. It, however, will take some days to collect troops, artillery, and horses, and a train. General Brice will be placed in command of this column. I have no personal acquaintance with him, but many officers in whose judgment I have great confidence say he is admirably suited for that duty, having energy and good judgment, and being thoroughly acquainted with every part of New Mexico. I know General Canby well. He is one of the best officers in the service. I am certain that he will do everything possible to hold out until our re-enforcements can reach him. I therefore do not deem it necessary, at least for the present, to attach New Mexico to this department. I am confident that General Canby and myself can co-operate as well as if he were under my direct orders. Moreover, his command is so very distant that I could not well direct his movements, and by having an independent position he can act more freely.

General Pope is gradually working his way through the swamps south {p.634} of New Madrid. His progress is necessarily slow, but if the operation should be successful, it can hardly fail to produce important results.

Generals Grant and Smith are near Savannah, on the Tennessee, with about 45,000 men. The streams in the vicinity are so very much swollen and the roads so nearly impassable that his movements are necessarily delayed. As I could not re-enforce him as I expected (on account of sending troops to General Curtis and New Mexico), I have directed him to make no important movements till General Buell’s column, now at Columbia, can form a junction with him. The Mobile and Ohio Railroad has been cut in two places between Corinth and Jackson, but we must take Corinth before we can seriously injure his communications. Johnston is reported to be in very strong force at Corinth and Tuscumbia, having received large re-enforcements from Georgia and Alabama. Beauregard and Polk are reported to be at Jackson and Humboldt with re-enforcements from Louisiana and Florida. Cannot Generals Sherman and Butler take advantage of this withdrawal of troops from Georgia and Alabama to attack Savannah and Mobile?

I am rapidly withdrawing all troops mustered into the service of the United States from State control and fitting them out here for the field. This causes some grumbling on the part of the troops and State authorities, but I am satisfied that it is the only way to get these forces promptly into the field, where they are now much wanted. So long as the soldiers remain near their homes they cannot be disciplined; moreover, as the local authorities derive profits from the expenditure of public moneys in their vicinity, they very naturally desire to keep them there as long as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE Mississippi, New Madrid, March 23, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Since yesterday our gunboats seem to have ceased their fire and are waiting for us to reduce the batteries opposite Island No. 10. If I can cross this force it will be an easy matter, as the batteries are only earth parapets, open to the rear-such works as could be put up in twenty-four hours. The river is very high and rising still, and the current runs so furiously that a row-boat, manned by six oarsmen, which I sent out yesterday, was unable to stem it and floated down 3 miles. It was necessary to haul it back to the upper redoubt by land. The river is over a mile wide at every point-a distance too great for our guns to cover the landing on the opposite side. To cross this army under such circumstances, in the face of the enemy, will be a difficult and dangerous operation, and nothing except the utter failure of our gunboats to achieve what they promise and the imperative necessity of taking the enemy’s batteries, now that they have been assailed, would induce me to hazard such an operation with volunteers without positive orders. The difficulties have much increased since I first determined upon such a movement by the greatly-increased velocity and fury of the current. The canal cannot be made deep enough for gunboats, and there will be nothing to cover our landing on the opposite bank. The movement must therefore be made under cover of darkness, which will greatly increase the danger and chance of confusion. I see well the necessity {p.635} of carrying the enemy’s works, now that the attack has begun, but it is distinctly to be understood that no manner of assistance has been or, from appearances, can be rendered us by the gunboats of the flotilla. Commodore Foote declines to run any of his boats past the batteries for fear of losing them. I have offered, through Colonel Bissell, engineers to secure the boat against damage from the enemy’s fire, but Commodore Foote fears that the enemy may board her. Surely such a risk is much less than will be that of crossing a large force in frail boats over a wide, swift river, in the face of an enemy, and without anything to cover the landing. I shall, however, carry out the operation; but I would respectfully suggest that if any plan of operations down this river has been made with the belief that our gunboat flotilla can dislodge the enemy from any batteries they choose to place on the main-land or on the islands, it must of necessity fail. Unless the gunboats are able to perform what has been asserted for them, the line of the river is the strongest the enemy has. If the enemy have planted batteries on the upper end of any island below us, we will have the same delay and difficulty we have had here. I must disembark, pass around by land, establish batteries below the enemy, and wait until they are starved out, as it is not likely that other places will be found where canals can be dug, so as to bring transports below the enemy’s batteries without passing in range. Even if such places could be found, wherever the enemy established a battery I would be obliged, as I am now, to cross, without cover or the aid of gunboats, in the face of the enemy. Of course, if the land forces are to cross and recross this river at every battery of the enemy along its banks and on the islands and carry their works, we must be delayed in our progress beyond all reason and must certainly sustain some disaster.

I write you frankly the facts, as I know you desire to have them. The newspaper puffing concerning the gunboats has misled the public greatly. I think it has been a fact sufficiently well established by experience that batteries on the water, especially where they have not the force to land and storm, cannot contend with redoubts on the land. The enemy here has been unable, with all his gunboats, to dislodge the riflemen and small artillery batteries I have established. Batteries of heavy guns would be still more difficult. The enemy exposes none of his men in the batteries except those at the guns, and as he does not fear a land attack or any attempt to storm on the part of the flotilla, he scarcely answers Commodore Foote’s cannonade. Colonel Bissell, whom I sent up, informs me that the enemy only fired twice during the day he was there. I state these facts because I think it proper that it should be understood precisely what is the exact capacity of the naval flotilla in such operations, and because it seems to me that we are undertaking a most difficult line of operations if the land forces are to be crossed and recrossed at every battery the enemy chooses to establish. The result of seven days’ operations of the gunboats has plainly shown that they are not likely to reduce any of the enemy’s batteries. I have also to complain that the corps of newspaper correspondents with the flotilla have been put in possession of my plans for bringing down boats here by digging a canal and have published it in the newspapers. I fear to write anything, lest I see it in a day or two in all the newspapers in the country. My dispatches to Colonel Buford and Commodore Foote concerning the blockade of the river below them were official, and not designed for publication. I regret to trouble you with such matters, but if my intentions and movements are published {p.636} days in advance by persons not under my control I must cease to correspond with the forces above me.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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PILOT KNOB, MO., March 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A.:

GENERAL: The Eleventh Wisconsin Infantry and the Sixteenth Ohio Battery marched from here this morning to join the advance at Doniphan or Pittman’s Ferry. Three squadrons of the Fifth Illinois Cavalry are waiting here for the return of their baggage wagons, which were sent forward with supplies, the supply train not being sufficient to keep the troops in advance provisioned. The other three squadrons of that regiment are at Greenville, having been sent as escorts to trains and as guard to the depot. I have detailed the Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry, four squadrons, under Colonel Bell, to guard the depot at this point and at Greenville, or wherever it may be established, and to escort trains between these points. The squadron of Illinois cavalry, under Captain Dodson (Dodson’s and Huntley’s troop), I shall take with me into the field. We have received 75 wheel mules and some teamsters from Saint Louis, and shall be able to get up an efficient supply train immediately. We have no ammunition for the batteries except what is in the boxes of the caissons and limbers-200 rounds of mixed ammunition. This is half the usual allowance for a campaign, and might not be sufficient if we should intrench ourselves at Helena. This did not occur to me until I inspected Captain Mitchell’s battery. He has four 6-pounder guns and two 12-pounder howitzers. Captain Manter has a 4-gun battery. I do not know whether either one is a howitzer. I know nothing about the small guns in possession of one of the cavalry regiments. If ammunition should be sent here, it could be forwarded to me immediately.*

I have been informed that all the prisoners of war taken by the rebels in Missouri and Arkansas are confined in the penitentiary at Little Rock. I could not ascertain whether or not there was any force at that place besides a prison guard.

I think General Curtis will have another battle soon. If Van Dorn should be defeated again he may turn his attention to my command. I do not anticipate much resistance this side of Helena. It is reported that they have been building iron-clad gunboats on the Lower Mississippi.

Very respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

FRED’K STEELE, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

* Some matter of detail here omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 23, 1862.

General SAMUEL R. CURTIS:

It is reported that the enemy has about 100 negroes engaged in the saltpeter works in Marion County, a little east of Worth. They are {p.637} guarded by only one company. A detachment of cavalry from Springfield could destroy these works and free the negroes, as being employed in enemy’s service.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., March 23, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication, dated Saint Louis, Mo., March 21, 1862, from Major-General Halleck, commanding the department, touching certain reports of disturbances in La Fayette, Jackson, and Johnson Counties, in this State. His instructions shall be attended to carefully and at the earliest possible day.

In connection with this, I would also mention, for the information of the major-general commanding, that I have just heard rumors from other sources of a disorderly state of things in Bates County, where a certain scoundrel, Jackman, heads a band of robbers and desperadoes, numbering, it is reported by Colonel Warren, as high as 500. Before my arrival here my predecessor, General McKean, had given orders which, when carried out, places eight companies of the First Iowa Cavalry and one section First Missouri Light Artillery at Clinton, Henry County. The object of this was undoubtedly to watch Jackman in Bates County, and also to keep an eye to the quiet of the other counties adjacent to Henry. The order of General McKean directs two companies First Iowa Cavalry, stationed at Lexington, to proceed to Sedalia when relieved by Companies A and C, Missouri State Militia, from Booneville.

The two companies First Iowa Cavalry from Lexington are represented as being broken down in horses and as requiring rest. When these two companies reach Sedalia, and General McKean’s orders are complied with, there will be four companies of cavalry at Sedalia.

I am, captain, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., March 23, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to state, for the information of the major-general commanding, that about 4 o’clock p.m. to-day, after the departure of all the mails, I received a messenger from Col. L. Merrill, at Columbia, who brought the information that rebels to the number of from 60 to 150 were concentrated in the vicinity of Mount Vernon, Moniteau County, and that he would co-operate on the north Side of the river with any expedition I might be pleased to order in that direction.

Deeming this matter of considerable importance I have sent out troops named in the inclosed copy of instructions to Lieutenant-Colonel Blood, commanding post at Tipton, Mo.

The infantry from here went by special train and the cavalry and {p.638} artillery marched by road, both leaving here about 9 o’clock p.m. for California, Mo.

I also inclose copies of Special Orders, Nos. 4 and 5,* from these headquarters.

For fear Lieutenant-Colonel Blood might be absent or necessarily prevented from taking command of the expedition, I sent Major Fletcher to Tipton with dispatches, and in such event to take command himself (Special Order, No. 5).

The inclosed telegrams I were deemed necessary on account of the weakening of the posts of California and Tipton.

Two companies Twenty-sixth Indiana are to move from the La Mine to Syracuse, relieving the two companies Sixth Missouri Volunteers there, who will move to Tipton, and the one company Sixth Missouri at Tipton to California, thus giving, as before, two companies at each of the above points and leaving still seven at the La Mine.

Owing to the heavy extra duty, building block and guard houses, guarding bridges, and to sickness in the troops here, it has been deemed necessary to bring troops from the La Mine to other points in this direction.

In order that the major-general commanding the department may comprehend the whole affair, I send also herewith a copy of Colonel Merrill’s letter from Columbia,** giving the information relative to the band after whom I have dispatched Lieutenant-Colonel Blood.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

* Omitted as unimportant.

** Not found.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., March 23, 1862.

Lieut. Col. J. H. BLOOD, Sixth Missouri Volunteers:

SIR: Information has just been received from Col. L. Merrill, commanding United States Volunteers at Columbia, Boone County, Mo., that a band of guerrillas, variously estimated at from 60 to 1502 are infesting the country on this side of the Missouri River, in Moniteau County, opposite Providence, in Boone County, to a point as high up the river as Rocheport Ferry, landing within 10 miles of Booneville. The camp-fires of these guerrillas have been seen on this side of the river by scouts in Boone County, near Providence.

It is necessary that these bands of lawless guerrillas should be thoroughly broken up and exterminated, and I have selected you in this instance to accomplish this most desirable and important duty, and I hope, by your energy and secret and rapid movements, you may be able to give the outlaws a terrible and long-to-be-remembered lesson.

To accomplish this object I have caused the following-named troops to march, and have directed them to report to you at Pisgah, some 12 or 15 miles northeast from Tipton. The troops ordered to report to you from this place and California are-

1st. Captain Adams’ company, C, Sixth Missouri Volunteers, numbering about 45 men, from Jefferson City.

2d. Capt. Daniel Rice’s company, with a detachment of Lieutenant {p.639} Ward’s company, loth belonging to the Missouri State Volunteers, from Jefferson City, numbering about 90 men.

3d. One section (two pieces) of Captain Cockefair’s Third Indiana, Battery, from Jefferson City, numbering about 30 men.

4th. Captain Fletcher’s company, B, Sixth Missouri Volunteers, from California, numbering 65 or 70 men, probably.

In addition to the above-mentioned troops, you will take with you from Tipton Captain Bragg’s company, A, Sixth Missouri Volunteers, which I have calculated will make your entire force about 170 foot, 90 horse, and two pieces of artillery.

My object in giving you thus large a force is that you may crush out this band of outlaws, guerrillas, and robbers, and utterly annihilate them.

On the receipt of this you will proceed with Captain Bragg’s company to Pisgah, where you will be joined by the troops hereinbefore mentioned. When your command has all come up, if they are not already there when you arrive, you will proceed, via Midway, to Mount Vernon, carefully examining the country as you approach that place, and as far as the Missouri River, opposite Providence, to ascertain the whereabouts of the guerrilla band which you are after, and which is under Watson.

Your expedition may take you as far as Rocheport Ferry Landing, or even nearer to Booneville, before learning anything of the robbers, but find them, and do not spare them when found.

You would do well to get a good, reliable guide to give you information about every road and by-path in the country through which you pass. About northwest from Midway, and probably 8 miles distant therefrom, is a place called Clarke’s Fork, which it may be well to examine into closely in your pursuit of the guerrillas.

By inquiry of such loyal men among the farmers as you may find, it is hoped, however, that you will, without much trouble, learn the whereabouts of the band you seek, and come upon them unexpectedly.

After you have found and punished the robbers and utterly broken them up or satisfied yourself they are not in existence, you will order your troops back to their respective posts, and report the result of your expedition to these headquarters.

You must take at least ten days’ rations with your command from Tipton; all the other companies have the same.

If anything of importance occurs in connection with your command report immediately by express.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., March 24, 1862.

Col. LEWIS MERRILL, Commanding, Columbia, Mo.:

Your communication of the 22d instant came to hand yesterday afternoon at 4 o’clock, and in accordance with your suggestions I dispatched last night an expedition from this point, to proceed via California and Pisgah, where they will be joined by re-enforcements from Tipton, and, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Blood, Sixth Missouri Volunteers, they are to thoroughly scour the country on this side of the {p.640} river, from Mount Vernon to Rocheport Ferry Landing, Booneville, and Clarke’s Fork, and to break up and entirely destroy the pestiferous gang of which you have advised me.

The expedition, when it reaches Pisgah, will number three companies of the Sixth Missouri Volunteers (infantry), two companies of Missouri State Militia (mounted), and one section of the Third Indiana Battery, under Lieutenant Thomas. Owing to the heavy guard duty at railroad bridges, &c., the companies of infantry will not be very strong, but the force I apprehend will be amply sufficient to crush out the marauders. They will doubtless move from Pisgah some time to-day, and are intended to move rapidly.

It is rumored here that the ferry at Providence is in the habit of crossing these marauding bands, and doing it after night. Also that a flat crosses men a short distance above Providence, and perhaps another just above Rocheport. If you will carefully examine into this matter on your side of the river I will endeavor to do the same on this side, and, if necessary, I shall break up every ferry between here and Booneville. I would give you more particulars as to the expedition, but am in doubt as to whether you will receive this safely.

If I learn anything of importance on your side of the river or in connection with this expedition I will inform you.

Keep a good lookout on your side as soon after the arrival of your express as possible and to-morrow be surely on the watch.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, Ark., March 24, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN:

CAPTAIN: The general’s dispatch about saltpeter works received. Had sent spies two days before preparatory to the purpose suggested. Will attend to it.

Last of my forward cavalry movement just in. They went southwest from Fayetteville; came up line road to Pineville. Indians ran back into Territory. Colonel Pease commanded. Took several prisoners, among them Captain Boone, who says he escaped from former captivity by jumping from cars on being transferred from Saint Louis to Columbus.

Some Union fugitives have just come in from east of Fayetteville, the rebel force coming again to devastate and destroy. I think it merely a foraging party of the enemy. The cavalry suffered for forage and food. The country is stripped from this point to the Arkansas, and my foraging teams have to make two days’ journey north to get anything.

Hospital stores arrived yesterday. They are thankfully received, and I am grateful to the general and the Sanitary Commission for promptness in this regard. Many an aching wound is comforted by this. God bless the ladies that care for the sick and wounded soldiers.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.641}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 24, 1862.

General POPE, New Madrid:

Yours of yesterday received. Commodore Foote will not attempt to run past the batteries and he cannot reduce them. If the crossing cannot be effected with safety it had better not be undertaken. The main object is accomplished by holding the enemy in position. If the idea of crossing is given up, send all the forces you can spare to Bird’s Point, to be transported up the Tennessee. We can there turn the enemy and cut off his retreat by land, while your guns command the river. If this meets your views, I will also withdraw the forces from Hickman with the same object. The immediate reduction of these batteries is not important, but the failure in an attempt to cross your army over the river might be disastrous. I am decidedly in favor of the move up the Tennessee. Answer.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 24, 1862.

Maj. J. D. SNEDICOR, Provost-Marshal, Fulton, Mo.:

MAJOR: In order that our enemies may be disarmed and that our friends may not be left isolated and exposed, to be overpowered and disarmed by rebels, you will take possession of all fire-arms of every description in your district. Give to the owner a certificate, and so number or mark the arms that they can be restored at the close of the rebellion. The arms you will keep or deposit in a secure place, where they will be properly guarded. In order to obtain arms, &c., you may in your discretion resort to the oath, a copy of which was forwarded you by Dr. Martin.

We have been at fault to know where to ship blanks and stationery for you. I will send them to Mexico, to care of postmaster, immediately on receipt of your requisitions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General. C. FLETCHER, Assistant.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 25, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: Your letter of the 19th instant in relation to military outrages in Jackson County, Missouri, is just received. I have had two regiments stationed or moving in Jackson County for some time past in order to put a stop to these depredations. This is as much as I can do, for many other counties in this State are equally urgent in their calls for protection, and to gratify them all would require an army of 50,000 men to be distributed through Missouri in addition to the militia.

That many and in some cases horrible outrages have been committed {p.642} in this State I do not doubt. They have been committed by three classes of persons.

1st. The enemy’s guerrilla bands. Since the expulsion of Price they are rapidly diminishing. Nevertheless it will require some severe examples to be made in order to suppress them.

2d. The Kansas jayhawkers, or robbers, who were organized under the auspices of Senator Lane. They wear the uniform of and it is believed receive pay from the United States. Their principal occupation for the last six months seems to have been the stealing of negroes, the robbing of houses, and the burning of barns, grain, and forage. The evidence of their crimes is unquestionable. They have not heretofore been under my orders. I will now keep them out of Missouri or have them shot.

3d. Our own volunteer troops. It cannot be denied that some of our volunteer regiments have behaved very badly, plundering to an enormous extent. I have done everything in my power to prevent this and to punish the guilty. Many of the regimental officers are very bad men and participate in this plunder. In such cases it is impossible to reach them by courts-martial. Where regiments are moving in the field courts cannot be assembled, and when courts are ordered the witnesses cannot be procured, or, if private soldiers, are frequently overawed by their colonels or other officers. This matter was fully represented to Assistant Secretary Scott when here, and he advised the mustering out of service of officers who were satisfactorily shown to be guilty of this species of plunder and marauding. Under the general authority given to me to muster out of service I have in a few cases, resorted to this remedy, and it is producing a good effect. By this means the officers escape the punishment and disgrace which they deserve, but the army is purged of them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 25, 1862.

E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

Pretended Union man from New Orleans just arrived within our lines represents that the rebels are building one or more river boats at that place, clad in railroad iron, like the Merrimac. Such a river boat could pass any of our batteries, destroy Commodore Foote’s flotilla, and burn the steamboats in the Western waters. This is a very serious matter, which requires immediate attention.

If there are any very heavy guns at Pittsburgh they should be sent immediately down the Ohio, to be mounted at Cairo or Columbus.

I have written to Commodore Foote to know if either of his gunboats can be more heavily iron-clad, so as to meet the apprehended danger. If so, authority should be given to alter her; if not, authority should be given to immediately construct a river monitor capable of meeting anything the enemy can send up the river.

The matter seems to me to admit of no delay.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.643}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, March 25, 1862-6.35 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Yours of this date has just arrived. Information of the same character reached me from other sources this morning, and this evening a number of Western boat-builders meet at the Department to consider the best mode of meeting the rebel boat. The universal opinion among naval and military engineers in the East is that a floating ram striking and sinking the iron-clad vessel is the best mode of encountering it. A large class boat at Saint Louis might perhaps be got ready in a short time; would it not be well for you to consult some of your river men? Commodore Vanderbilt has given his steamship Vanderbilt for the purpose, and it is now at Norfolk to meet the Merrimac, and although not armor-clad, he is very confident of being able to run her down. Charles Ellet, a distinguished engineer, has given the subject much attention. I will send him to-morrow to see and consult you, and with authority to act as you may deem best. He is a man of courage and energy, and willing to risk his own life upon his own job.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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NEW MADRID, March 25, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our canal progresses well; two steamers with four barges are nearly through. I will bring down several more steamers, and will deepen the canal so as to bring through it the smallest gunboat. We need her to cover our landing on the opposite bank. I sent some cavalry out from Point Pleasant 25 miles on plank road, under Major Rawalt, Seventh Illinois Cavalry, to break up Jeff. Thompson’s camp. Came upon him, killed 6, and wounded many more; dispersed his force entirely in the swamp.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 64.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENL.’S OFFICE, Washington, March 25, 1862.

...

4. Brig. Gen. Thomas A. Davies is assigned to duty in the Department of the Mississippi, and will report in person to Major-General Halleck at Saint Louis.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 26, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The main works of the enemy are on main-land, above Island No. 10. Gun and mortar boats can make no impression on them. Pope has been preparing to cross below and attack them in the rear, but may fail on account of the flood. If so, he will probably cross above to {p.644} Columbus or Hickman for the same purpose. Nearly the whole Mississippi Valley in that vicinity is overflowed.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 26, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your letter of the 23d just received. General Hunter has been placed in command of the Southern Department, including Sherman’s and Brannan’s commands. I have instructed him to proceed immediately to his command and operate vigorously against Savannah and Mobile. The sooner all the troops are withdrawn from their respective States and placed under discipline the better it will be for the service.

Nominations of Canby and Brice are pending before the Senate. Strong was about to be rejected, but I have applied for his confirmation, and it will be done.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 26, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Information received from a man who left New Orleans that one iron-clad gunboat for river was nearly completed. Thinks it is now on the way up the Mississippi. Eleven other river gunboats building; also a very large ocean steamer, said to carry twenty-four guns, and to be made impenetrable to shot. All these vessels are being rapidly completed.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, March 26, 1862.

Flag-Officer ANDREW H. FOOTE:

I have directed Colonel Bissell, who is making slow but certain progress with his work, to deepen the channel sufficiently to enable one of your smallest gunboats to be brought through. The river here is so wide that our guns on this side cannot command the landing on the opposite bank, and I need a gunboat to lie near the opposite shore, to prevent the establishment of batteries or the use of field guns against our boats in crossing. The enemy’s pickets line the opposite shore from Island No. 10 all the way around to Tiptonville (Meriwether’s Landing), and any movement will be observed as soon as it is begun. Of course the frail steamers loaded with men are not suitable to effect the passage of the river in the face of an enemy, even with field batteries. Your smallest gunboat will answer all purposes, and can be brought through, even if it be necessary to take off her guns temporarily. They can either be brought down in one of the steamers or barges or we can arm her with 32s and 8-inch howitzers here. I {p.645} think the escape of the enemy nearly impossible. Certainly no baggage nor any sort of artillery or material of war can be carried off. My lower battery is 2 miles below Tiptonville, and commands the upper end of the overflowed lands on the east bank. It consists of two 24s and two 10-pounder Parrotts well supported. From this place around to the lower battery the shore is lined with heavy guns, 24s and 32s.

I shall anxiously await your reply, in which I hope you will let me know the draught of your smallest gunboat with and without guns. To cross this furious river, so wide that our batteries cannot cover the landing, in the face of an enemy with artillery, and on such frail vessels as we must use, is a very hazardous and difficult operation, only to be justified by the necessities of the case. Every means, therefore, must be taken to diminish the danger of any disaster, and your gunboat will render matters greatly more safe. When once my force is on the other side I am a match for any enemy to be found there, in whatever numbers they are likely to have. Please communicate with me as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, March 27, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our canal progresses slowly but surely. Much difficulty has been met with sawing off trees below the water. It will require three days to get the boats through yet. I fear no gunboat can be brought, but I will speedily fit up one that will carry a heavy shell gun or two to cover our landing. Some delay is unavoidable, but I am confident of success. The enemy’s gunboats keep very clear of us. I do not think it possible for the enemy to escape in transports from Tiptonville in the face of our heavy battery below. They cannot embark below Tiptonville, as the whole country is under water. Bragg is said to be at Island 10. Doubtful.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, March 27, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Your dispatch of 24th received. Will take Island 10 within a week. Trust me. As Commodore Foote is unable to reduce and unwilling to run his gunboats past it, I would ask, as they belong to the United States, that he be directed to remove his crews from two of them and turn over the boats to me. I will bring them here. I can get along without them, but will have several days’ delay.

The railroad from Bird’s Point to Sikeston under water, and route to Commerce impracticable from backwater of swamps. Troops could not be taken from here till river is open. I am confident of success, and shall carefully provide against any danger in crossing the river.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

{p.646}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, March 27, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: A reliable friend from Huntsville says Price’s army is losing and gaining. Van Dorn goes East, leaving Price in command. He must attack me soon or the Missouri troops will leave him. Expects fifteen regiments from Texas. Four contrabands just arrived. Left Van Buren Sunday last. They think most of the troops are ordered to Little Rock and Memphis, and were about going. They say the troops were badly whipped and swear they won’t fight us again; that all who won’t join the Confederates are breaking for home.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 28, 1862.

Flag-Officer FOOTE:

General Pope is confident that he can turn the enemy’s position by crossing below. Give him all the assistance in your power by the use of your gunboats. I think that by a combined operation the object can be accomplished. One or two gunboats are very necessary to protect his crossing. Assist him in this if you can.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, March 28, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our canal approaches completion. It has been a great labor to cut through the swamps, but to-morrow brings us to the bayou which conducts to this place. During progress of this work have had two heavy barges lashed together, strengthened all around with 4 feet thick of heavy timber, and to be lined with batters of pressed hay, and to carry one columbiad and two Dahlgrens. Four steamers will be brought through immediately. I have little doubt of success in crossing and capturing everything.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 28, 1862.

General POPE, New Madrid:

I have telegraphed to Commodore Foote to give all the aid in his power. You have a difficult problem to solve. I will not embarrass you with instructions. I leave you free to act as your judgment may deem best.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.647}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, March 28, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: A scout from Fort Scott reports that Deitzler is ordered to New Mexico. What does this mean? Price has announced his march against me with re-enforcements, starting on the 26th. No re-enforcements and no artillery ammunition has yet arrived for me.

The time of Phelps’ regiment is ending and it wants to go out. I have ordered forward all available detachments, but mainly depended on Kansas forces, which I have been assured were moving to this command. Price at last accounts, was making great preparations for another march, and if he is coming this way I should surely be re-enforced.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 28, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: I have directed that Jefferson Barracks be evacuated, the public property to be removed, and the buildings to be turned over to the medical department for a hospital. General Buell reports the number sick and absent of his army (of 101,000 men) to be 30,000 or nearly one in every three. This is certainly an enormous sick list for an army that has been engaged in no serious battle. Of the regiments which I have recently sent up the Tennessee River, now numbering in all about 50,000 men, all the sick were left behind in hospital, and yet, after being less than two weeks in the field, it is reported that 5,000 men are already on the sick list. This, at a healthy season of the year, is certainly an unprecedented condition of things, and would seem to indicate a radical deficiency somewhere. I am confident it does not result from a want of proper provisions and hospital stores, for no army was ever better supplied. I have given the subject as much attention as my time would permit, and I think one great source of the evil is in the incompetency of the brigade and regimental surgeons of volunteers. It is alleged that men are placed on the sick list and given certificates of inability as a mere matter of favoritism, in order that they may visit their homes or avoid disagreeable service in the field. On several occasions I have ordered medical boards to re-examine men sent from the field to the hospitals in this city, and a large portion of those so re-examined have been reported fit for duty in the field. This is a serious evil, but very difficult to remove. To order men into the field who are reported by their surgeons as sick would seem a cruel procedure on the part of a commander.

In detailing General Denver for the command in Kansas I followed the advice of the officers of General Hunter’s staff. They gave it as their opinion that he was best suited for the place, and as I had very little personal acquaintance with him I felt bound to follow the best advice I could obtain. Subsequent information convinces me that it was good, and that a better selection could not have been made. There are few, if any, enemies in Kansas, and the qualities most required there are administrative. I think General Denver would preserve peace on {p.648} the border and enable me to send most of the Kansas troops into the field, where they might be of some use. As it now is they are really worse than useless, for they compel me to keep troops from other States on the Missouri border to prevent these Kansas troops from committing murders and robberies. It appears, however, that there are some political influences connected with this matter. Not being a politician, this did not occur to me. I am a little surprised however, that politicians in Congress should be permitted to dictate the selection of officers for particular duties in this department. Under such circumstances I cannot be responsible for the results. Nevertheless I shall comply with the President’s wishes, and place some other officer in command in Kansas as soon as I can spare one for that purpose.

On consultation with Major Donaldson, just from New Mexico, it has been determined to send out an expedition of one regiment of cavalry, three of infantry, and two or three batteries. He does not deem a larger force necessary. Moreover it will be a very difficult task to get this number through at this season, as there is no forage or grass on the road. Many say that all our animals will die for want of food before they can reach Fort Union, while others say they can get through if managed with care. The urgency of the case requires, in my opinion, that we run all risks in order to save General Canby’s command if it is possible. It is estimated that each regiment will require at least 100 wagons to carry it through, and as there is no large amount of stores at Fort Union, the general supply train must follow as early as possible. I shall do everything in my power to urge the expedition forward as rapidly as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CIRCULAR.]

DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL, Saint Louis, March 28, 1862.

By General Orders, No. 41 current series, issued from headquarters of the Department of the Missouri by Major-General Halleck, commanding, every voter will be required to take the oath of allegiance prescribed in article 6 of the ordinance of the Convention, dated October 16, 1861. This applies to all elections, whether for State, municipal county, or town officers.

Officers of the polls, judges, clerks, and civil officers, whose duty by law it is made to attend elections, will be held responsible for the execution of this order. If they receive votes of persons not taking the oath, they will be arrested and tried for military offense and the election will be declared void.

In order that no mistake or fraud may occur, it is directed and required that every voter subscribe the oath of allegiance in the form directed by the order of General Halleck, and swear to it, either before some officer authorized to administer oaths for general purposes or before one of the judges of election, and file the same with the judges of election at the time of depositing his vote; that said oaths so taken shall be returned, with the poll-book, to the officer to whom the law may direct the same to be returned, and said oaths to be by him preserved.

BERNARD G. FARRAR, Provost-Marshal-General

{p.649}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 29, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Without waiting for details you will report without delay by telegraph about the strength of your command and the general distribution of the troops, naming the localities of the principal commanders.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 30, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Under Major-General Buell, in Kentucky and Tennessee, 101,000; under Major-General Grant, in Tennessee, 75,000; under General Pope, New Madrid, 25,000; under General Curtis, Arkansas, 23,000; under General Strong, Cairo, Columbus, &c., 9,000; under General Steele, Arkansas, 6,000; under General Schofield, Saint Louis District, 15,000 including regiments organizing at Benton Barracks; under General Totten, in Central Missouri, 4,000; in Northern Missouri, 2,000 volunteers and State militia; in Kansas, Colorado, Nebraska, &c., about 10,000.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 30, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I reached Island No. 10 last evening about 5 o’clock. Found matters very quiet. A plan was agreed on for active operations, which will go into effect about Thursday. I will write you fully in regard to it. Commodore Foote has asked the Navy Department for more guns, to replace those on his boats, which are nearly worn-out. It is very important to have these guns by the time No. 10 is taken, and the Navy and War Departments should by some means manage to forward the guns immediately. We have information here that the rebels are finishing some heavy gunboats to ascend the river. To provide for them and any mishap that may occur to our own fleet in contending with their combined land and water batteries, Columbus and Belmont should be strongly fortified. Halleck and Foote both anxious to have this done. I returned to Cairo this morning. Probably return to island to-night.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 30, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I left fleet 10 o’clock last night. Matters quiet. Bissell progressed 3 miles feels confident will get through by Tuesday night. Commodore will give all aid possible.

Columbus and Belmont should have heavy batteries in position soon {p.650} as possible. Glad to see you moving in that direction. Have you sent engineer officers to locate and proceed with work? Should you not have twenty heavy columbiads and rifled cannon in addition to those you have ordered? Those batteries should be strong enough to prevent any gunboat or war vessel of the enemy from coming up in case our fleet should be disabled.

I will go down to flotilla to-night. Have you any order? How are matters progressing up the Tennessee? Is Buell in motion for co-operation? I suppose the order No. 3 gives you all that was desired.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, March 31, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Accounts continue to bear testimony that the enemy moves east for a movement on Forsyth or Jacksonport or Pocahontas. Van Dorn had passed Dover last Tuesday with the advance. It is said Fort Smith is evacuated and guns carried down the river; that they are pulling down telegraph wires from Fayetteville to Van Buren. My cavalry was in Fayetteville yesterday and will try to be in Huntsville to-night.

Pike’s forces must be in Indian Territory. Five thousand Texans were hourly expected at Fort Smith on Wednesday.

Much talk about Thompson and others burning railroad and Rolla. Rebels think that is Price’s next move. Recruiting rapidly, it is said, about Little Rock, to go with Van Dorn.

Rebel bands through the country impudent, but impotent.

Very respectfully,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, March 31, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our canal is finished. The barges and first steamer are in the bayou which conducts to this place. The other steamers are entering the cut above. The heavy work is done, and it only remains to cut out overhanging limbs and remove drift-wood in the bayou. Our floating battery is nearly ready, and will carry three heavy guns. It will be anchored within 500 yards of the opposite bank, to cover landing. A gunboat or two would remove nearly all our difficulty in crossing, and I am sure they could be brought down without injury. Several river pilots are ready to bring them, and state that at this stage of water they can run down close to the Missouri shore without being within three-fourths of a mile of the batteries on Island 10. If we cannot get them we shall get along without. By Tuesday night it is expected that all our boats will be there. From all information the enemy’s force at Island 10 and in the bend does not exceed 7,000. They seem to have made no preparation to resist our crossing. Probably they do not believe it possible to get boats through from No. 8. Will keep you advised now of enemy’s movements.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

{p.651}

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PARIS STATION, March 31, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Colonel Carlin marched this morning with two regiments infantry, one regiment cavalry, and one battery, by way of Doniphan, to collect supplies and take possession of Pitman’s Ferry. The rest of the command will go direct to Pitman’s, but cannot leave for several days. I found it necessary to send a train back to Pilot Knob for articles which the regiments ought to have supplied themselves with.

FRED’K STEELE, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, March 31, 1862.

The following order of Major-General Halleck commanding the department, having just been received, is published, that the officers and soldiers of this command may know that during their long winter marches they have neither been forgotten nor their merits unappreciated at home.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 56.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, SAINT LOUIS, March 5, 1862.

SOLDIERS OF THE ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST: You have nobly performed the duty assigned you. You have made a long and fatiguing march in midwinter over almost impassable roads, through snow, deep mud, and swollen streams. You have driven the enemy from Missouri into the barren mountains of Arkansas. It is not your fault that he did not stay to give you battle. Fighting, however, is but a small part of a soldier’s duty. It is discipline, endurance, activity, obedience to orders, as much as steadiness and courage in the battle-field, that distinguishes the veteran from the recruit.

Let not the honors you have won in this campaign be tarnished by any excesses or improprieties. All officers must maintain order and enforce discipline in their commands. You have an active foe before you. Be vigilant, and ready to take advantage of the first opportunity to fight him.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

These high compliments are fairly earned. You were foremost in the great interior movements south. You have driven the enemy under your fire and at the point of your bayonets from Missouri; restored the flag of the Union to Arkansas; routed the foe from all his strongholds, and since the foregoing order of General Halleck, in a three days’ hard-fought battle against three times your own number, have achieved a signal and most decisive victory, scattering, demoralizing, and almost destroying the combined forces of the enemy. You have shown to the general commanding the department, to your friends at home, and to the people of the United States that your activity and endurance in midwinter are only equaled by your prowess, bravery, and invincible determination in battle.

Your praises are in every mouth throughout the loyal States; you have carved out a history, and the name of the Army of the Southwest will live, the result of your diligence and valor.

The following congratulation, written since the news of this battle reached General Halleck, was received a few days ago:

{p.652}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, Mo., March 10, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Commanding Army of the Southwest:

I congratulate you and your command on the glorious victory just gained. You have proved yourselves as brave in battle as enduring of fatigue and hardship.

A grateful country will honor you for both.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

This victory, so decisive and thus commended, by no means insures you repose. You must expect to bear further trials of your endurance and valor. The general will confide in you as in veterans, and will rely upon your discipline, devotion, and well-tried bravery to give tone and effect to our further movements supported, as we shall be, by gallant forces now joining our standard. While we rejoice we should not forget to contribute kindness to our wounded comrades and a tear to the memory of those who lie buried on the field, and reverently to ascribe thanks to the God of Battles, who giveth us the victory.

A grateful people will provide for and comfort the bereaved, and the rocky cliffs of the Ozark Mountains will remain monuments to the memory of those who fought and fell for their country at the battle of Pea Ridge.

By command of Major-General Curtis:

H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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-Abstract from return of the Department of the Mississippi, Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, commanding, for March, 1862-

Commanders.Districts.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant West Tennessee2,09344,27756,33668,175
Maj. Gen. John PopeThe Mississippi90119,50924,51923,851
Maj. Gen. S. R. CurtisSouthwest Missouri57812,48015,03820,554
Brig. Gen. W. K. StrongCairo2214,4255,9188,065
Brig. Gen. J. M. SchofieldSaint Louis50710,54012,74114,179
Brig. Gen. Fred. SteeleSoutheast Missouri2865,9837,0437,716
Brig. Gen. James TottenCentral Missouri1163,0453,5824,228
Brig. Gen. Ben. LoanNorthwest Missouri4137226277
Col. J. M. GloverNortheast Missouri378931,2771,746
(In Illinois and Minnesota)811,6682,1322,548
Total*4,824102,957128,810155,840

* The districts of Kansas and of the Ohio not reported In the original return, but see Halleck to Secretary of war, March 30, p. 649.

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UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP BENTON, Near Island No. 10, April 1, 1862. (Received April 3, 1862.)

General M. C. MEIGS:

GENERAL: On examination it is found that on account of the vessel not being in as good condition as was supposed, and a ram being {p.653} necessary, the cost of completing the Eastport for that purpose will be about $56,000. As I am authorized by General Halleck to make any arrangements I may deem advisable for the construction of rams, and as the Eastport is designed to be used in part as a ram, I shall) under that authority, proceed to finish her, unless otherwise directed by you or by the President. Considering the strength of naval force the rebels have ready and in preparation, and also the service required of this flotilla, I consider that it is essential to have the Eastport ready in the shortest possible time.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Was absent when your dispatch arrived. Canal is finished and boats are now descending bayou to this place. Expect them here to-night. The enemy commenced erecting batteries at points of high land and landing places on the river; little serious to be feared from them. Our floating battery, properly placed, will deal easily with them or any other obstacle to landing. Have erected two batteries, of two 32s each, about a mile and a half below the 24-pounder battery, opposite mouth of slough. (See sketch sent you.) These batteries cover handsomely the landing on opposite shore; I have no apprehensions of the result. Commodore Foote promises to run a couple of his gunboats past island to-night; if so, all difficulty is over. Troops in fine condition and can be relied on, Railroad to Sikeston under water and road to Commerce bad. Best send everything for this command to Island No. 8, with orders to Colonel Buford to send it through the canal in barges or flats. Easy communication in this way for heavy stores. Do not be uneasy. No precaution will be omitted, and there is no fear of the result in this command. I telegraphed you yesterday that gunboats had again been repulsed by our heavy battery; one of them so badly damaged as to drift broadside down the river, unable to work her engines.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., April 2, 1862.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I arrived at this post yesterday evening, and immediately assumed the command of the district.

I have been unable at present to obtain accurate statistics of the numbers and stations of the troops within this district, but as near as I can ascertain they consist of the following regiments: First Kansas (infantry), Colonel Deitzler, stationed at Lawrence Second Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Mitchell, stationed at Shawneetown: Third Kansas (infantry), Colonel Cloud, stationed at Mound City or Fort Scott; Fourth Kansas (infantry), Colonel Cloud, stationed at Wyandotte. The Governor proposes to consolidate these two regiments, to be designated {p.654} as the Tenth Kansas, and desires them to be concentrated at Lawrence for that purpose. Fifth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Clayton, at Fort Scott; Sixth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Judson, at Fort Scott; Seventh Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Jennison, at Lawrence; Eighth Kansas (infantry), Colonel Graham’s scattered, headquarters at Leavenworth City; Ninth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Lynde (incomplete), at Iola, near Humboldt; Ninth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Salomon, at Fort Scott; Twelfth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Bryant, at Lawrence; Thirteenth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Maloney, at Lawrence; Second Ohio (cavalry), Colonel Doubleday, at Fort Scott; Rabb’s Indiana battery, at Fort Scott; Hollister’s battery, at Fort Leavenworth.

It has been recommended by Major Prince to detail the following regiments for the expedition to New Mexico: First Kansas, Twelfth and Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, Second and Seventh Kansas Cavalry, a battery from Saint Louis, and Hollister’s battery. The latter battery is at present composed of men detailed from the Second Ohio Regiment, but this, unless that regiment accompanies the expedition, ought to be changed, and men detailed from some regiment of the same command for that purpose-say from Mitchell’s.

Major Easton quartermaster at this department, will have 311 wagons and teams ready for service in a few days and 50 ambulances; teams not complete, but can be purchased in a few days. This includes all the wagons which can be spared from this post, but he has no information of the amount of transportation at other posts or with the troops in the district. Estimates have been forwarded to department headquarters for 500 wagons, and arrangements have been made by which mules will be obtained to complete 500 teams by the 18th instant.

It is estimated that the expedition to New Mexico, composed of about 5,000 men, will require 500 wagons and 25 ambulances. This will give them transportation for fifty days’ provisions and an ample supply of ammunition.

Requisitions have been made for an ample supply of subsistence stores. Moreover a large amount, say over 100,000 rations, can be spared from the stores at Fort Wise, which might be reserved for the expedition to New Mexico should they take that route.

Some of the mounted regiments in this district are armed with the Austrian carbine, which has been found very inefficient and unreliable, the hammers of many of them breaking after a few discharges and the cartridges furnished for them being entirely too small. I am having an inspection of these arms, and will have them repaired as fast as possible, but if better arms can be furnished it ought to be done at once.

The artillery and artillery equipments are very good, but an extra supply of ammunition for the Parrott guns ought to be forwarded immediately, as that cannot be fabricated here.

The medical department is well provided with everything.

I would strongly urge that the troops to compose the expedition to New Mexico may be designated at as early a day as possible, as it is my intention to concentrate them at Fort Riley, there being a large amount of forage at that post which has been on hand for some time, and which it would be economy on the part of the Government to use at once; and, besides, being the most convenient post in Kansas for outfitting a large expedition with the exception of this place, where it would be almost impossible to supply them with forage even at a largely-increased cost, it is the opinion of Major Easton and other experienced officers that this expedition should not start until the 1st {p.655} to the 10th of May. Should they leave before that time their animals would be badly broken down before reaching their destination, and it would require a long time in that country to recruit them. It has been found impossible to take any number of animals over the plains in fair condition before grass.

No provision whatever has been made for the expedition south, which for 5,000 men will require about the same transportation and nearly the same supplies as the expedition to New Mexico.

If possible, the four companies of Missouri cavalry referred to by Major Prince ought to be returned and kept on duty here. This would allow two mounted regiments for New Mexico; and as the impression here is that Sibley has already done all the harm there he can, the force sent out ought to be strong enough to overwhelm him, without reference to the troops under General Canby. From all the information I can obtain, I think Major Prince’s recommendation is about correct. It might perhaps be as well to substitute Doubleday’s for Mitchell’s regiment, but that is not material, except as regards Hollister’s battery.

Fearing you may have left Saint Louis, I send this by my aide, Lieutenant Broadhead, who will bring back your answer.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. DENVER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I submit herewith two plans of crossing the river with this command, one of which will be adopted, as circumstances dictate:

First plan (without any assistance from Commodore Foote). The road down the bend runs nearly due east, and intersects the road from Island No. 10 to Tiptonville at right angles about midway between those places. This road leaves the river at Watson’s Landing, 1 1/2 or 2 miles below the slough which makes the small island opposite this place. From Watson’s Landing to Tiptonville, or Island No. 10, is 10 miles. I have thrown up a battery of four 32s, flanked by rifle pits for 1,000 men, immediately opposite Watson’s Landing, or about 1 1/2 miles below the battery of two 24s thrown up some time since to command the mouth of the slough. (See sketch I sent you.) The enemy has thrown up batteries and rifle pits at Watson’s Landing, immediately opposite our battery of 32s. I am extending our batteries and rifle pits and firing frequently so as to draw his attention as much as possible to that point and induce him to concentrate his opposition to our landing as much as possible at Watson’s. As soon as everything is ready I shall tow over in the night to the shore of the small island immediately opposite to this place our floating battery, and drop it down along the shore until it enters the mouth of the slough, anchoring it half way across the slough and within 100 yards of the main shore, so that it will enfilade the bank of the river for a mile and a half below and completely cover the high land at the mouth of the slough. At daylight, having one whole division of four infantry regiments and a battery of artillery on board the boats, I shall commence to cross, landing at the mouth of the slough, every man with a spade to put himself at once into a rifle pit. Our 32s opposite. Watson’s Landing {p.656} and our 24s opposite mouth of slough, together with the floating battery, will cover the whole ground (all open corn fields) for half a mile back from the river with shells and round shot, and prevent any considerable body of the enemy from assembling against the first division which crosses. Once give that division a foot-hold on the bank, and covered by these batteries, and no force the enemy has can dislodge it.

With this whole force on the other side, I shall at once advance and intersect the road from Island No. 10 to Tiptonville. Subsequent movements will of course depend upon circumstances.

Our floating battery has been somewhat changed in plan since I telegraphed you. In addition to its defensive arrangements, I shall lash on each side of it a barge floored over with empty water-tight barrels and loaded with cotton bales and dry cottonwood rails packed tight. The barges will be planked over the top with heavy planks, spiked to string pieces to prevent any of the barrels, bales of cotton, or rails escaping. These barges will float even if filled with water. This arrangement will give 20 feet of cotton bales and tightly-packed rails on each side of the barge carrying the guns, the sides and ends of which are 4 1/2 feet thick, of heavy timber. This battery will carry 150 riflemen, and will be well provided with row-boats in case of unforeseen accident. As it will be anchored in shoal water in the slough and very near the shore, both of the main-land and of the island, the worst case for us that could happen will not occasion loss of life.

If Commodore Foote will send us two of his gunboats (which I hardly hope) I shall continue to make a great show of preparation at the batteries opposite Watson’s, and during the night will drop the transports and gunboats without lights, down the river, close along the Missouri shore Just below our battery of 32s they pass behind Island No. 11, and even in day-time would be out of danger. For half a mile along the shore, until they pass behind the island, they would be within range of the enemy’s batteries opposite, but would run no risk in the night, as they cannot be seen and will not be heard. I propose to push them on down the river to a point opposite Tiptonville, marching the whole force down by land the same night, so as to embark and cross to Tiptonville at daylight under cover of our two gunboats. This plan is perfectly feasible and free of danger, and would completely cut off everything in the bend and at the island. The enemy’s gunboats could not for a moment contend with ours. There are no heavy guns of the enemy near Tiptonville, though without the cover of our gunboats their own gunboats and field batteries, with the infantry force they have there, could effectually prevent our crossing. This plan, therefore, by far the easiest to execute and the most complete in its results, depends upon getting two gunboats. If I had the gunboat fleet under my control I would have them very soon. There is not one chance in a thousand that either of them would be hit or even seen in the night. There are 9 feet of water in the channel along the Missouri shore from Commodore Foote’s flotilla to this place, in no part of which would the boats be nearer than three-fourths of a mile to the batteries of Island No. 10. I could tell you many strange and startling reasons given by the commodore for not risking it, such as his grave responsibility to the country for the security of Saint Louis, Louisville, &c. He says if the Benton were taken by the enemy, or in fact any of his iron-clad boats, which (as he says) are invincible fighting up stream, his whole fleet could be routed, and Saint Louis and Louisville be at the mercy of the enemy from Island No. 10, &c. It is useless to argue against such ideas; so I {p.657} shall probably do the work with the army alone. Our canal has been a gigantic work; it has been infinitely more difficult than at first supposed. Six miles, through a great forest of immense trees, which had to be sawed off 4 feet under water, and then through cypress swamp thickly studded with cypress knees, have furnished us with an amount of labor surpassing any one’s belief who has not seen it. We have now a canal 50 feet wide, 4 feet deep, and 6 miles long, through which large steamers can pass and all our supplies be delivered to us.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, April 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our boats are in the main bayou and ready to move into the river at a moment’s notice. I keep them up the bayou, concealed from the enemy. I am only waiting to finish the floating battery, which carries one 8-inch columbiad and three 32s. It will be finished by to-morrow night, and I think will be impregnable to any batteries the enemy can establish in any reasonable time. I have no hope of Commodore Foote. He has postponed trying to run any of his gunboats past Island No. 10 until some foggy or rainy night. The moon is beginning to make the nights light, and there is no prospect of fogs during this sort of weather. We must do without him. I will give you details of the manner I intend to cross by mail.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 3, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Steele’s advance guard has reached Pitman’s Ferry, Ark. Colonel Carlin had an engagement with the enemy on the 1st instant in crossing the river. Killed one lieutenant and wounded several others. Captured 5 prisoners, camp equipage, horses, mules, forage, and a number of small-arms.

H. W. HALLECK.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 3, 1862.

WILLIAM M. MCPHERSON, Esq., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Your letter of this date is received.* In answer to your inquiries I have to state that persons in arms against the United States under General Price can be received only as prisoners of war, and that they will be treated in the same kind and lenient manner as others have been who are willing to abandon a hopeless and unholy cause, take the prescribed oath of allegiance, and give satisfactory security for their future good conduct. {p.658}

Any one who voluntarily takes the oath and gives his parole of honor and afterwards violates it by aiding or abetting the enemy will most certainly be executed. A man who violates his military parole commits the most serious of all military offenses, and I will pardon no one who is guilty of that crime.

In regard to the wife of the reverend Captain Chaplain in General Price’s army, who wishes permission to visit her husband, please inform her that no such permission can be granted. Nearly all the secessionists of this State who have entered the rebel service have left their wives and daughters to the care of the Federal troops. There is scarcely a single instance where this confidence has been abused by us. But what return have these ladies made for this protection? In many cases they have acted as spies and informers for the enemy and have been most loud-mouthed in their abuse of our cause and most insulting in their conduct towards those who support it. Under any other gov. eminent they would for such conduct be expelled from the country or confined within the walls of a prison.

I am well aware that some good Union men in the interior of the State think that those now serving the rebel cause under General Price should be permitted to return to their homes without being considered prisoners of war, or, when taken prisoners of war, that they should be released simply on promise of future good conduct. Experience has satisfied me that such a course would neither be wise nor safe. Indeed, I find that the very persons who advocate a more lenient policy towards returned secessionists are also continually petitioning to have additional troops sent to their counties to protect them from the operations of these same rebels.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., April 3, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the major-general commanding, that official communications from Col. Fitz Henry Warren, First Iowa Cavalry, bearing date Clinton, Mo., March 30, 1862, have been received, announcing the arrival of two of his scouting parties. One brought in 15 prisoners, 5 horses, 1 secession ambulance, 2 wagons, and 2 yoke of oxen belonging to Price’s army. Two rebels were wounded; 1 fatally. The second detachment mentioned returned with 4 prisoners, 3 horses, and 1 mule. One of our soldiers, Kelley, a gallant boy of Company K, is badly wounded in the ankle and thigh.

At that date Colonel Warren had also two other detachments out. He seems to be following up the guerrillas, of whom there are many in that quarter, with commendable energy.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

{p.659}

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NEAR ISLAND No. 10, April 4, 1862-8 a.m.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The commodore opened fire at 11 o’clock yesterday with cannon and mortars. Struck their large floating battery a number of times. Our scouts report it completely disabled. Also burned a steamer the enemy had sunk in Missouri channel. Will report from New Madrid to-night. Weather delightful.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, April 4, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: Men direct report Price, with infantry and artillery, went east, with intent to reach Pocahontas very soon by rail and water.

Six regiments of cavalry were moving east or north through Jasper last Sunday. The cavalry at Salem, Ark., were also gaining recruits.

Have sent to Forsyth and Yellville to ascertain the further movements of the enemy.

No signs of force at Huntsville and Fayetteville. If line gets open to Saint Louis I desire to confer with the general as to a counter move.

Respectfully,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 134.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, April 4, 1862.

...

VIII. The army in the field will move to-morrow, the 5th instant, in the order herein stated, on the road northeastward leading through Cassville and thence toward Yellville.

Order of march.-First Division will move at 6 a.m.; Fourth Division at 8 a.m.; Wyman’s brigade at 8.30 a.m.; Second Division at 8.30 a.m.; Third Division upon the arrival of its trains.

...

By command of Major-General Curtis:

H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, April 4, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A., Comdg. Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War, with the concurrence of the Secretary of the Interior, has granted authority* to Robert W. Furnas and {p.660} John Richay, esqrs., to raise two regiments from such loyal Indians as have been driven from their own country into Kansas by other Indians in rebellion against the United States Government. These regiments are to be raised for the purpose of restoring their lands to the loyal Indians and offering them protection while planting their crops. The colonels of these regiments will report to you for instructions when their command shall have been completely organized. When this shall have been done it is the desire of the Secretary of War that you furnish two regiments of volunteers to aid these Indian troops in effecting the purpose for which they are to be raised.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* Under date of April 2.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 5, 1862.

Commodore ANDREW H. FOOTE:

Your note of yesterday is just received.* Captain Walke arrived safely with the Carondelet, not a shot having touched her. Officers and men are in good condition and anxious for service. I requested Colonel Scott, Assistant Secretary of War, to write you yesterday in relation to sending another one of the gunboats, and, with profound respect, I venture to urge you still further on the subject. I have not a doubt but that one of them could run the batteries to-night without any serious injury. Notwithstanding their inferior character, the enemy’s gunboats pass and repass our batteries in the night without injury. My best artillerists, officers of the Regular Army, of many years’ service, state positively that it is impossible in the night to fire with any kind of certainty the large guns, 32s, of our batteries, especially at a moving object. The guns fired at the Carondelet passed 200 feet above her. I am thus urgent, sir, because the lives of thousands of men and the success of our operations hang upon your decision. With the two boats all is safe; with one, it is uncertain. The lives of the men composing this army are in my keeping, and I do not feel justified in omitting any steps to fortify this movement against any accident which might occasion disaster not to be repaired. Certainly the risk to a gunboat moving down in the night is not nearly so great and involves no such consequences as the risk to 10,000 men crossing a great river in the presence of the enemy. You will excuse me, I am sure, if I seem urgent. A sense of duty alone impels me to present the facts to you as forcibly as possible.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 5, 1862.

Flag-Officer FOOTE:

I shall want a gunboat at Cairo ready to go up the Tennessee in the early part of next week. War Department has authorized the purchase {p.661} of two steamers at this place to be fitted up as rams and gunboats. I shall intrust the whole matter to Captain Porter till you otherwise direct. Everything in relation to these boats will be subject to your orders. Is it not possible by lashing bales of wet hay or cotton on exposed sides of gunboats to get one or two through in the night to the assistance of General Pope?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, MO., April 5, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I arrived here at noon yesterday. Found General Pope’s command all ready for movement as soon as batteries and transports could be got ready. Last night Captain Walke, with gunboat Carondelet, ran the gauntlet at Island No. 10. Was fired upon from all their batteries, but was not struck once. Her arrival will enable General Pope to carry out his plans promptly. You will hear from here within three days. I remain with this army and will report frequently.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 5, 1862.

General CURTIS, Cassville, Mo.:

I will meet you to-morrow morning at 10 o’clock. The great battle of the war is to be fought on the Tennessee River. If we succeed, Price and Van Dorn will soon leave your front.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 5, 1862.

General CURTIS, Cassville, Mo.:

Captured letters received to-day from General Steele say Van Dorn is at Jacksonport, and is expecting re-enforcements from Price by Clinton and Batesville. General Cabell is at Pocahontas with about 3,000 men, but expects Van Dorn daily. Kansas troops a humbug. Can’t do anything with them till reorganized, with different officers. Send General Sturgis to do this. If fully satisfied of Price’s move east, leave a small force to hold a position near the frontier, move with main body by Forsyth and thence on Salem or down White River on Batesville. General Steele will be ready to co-operate with you. I think a cavalry force should move by Carrollton and Yellville to observe the enemy. If you think best, draw down the Tenth Illinois Cavalry to Gainesville or to Salem. The First Illinois Cavalry will be sent to Rolla on Monday or Tuesday, to act as you order. I go to Tennessee the early part of next week. We should converse freely before I leave; nevertheless I have arranged to have telegraphic communication with you and General Steele from here.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.662}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cross Timber, April 5, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis:

CAPTAIN: The army has moved this morning and will camp to-night 3 or 4 miles northeast of Cassville, to proceed on the way to Forsyth to-morrow. A large force of cavalry in Carroll County threatening Springfield.

All quiet here and southwest of me. Shall crowd the enemy toward Yellville.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cassville, April 5, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department:

Hope I meet you well. I have sent your adjutant my news of Arkansas army going down east and some recent attempt to send a large force of cavalry in my rear through Forsyth.

The White River is high; hence it is not very easy for either of us to cross.

The only shadow of force I can hear of in the west is some of the Indians who have gone home, and some small roving bands, who are detested by the people of all parties.

Western Arkansas is particularly sick of the rebellion. They never had much real affection for it.

Van Dorn and Price are taking east a large number, many of them from Missouri, who expect to get behind somebody to do some mischief in Missouri.

My troops, especially cavalry, have been overworked. Why should 4,000 or 5,000 stay at Fort Scott and Carthage? I have tried to get them eastward, so they could co-operate, but I do not know whether I have a right to command.

General Sigel has gone home on sick leave. Much care and private grief bear heavy on me, but I can still do my duty.

Respectfully,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 5, 1862.

Maj. Gen. SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Army of the Southwest:

Tenth Illinois Cavalry en route for Lebanon. If not required with you send them west in the direction of Fort Scott, to break up guerrilla bands. If Price has moved east, follow him in that direction, keeping on his flank. General Steele is at Pitman’s Ferry, with 6,000 men, observing Pocahontas. Don’t lose sight of the enemy or permit him to outflank you. Report on best route to Salem or Jacksonport from your present position.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.663}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., April 5, 1862.

Brig. Gen. JOHN M. SCHOFIELD, Commanding Missouri State Militia:

GENERAL: Numerous irregularities and outrages, such as indicated in Special Orders, No. 27, of this date, from these headquarters (a copy of which has been inclosed to your assistant adjutant-general), have been brought to the notice of the undersigned; and I now have the honor to call your attention to the same, and propose a remedy, in some measure, by which, possibly, they may be hereafter prevented.

The disturbances throughout this district, wherever the Missouri State Militia have been implicated in improper conduct, have principally arisen from a desire for personal revenge to satisfy past difficulties, having no bearing whatever upon the cause for which we are now laboring.

Private quarrels of long standing, originating out of matters connected with property, county politics, and neighborhood disagreement, are too often the cause of persecution of those in military power, and all is made to appear as connected with the rebellion.

This state of things should be put a stop to, and officers and enlisted men should be made to feel that they are watched, and will be punished for any such conduct not warranted by the necessities of the case.

At present I can contrive no better method than having a constant system of inspections made by impartial officers unprejudiced on either side.

I therefore have to propose that some officer of sufficient rank may be appointed and authorized as inspector-general by the State authorities to inspect and investigate all such matters, as well as to attend to the military functions of his office in connection with the Missouri State Militia. My staff is too small and the business of this office too extensive to admit of my detailing one from these headquarters. If, therefore, you could detail such an officer as indicated and direct him to report to me for such orders as I might give I think great good might be the result.

Col. W. D. Wood, aide-de-camp to the Governor, I am inclined to think would impartially, intelligently, and justly fill the position, and could he be detailed, if only temporarily, I should hope to accomplish something beneficial in preventing such troubles and outrages as mentioned.

I beg that you will give your early attention to this and inform me of your conclusions and actions in the case.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 27.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., April 5, 1862.

1. Maj. W. M. G. Torrence, commanding at Warrensburg, will furnish Col. John A. Turley, formerly of the Eighty-first Ohio Volunteers, every assistance and facility in his power to enable him to thoroughly investigate the cause and manner of his brother’s recent death at Warrensburg, Mo.

2. Major Torrence will take measures to examine into the circumstances connected with the murder of Mr. Turley. Also those attending {p.664} the causes recently reported by Captain Thompson, First Iowa Cavalry, viz, the burning of the residence, furniture, &c., of Colonel McCowan; the shooting of Mr. Burrgess and his brother, and the burning of their dwelling; the killing by Captain Hart’s company of Mr. Piper on March 30, and the burning of some five dwellings by the same, and any other misdemeanors which may come to his notice. He will place in arrest and prefer charges against such officers or men as an examination shall indicate as guilty of these outrages without sufficient cause. A minute report will be made to these headquarters upon these cases, supported by charges and specifications, where wrong has been committed upon quiet and unoffending citizens peaceably occupying their homes.

In these investigations Major Torrence will be guided by General Orders, No. 8, of November 26, 1861, General Orders, No. 13, of December 4, 1861, Department of the Missouri, and the thirty-second, thirty-third, forty-first, fifty-first, and fifty-fourth Articles of War.

By command of Brig. Gen. James Totten, commanding district:

LUCIEN J. BARNES, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Cassville, April 5, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN:

CAPTAIN: The general’s dispatch is received. Price has gone below Dover with his main force, at least 60 miles below Van Buren; says he is going to Missouri. I am moving east, keeping north of White River, which carries me through Galena and Forsyth, Mo.

No enemy at Huntsville, Van Buren, Fort Smith, or Fayetteville, but Price takes with him some 20,000 or 30,000.

From 8,000 to 10,000 cavalry, under Van Dorn, were opposite Forsyth day before yesterday, but it is said they were ordered to Des Arc.

I think Kansas troops should move east with me, but I cannot move them anywhere.

Have had no re enforcements, and shall try to hold any on their way till Price and Van Dorn are better known or disposed of. I will remain here to-night to keep in easy communication with headquarters.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 5, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. W. DENVER, Fort Leavenworth:

GENERAL: Yours of the 2d is received. You will designate for the New Mexico expedition the First Kansas Infantry and the Twelfth and Thirteenth Wisconsin Regiments and the Second and Seventh Kansas Cavalry. There should be two batteries of artillery. I send one-Carpenter’s Wisconsin, about 150 men and six pieces-from here. I see that by Governor Robinson’s General Orders, No. 1, N. Allen’s light artillery company is attached to Colonel Deitzler’s regiment. I think this should go in place of Hollister’s, making the troops entirely Kansas and Wisconsin. If Allen’s company has no guns, those of Hollister’s can be transferred and others sent to Hollister from this place.

{p.665}

I approve of concentrating the troops of this expedition at Fort Riley as soon as possible. No time should be lost in completing their organization and the supply train. As it will go by Fort Wise it can avail itself of the supplies at that place. I directed Colonel Leavenworth to take his command up the Platte River so as to economize forage on the Arkansas route.

Major Allen has ordered wagons from Cincinnati and Chicago to fill Major Easton’s requisition.

The cavalry is as well armed as ours here. We can do no better for them. I understand that you have Frémont revolvers at Fort Leavenworth. You can have them issued. The carbines should be put in order and the ammunition carefully inspected and all defects supplied.

Requisitions should be forwarded immediately for the Parrott guns. I cannot send ammunition until requisitions are made, stating caliber, amount, &c.

The expedition must start as early as possible. As soon as General Brice is confirmed he will be ordered into the field.

Ali troops not required for the New Mexico expedition or in Kansas should be prepared as soon as possible to move via Fort Scott or Humboldt into the Indian country. Report immediately what means you have for arming friendly Indians, and how many it will be safe to arm. These Indians can be used only against Indians or in defense of their own territory and homes.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The chief part of the Army of the Potomac is now at Fort Monroe. McDowell’s and Banks’ corps remain. Yesterday General McClellan commenced an advance on Yorktown. The enemy are expected to make their strong stand there. Three steam rams are rapidly being constructed at Pittsburgh; one at Cincinnati for your use. We are looking anxiously toward Island No. 10.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, [Cassville,] Mo., April 6, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK:

GENERAL: I will try to form a junction with General Steele, and he should try to unite with me. Together we would repel Van Dorn’s combinations, but I have a long, rough road before me, and the matters of supplies may retard me.

My advance is 15 miles east of this place. This accords with my views. My force is too small to divide and leave a large force here although I admit the good results of holding on at Pea Ridge would be further realized by remaining steady farther west. The trouble is my rear, threatened by forces through Forsyth and Yellville; and General Steele could not, where he now is, check a dash down on Springfield, which my present movement is designed to effect; besides, forage is so exhausted I must shift west or east.

{p.666}

There is no doubt of Price having gone down east. I should have moved through Carrollton if I could have crossed White River, but I shall send spies and force there as soon as possible.

Respectfully,

SAML. B. CURTIS, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 6, 1862.

General CURTIS, Cassville, Mo.:

General Steele will cross Black River at Pitman’s Ferry and observe Pocahontas. As you approach he will move towards Salem or that vicinity to join you. Great care should be taken in your flank march not to be attacked in flank. Steele will observe same precaution. I think your combined forces will be sufficient for anything the enemy can bring against you. If certain that main body of enemy has moved to Black River, you should move by rapid marches, so as to prevent his driving Steele back before you can effect a junction.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 6, 1862.

General CURTIS, Cassville, Mo.:

Some time must elapse before the Fort Scott forces will be in a condition to do much. I think a large force should be left in southwest if you can spare it. General Steele will be directed not to advance beyond Pitman’s Ferry, but to hold himself in readiness to co-operate with you. If the enemy should concentrate near Batesville or Jacksonport, Steele will unite with you.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID (via Cairo), April 6, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Pope is progressing well with his plans to execute the most difficult movement of the campaign-that of crossing the Mississippi in face of the enemy. He needs another gunboat, but we cannot prevail on Commodore Foote to run the blockade. It can be done with comparative safety any night, and might save the lives of thousands of our soldiers. The risk of the boat is trifling compared with that of Pope’s army. Can you have it ordered by the Secretary of the Navy to-day, and thus relieve the flag-officer from a responsibility which he is not willing to assume?

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 6, 1862.

General E. A. PAINE:

I desire you to march your division down to the river at the upper redoubt, to take post at the steamboat landing of the town as soon as {p.667} day dawns. Carry two days’ cooked rations, the spades, shovels, axes, and everything complete for service. Load your command on the steamboats as soon as possible and await further orders. I will be down in person. Your supply of ammunition, over and above the full cartridge-boxes, you will have placed on one of the steamers and when you disembark leave an officer in charge of it. Be prompt and up to time.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 6, 1862.

Capt. HENRY WALKE:

I am induced to believe, by the reports of General Granger and Colonel Smith, that you will be able to silence or take the upper batteries of the enemy on the opposite shore; I mean the batteries immediately opposite our batteries of 32s. Commodore Foote sends another boat down to-night. I design to attempt the crossing with my force to-morrow, and I desire, if it meet your views, that the two gunboats go down as soon as day dawns and silence the batteries specified and to hold on near the shore until the troops disembark. As soon as you start I will have the transports brought into the river and loaded with troops, which will cross the river and land near you as soon as the batteries are silenced. You will doubtless have to run close into them, and maintain your position so as to cover the whole ground in rear of the landing. Our batteries will be ordered to open as soon as day dawns and to keep up their fire vigorously until the object is accomplished. I can cross 3,500 men at a time. If you can thus silence those batteries in three hours or more we have the rebels opposite in our hands. Call on Colonel Bissell, who is in the intrenchments near you, and he will give you 32 and 64 pounder ammunition.

Respectfully, captain, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, April 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The second gunboat did not try to run the batteries last night; will probably be here to-night. I sent down the Carondelet with some officers to reconnoiter the opposite shore closely between here and Tiptonville. She unmasked five or six batteries along the shore, I think largely in consequence of my plan of getting transports to cross the river to take the enemy in rear having been published by the newspaper reporters of the flotilla. The enemy has for two weeks been kept advised of my plans and have lined the whole river bank with guns. To-morrow will determine whether we can dislodge a sufficient number to cross with any sort of security by the aid of gunboats, our floating battery, and our land batteries. The matter will be settled. Of course there will be no such thing as crossing in frail steamers in the face of heavy guns at all points of landing. I will telegraph you further tonight. The gunboat has not yet returned from below.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

{p.668}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. S. D. STURGIS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of a letter written yesterday to General Denver.*

On assuming command of the district you will take measures to carry out these instructions with the least possible delay.

General Denver should be sent with such forces as may be spared from Kansas to Fort Scott to take the immediate command in that vicinity, and particularly to take the general charge of the Indian tribes. He will give all proper protection to the friendly Indians, and seek to bring back to their peaceful position those who, through the influence of Pike, Ross, and others, have been induced to take up arms against the Government. He should also observe the enemy’s movement near the Arkansas frontier, and break up all insurgent and guerrilla bands in the western counties of Missouri. In doing this he will not limit himself by the State line, but will operate wherever he can do most service.

The Sixth Ohio Cavalry, four companies, have been ordered to Nebraska City, to be fitted out for Fort Laramie, to serve for the protection of the Overland Mail Route.

Inclosed herewith you will find a copy of instructions to the lieutenant-colonel.** Every effort should be made to fit them out and dispatch them on the route as early as possible.

Colonel Leavenworth takes with him, via Nebraska City, a Wisconsin battery of artillery for service in Colorado Territory. All the troops in Colorado should be made available for service in New Mexico, if they should be required there.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 664.

** Not found.

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UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP BENTON, Off Island No. 10 (via Cairo), April 7, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

This morning at 2 o’clock, in a heavy thunder-storm, the gunboat Pittsburg, Lieutenant-Commander Thompson, ran the blockade under fire of seventy-three guns, and has probably reached New Madrid, and is now with the Carondelet, Commander Walke, as reports of heavy guns are heard opening upon the rebel battery on the opposite shore to destroy them, that General Pope with his army may land on the Tennessee side preparatory to moving to attack the rear of the rebels at this place while we attack them in front.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Comdg. U. S. Naval Forces Western Waters.

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STEAMER BENTON, OFF ISLAND No. 10, April 7, 1862.

Hon. GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy:

Two officers from Island No. 10 have this instant boarded us, stating {p.669} that by order of their commanding officer they are ordered to surrender Island No. 10 to commodore commanding the gunboats. As these officers know nothing of the batteries on the Tennessee shore I have sent Captain Phelps to ascertain something definite on the subject. I will telegraph when further information is received from General Pope, now advancing from New Madrid in strong force to attack in rear. I am with the gun and mortar boats, ready to attack in front while General Buford here is ready to co-operate with the land forces; but it seems as if the place was to be surrendered without further defense.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Commanding Naval Forces in Western Waters.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 7, 1862.

Flag-Officer ANDREW H. FOOTE:

I am happy to inform you that the Pittsburg has arrived untouched. I shall cross the river if possible to-day, and shall probably be prepared to assault the works near Island No. 10 by, p.m. to-morrow. May I beg that you will have a careful watch kept for us, that we may suffer no injury from your boats as we approach the rear of the enemy’s batteries? With the aid of the two boats you have sent and of the gallant officers who command them I shall be able to effect the passage of the river with the necessary force, and without increasing the tremendous hazard which must otherwise have attended such an operation.

Be pleased, sir, to accept my hearty good wishes.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, April 7, 1862-12 m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Enemy’s batteries silenced, and Paine’s division has made good its lodgment on the other shore. Stanley’s division follows immediately. All goes well.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 7, 1862.

Capt. HENRY WALKE:

General Pope requests that as soon as the next division has crossed the river you proceed with the two gunboats to Tiptonville and the landing below and endeavor to intercept the retreat of the rebels. You had best confer with General Palmer, commanding battery 2 miles below.

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. A. MORGAN, Major and Aide-de-Camp.

{p.670}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, In the Field, April 7, 1862.

General PAINE:

The general commanding directs me to inform you that he has received reliable information of the evacuation of Island No. 10, and that you will probably find no force to oppose you. He wishes you, instead of waiting for General Hamilton, to march on Tiptonville. As soon as Stanley commences to cross he will follow you immediately. Keep a cloud of skirmishers in advance of your column.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

[C. A. MORGAN,] Major and Aide-de-Camp.

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NEW MADRID, April 7, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Paine’s, Stanley’s, and Hamilton’s divisions are across, together with three batteries of light artillery and a battalion of cavalry. Everything will be over by 12 to-night. The divisions of Paine and Stanley are on the march to Tiptonville. Rebel force in the bend rapidly retreating on that place. Hamilton’s division and the cavalry move forward at once. Do not believe there will be more than a skirmish. Am just embarking myself. You will not hear from me before to-morrow. All goes well and everybody in fine spirits. No. 10 will be ours before to-morrow night.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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CAMP ON EAST SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER, April 7, 1862-7 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Enemy in rapid retreat, leaving artillery, baggage, supplies, and sick. Paine is near Tiptonville; Stanley within mile of him; Hamilton 3 miles in rear of Stanley; Plummer now at landing on this side; our gunboats below Tiptonville on the bank. Think we shall bag whole force, though not certain. No escape for them below Tiptonville, except by wading shoulder-deep in swamp. Whole command well in hand and will move forward at daylight. Captured eleven heavy guns, and enemy’s famous floating battery, carrying fourteen guns, which drifted down from Island 10. I think rebels are trying desperately to escape; many of them must be captured. Have already taken 100 prisoners. Will occupy Island 10 early to-morrow unless enemy is assembled there in force; capture it anyhow by evening. Send down all transports you can get at once. Do not believe enemy will make another stand this side of Memphis. If I can get transportation, I will be in Memphis in seven days.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, April 7, 1862.

E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Pope has just landed General Paine’s division on the Tennessee shore. The whole movement has been a grand success. The {p.671} whole army will be moved over to-day and to-night. General Pope has four steamers to ferry with, which arrived by the new route through the swamps last evening. Another gunboat arrived this morning from above Island No. 10. I will report from the field as frequently as possible.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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NEW MADRID, April 7, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Eight thousand infantry, three batteries of artillery, and one regiment of cavalry have crossed the Mississippi within the last six hours. Everything working well. Forces advancing to Tiptonville to cut off retreat. By to-morrow night General Pope will have the enemy completely caged.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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WATSON’S LANDING, TENN., April 7 (via Cairo, April 8, 1862).

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

The movement across the river has been a great success. The divisions of Generals Paine, Stanley, and Hamilton have advanced, and we believe will occupy Tiptonville before morning. About 100 prisoners, three pieces of light artillery, eleven large cannon in batteries, camp equipage, and other property have been captured here. Enemy left in great haste. Gunboats have been sent below Tiptonville to capture any transports that may appear and prevent the escape of the enemy. The large floating battery (fourteen guns), that the enemy towed from New Orleans to Island No. 10, came down the river adrift this evening and has been secured. We leave for Island No. 10 at daybreak.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRED. STEELE, Rives’ Station:

General Curtis reports Price moving from Dover, on Arkansas River, to Batesville, and Van Dorn from Yellville, on same place or Pocahontas. Curtis is following on their left flank, to communicate with you, probably at Salem.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.672}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. FRED. STEELE:

The concentration of enemy’s forces at Jacksonport and Pocahontas renders it perilous for you to advance farther south than Pitman’s Ferry. I send you a pontoon train to enable you to operate on Black and Current Rivers. Push your reconnaissance in direction of Salem and White River to connect with General Curtis, who is moving from Forsyth towards Salem. The enemy is reported to be in considerable force at Yellville. If he attempts to move between you, operate against his flank.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 7, 1862.

Capt. W. D. PORTER, U. S. N., Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: Flag-Officer Foote, commanding flotilla in Western waters, has designated you to take charge of fitting out two gunboats to be purchased at this place. It is proposed that they be so altered as to serve the double purpose of gunboats and rams. The Quartermaster’s Department will purchase the boats under your direction and supply all the necessary means for fitting them out.

It is expected that the work will be pushed forward with all possible dispatch.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 7, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

General Denver goes to Indian Territory, Sturgis to Kansas, and General Craig to Overland Mail Route. Until General Brice is confirmed I have no one to command New Mexico expedition. Flag-Officer Foote has designated Captain Porter to direct the fitting out of new gunboats. I shall probably leave on the morning of the 9th for Tennessee. General Buell’s advance guard has reached Grant. Entire force will connect in two or three days. I will write you about dispositions of Generals Curtis and Steele.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE MILITIA, Saint Louis, Mo., April 7, 1862.

General JAMES TOTTEN, Jefferson City, Mo.:

I have seen General Halleck about giving you more cavalry, but he says he cannot do it. You will have to do the best you can for the present The same calls are made from all parts of this State, Kentucky, and {p.673} Tennessee. It would require 100,000 men to supply all such demands. Very naturally the general is inclined to overlook them all in view of the great battle that must soon be fought near Corinth. Something can be risked elsewhere, but nothing there.

There is no doubt, however, that you should have more cavalry, and I shall make it my business to get it for you in some way or other as soon as possible. I shall be able to spare some from Northern Missouri before long and then will send it to your district. We could soon raise enough in Southwestern Missouri, if allowed to, but that is forbid. Even recruiting for the volunteer service is forbid. I hope, however, when we get what men are now enlisted well organized and equipped we will be strong enough, with what United States troops are now in the State, and I shall try to keep them all here if possible.

Our men complain very much about their arms, and perhaps with some reason, yet they are better supplied than the majority of volunteers. There are several regiments here now for which there are no arms of any kind; carbines, revolvers, and sabers can’t be obtained, nor are they indispensable. Our men have no more use for a saber than for a columbiad, and yet all clamorous to get them.

We will be able, I think, now to get transportation without delay. I am pushing it forward all the time. Have ordered a full supply of everything sent to Colonel McClurg, including thirty days’ rations.

I will let you have Wood as inspector-general in a short time. He is now attending to ordnance duties, which will be closed up soon, as all will be supplied, and Callender will have more time to attend to our matters.

Keep me informed of your wants. I will do what I can to supply them.

Very respectfully,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., April 7, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that a communication from Col. Fitz Henry Warren, dated April 4, announces the capture, by detachments of his command, of 25 more prisoners, including Lieutenant-Colonel Murrell and quartermaster Cox, of Price’s army.

Evidence reaches me daily of the return of men from Price’s army to every portion of this district. Wherever these characters are roaming about and can be captured, what is the general’s pleasure in regard to them? Where they do not voluntarily give themselves up and give bond for future good behavior I can regard them only in the light of spies, they being within our lines and in citizen’s dress.

If not otherwise directed by the major-general commanding, I shall therefore give orders to arrest them accordingly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District. {p.674}

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP BENTON, Island No. 10, April 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

SIR: I have the honor to inform the department that since I sent the telegraph last night announcing the surrender of Island 10 to me possession has been taken of both the island and the works upon the Tennessee shore by the gunboats and the troops under command of General Buford. Seventeen officers and 368 privates, besides 100 of their sick and 100 men employed on board transports, are in our hands unconditional prisoners of war.

I have caused a hasty examination to be made of the forts, batteries, and munitions of war captured. There are eleven earthworks with seventy heavy cannon, varying in caliber from 32s to 100 pounders rifled. The magazines are well supplied with powder, and there are large quantities of shot and shell and other munitions of war, and also great quantities of provisions. Four steamers afloat have fallen in our hands, and two others, with the rebel gunboat Grampus, are sunk, but will be easily raised. The floating battery of sixteen heavy guns turned adrift by the rebels is said to be lying on the Missouri shore below New Madrid.

The enemy upon the main-land appear to have fled with great precipitation after dark last night, leaving in many cases half-prepared meals in their quarters, and there seems to have been no concert of action between the rebels upon the island and those occupying the shore, but the latter fled, leaving the former to their fate.

These works, erected with the highest engineering skill, are of great strength, and with their natural advantages would have been impregnable if defended by men fighting in a better cause. A combined attack of the naval and land forces would have taken place this afternoon or to-morrow morning had not the rebels so hastily abandoned this stronghold. To mature these plans of attack have absolutely required the past twenty-three days’ of preparation. General Pope is momentarily expected to arrive with his army at this point, he having successfully crossed the river yesterday under a heavy fire, which no doubt led to the hasty abandonment of the works last night.

I am unofficially informed that the two gunboats which so gallantly run the fire of the rebel batteries a few nights since, yesterday attacked and reduced a work of the enemy opposite New Madrid mounting eight heavy guns. I regret that the painful condition of my foot, still requiring me to use crutches, prevented me from making a personal examination of the works. I was therefore compelled to delegate that duty to Lieutenant-Commanding S. L. Phelps, of the flag-ship Benton.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Commanding Naval Forces Western Waters.

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CAMP ON EAST SIDE MISSISSIPPI RIVER, April 8, 1862-7 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Island No. 10 was hastily evacuated last night and the forces are trying to get off. Whether they will succeed remains to be seen. Paine’s division is in advance. I have not heard from him since last night; everything the enemy had is ours at all events. It may be {p.675} possible, to get their men off by wading the swamps, but nothing in the way of baggage, supplies of any description, can go.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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TIPTONVILLE, April 8, 1862-9 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

The advance under General Paine reached this place at daylight, driving the enemy before him. After sharp skirmishing and frantic attempts to cross the swamp the enemy was so furiously pressed by Paine that he laid down his arms. Two thousand prisoners, including General Mackall, formerly of the Adjutant-General’s Department, and staff, together with large quantities of siege and field artillery, tents, baggage, and an immense quantity of supplies have fallen into our hands. Our troops are scouring the country between here and Island No. 10. Many more prisoners will be taken in course of the day. Everything has worked smoothly and well.

The captured troops are from Arkansas and Louisiana.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEW MADRID, April 8, 1862-7 p.m.

General HALLECK:

Everything is ours. Few, if any, of the enemy escaped. Three generals, 6,000 prisoners, an immense quantity of ammunition and supplies, 100 pieces of siege and several batteries of field artillery, great numbers of small-arms, tents, wagons, horses, &c., have fallen into our hands. Our success has been complete and overwhelming. The enemy’s forces are from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Alabama. I will give to-morrow by telegraph a brief summary of our operations.

We have not lost a man in crossing the river or in pursuing or capturing the enemy.

JNO. POPE, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, April 8, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

I congratulate you and your command on your splendid achievement. It exceeds in boldness and brilliancy all other operations of the war. It will be memorable in military history and will be admired by future generations. You deserve well of your country.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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MERIWETHER LANDING, April 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Paine’s division marched forward to Tiptonville last night and captured General Mackall, formerly on the Adjutant-General’s {p.676} (U. S.) staff, with about 2,000 prisoners from Arkansas and Louisiana large quantities of stores, ammunition, and other property. General Pope’s movement has been a complete success. We move in the direction of Island No. 10 in a few moments to capture all that are left.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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NEW MADRID, April 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Just returned from Tennessee. General Pope’s movement has been a glorious success. Captured the rebel general and nearly all his forces are prisoners. They will number about 5,000. Over 100 pieces of heavy artillery at Island No. 10, and along the river shore a large amount of arms and property of every description. The rebels sank six steamers. Will endeavor to have five of them raised. If transportation arrives to-morrow or next day we shall have Memphis within ten days, and General Pope can co-operate with General Grant at Corinth in wiping out secession. Captain Walke, of the gunboat Carondelet, is entitled to great credit for his efficient co-operation with General Pope to effect the crossing of the river.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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NEW MADRID, April 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The movement of General Pope yesterday and to-day has been all that could be desired. If you can send him transportation, Memphis will fall within seven days. Then for co-operation at Corinth or a big fight wherever you want the work done.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 8, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, New Madrid:

Ten large steamers are preparing to take General Pope’s command down the river. Gunboats and mortars should be in readiness to accompany him.

A severe battle and splendid victory yesterday at Pittsburg, Tenn. I shall be in Cairo early Thursday morning. Can’t you meet me and go with me up the Tennessee River?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NEW MADRID, April 8, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I will meet you at Cairo Thursday morning. Want to say a few words. After interview will decide where to go. Will urge the early {p.677} movement of gunboats and mortars. I go with General Pope to see the commodore to-morrow.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

Brig. Gen. W. W. Mackall, late of United States Adjutant-General’s Department, with over 2,000 of the rebel forces, has surrendered to General Pope, and it is expected that many more will be captured today. Immense quantities of artillery and supplies have fallen into our hands.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 8, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Pope has captured 3 generals, 6,000 prisoners of war, 100 siege pieces, and several field batteries, with immense quantities of small-arms, tents, wagons, horses, and provisions. Our victory is complete and overwhelming. We have not lost a single man.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 138.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Galena, Mo., April 8, 1862.

I. Order and hours for marching April 9 will be as follows:

First Division at 6 a.m., and proceed to the mouth of Bear Creek, 16 miles. The transportation wagons belonging to this division, now forming a part of the brigade at James Fork, will be left in such brigade, and one regiment of this division remain and bring up the rear, with the trains.

Fourth Division, immediately after Bowen’s battalion and train have crossed James Fork, will cross and camp on the east bank, move at 7.30 a.m. of 10th in rear of Third Division.

Bowen’s battalion, immediately after the First Division has crossed James Fork, and proceed with the same to the mouth of Bear Creek.

Wyman’s brigade, immediately after Fourth Division camp on the east bank, move at 8 a.m. of the 10th instant rear of Fourth Division, and camp at mouth of Bear Creek.

Third Division move from camp on east bank of Flat Creek at 7 a.m. 9th, cross James Fork at Galena, camp on east bank, and move at 5.30 a.m. of the 10th, and camp at the mouth of Bear Creek. Second Division will bring up and protect the rear.

By command of Major-General Curtis:

H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.678}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 9, 1862.

Major-General POPE, New Madrid:

Send sick to this city. General and field officers, prisoners of war, to Fort Warren, Boston Harbor; other officers to Columbus, Ohio. Send 1,500 prisoners to Chicago, 1,000 to Springfield, and remainder to Madison and Milwaukee, via Prairie du Chien. Wisconsin troops should be sent to guard the latter. I suggest Colonel Murphy. Telegraph to Major Allen when you will be ready to send back your troops. He is preparing ten large steamers.

All stores, &c., should be removed from Commerce, and all mules, wagons, &c., not required by you must be immediately sent up the Tennessee River. As you will have all your supplies in steamers and will not move far from the river, you will not require a large amount of land transportation. I shall leave here at 2 p.m. and will be in Cairo tomorrow morning.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis: ORDERED:

1st. That at meridian of the Sunday next after the receipt of this order at the head of every regiment in the armies of the United States there shall be offered by its chaplain a prayer giving thanks to the Lord of Hosts for the recent manifestation of his power in the overthrow of rebels and traitors, and invoking the continuance of his aid in delivering this nation, by the army of patriot soldiers, from the horrors of treason, rebellion, and civil war.

2d. That the thanks and congratulations of the War Department are rendered to Major-General Halleck for the signal ability and success that have distinguished the military operations of his department and for the spirit and courage manifested by the army under his command, under every hardship and against every odds, in attacking, pursuing, and destroying the enemy wherever he could be found.

3d. That the thanks of the Department are also given to Generals Curtis and Sigel and the officers and soldiers of their command for matchless gallantry at the bloody battle of Pea Ridge, and to Major-Generals Grant and Buell and their forces for the glorious repulse of Beauregard at Pittsburg, in Tennessee, and to Major-General Pope and his officers and soldiers for the bravery and skill displayed in their operations against the rebels and traitors intrenched at Island No. 10, on the Mississippi River. The daring courage, diligent prosecution, persistent valor, and military result of these achievements are unsurpassed.

4th. That there shall this day be a salute of one hundred guns from the United States Arsenal at Washington in honor of these great victories.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST, Forsyth, April 10, 1862.

Capt. N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis:

High water detained me so I have only arrived to-day at 2 p.m. Skirmishing with a rear guard of enemy’s cavalry, and some prisoners taken.

My cavalry is scouring the country down in Arkansas. No force of consequence near. Main force was cavalry, and left some days since. The country is very rough. Roads pass down deep valleys or run on narrow divides. My main force must remove back to more open ground, perhaps near Ozark, for forage and convenience of movement east or west. One division, with cavalry, could hold this point against the world, and keep the enemy pressed down. I shall try to alarm the enemy in front, but cannot extend far enough to do much. The taking of Island No. 10 may soon give you the mouth of the river, which is the key to Arkansas. I am arranging a rope-ferry for convenience. White River is not fordable, and rebels come and fire across. Will soon stop that.

I will try to get into telegraphic communication as soon as I complete arrangements here.

This is a dilapidated town. It is only important when steamboats are running and commerce is safe on the White River. The surrounding country is not cultivated.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI Jefferson City, Mo., April 10, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the major-general commanding the department, that I have been advised by Col. Fitz Henry Warren of the capture of 15 more prisoners, one a rebel lieutenant, and the recovery of a herd of cattle jayhawked near Clinton some time ago. Also a letter of the next date (7th) announces return of another scouting party, with 4 prisoners, with horses and side-arms of each. One of these latter, Mr. Beasley, had taken the oath only the previous week, and when taken denied most solemnly having any arms or ammunition, but a search of the premises revealed one revolver, one double-barreled shot-gun, and one rifle, with buckshot and powder.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

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SAINT LOUIS, April 10, 1862, From Fort Leavenworth, April 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

From the best information obtainable at least 2,000 Indians can be armed. Arms for that number are now going forward to Humboldt. Taking out troops for New Mexico will leave three regiments of infantry, four of cavalry, and two batteries in this State.

{p.680}

General Curtis seems not to have received your order returning Kansas troops.

Texans reported leaving New Mexico. If true, might not one mounted regiment be left on the plains.

Snake Indians, Bannocks, and Mormons reported committing depredations about South Pass.

J. W. DENVER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI, Jefferson City, Mo., April 10, 1862.

To DEPUTY SHERIFF and MEMBERS OF THE GRAND JURY, Moniteau County, Mo.:

GENTLEMEN: It has been officially reported to these headquarters that certain officers in civil authority, including members of the grand jury, have evinced a determination to persecute Union men as such, including officers and soldiers of the U. S. Army.

For instance, at the late session of the grand jury, two-thirds of whom were secessionists, known and avowed, a bill of indictment was found against one Grason for stealing a horse from a secessionist last fall, while said Grason was a lieutenant in the Home Guards, which horse was never taken from California, Mo., and has long since been restored to the owner, and in fact was not taken by the said Grason at all. He is held in $500 bonds for appearance next term, which he gives. Soon after, he is arrested upon another and similar charge, and resists the officer (deputy sheriff) attempting to make the arrest. He being at this time a member of the Missouri State Militia, and in that capacity assisting to maintain the Federal Union and the constituted authorities thereof, it would therefore seem that the grand jury is persisting in persecuting the said Grason because he is actively engaged in the cause of the Union, and that this is not the only case in which their persecutions have been made apparent.

If these statements be facts-and they come as official information to these headquarters from officers of the U. S. Army in responsible positions-the civil officers, including members of the grand jury and deputy sheriff, are warned that their action is closely observed, and will be, if persisted in, further investigated and they held accountable.

Martial law, as declared in General Orders, No. 2, Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, March 13, 1862, having been legally declared in the city of Saint Louis and on and in the immediate vicinity of the railroads and telegraph lines, and thereby civil authority having been partially suspended, the officers acting under the same are cautioned that they are not beyond the power of military investigation, and that such a course will be adopted in reference to their actions whenever it seems they are persisting in persecuting Union men or opposing the military authority of the Federal Government. In this connection it may be well enough for the civil authorities above referred to to consider how far and in how many cases they have found indictments against known rebels and sympathizers with rebellion who have perpetrated acts in opposition to the laws of the United States. It is doubtless known to them that many such acts of opposition to the Government and its supporters have been perpetrated, and that the perpetrators of the same are in many instances indictable under {p.681} the criminal law, and therefore, to make their record clear, the grand jury and other civil officers in and around California should be able to show that they have been zealous to bring to trial the law-breakers indicated.

It seems incredible to suppose that members of the grand jury and the deputy sheriff are not acquainted with the names and residences of men within their jurisdiction who have by acts of violence committed upon Union men and in a spirit of opposition to the laws of the United States and State of Missouri laid themselves liable to serious charges, for which they should have been indicted by the grand jury. The question arises, has this been done in every instance where the party implicated was known to be of secession proclivities ? There should be no partiality, favor, or affection in such matters.

I am, gentlemen, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. TOTTEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding District.

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CAIRO, April 10, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

General Halleck arrived at 9 o’clock on way to Tennessee. After conference he desired me to go down Mississippi. I leave for Madrid at 11 o’clock. Will push everything forward as rapidly as possible. Enemy concentrating to two other points in great force. We should have a column from Potomac for Tennessee River. Cannot 20,000 or 30,000 efficient men be spared to replace those lost and rendered ineffective in battle? If you have any instructions telegraph me at New Madrid. Victory near Corinth has been decisive in our favor, but at terrible cost.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 30.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 10, 1862.

The following dispatch from Major-General Halleck, commanding this department, has been received, and, with this order, will be published at the head of every regiment and detachment of this command:

SAINT LOUIS, April 5, 1862.

Major-General POPE:

I congratulate you and your command on your splendid achievement. It excels in boldness and brilliancy all other operations of the war. It will be memorable in military history and will be admired by future generations. You deserve well of your country.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

The general commanding has but little to add to this dispatch. The conduct of the troops was splendid throughout. It was precisely what he expected. To such an army nothing is impossible, and the general commanding hopes yet to lead them to some field where superiority of numbers and position will tempt the enemy to give them the opportunity to win the glory which they are so capable of achieving.

{p.682}

The regiments and battalions of this command will inscribe on their flags New Madrid and Island 10.

JNO. POPE, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 31.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, New Madrid, April 10, 1862.

The several divisions of this army will make preparations to embark and move down the river in the following order:

First, Paine; second Stanley; third Hamilton; fourth, Palmer; fifth, Plummer; sixth, Granger.

One battery of artillery, complete, for each division, and four wagons to each regiment will accompany the respective divisions.

General Palmer will detail one brigade of his division to constitute for the present the garrison at this place, one regiment of which will be sent up immediately. The other will remain for the present at Tiptonville, to collect and take charge of the public property.

The commanding officers at Tiptonville, Island 10, and New Madrid will be held responsible for the collection and safe-keeping of all property captured from the enemy, will have careful inventories made of it, and have a copy sent to these headquarters.

Colonel Bissell, Engineer Regiment, will detail two companies of his regiment to remove the heavy guns from the main-land, both of our own batteries and those of the enemy, as follows:

The guns opposite Island 10 will be transferred to the island for safe-keeping; those below New Madrid to the two redoubts at that place.

Immediate and careful inventories will be made of the artillery and ammunition of every description by the commanders of the two companies, and when completed the whole property will be turned over to the ordnance officer at the upper redoubt. The engineer companies will then build as rapidly as possible a sufficient magazine to contain all the ammunition within the limits of New Madrid and at a safe distance from the shore. As soon as the magazine is completed it will be turned over to the ordnance officer, who will move all the ammunition into it immediately, and the two engineer companies will rejoin their regiment at the earliest opportunity.

The sick of the command who will not be fit for duty within five days, together with all the sick of the enemy upon the opposite shore, are placed under the general supervision of Brigade Surgeon Bryan, of the U. S. Army, who, under the direction of the commanding officer in this vicinity, will transfer them as rapidly as possible to Saint Louis, communicating immediately with the medical director at that place for that purpose.

The senior officer present with the troops at Island 10, New Madrid, and Tiptonville will assume the command of the whole forces in the neighborhood, which shall constitute the District of New Madrid, at which place he will make his headquarters. One steamer will be left in his charge to carry out the provisions of the order. If he needs others, he will telegraph General Strong, at Cairo, for them.

The troops will take with them all camp equipage and baggage and not less than four days’ cooked rations. They will hold themselves in readiness to embark at a moment’s notice.

The chief commissary will provide, to carry with this command, not {p.683} less than fifteen days’ rations, besides what are in possession of the troops.

Commanders of divisions and the chief of artillery will take care that a sufficient quantity of ammunition is transported with their respective commands.

The six companies of United States Infantry and the Engineer Regiment will be assigned one steamer for their transportation.

The chief quartermaster will leave one assistant at this place, to forward the remaining wagons and supplies of this command to Memphis.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF KANSAS, Fort Leavenworth, April 10, 1862.

I. In pursuance of General Orders, No. 77, from Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, dated Saint Louis, Mo., April 6, 1862, the undersigned hereby assumes command of the District of Kansas.

II. Capt. Thomas Moonlight, Light Artillery, Kansas Volunteers, is hereby appointed acting assistant adjutant-general of this district.

III. The other staff officers of this district will continue as before.

S. D. STURGIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, April 16, 1862.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor herewith respectfully to transmit, for the information of the Secretary of War, an official copy of a letter of instructions to Brig. Gen. J. W. Denver, dated April 5, 1862; also of one to Brig. Gen. S. D. Sturgis, dated one day later; these papers having been called for by the Secretary of War.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See pp. 664, 668.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6