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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 7, Ch. XVII-Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XVII.
OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, TENNESSEE, NORTH ALABAMA, AND SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA.
November 19, 1861-March 4, 1862.
(Mill Springs, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson)
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UNION CORRESPONDENCE

{p.439}

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 19, 1861.

I. In compliance with General Orders, No. 97, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, November 9, 1861, the undersigned hereby takes the command of the Department of the Missouri, including the States of Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Arkansas, and that portion of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River.

II. All reports and returns required by Army Regulations will be made to the headquarters in the city of Saint Louis.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., November 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, Crab Orchard, Ky.:

SIR: General Buell directs me to say that the orders he has given you in reference to the movement of your command* contemplate the whole of it, and it will, in consequence, not be necessary to continue the depot from which you are now supplied. You will come upon a line of which Louisville and not Cincinnati will be the main depot.

The general desires to be informed in due season of the time at which you will probably arrive at Liberty, as he intends to have further instructions ready to reach you when you get to that point.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

* See Thomas to Carter, Series I, Vol. IV, p. 361.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Crab Orchard:

GENERAL: I have just received information that the rebels, 5,000 strong,were last night at Flat Lick, 8 miles above Barboursville and 32 miles from this place. The messenger left Barboursville this morning. As I can make no stand at this place without artillery with my force, which consists of only some 2,000 effective men, I shall, on obtaining certain information of the enemy’s approach, if possible move in the direction of Somerset.

From our very limited means of transportation I shall probably have to destroy nearly the whole of our rations, as I shall not be able to move more than our camp equipage.

{p.440}

Were I sure of your being still at Crab Orchard I should of course fall back on Rock Castle, notwithstanding the almost impassable state of the roads; but as I have been told you had left the Crab Orchard, I must take your advice and retire to Somerset.

I need not say, general, how much I regret the necessity of this move, but I can see no help for it, as this place without artillery and with so small a force, is altogether indefensible. I have sent out to press all the wagons that can be obtained; but as most of them were taken by General Schoepf’s troops, I fear I can obtain but few, if any.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, November 20, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

SIR: Will you allow me to suggest the consideration of a great movement by land and water up the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers?

1st. Would it not allow of water transportation half way to Nashville?

2d. Would it not necessitate the evacuation of Columbus by threatening their railway communication?

3d. Would it not necessitate the retreat of General Buckner by threatening his railway lines?

4th. Is it not the most passable route into Tennessee?

Yours, respectfully, &c.,

CHAS. WHITTLESEY, Colonel, and Chief of Engineer Department.

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, November 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER, Commanding Camp Calvert:

GENERAL: Your dispatch [of 19th instant] has just been received. My orders are to move towards Columbia, and therefore am unable to render you any assistance. You must exercise your best judgment as to the best route to retreat, should your information prove correct concerning the approach of the enemy; but,from all the information I have I should think the road to Richmond the best and easiest to defend. I will immediately dispatch to General Buell.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Vols., Commanding.

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CAMP CALVERT, EAST TENNESSEE, November 20, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Crab Orchard:

GENERAL: The news I received and forwarded you last evening seemed to be reliable, and I accordingly forwarded it to you; but from intelligence received to-day through scouts sent to Barboursville I learn {p.441} that the rebel force was much exaggerated, as by their statement no more than one regiment was at Flat Lick, and that returned towards the Ford yesterday.

I had made all the preparation in my power to save as many of the public stores as possible, having determined in case of absolute necessity to destroy the rest, and then deal with the rebels as I could.

If the quartermaster can send me more wagons and teams, so as to fill up the number we are entitled to, it will add not only to our convenience, but efficiency, as well as be no small saving to the Government.

Recruits are arriving almost every day from East Tennessee. We have no arms to put into their hands. The Union men coming to us represent the people in East Tennessee as waiting with the utmost anxiety the arrival of the Federal forces. They are all ready to join them and do their part towards the deliverance of their native land. Union camps are already forming in some of the counties, and unless help soon reaches them, as they have but little ammunition, they will be scattered or destroyed.

Will you please send me some rifle powder. I am greatly in want of stationery.

With the hope of soon seeing you here, respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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COLUMBIA, KY., November 20, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I am here with my regiment safe in camp. The danger at this place is not now threatening. The enemy has again fallen back to Monroe County. Zollicoffer’s forces, under General Lee, have been moving across the mountain towards Jamestown, Tenn., or Camp McGinnis. I have not, however, been able to hear anything from them since they passed through Huntsville, in Scott County. We sent some five of Colonel Wolford’s men through Clinton to scout, but they have not yet had time to get in.

If you can get all your forces here with General Boyle’s and General Ward’s, you can make a movement upon Buckner’s flank and successfully turn him. I do not doubt that a forward-movement from here would make him retreat from Kentucky precipitately. He is not near so strong as represented. His forges do not exceed 20,000, and a movement upon his flank before he is re-enforced by General Lee would run him from Kentucky. The movements he is making I am persuaded are to cover his weakness and hold in check a forward movement until he can be re-enforced. Such I am now convinced is the cause of all these threatening movements upon Clinton, Wayne, Cumberland, Barren, &c. It is but the trick of a desperate gamester.

I hope to see you soon at this place, and would not be in the least surprised if your movement in this direction does not cause a hasty retreat from Kentucky anyhow; especially if they take up the idea that it is a flank movement, as Buckner will be apt to do.*

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry, Kentucky Volunteers.

* Some matters of detail omitted.

{p.442}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 21, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General Orders, No. 1, of the 19th instant, Department of the Missouri, is just received. During the temporary absence of headquarters from Saint Louis I made a report to Major-General McClellan, and was directed by him to make a full report of all my command, how located, their wants, &c. This has been done, but no requisitions forwarded.

My command embraces the posts of Cape Girardeau and Bird’s Point, Mo., Fort Holt, Ky., and Cairo and Mound City, Ill. For strength of each command see tri-monthly report, which will be forwarded in a day or two.

Paducah and Smithland compose a separate district. Since the affair of Belmont, on the 7th instant, quite a number of Northern men have made their escape from the South, not a few of them soldiers. From this source I have got what I believe a reliable statement of the strength of the enemy; the position of his batteries; number of his troops, &c.

Thee are now at Columbus forty-seven regiments of infantry and cavalry, two companies of light artillery, and over one hundred pieces of heavy ordnance. All the statements I have received corroborate each other. In addition to these there are at Camp Beauregard, on the road about half way between Mayfield and Union City, some 8,000 more, of all arms, under command of Major Bowen, of Camp Jackson notoriety. The position of the camp may have been changed since I last heard from them, but the force is exclusive of those enumerated above.

The enemy are working night and day upon their fortifications, and the greatest consternation has prevailed for the last ten days lest Columbus should be attacked. Finding that they are let alone, they may be induced to act on the offensive if more troops are not sent here soon. A gunboat reached Columbus the night of the 19th instant, and another is expected within a few days.

The condition of this command is bad in every particular except discipline. In this latter I think they will compare favorably with almost any volunteers. There is great deficiency in transportation. I have no ambulances. The clothing received has been almost universally of an inferior quality and deficient in quantity. The arms in the hands of the men are mostly the old flint lock repaired, the “Tower” musket, and others of still more inferior quality.

My cavalry force are none of them properly armed-the best being deficient in sword-belts and having the old pattern carbines. Eight companies are entirely without arms of any description.

The Quartermaster’s Department has been carried on here with so little funds that Government credit has become exhausted. I would urgently recommend that relief in this particular be afforded at as early a day as practicable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

P. S.-The facts relating to arms, clothing, Quartermaster’s Department, &c., have been frequently reported and requisitions made.

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STANFORD, KY., November 21, 1861.

Capt. J. B. FRY A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Hdqrs. Dept. of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

SIR: Your communication of the 19th has just been received. The roads being in such bad condition I am compelled to move by Danville {p.443} and Lebanon to get to Columbia. It is not possible at this season of the year to go by Liberty. I have therefore concluded to halt at this place for the general’s instructions; in the mean time measures have been taken to remove all troops from London, and I am in hopes they will be able to start next Saturday, and reach here on Wednesday, the 27th. The roads between Crab Orchard and London are in wretched condition, and the animals very much reduced.

There arc a large number of sick at Crab Orchard, which will make it necessary for Colonel Coburn to remain there with his regiment for two weeks or more.

Captain Gillem can give the general any information he may desire in reference to the condition of the troops and means of transportation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

P. S.-I have with me the Seventeenth and Thirty-eighth Ohio Regiments; with General Schoepf, near Lebanon, the two batteries of artillery, the Fourteenth Ohio, and the Second Regiment Kentucky Volunteers. Bramlette’s and Wolford’s regiments are at Columbia.

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GEO. H. THOMAS.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., November 22, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

MY DEAR FRIEND: The Kentucky regiments are being consolidated, some forty or fifty fragments worked into about twenty-two full regiments, and mustered into service as rapidly as possible, and I shall expect soon to get them somewhat in hand. They are now scattered all over the State for the convenience of recruiting. As near as I can ascertain, some 10,000 stands of arms will be required to complete their armament. Two of the Ohio regiments from Camp Dennison have arrived. The other has been diverted by our officious Governor to Gallipolis, where its colonel is telegraphing mysteriously to unauthorized persons for cavalry for his “expedition to J.” The Governor evidently looks upon all Ohio troops as his army. He requires, I am told, morning reports from them, and their quartermasters to forward their returns to him. I shall stop all this sort of thing. But everything here has been done in the most extraordinary manner. Every colonel and brigadier-general has his personal establishment or army. I learned this morning that a company of cavalry, got up by the Governor of Indiana as a body guard to General McCook, had passed through the city without reporting, and reported to its general. It is unnecessary to add that I ordered it forthwith to repair to another place. Then General Mitchel had his body guard, which I have been obliged to interfere with. Following out the idea, the brigade commanders have their cavalry and their batteries, which they tell the division commander he has nothing to do with. I mention these little items to show you what sort of organization and subordination has existed in these remote parts.

And now to come to strategy: Without abandoning any line, I am concentrating somewhat for the purpose of organization and outfit. I am studying the country and our enemy, and I believe I am wasting no time. I shall be prepared to do anything you think best after you hear what I propose to do, and I shall do nothing that you are not willing to assent to. I do not expect to be tardy, but I do not mean to be {p.444} disturbed by unreasonable newspaper clamor, and I expect that your confidence in me will not be shaken by that abuse either. I have by no means abandoned the idea which you put forward prominently; on the contrary, I am studying it carefully and preparing for it, for I find some attraction in it; but neither have I determined on it absolutely, unless I am to understand that the Adjutant-General’s letter absolutely requires it. If it does, I shall execute it carefully and with all my might. Governor Johnson is here. I have talked freely with him, and I think thus far satisfied him. I believe I shall do so entirely as far as purposes are concerned; but whether the execution will realize all our hopes is a matter for the future to dispose of. For my own part I do not fear to try; neither do I wish to appear overconfident.

The route we had in our eye wins upon me the more I investigate it. I am pretty nearly assured that it has decided advantages over the old one. I do not mention names for I have an enormous respect for secrecy in military operations, and therefore it is, and also because I want to speak to you freely, that I like that you should allow me to write informally, rather than through official channels, for there is no secret in the Adjutant-General’s Office.

Sherman still insists that I require 200,000 men. I am quite content to try with a good many less; but I do not want to abate in the end what you yourself thought desirable, if not necessary. It will be important that Halleck shall strike at the same time that I do, and I think you will agree that his blow should await my preparation.

As for our enemy, I do not find it difficult to ascertain pretty nearly what he is and what he is doing-at least within a certain limit. First, he is fortifying pretty strongly at Bowling Green, and he has some weak batteries on the Cumberland and Tennessee. Second, he can concentrate at Bowling Green in three or four hours some 20,000 or 25,000 men. As for his attacking, though I do not intend to be unprepared for him, yet I should almost as soon expect to see the Army of the Potomac marching up the road.

This is rather a prolix letter for a man who has not much time for light reading, but it has the same advantage-you can put it aside without much loss of your hearing of it.

Cannot you get me on the track of the Fort Randall companies? Please do not let the Departments put off my calls.

If you have any unoccupied brigadiers-not my seniors (?)-send six or eight, even though they should be no better than marked poles.

Sincerely, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding, &c., at Paducah, Ky.:

It is reported that General Hardee, with 8,000 men, is about to cross the Ohio between the Wabash and Cumberland, to destroy the Ohio and Mississippi and the Illinois Central Railroad. Others say that he is to be re-enforced by General Polk and attack Paducah. Keep me advised of the enemy’s movements.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.445}

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LOUISVILLE, November 22, 1861-8.15 p.m. (Received November 23, 1861-8.30 a.m.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Danville:

If the regiments at London have not started to move by the time you can communicate with them, order them to remain at London.

By command of General Buell:

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 22, 1861. (Received Nov. 23, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of 20th [21st?] instant from Stanford, ordering me to break up the camp at London and join you with my command, has just been received.

I shall endeavor, if I can obtain means of transportation, to start the sick and hospital stores forward in the morning, and hope to follow with the rest of my command just as soon as I can press or hire wagons to move the subsistence stores and ammunition now at this place. Although this brigade has a great dread of the Blue-grass country, and are most desirous of driving the rebels from East Tennessee in the quickest possible time, I trust there will be no difficulty in moving them to any point where there is a prospect of meeting our common enemy.

Owing to the condition of the roads over Rockcastle Hills it is possible that I may, in case I obtain a favorable account of the Somerset road, proceed to join you with those fit for service via that place. Should I do so, I will advise you by special messenger.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, November 23, 1861.

General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

I have a report not yet confirmed that Zollicoffer, 6,000 strong, has crossed the Cumberland at Gainesborough, probably on his way to Bowling Green; also a rumor of the same sort that about the same number have left Bowling Green going north. Neither is improbable.

The burned bridges are being repaired with my consent. I have a letter from the Adjutant-General. Have you seen cause to curtail my discretion? Will write to-night.

D. C. BUELL.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., November 23, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Hdqrs. Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have just answered General Halleck’s telegram* in relation to Hardee’s supposed purpose of crossing the Ohio between the Wabash and the Cumberland. I have said:

My last information was that 2,000 men, with three field guns, were at Princeton, running off hogs-plundering generally. I have sent the gunboat Conestoga to gain information and watch the Ohio.

{p.446}

One of the three points of attack to be made simultaneously on this place, it has always been understood, is to be by the Tennessee or Cumberland, or both. The idea has military merit. What renders it probable (whenever the attack is to come off) is that the enemy is constructing one or more gunboats far up the Cumberland, and at Sandy Creek, up the Tennessee, some 8 miles beyond the State line, he has been converting river steamers (two or three) into iron-plated gunboats, to be heavily armed. This river side is my weak point.

The inhabitants in the counties east of the Cumberland and bordering on the river are much alarmed, and send messages that a force is coming, &c.; but heretofore it has been marauding parties merely, and latterly the increase of force is, I think, more to sweep the country of provisions without risk than from any idea of crossing the river. They want the means of transportation to do so.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Of November 22, p. 444.

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DANVILLE, KY., November 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER, Commanding East Tennessee Brigade:

GENERAL: The inclosed dispatch* has just been received. The general commanding directs me to say that the order to break up camp was based upon orders received from department headquarters.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. H. Thomas:

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* See Fry to Thomas, November 22, p. 445.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 24, 1861. (Received November 27, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Danville, Ky.:

GENERAL: On the 21st instant I sent out upwards of 600 men, with orders to take the old State road and proceed as far as Flat Lick (8 miles this side of Cumberland Ford), and endeavor to gain some certain information as to the force and position of the rebels, and if possible to cut off their cavalry, which I had been informed were in the habit of coming down on thieving expeditions to the vicinity of Barboursville.

The detachment returned this evening, having marched from Barboursville since morning. Lieutenant-Colonel Spears, the officer in command, reports that none of the rebels were at Cumberland Ford, nor have they been below that point for some days. From the best information he could obtain from the citizens there is but a small number of troops at Cumberland Gap, the larger portion of them having moved down Powell’s Valley in the direction of Jamestown.

Lieutenant-Colonel Spears represents that subsistence in large quantities can be obtained in Knox County, and that a very small force could occupy a position at or near the Cumberland Ford, and hold it against a greatly superior force.

{p.447}

We have arrivals every day from East Tennessee. The condition of affairs there is sad beyond description, and if the loyal people who love and cling to the Government are not soon relieved they will be lost.

I have sent forward nearly all the sick and a part of the commissary stores to Crab Orchard, and will leave with the rest of the command as I can obtain means of transportation for our stores. I have had the whole country scoured for wagons, but have not yet been able to obtain a sufficient number.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., November 25, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: Your telegram received.* I have not seen the letter you allude to from the Adjutant-General.** I instructed him to write to you that I was still firmly impressed with the great necessity of making the movement on Eastern Tennessee with the least possible delay. Eight regiments have been ordered to report to you from Western Virginia, three from Ohio, and whatever was available from Indiana. I hope to place at your disposal early next week two divisions from Missouri, as well as other troops from Illinois. I do not credit the statement that Buckner is in very large force, and I am still convinced that political and strategical considerations render a prompt movement in force on Eastern Tennessee imperative. The object to be gained is to cut the communication between the Mississippi Valley and Eastern Virginia; to protect our Union friends in Tennessee, and re-establish the Government of the Union in the eastern portion of that State. Of course Louisville must be defended, but I think you will be able to do that while you move into Eastern Tennessee. If there are causes which render this course impossible, we must submit to the necessity; but I still feel sure that a movement on Knoxville is absolutely necessary, if it is possible to effect it. Please write to me very fully.

Very truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

* November 23.

** Probably that of November 16. See Series I, Vol. IV, p. 358.

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CALHOUN, November 25, 1861.

General BUELL:

I wrote you this morning* that a rebel force, said to be commanded by Breckinridge, estimated from 4,000 to 6,000, reached Rochester yesterday morning. Since writing, an agent, reliable, is in from Hopkinsville, says all are talking there of a concerted move on Lock No. 1, on Green River. I have ordered Jones’ regiment here. Can’t you have Steele’s, now at Evansville, ordered to Lock No. 1? 1 have written to Colonel Steele, suggesting the propriety of the movement. The forces at Hopkinsville are estimated at 8,000.

T. L. CRITTENDEN.

* Letter not found.

{p.448}

HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 25, 1861. (Received November 29, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Danville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 23d instant, inclosing orders from department headquarters for me to remain at London, has been received.

The sick of First and Second East Tennessee Regiments have been sent on and will probably reach Crab Orchard to-day. As there are good hospital accommodations there, I have directed that they be kept at that place for the present. I have sent to recall the commissary stores which had been forwarded.

The order to remain was received with general satisfaction.

The rebel force at Cumberland Gap is, from the best information I can obtain, so small, that I think we will meet with but little opposition in case it is determined to advance by that pass.

Our desires are to get to East Tennessee as soon as possible, in order that our loyal friends there may be relieved. Many of them have been lying out in the woods to escape their enemies, but as the season advances they will be driven to their houses, and be forced into the rebel ranks or carried to prison. Let us up and help them now, when it will require so little to accomplish this desirable and necessary end.

Will you have the kindness to send the paymaster forward? We have been looking for him for some days, and need funds very much. Do not let him delay a single day.

The greatest part of our lost men have returned. We need arms; if it be possible, send them to us.

I am, general, respectfully and truly, yours,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, November 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding at Paducah, Ky.:

GENERAL: The protection of the line of the Ohio between the mouths of the Wabash and Tennessee against any of Hardee’s rebel force attempting to cross the river into Illinois to operate upon the rear of Cairo, to isolate you at Paducah or to obtain subsistence from that State, it seems to me will be better secured by concentrating your forces at Paducah, with your bridge-head on the Illinois side of the Ohio held by a strong guard, than by any dispersion of them in posts at Shawneetown, Cave in Rock, and Golconda, as has been strongly urged by the Governor of Illinois. The river, of course, should be carefully watched by the flotilla, and in the event of any attempted crossing, not probable by anything but marauding parties, you have it always in your power to disperse them or cut off their retreat by a suitable force crossing the river at Paducah and falling upon their flank or rear.

Against any apprehended danger from rebel gunboats descending the Tennessee or Cumberland your main reliance will be the activity of your flotilla and your own guns in position at Paducah. Of course you will keep yourself well informed of any projected descent of the enemy.

To break up marauding of the rebels in the country east of the Tennessee, {p.449} it may be well for you to secure the right bank of the river with strong cavalry scouts. Persons from that part of the country say that hogs are being collected together to be driven off to the rebel army. Would it not be possible for you to capture some of these droves so collected?

You will report your opinion as to the proposed occupation of Shawneetown and Cave in Rock by the Illinois regiments (three) just mustered into service.

The engineer officers under your command will be retained in service until further orders. The same rule will apply to Captain Neustaedter. It is understood that a board will soon be organized for the examination of all volunteer officers of the volunteer service-brigadier-generals included-so that incompetent officers may, if they do not resign, be discharged from the service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. -.}

HDQRS. DIST. SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., November 26, 1861.

The commanding officer at Caledonia, Ill., will in future prevent all crossing of citizens and all intercourse between the people of Kentucky and the Illinois shore. All persons known to be engaged in unlawful traffic between the two States will be at once arrested and sent before the provost-marshal in Cairo, with such proof as may be at hand. Whenever any property is known to be for the use of the Southern Army, the commanding officer may seize it, whether on the Illinois or Kentucky side of the river. Particular caution is enjoined, however, in making seizures, to see that no hardship is inflicted upon innocent people. The greatest vigilance will be observed to prevent contraband trade or intercourse between the two States.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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DANVILLE, KY., November 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. ALBIN SCHOEPF, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: Break up your camp near Broomfield’s to-morrow and move on Lebanon, encamping with the Fourteenth Ohio, and await my arrival. Should you have time, please examine the country in the neighborhood, with a view to a large encampment.

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

[Orders issued same day for Colonel Barnes’ regiment, at Irvine, and Colonels Connell’s (Seventeenth Ohio) and Bradley’s (Thirty-eighth Ohio) to move to Lebanon.]

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CALHOUN, November 26.

General BUELL:

No news of infantry moving from Hopkinsville. Three or four hundred cavalry from there in Greenville yesterday. I don’t think they {p.450} mean to attempt the locks. I think I can protect them unless troops come from Bowling Green.

T. L. CRITTENDEN.

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NOVEMBER 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

GENERAL: What is the reason for concentration of troops at Louisville? I urge movement at once on Eastern Tennessee, unless it is impossible. No letter from you for several days. Reply. I still trust to your judgment, though urging my own views.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., November 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

MY DEAR FRIEND: I have not written you very frequently because I could not write definitely, and because such, perhaps exaggerated, importance do I attach to secrecy in these matters, that I have hesitated to put my own thoughts to paper, and I now ask you to keep them to yourself. It is certainly possible that in the end you may have to observe how far the consummation will have fallen short of my plans.

I hope you have not supposed that the introduction of the re-enforcements through this point has had any reference to a defense of Louisville. That has not entered my mind at all. I assume that to be safe in any event. I do not place high estimate on Buckner’s force at Bowling Green, and have no such thought as that he will attempt to advance. His position is purely defensive, and he will be quite content, if he can maintain that. I have therefore thought of no such thing as fortifying Louisville, Sherman threw up a little work at the mouth of Salt River. It may have been judicious when he did it. I have not seen the necessity of it since, though it does no harm.

If you will look carefully at the map you will see that Louisville affords the best base that can be taken for land operations from the north upon any part of Tennessee. The railroad to Lebanon curves around to the northeast behind Salt River, giving, besides the Nashville Railroad, three good pike roads, which converge to a point of easy communication for three columns about Glasgow-one by the mouth of Salt River, coming into the railroad at Elizabethtown; one by Bardstown and New Haven, and coming into the direct pike road to Gallatin and Nashville; and one by Lebanon, Shepherdsville, and Greensburg into the same road; while Lebanon Junction, New Haven, and Lebanon form convenient points for the final departure of as many columns. Lebanon also affords a point of departure for a column on east Tennessee as short as any route; for wagon transportation as short as the route from Cincinnati by Lexington, and shorter and less attended with delay by railroad. Nothing could be more convenient. This point has the further advantage of bringing everything under my eye. I could know nothing of what would be done from a base at Cincinnati. These advantages will not fail to impress themselves upon you without going more into detail.

And now for a plan of campaign: Up to the organization of columns behind Salt River all the plans I have in view at present concur.

{p.451}

Beyond that they diverge, and may be stated briefly and candidly thus: First, to establish a sufficient force before Bowling Green to hold Buckner there, while a column moves into East Tennessee by Somerset and the route we had in view; second, to hold him in check while a column moves rapidly past him on Nashville by the turnpike via Gallatin; and, third, holding him in check at Bowling Green and throwing in columns on both the Somerset and Nashville routes. The choice of these must depend on circumstances, which may vary in the mean time or which may not now be clearly perceived. In conjunction with either of these should be the movement of two flotilla columns up the Tennessee and Cumberland, so as at least to land and unite near the State line, and cut off communication between Bowling Green and Columbus, and perhaps run directly into Nashville. A strong demonstration should at the same time be made on Columbus by the Mississippi. The details of all this, such as the destruction of railroads, so as to cut off communication, and a thousand other details, I do not go into, nor is it necessary. You can imagine them all.

All this I hope you will at least say looks plausible; more than that, I hope it is reasonable and believe it is practicable, though I would not like you to forget that circumstances not fully foreseen may mar it in part. For the water movements means are necessary which I have not the control of; that is, gunboats and transports. The troops which you promise from Missouri could be used for the purpose, and ought to move at my signal. I should take the troops from Paducah for one of them, and replace them by those which probably would not be as well disciplined and equipped.

Thus far I have studiously avoided any movements which to the enemy would have the appearance of activity or method. The points occupied are pretty much the same as when I arrived, except that a regiment has now and then been moved into position and Thomas has gradually been closing in upon Lebanon. I shall in a couple of days at most complete the matter of organizing brigades and divisions as the troops come in, and begin to get them into position. We are now “lying around somewhat loose,” and I shall not care much if some of our fragments have to look sharply after themselves. We are at the mouth of Salt River, Elizabethtown, Nolin, Columbia, Campbellsville, at the points on the Lebanon Railroad, Somerset, London, Crab Orchard, and Dick Robinson, and on the Lower Green River. The latter force is composed mostly of Kentucky regiments, half organized. I shall probably keep them to make a demonstration on Russellville and Hopkinsville at the proper time. We have occasional stampedes at the outposts, but I do not allow myself to be much troubled about them. Such a one we have now on the Lower Green River, where Breckinridge is said to be advancing with 8,000 men. He may have 2,500 or 3,000. Another at Somerset, where Zollicoffer is said to be crossing with 10,000. He may have 4,000 or 5,000, and he may cross a regiment or two.

As the troops come in they go into camp 5 miles from the city, under Mitchel, who is attentive and subordinate, and where they replenish their worn-out clothes and outfit and go to drilling. Nelson has been in camp a day, and, I am informed, has already got into difficulty with Mitchel; and, if I am rightly informed, has behaved very absurdly. As he is a veteran, some allowance must be made for him.

There are at Indianapolis seven regiments ready for service, but demoralized by the proximity of friends and the want of discipline and instruction. I propose to form them into a reserve and camp of instruction {p.452} at Bardstown, which is a convenient place in many respects. I can make no use of them in an advance. The Kentucky regiments are only partially organized, and can be but little used at present.

If I were to go into my affairs I should have the appearance of complaining over difficulties. I am greatly in need of general and staff officers. My own staff force is entirely insufficient, but I have no means of augmenting it with advantage. As for myself, I should pay myself a very high compliment if I hoped to come up to the expectations which you first formed. I am afraid I shall have to ask a little patience.

Very truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

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COLUMBIA, KY., November 27, 1861-2.30 a.m. (Received November 29, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

Since writing to you last evening Mr. E. L. Van Winkle has just come in with dispatches from Colonel Hoskins, who says that two regiments of infantry and one of cavalry are preparing and perhaps crossing on a raft at Mill Springs, 12 miles below him, on the Cumberland.

I cannot give full credit to the crossing, but it may be true. I still think they are only preparing to steal what they can in the way of provisions and retire; but they ought to be and could be hemmed in and cut off from here with proper movement and sufficient force. It will not do for the forces here to leave the stores unprotected, for the reason that the rebel pickets have advanced, to Edmonton, 20 miles from here, and threaten us with forces coming on.

Although I do not believe they have the forces behind, yet it will not be prudent to weaken this point while the question is one of doubt.

If you will throw forward two or three regiments, with one or two batteries, and give me authority, I can leave enough to protect this place and take enough to knock these scoundrels on the head and stop this eternal annoyance by the raids of these hog-stealers. They are taking mules, hogs, &c., as they go, and, unless driven out and crushed, will desolate the counties of Wayne, Clinton, and Cumberland.

Were there sufficient forces to protect the stores here and let me have what could move from here now, I could get in behind these marauders and cut them entirely off. They report Zollicoffer’s forces just behind, but that I think is all humbug.

Lieutenant Nell is sick, and I have no one to work his artillery in his absence. Can’t the Ohio batteries be hurried up?

There are ample forces from Lebanon and on this way for all the present needs if they were up this far.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry, Kentucky Volunteers.

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LOUISVILLE, November 27, 1861.

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

Send General Schoepf, with one section of artillery, Wolford’s cavalry and the nearest regiment of infantry rapidly to Somerset to relieve Hoskins, who is threatened by Zollicoffer. Vary the force if later information makes advisable. Be at all times ready to advance.

D. C. BUELL.

{p.453}

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CAMP HOSKINS, PULASKI COUNTY, KY., November 27, 1861. (Received November 28, 1861.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Headquarters, Danville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have received no reliable news from the rebel forces across the river for twenty-four hours. On last evening they came (some 20 in number) across the river opposite our encampment, but a preparation to level the howitzer at them dispersed them immediately.

About the same time my picket guard at the river at Mill Springs, 12 miles below this point, at which their cavalry are encamped, had a skirmish,in which 4 of the rebels were killed in eight shots from our Colt’s rifles at a distance of 300 yards; and strange to say, although they fired some hundred shots at our party, they escaped unhurt. I have had all the boats on the river for several miles below and above this point sunk, and as they have but two boats of small capacity at Mill Springs, should they attempt to cross at that point I shall meet and amuse them before they get over a force sufficient to cut us off.

I am now inclined to the belief that their force is strong, whether Zollicoffer be with them or not. Some five negroes (fugitives) from Monticello, Wayne County report that a strong force is now at and this side Monticello, and as all communication between this and that side the river has been cut off for two days by the main road, I am inclined to the belief that it is true.

All my buck and ball cartridges are now distributed, and I send up the wagon for a supply, which you will oblige us by forwarding as expeditiously as possible.

I shall send a scout to the opposite side of the river, with orders to proceed as far as Monticello, if possible; and on his return I hope to be enabled to give you reliable information of their numbers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS, Colonel, Commanding Fourth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

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CAMP HOSKINS, PULASKI COUNTY, KY., November 27, 1861. (Received November 29, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Headquarters, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Can you not send us Captain Hewett’s battery? If we had him here with his battery I feel confident we could maintain our position at this place.

With a battery we could drive them from their position at Mill Springs, as there is a position on this side the river opposite their encampment which commands it at a range of one-half mile, and as the ground slopes from that elevation to the water’s edge with a precipitous bluff on the south side of the river, it is impossible to reach them without artillery. At the same time we are shelling them from that position we could leave a section of the battery at this place to prevent their effecting a crossing at this point should they attempt it, as they in all probability would do if they have the force which they are represented to have.

I am anxious to hold our position, believing as I do that it is due the country from the noble stand which they have taken in favor of the Union, and once they have possessed this point there is no point of advantage for us to impede their march north until we reach the north {p.454} side of the Kentucky River, and I find their strength increasing by accession of those who, while we held possession of the counties below this, professed to be good Union men.

Our pickets had a skirmish on last evening with theirs at Mill Springs, in which 4 of their’s were killed with the Colt’s rifles in eight shots at a distance of 300 yards, and although they fired some hundred shots at our pickets they came off unharmed.

I now have out a strong picket guard to prevent a surprise, and hope on to-morrow to be able to lead some of their party into an ambuscade. I have sunk all the boats for several miles along the river with the exception of two small ones (capable of ferrying 40 men at time); and, as I kept a picket within view of them all the time, should they attempt to cross their whole force, I shall endeavor to be upon them before they can get a force over sufficient to overcome us.

If it is possible for you to send the battery, please do so as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 27, 1861. (Received November 29, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Danville:

GENERAL: I wrote you this morning rather despairingly.* I am glad to say that the feeling in camp seems better this evening.

Yours of the 25th instant has been received. So much of its contents as I can make known will have a good effect on officers and men.

In case it shall be necessary to move this force to any point west of this, I would ask that we be permitted to go via Somerset, as all the men and many of the officers have an almost unconquerable aversion to Rockcastle Hills and the whole Crab Orchard road.

I shall hope that the movement into East Tennessee will be direct and speedy, and that you are to be in command. The force at Cumberland Gap is stated to be between 1,500 and 2,000.

News received from Anderson County, East Tennessee, this morning has it that Zollicoffer has gone towards Jamestown, East Tennessee.

I shall make every effort to be ready to move as soon as orders are received. I have before advised you that our means of transportation are very limited. Six wagons (for which a requisition was made some time ago) are still wanting for Second Regiment.

The paymaster’s appearance here will have a good effect. I hope he will be hurried on; and as Treasury notes will not answer to send to Tennessee, the soldiers should be paid in gold, in order that they may remit to their families.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

{p.455}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 28, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I would respectfully report for the consideration of the general commanding the department that on Monday last one of the two gunboats for service at this place was sent to meet two of the new ones then said to be ready to start for Cairo. None of this fleet have yet arrived.

As reported by me, the rebels have one gunboat at Columbus, and are now expecting a fleet of them from New Orleans, under command of Captain Hollins. The arrival of this fleet without the floating means here of competing with them will serve materially to restore the confidence and feeling of security of the enemy, now, from best accounts, much shaken.

I have been much dissatisfied with the progress making upon the gunboats being built at Mound City, and have expressed the fear that the detention upon those being built at Carondelet would prevent their being brought out this winter. In view of the fact that the Mississippi River is usually very low in the month of December, I would respectfully recommend that all the gunboats at Carondelet be brought here as soon as practicable and as light. One point I would ask for information on. Many men, representing themselves as Northern men, who happened to be South at the commencement of our present difficulties and forced to enter their service, are deserting and pass our lines on their way North. Some enlist in our service, but the majority make their way North. Many of them are without the means of paying their passage, and I would ask in such cases if I am authorized to give them free passage to their homes. I am satisfied that in every case that has come under my own observation the desertion has been for the purpose of escape, and not to get within our lines for the purpose of gaining information.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, November 28, 1861.

General THOMAS, Washington:

I have one regular and nine volunteer batteries. My artillery inspector represents all the volunteer batteries to be in bad condition for service. Seven have been for some time in service; the others are entirely uninstructed. No other batteries are being formed. There should be not less than twenty batteries with this command as now composed.

D. C. BUELL.

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LEBANON, November 28, 1861.

General BUELL:

Express from Colonel Bramlette at 2 o’clock this morning. He says the enemy is now in Wayne County, advancing towards the river; some at Monticello and others at Mill Springs; ten regiments strong; one piece of artillery. His scouts have just gotten in from Clinton; they were within 200 yards of the enemy’s camp last night; examined well; saw and talked with friends on the road, and reported the facts to him. Will you order the movement of any of the troops here?

J. T. BOYLE.

{p.456}

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Danville:

GENERAL: I have directed the quartermasters of different regiments as well as brigade commanders to endeavor to learn how many wagons they can gather in a day’s notice. Some 25 to 30 will be needed, in addition to those of the baggage train, to transport the stores and ammunition in case we have to move.

This morning I received a dispatch from Colonel Hoskins, stating that he was threatened with an attack by the rebels, whose forces were estimated at from 3,000 to 10,000, and asking me for assistance; but as my orders are to remain at London, I cannot without authority from headquarters go to his aid.

I have been informed to-day, by a reliable citizen of Knox County, Kentucky, that secessionists in that county have gone South and left from 8,000 to 12,000 bushels of corn standing in their fields-all within from 1 to 7 miles from Barboursville-and 3,000 to 5,000 bushels of wheat. The owners of above property have taken active and open part against the United States Government. There are also numbers of horses, cattle, and hogs. In case our force moves through Knox County, could not the above be used for subsistence of men? In Manchester, Clay County, I am also advised there are 100 barrels of flour, which were ground for the rebels and are ready to be hauled off by them.

I hear that nearly the whole rebel force in East Tennessee has moved to Jamestown, Fentress County, except Rains’ and Churchwell’s regiments and some 200 cavalry, which are left at Cumberland Gap. The last news is confirmed by prisoners who have within a few days made their escape from the Gap.

The passes in the mountains south of Williamsburg are at this time unoccupied by rebel troops, although they have temporarily closed the roads by rolling rocks and felling timber in them, and it seems to me that through one of those passes we might enter East Tennessee without encountering any opposition.

I have not yet heard anything of the paymaster. His presence here will do much good in more ways than one, as pay is actually needed by both officers and men. I shall be greatly obliged if you will order him up at once, for the men begin to think that they are never to receive any pay.

The arms asked for some time since have not arrived, and, as recruits are coming in daily, they are greatly needed. I would renew my request that in case it should become necessary to move my force to any point West I be permitted to go via Somerset.

If the Sharp’s rifles which were in the hands of the cavalry are turned in I hope they will be forwarded to us, with a supply of ammunition, as they were originally intended for the East Tennesseeans.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP HOSKINS, November 28, 1861-10 a.m.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Headquarters, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: My scouts have just returned from Clinton County, and report that the rebels (10,000) are certainly advancing. They report a {p.457} transportation train of 140 wagons, but give no account of any artillery. They say that Zollicoffer is with them, which I think probable, as they have not had that number of troops anywhere below this.

If you could send me Hewett’s battery to this place, and send in below their crossing at Greasy Creek about six regiments, among the number Wolford’s, we might be able to overcome them; at all events we would like to have a force sufficient to make show of resistance at this point.

Please let me know by bearer whether we can hope for any assistance from above, and, if so, what amount, and how soon they will probably be up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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CAMP JERRY BOYLE, November 28, 1861. (Received November 29, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

GENERAL: There is no doubt that Zollicoffer, with 8,000 men, is in Clinton and Wayne, the advance being close [to] the Cumberland River. They will cross the river in a short time and take Somerset, and go on to Danville or Crab Orchard, if not prevented. They are at this time constructing boats to cross the river on. There’s no doubt but that the enemy are advancing from Bowling Green; they are at this time, with strong pickets, in 20 miles of this place. The enemy can be whipped at Cumberland River if a force is immediately sent there. Excuse me for urging sufficient force being sent forward to whip them at once.

FRANK WOLFORD.

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WASHINGTON, November 29, 1861.

General BUELL:

Your letter received. I fully approve of your course and agree in your views.

MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, Monday night [November 29, 1861].

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

MY DEAR BUELL: Your welcome letter of the 27th [of November, 1861] reached me this evening. I have just telegraphed you, expressing my satisfaction at its contents. I now feel sure that I have a “lieutenant” in whom I can fully rely. Your views are right. You have seized the true strategic base, and from Lebanon can move where you will. Keep up the hearts of the Tennesseeans. Make them feel that, far from any intention of deserting them, all will be done to sustain them. Be sure to maintain their ardor, for it will avail you much in the future. I am not, as a general rule, at all disposed to scatter troops. I believe in attacks by concentrated masses, but it seems to me, with the little local knowledge I possess, that you might attempt two movements, one on Eastern Tennessee, say with 15,000 men, and a strong attack on Nashville, as you propose, with, say, 50,000 men.

I think we owe it to our Union friends in Eastern Tennessee to protect them at all hazards. First, secure that; then, if you possess the means, carry Nashville.

{p.458}

If I can ever get the account of the small-arms in our possession I can tell you what you may expect, but with the present Chief of Ordnance I scarcely hope for so simple a result. You can count on one thing, viz, that you shall have all I can give you. You have already been informed that twelve regiments have been ordered to you from West Virginia. I have also ordered thence to you one regular and one excellent volunteer battery; these, with the Randall companies, will give you five batteries equivalent to regulars. Give each of these captains three other batteries, and you will soon have your light artillery in good order. I am informed that large supplies of cavalry arms will arrive this week. Telegraph me what you need and I will try to supply you. Give me by telegraph and letter the statement of your command by regiments and batteries as soon as possible. I have telegraphed to-day to Halleck for information as to his gunboats. You shall have a sufficient number of them to perform the operations you suggest. I will place C. F. Smith under your orders and replace his command by other troops.

Inform me some little time before you are ready to move, so that we may move simultaneously. I have also other heavy blows to strike at the same time. I doubt whether all the movements can be arranged so that the grand blows shall be struck in less than a month or six weeks from the present time.

Make the best use of your time in organizing and drilling your command. Unless circumstances render it necessary, do not strike until I too am ready. Should I be delayed, I will not ask you to wait for me.

I will at once take the necessary steps to carry out your views as to the rivers.

In haste, truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, November 29, 1861.

General THOMAS:

I have a communication from General Boyle; he will speak to you on the subject.

I don’t expect Zollicoffer to cross the Cumberland in force, but he will try by demonstrations to drive us from Somerset, or even attack there if we are not watchful, and he will prepare the means of crossing, so as to threaten our flank if we advance. We will be organized to-day-in the mean time consider yourself in command of everything east of New Haven, but make no important move without referring to me, except to avert immediate danger.

Send intrenching tools rapidly to Somerset. Direct General Schoepf to throw up as rapidly as possible a small closed work for four and six guns which will command the river up and down and the crossing. Captain Prime will go down in the morning to direct it; at the same time Schoepf must watch Zollicoffer, and not only guard against his crossing, but, if possible, prevent him from collecting the means of doing so.

Send five companies of cavalry to Schoepf for scouts, if you think proper. Get your regiments in order as rapidly as possible and be always ready to move. I wish to avoid for the present anything like threatening demonstrations, and only be prepared for emergencies until we are ready to act.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.459}

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HEADQUARTERS, Lebanon, November 29, 1861.

Col. W. A. HOSKINS, Commanding Camp Hoskins, near Somerset, Ky.:

COLONEL: In the absence of the commanding general I have opened your dispatch of the 28th instant. The general will be here to-day, when your communication will be laid before him.

I will state, however, for your information that General Schoepf is moving towards your camp with nineteen companies of infantry and one battery of Ohio artillery, and will probably reach you as soon, or nearly so, as this communication.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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COLUMBIA, KY., November 29, 1861. (Received November 30, 1861.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I received a dispatch before day this morning from Burkesville that 200 rebel cavalry were at the ferry on the south side of the river; a few of them crossed over and went to Boles’, saw and arranged with him and his partners for the slaughter of hogs, and returned. The courier informed me that the men who are acting for the rebels are killing and packing a large number of hogs at Burkesville, viz, J. B. Alexander, J. R. Ryan, James and Sam. Boles, and Robert Cross.

I have no doubt but steamboats will be up in a few days and carry off the large amount of pork, wheat, &c., the rebels are gathering upon the river. All this could be prevented by a force being stationed at Burkesville with artillery to command the river. The rebels are now in possession of the river from Mill Springs down. I sent out scouts towards Glasgow; they went as far as Edmonton, and returned with a rebel flag, which the rebel cavalry had hoisted there the day before. I have a small number at Lairville, opposite Rowena, seven, including James Ferguson.

On yesterday some 50 rebel cavalry appeared on the southern bank. Ferguson and his squad fired upon them, and after about four rounds the rebels fled, leaving one fine horse wounded in the hind leg, some blankets, &c., which our scouts secured.

I sent Colonel Wolford to the aid of Colonel Hoskins with 500 cavalry, embracing part of Colonel Haggard’s command.

As I have before advised, the rebels are at Mill Springs, in force about 8,000, but as yet have not crossed the river, and I do not believe will. I am still unshaken in the conviction that their purpose is to seize all the wheat, corn, fat hogs, mules, &c., they can south of the river and return perhaps by steamboats or other craft; perhaps fall back to their former camps in Tennessee.

It would be an easy matter to hem them in were there sufficient forces to make the movement from here. Two days’ easy march would throw us in their rear, so that, with the river in front and around and we in their rear, no escape would be left.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry, Kentucky Volunteers.

{p.460}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., November 29, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have here two prisoners, arrested as spies, who are undoubtedly guilty of the charge. One of them can be proven to have been engaged in carrying information from sympathizers in Southern Illinois to the troops at Columbus, Ky. As the evidence against these prisoners will be more easily obtained here than in Saint Louis, I would recommend that their trial take place here.

Information from Columbus to-day is to the effect that the rebels have three gunboats. They are small, carrying but four guns each, but I have no information as to their strength. The State of Mississippi has called for 10,000 State troops for sixty days to assist in the defense of Columbus. There seems to be a great effort making throughout the South to make Columbus impregnable. I get this information from the Memphis Appeal of the 28th (yesterday), a copy of which I received this evening. 1 give the information for what it is worth.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., November 30, 1861.

The following organization of brigades will be observed until further orders:

  • First Brigade.
    Brigadier-General SCHOEPF,commanding.
    • 33d Indiana.
    • 12th Kentucky.
    • 17th Ohio.
    • 38th Ohio.
  • Second Brigade.
    Colonel MANSON, commanding.
    • 10th Indiana.
    • 4th Kentucky.
    • 10th Kentucky.
    • 14th Ohio.
  • Third Brigade.
    Colonel MCCOOK, commanding.
    • 2d Minnesota.
    • 9th Ohio.
    • 35th Ohio.
    • 18th U. S. Infantry.
  • Fourth Brigade.
    Brigadier-General ROUSSEAU, commanding.
    • 6th Indiana.
    • 3d Kentucky.
    • 1st Ohio.
    • 15th and 19th U. S. Infantry (battalion).
  • Fifth Brigade.
    Brigadier-General WOOD, commanding.
    • 34th Illinois.
    • 29th Indiana.
    • 30th Indiana
    • 77th Pennsylvania.
  • Sixth Brigade.
    Brigadier-General JOHNSON, commanding.
    • 32d Indiana.
    • 39th Indiana.
    • 15th Ohio.
    • 49th Ohio.
  • Seventh Brigade.
    Brigadier-General NEGLEY, commanding.
    • 38th Indiana.
    • 78th Pennsylvania.
    • 79th Pennsylvania.
    • 1st Wisconsin.
  • Eighth Brigade.
    Colonel TURCHIN, commanding.
    • 19th Illinois.
    • 24th Illinois.
    • 37th Indiana.
    • 18th. Ohio.
  • Ninth Brigade.
    Colonel SILL, commanding.
    • 3d Ohio.
    • 21st Ohio.
    • 33d Ohio
    • 10th Wisconsin.
  • Tenth Brigade.
    Colonel AMMEN, commanding.
    • 34th Indiana.
    • 36th Indiana.
    • 6th Ohio.
    • 24th Ohio.
    {p.461}
  • Eleventh Brigade.
    Brigadier-General BOYLE, commanding.
    • 1st Kentucky.
    • 9th Kentucky.
    • 2d Ohio.
    • 59th Ohio.
  • Twelfth Brigade.
    Acting Brigadier-General CARTER, commanding.
    • 31st Ohio.
    • 6th Kentucky.
    • 1st Tennessee.
    • 2d Tennessee.
  • Thirteenth Brigade.
    Colonel CRUFT, commanding.
    • 31st Indiana.
    • 44th Indiana.
    • 17th Kentucky.
    • - Kentucky.
  • Fourteenth Brigade.
    - -, commanding.
    • 42d Indiana.
    • 43d Indiana.
    • 11th Kentucky.
    • - Kentucky.
  • Fifteenth Brigade.
    Colonel HASCALL, commanding.
    • 15th Indiana.
    • 17th Indiana.
    • 41st Ohio.
    • 51st Ohio.
  • Sixteenth Brigade.
    - -, commanding.
    • 13th Kentucky.
    • 15th Kentucky.
    • 9th Michigan.
    • 3d Minnesota.

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

Memorandum of regiments under Brig. Gen. George H. Thomas’ command, November 30, 1861.

  • CAMP DICK ROBINSON.
    • 31st Ohio Infantry.
    • Hewett’s Battery.
  • CRAB ORCHARD.
    • 33d Indiana Infantry.
  • COLUMBIA. LEBANON.
    • 1st Kentucky Infantry.
    • 1st Kentucky Cavalry,
  • LONDON.
    • 3d. Kentucky Infantry.
    • 1st East Tennessee Infantry.
    • 2d East Tennessee Infantry.
  • SOMERSET.
    • - Kentucky Infantry.
    • 17th Ohio Infantry.
    • 38th Ohio Infantry.
    • Battery B, Ohio Artillery.
  • LEBANON.
    • 10th Indiana Infantry.
    • 2d Kentucky Infantry.
    • - Kentucky Infantry (en route for).
    • - Kentucky Infantry.
    • 14th Ohio Infantry.
    • Battery C, Ohio Artillery.

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PADUCAH, KY., November 30, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

Enemy, 600 to 1,000 strong, reported in camp at Caseyville, with intention to attack. I have sent three companies and a howitzer to Cave in Rock; also the Conestoga, as circumstances may require.

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., November 30, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: A very intelligent person employed by me to obtain intelligence of the movements of the enemy east of the Cumberland returned early {p.462} this morning, and states that the troops who were at Princeton (2,000, with two guns) have gone to Hopkinsville; that with the exception of two parties of cavalry, of about 50 men each, who were moving up and down from the Ohio plundering, no troops were between Ford’s Ferry and Princeton; that he learned from an old lady, who had a son (a lieutenant) in the rebel army, whom she saw just as he was about marching from Princeton, that his regiment was to go to Muldraugh’s Hill, and that the force at Hopkinsville would soon move in the same direction.

Immediately after getting this statement the captain of the steamer Golden Gate, which plies between Evansville and Cairo, came to inform me that his vessel had been forbidden to go to Caseyville by Captain Seaton, of the Twenty-second Illinois Regiment, stationed at Cave in Rock, with about 40 men of his company, on the ground that a party of 600 to 1,000 were at Caseyville (in camp), and intended to take his steamer and cross over.

I have just ordered three full companies of the Eighth Missouri, with a howitzer, under a field officer, to proceed to Cave in Rock, to act as circumstances may require.

As soon as the Conestoga (gunboat) returns from up the Tennessee I will send her up to Caseyville.

I sent the Conestoga up the Tennessee to look after the rebel gunboat, which I understand had been making a reconnaissance below Fort Henry. I imagine this so-called reconnaissance was merely a trial trip. I think it advisable to have another gunboat here as an additional security.

I inclose Captain Seaton’s letter to me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-The telegraph wire has not been in working order for the past two days, or I would have sent the substance of the above in that way.

P. P. S.-The Conestoga has returned since writing the above, and will at once go up to Caseyville.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP ALTONA, Cave in Rock, November 29, 1861.

Brigadier-General SMITH:

DEAR SIR: Send troops up here immediately, as the secessionists are on the point of crossing over into Illinois at Caseyville, 8 miles above here, from 600 to 1,000 strong. They made their appearance at Caseyville late this afternoon, and pitched their tents upon the hill. It is their intention of seizing upon a steamboat and appropriating her for their use in crossing here. Two messengers rowed down to this point in a skiff and two more just arrived on horseback, all giving the same information, one corroborating the other. The first was from Kentucky and the others from this side. Send them immediately.

JOHN SEATON, Captain, Twenty-second Regiment, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 1, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Bishop Major-General Polk’s three gunboats made a Sunday excursion up to see us this evening; fired five or six shots when within about {p.463} half a mile of range of the nearest point of the camp at Fort Holt, and returned as soon as their fire was replied to. Our gunboats followed them 7 or 8 miles, but could not get near enough to engage them.

I would respectfully submit it to the general commanding the department whether the hospital facilities at this place and at Mound City should not be increased in advance of the demand for more room. The hospitals are sufficiently commodious for all that are sick at present, and have a very suitable supply, with everything required, except, perhaps, blankets. By adding bedsteads and bedding, accommodations can be provided for about 350 more.

I have received invoice and bill of lading of 4,000 stand of French muskets, with accouterments complete, from the East. These, with 4,000 stand of improved arms, which I understand are to be sent for General McClernand’s brigade, will supply the command, or nearly so.

There is much difficulty experienced here in finding storage for our commissary supplies. I caused to be rented some months ago a very large and conveniently-arranged wharf-boat for this purpose. It will store conveniently for issue 2,500,000 of rations, with office room and apartments overhead sufficient for the assistant commissary of subsistence and his assistants. This boat could be moved down the river at any time, if required. When the gunboat fleet began to receive their supplies, Commodore Foote made application for this storage room, and obtained an order for it. At that time I looked upon it as necessary for their use. Now, however, they have a large receiving steamer, which in my judgment will accommodate all their stores, and be quite if not more convenient than the wharf-boat. For this reason, and the fact that a large amount of provisions are now on the way or soon will be, I would recommend that the order transferring this boat be rescinded. Otherwise a large portion of the stores to arrive will have to be stored on the landing without shelter. If Commodore Foote was here in person I think he would not object to making the arrangement asked without the issuing of an order.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., December 1, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: The letter of the major-general commanding the department, dated on the 26th ultimo, in reference to the defense of the line of the Ohio between the mouths of the Wabash and Tennessee from Hardee’s rebel forces attempting to cross into Illinois, &c., was duly received. I concur entirely with the general that the cavalry force he speaks of operating on the north bank of the Ohio would, with an occasional visit of a gunboat, be sufficient.

Our main reliance against the enemy’s attempt by gunboats by way of the Tennessee and Cumberland must be by the flotilla, though at present that term is rather a misnomer, since it consists of but the gunboat Conestoga. The two floating batteries (two coal-barges joined), one of which is in position, can scarcely be regarded as part of the flotilla. They were intended to sweep both shores and guard the bridge, but only as against field guns. Alone, they could be run down or destroyed by an enemy’s gunboat, properly constructed and armed, easily, though as an auxiliary to gunboats they may do good service. The {p.464} bridge is down and the parts sheltered, as I have already reported. I inclose a copy of General McClellan’s orders in relation to it. My reports to him on this and other matters were made to him direct, by his orders, during the absence of General Frémont in the West, and until General Halleck’s arrival at Saint Louis.

There is no bridge-head, it not being deemed necessary at the moment. The nature of the surface on the opposite shore is such that at this season an enemy could not take up an effective position.

I am not aware of any marauding in the country just east of the Tennessee-i.e., between the Tennessee and the Cumberland-but it has been carried on extensively on the east of the Cumberland. My cavalry force is not adequate to attempt the service of scouring this part of the country and attending to necessary duties here. It consists of four companies of the Second Illinois Cavalry, imperfectly armed. Each company wants 20 sabers. They have no pistols and only some of them have carbines. I have written several times about the arming of these men, but have not been successful. Of two companies of regular cavalry (neither of which has a single officer belonging to it present), one is weak in numbers-only 54. This is Company C, Second Cavalry. If recruits are received, they will need the usual equipments. Thielemann’s company of Chicago cavalry is in full strength, and armed with sabers, though but partially with pistols. General Frémont authorizes it to be converted into a squadron. The second company has one first lieutenant and 70 men. It needs a captain and second lieutenant, which might well be taken by transfer from the other company, and which I recommend. These men need horses and arms.

I think Shawneetown and Cave in Rock might well be occupied by the three regiments spoken of, and from thence patrol the north bank of the Ohio, occasionally crossing and scouring the country east of the Cumberland. This, I think, would stop the plundering.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 2, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Inclosed herewith I send you a letter from Colonel Ross on the subject of winter quarters, change of cavalry, ordering a court-martial, &c.* I would respectfully call the attention of the general commanding to the subject of winter quarters. I received instructions from General Frémont, whilst he was in command, on the subject. Under the instructions then received, winter quarters for the command here are being rapidly completed. I visited Cape Girardeau and gave such verbal directions as I thought would secure winter quarters for the troops at that place at a very small outlay. The cavalry complained of belong to General Sigel’s brigade, and such complaints have been made against them for their marauding propensities that I would recommend mustering them out of service.

There seems to have been no provision made in the acts of Congress organizing our volunteer system for manning our siege batteries, other than to take companies authorized as light-artillery companies. All {p.465} these manifest a great desire to get their batteries, and do not like to remain in fortifications. In view of these facts, I authorized Lieutenant Powell, of the Twentieth Illinois Volunteers, an acting engineer on the works at Cape Girardeau, to raise a siege company out of the Missouri Home Guards that were on duty there. I also authorized the commanding officer of the battalion of Home Guards-Colonel, now Captain, Murdock-to raise another company of cavalry or infantry from the same men, subject to the approval of higher authority. These men were at Cape Girardeau by authority of the commander of the department when I was assigned to this command. Most of them are Missourians, who could not return to their homes, and who could not have remained at home from the first and remained loyal. These companies are about full and could be filled to the maximum, if authorized, in a very short time. They have never been mustered into the United States service, but are ready to be whenever authority to do so is given. I would respectfully ask to have this act legalized and these troops received. They have already been in service some four or five months as Home Guards and under their present organization.

Since writing the above the J. D. Perry has arrived, having landed at Price’s, putting ashore a large amount of freight. I understand that the authority to do so was given by the provost-marshal of Saint Louis. There is great danger of losing our boats by making these landings, and all the Union men of this section of the State have been driven out by Thompson and his band.

I have ordered the captain of the J. D. Perry to disregard all orders to land on the Missouri shore between Cape Girardeau and this place, unless given by the commanding officer of the department or myself. Should it be necessary for freight to go to Charleston, Mo., it can be landed at Bird’s Point, and go out by rail more economically than by any other route.

I inclose herewith report of Colonel Oglesby, commanding at Bird’s Point, just received.*

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

General S. P. CARTER, Commanding Twelfth Brigade:

SIR: It is the intention of the general commanding to keep your command in front of Cumberland Gap, both for the protection of that section of the country and to operate on that line at a suitable time. At as early a moment as possible a squadron or so of cavalry and at least one section of artillery will be sent you. Your supplies will be drawn from Lexington, through Richmond.

It is desirable, perhaps, that you should take a position at the Cumberland Ford, but you must for the present be the judge of the expediency of moving there now. By throwing up a small field work, it will enable you at any time to hold that position and to operate so as to protect the inhabitants and expel marauders.

It was the wish of the general commanding to join the East Tennessee regiments to the main body of the army which will operate upon Tennessee, but they would perhaps prefer remaining on their present line of {p.466} operations, their acquaintance with that region rendering them peculiarly suitable for service there. For the present, at least, he deems it advisable to keep them on that line.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Third Regiment Minnesota Volunteers:

SIR: An order has been issued for your regiment to take post with six companies at Shepherdsville and four at Lebanon Junction. The general commanding places upon you the responsibility of guarding the bridge over Wilson’s Creek a few miles in advance of the Junction.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

Colonel DUFFIELD, Comdg. Ninth Regt. Mich. Vols., Mouth of Salt River:

SIR: The general commanding assigns you to the command of the post and field work at the mouth of Salt River. It will be your duty to hold the field works at the Salt River crossing and the turnpike towards Elizabethtown and to guard the army supplies which may be at the post.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

Col. E. H. HOBSON, Comdg. Thirteenth Regt. Ky. Vols., Campbellsville, Ky.:

SIR: The general commanding assigns you to the command of the post of Lebanon. It will be your duty to guard the army supplies which may be at that place and to look to the safety of the railroad towards New Haven and the turnpike towards Campbellsville.*

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Detailed instructions omitted.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

Col. L. T. MOORE, Comdg. Fourteenth Regt. Ky. Vols., Catlettsburg, Ky.:

SIR: The general commanding directs that you establish your regiment at or near the town of Prestonburg, with a view of giving security {p.467} to the inhabitants in the region of the Big Sandy and of punishing the marauding bands of the enemy who annoy that part of the State. The general expects vigilance, activity, and good order on the part of your command in the important and isolated duty assigned to it.*

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

Col. CURRAN POPE, Commanding Fifteenth Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers:

SIR: The general commanding has placed upon you the responsibility of guarding against all injury, whether through neglect or design, the railroad and turnpike bridge at and near New Haven, and also the railroad bridge over the Bushy Fork of Salt River and the turnpike bridge over Rolling Fork in advance of New Haven.*

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Detailed instructions omitted.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

Colonel WARNER, Commanding Regiment Kentucky Volunteers:

SIR: The general commanding has placed upon you the responsibility of guarding the line of railroad from Lexington to Covington.

The headquarters of your regiment will be established at Falmouth, and you will post your companies so as to effectually guard all the important bridges on the line.*

Very respectfully,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Detailed instructions omitted.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 19.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 2, 1861.

The following organization of divisions will be observed until further orders:

  • First Division.
    Brig. Gen. G. H. THOMAS, commanding.
    • 1st Brigade.
    • 2d Brigade.
    • 3d Brigade.
    • 11th Brigade.
    • 12th Brigade.
    • 1st Kentucky Cavalry (Wolford’s).
    • Battery B, Ohio.
    • Battery C, Ohio
    • Hewett’s (Kentucky) battery.
    • - Indiana Cavalry (squadron).
  • Second Division.
    Brig. Gen. A. MCD. MCCOOK, commanding.
    • 4th Brigade.
    • 5th Brigade.
    • 6th Brigade.
    • 7th Brigade.
    • 2d Kentucky Cavalry (Board’s).
    • Stone’s battery.
    • Cotter’s battery.
    • Mueller’s battery.
    • Squadron Indiana Cavalry, Captain Graham.
    {p.468}
  • Third Division.
    Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL, commanding.
    • 8th Brigade.
    • 9th Brigade.
    • 17th Brigade.
  • Fourth Division.
    Brig. Gen. W. NELSON, commanding.
    • 10th. Brigade.
    • 15th. Brigade.
    • 19th. Brigade.
  • Fifth Division.
    Brig. Gen. T. L. CRITTENDEN, commanding.
    • 13th Brigade.
    • 14th Brigade.
    • 3d Regiment Kentucky Cavalry (Jackson’s).
    • - Battery.

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WASHINGTON, December 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

MY DEAR BUELL: I inclose two letters, which were referred to me by the President and were intended for your eye. I do so, feeling sure that you sympathize with me in my intense regard for the noble Union men of Eastern Tennessee; that you will overlook all mere matters of form, and that you will devote all your energies towards the salvation of men so eminently deserving our protection. I understand your movements and fully concur in their propriety, but I must still urge the occupation of Eastern Tennessee as a duty we owe to our gallant friends there who have not hesitated to espouse our cause.

Please send, then, with the least possible delay, troops enough to protect these men. I still feel sure that the best strategical move in this case will be that dictated by the simple feelings of humanity. We must preserve these noble fellows from harm; everything urges us to do that-faith, interest, and loyalty. For the sake of these Eastern Tennesseeans who have taken part with us I would gladly sacrifice mere military advantages; they deserve our protection, and at all hazards they must have it. I know that your nature is noble enough to forget any slurs they may cast upon you. Protect the true men and you have everything to look forward to. In no event allow them to be crushed out.

I have ordered one regular and one excellent volunteer battery to join you. To-day I ordered 10,000 excellent arms to be sent to you at Louisville. I have directed all your requisitions to be filled at once. You may fully rely on my full support in the movement I have so much at heart the liberation of Eastern Tennessee.

Write to me often, fully, and confidentially. If you gain and retain possession of Eastern Tennessee you will have won brighter laurels than any I hope to gain.

With the utmost confidence and firmest friendship, I am, truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

P. S.-This letter has been dictated by no doubt as to your movements and intentions, but only by my feelings for the Union men of Eastern Tennessee.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, near London, Ky., November 21, 1861.

Hon. HORACE MAYNARD:

DEAR SIR: The copy of Evening Star received this evening assures me you have not forgotten me.

{p.469}

We are still here, together with Third Regiment Kentucky Volunteers. Why all the other forces were withdrawn is a question to be answered at Louisville. By the papers you will have seen that we, too, left on the night of the 13th, by orders of General Schoepf, in company with the Ohio and Indiana troops, as it seemed, by orders which should have been given me that day, but which were not received until two days afterwards, not only unnecessarily, but contrary to General Thomas’ directions.

I was intensely mortified at the hesitancy of some of our Tennesseeans to move on when they found they had to take the road leading to Crab Orchard. They had got the impression we were returning to Camp Robinson to winter, but after I spoke a few words to them they obeyed the order to march. Many fell out during the night and some deserted. Our losses amount to about 40 to 45. We were without transportation, and were forced to leave almost the entire camp standing and every one of our sick behind. The roads were in a terrible state, and large numbers of men from the various regiments fell out on the way from sheer exhaustion. When I reached Dr. Josslin’s I learned for the first time we were to return to this place.

Our men are most anxious to return to Eastern Tennessee, not so much to see their families as to drive the rebels from the country. We are all inclined to think that help will be deferred until it is too late to save our people. This ought not to be so Two or three batteries and 10,000 men, provided even with powder and lead for the people, could save Eastern Tennessee at this time. Will help never come?

General Thomas has left Crab Orchard, and we are here to look out for ourselves. To-night I have sent out between 600 and 700 men in the direction of Flat Lick, 8 miles above Barboursville, to try and cut off some of the thieving rebel scouts and to gain correct intelligence of their whereabouts.

I think it probable that we shall in a few days move on Somerset. I have no information as to the plans of General Buell. Can you not get those in power to give us a few more men and permission to make at least an effort to save our people? Do try. They are even now in arms, and must be crushed unless assistance soon reaches them.

Two men came in from Carter this evening who have been nearly six weeks on the way.

With respect, yours, truly,

S. P. CARTER.

[Indorsement.]

DECEMBER 3, 1861.

Please read and consider this letter.

A. L.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 25, 1861.

Hon. HORACE MAYNARD:

MY DEAR SIR: A day or two after I wrote you I received orders to break up at this place and join General Thomas. I had sent on a portion of our sick to Crab Orchard and a portion of our commissary stores, but fortunately I was unable to obtain wagons enough to move the whole and was detained until this morning, when I received other orders from department headquarters to remain at London. I know not what will be the next move, but hope most sincerely it maybe towards Eastern Tennessee. {p.470} If something is not done, and that speedily, our people will be cut up and ruined. A column should be ordered to move into Eastern Tennessee, one detailed for that purpose and no other, to go without reference to any other movement, with the specific object of relieving our people, simply on account of their loyalty and as though it were entirely disconnected with any military advantages. I intend to say that our people deserve protection and should have it at once, and independently of all outside considerations.

I sent on 21st between 600 and 700 men, under Lieutenant-Colonel Spears, to Flat Lick, a point 8 miles below Cumberland Ford, for the purpose of obtaining information of the enemy, and with the hope they would fall in with a portion of them and cut them up. Some of our men went nearly to the Ford. None of the rebels were there. From best information the force at the Gap was only about 2,000. Zollicoffer, with some 6,000, was at Ross, in Anderson County.

If we had a battery I believe we could go into Tennessee, and then, if we could carry arms or even powder and lead to furnish to our people, I believe we could stay there.

Will help ever come? I do not mean contingent aid, but special and direct.

We are getting along well. Most of our men have returned who left on night of 13th, and all are elated at the orders to remain here. If it be possible, have it so arranged that the Eastern Tennesseeans shall not again, except in case of urgent and pressing necessity, be ordered back towards Central Kentucky. Many would sooner perish in battle than turn their backs towards the Tennessee line again.

Will you please write me if the President has ever acted on the petition which you forwarded from the officers of the two regiments to commission me as brigadier-general, and, if so, the reason for his non-compliance, as well as what you can learn of his intentions in regard to that matter.

With best wishes, I am, yours, very truly,

S. P. CARTER.

[Indorsement.]

DECEMBER 3, 1861.

Please read and consider this letter.

A. L.

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HDQRS. EASTERN DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 3, 1861.

Col. T. E. BRAMLETTE, Commanding at Columbia, Ky.:

COLONEL: I have just received yours of the 2d, inclosing Mr. Leverage’s statement of the strength of the enemy. I [have] no doubt his information is correct.

It will be a good service to seize the pork at Burkesville if you are sure it is intended for the Confederates.

As soon as General Buell gets the troops organized into brigades I have no doubt one brigade will be posted at Burkesville. In the mean time I wish you to do all in your power to prevent an advance of the enemy via Columbia, as well as the passage of the steamers up the river. Do not run any risk of disaster, and should the enemy attack you at Columbia, hold him in check as long as possible and send me word immediately. Should he dare come to Columbia, we can easily capture him before he can get back to his lines.

{p.471}

I do not think you can get an umbrella tent in Louisville. I will see Captain Webster, who will write you where he purchased his in Cincinnati.

Respectfully,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

LEBANON, Ky., December 3, 1861-11 p.m.

General D. C. BUELL, Headquarters, Louisville:

I have just received a dispatch from General Schoepf. The enemy are opposite Somerset and have commenced cannonading Hoskins’ camp. He says the strength of the enemy is estimated, from the best accounts he can get, of the following numbers: At Mill Springs, 2,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry; at Captain Wiatt’s farm, 2 miles from Mill Springs, 1,000 infantry; at Steubenville, 2 miles farther west, is 2,000 infantry; and at Monticello, 5 miles from Steubenville, 3,000 infantry. I have sent to Colonels Walker and Van Derveer to march to his relief as rapidly as they can. When these two regiments reach him, he will have five regiments of infantry and one battery of artillery.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

HEADQUARTERS EASTERN DIVISION, DEPT. OF OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER, Commanding at London, Ky.:

GENERAL: Yours of November 28 has been received. The information which we have of the immediate movements of the rebels is to the effect that they are moving towards the west. You did right in declining to march to Somerset without orders.

It is General Buell’s intention to keep troops at London for a while yet. As I wrote you a few days since, your regiments, at least the Tennesseeans, will move to Somerset, if they are moved west. Encourage your men to remain hopeful, and assure them that the Government will not leave them to their enemies, but will afford relief to East Tennessee as soon as possible. I am not authorized to tell you even what I know, because General Buell is desirous that the enemy be kept profoundly ignorant of our movements.

I will take measures to have arms for your recruits, if they can be had from Louisville, and also some for the East Tennesseeans.

Should you need the corn, flour, &c., of those secessionists you mentioned, I would not hesitate to take it. Have statements of the amount of ammunition you have on hand made out and send to Capt. A. Miller, ordnance officer at this place, as soon as the colonels can forward them; also direct them to forward their monthly regimental returns immediately. The paymaster will be with you soon. You may hasten his arrival by sending an escort with a wagon to take charge of his money-chest. Let the escort meet him at Crab Orchard.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

{p.472}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 3, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

By orders from the Governor of this State two regiments of troops have been sent to Shawneetown. One of these has been mustered into the service of the United States, and the acting assistant commissary of subsistence, who is now here, represents to me that the State authorities decline rationing them longer. Under these circumstances I have caused to be turned over to the commissary ten days’ rations for his regiment. In a few days I understand that the other regiment will be mustered in also, and will probably be calling here for subsistence.

Troops are highly necessary at Shawneetown, not only to protect the citizens from marauding parties of secession troops, who are now collecting hogs and cattle and horses on the opposite side of the river, but will serve to keep open navigation of the Ohio, and to prevent much of the smuggling now going on. Under these circumstances I would respectfully ask if it would not be well to extend the limits of this military district to the Wabash and give it limits north in this State. If this is not done, I would at least recommend that some command be required to take in these troops, where they can look for supplies and so that they may be properly retained.

Constant complaints are coming here from citizens of Crittenden and Union Counties, Kentucky, of depredations that are being committed by troops from Hopkinsville, and as the troops at Shawneetown have a steamer at their command, they may make excursions across the river that might be improper. There are large quantities of stock of all kinds being driven from these counties to the Southern Army, and quite a trade is being carried on in salt, powder, caps, and domestics. I have reported these facts, as far as could well be done in a limited telegraphic dispatch, to General Buell.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

–––

CAMP CALVERT, KY., December 4, 1861. (Received December 6, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: As I had heard nothing from you since 25th ultimo, I did not until this evening know where you had established your headquarters.

I wrote to the commander of this department on the 2d instant, and advised him that we had already no little difficulty in obtaining necessary forage for our draught animals and that a portion of our stores was nearly exhausted, and in order to be nearer our depot I expected, unless I should receive orders to the contrary, to move towards Somerset. I hope that this step will meet with your approbation.

Another reason which renders a change of camps advisable is the sickness of our men and the increased malignity of disease. We have some rebels in camp from Scott County, East Tennessee; they were brought in yesterday by some Tennesseeans and Kentuckians. They have been noted for the bitterness of their enmity to the Union cause and the unrelenting manner in which they have persecuted loyal men. Four of them are said to be members of a rebel company of rangers, one of whom is a sergeant. What shall be done with them?

{p.473}

I await anxiously permission to march to Somerset, where I have just been informed Zollicoffer has been engaging a small Federal force.

Col. J. P. T. Carter left this morning for the headquarters of this department at Louisville, to see if he can obtain arms for the recruits of his regiment.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP GOGGIN, December 4, 1861. (Received December 5, 1861-3 a.m.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: According to your instructions to keep you informed of the movements of the enemy, I do so now.

From information just received (1 p.m.) from a captain of the Thirty-eighth Ohio, who was on picket west of me, I learned that the enemy, two regiments of infantry and one battery strong, beat the reveille at 3 o’clock this morning; he heard the train moving in a southwesterly direction, and also heard commands given distinctly.

I have no doubt they are moving towards Mill Springs. A negro man who came from the other side this morning informs me that they had constructed a large number of boats on Meadow Creek, opposite Mill Springs, with the intention to cross at that place. Being certain that they are not going to cross here, I ordered the whole battery to Mill Springs. I will order the Thirty-eighth Ohio to-morrow morning to Somerset, to be in readiness to move either to this place or to Mill Springs, where it should be most needed, the distance to either place being only 6 miles.

I will proceed to Mill Springs to-morrow; am only waiting to get more reliable information with regard to their movements here.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

–––

WASHINGTON, 5th [December, 1861.?]

General D. C. BUELL:

MY DEAR BUELL: I have only time before the mail closes to acknowledge yours of the 30th. Give me at once in detail your views as to the number and amount of gunboats necessary for the water movement, the necessary land forces, &c. Would not C. F. Smith be a good man to command that part of the expedition? When should they move?

Pray do not abandon the Pikesville [Piketon] region. I consider it important to hold that line; your supplies can go by water to Prestonburg. I will also re-enforce the Guyandotte region at once. Let me again urge the necessity of sending something into East Tennessee as promptly as possible. Our friends there have thrown their all into the scale, and we must not desert them. I tell the East Tennessee men here to rest quiet, that you will take care of them and will never desert them. I ordered to-day two fully armed regiments of cavalry to join you from Camp Dennison. Will send you some more infantry from the Northwest in a day or two.

{p.474}

I will try to write more fully to-night. By all means hold Somerset and London. Better intrench both; still better, the crossing of the river nearest these points.

In haste, truly, your friend,

MCCLELLAN.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP GOGGIN, December 5, 1861-8 a.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: Colonel Bradley, of the Thirty-eighth Ohio, reported to me that he has only 40 rounds of ammunition. In my position, without ammunition, I could not sustain myself, being almost certain the enemy is going to make the attempt to cross.

I may be wrong, but I ordered the Tennessee brigade under General Carter to join me, he being the nearest.

Mr. Smith, father of one of the officers in Colonel Hoskins’ regiment, came from the enemy’s camp and confirms all I reported to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I just now learned from two reliable men that the enemy has been re-enforced by two additional Mississippi rifle regiments; they are represented to be in first-rate order with regard to clothing and arms.

–––

HEADQUARTERS CAMP GOGGIN, December 5, 1861-12 m.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: I left this place this morning in company with Captain Prime Engineer Corps, to go to Mill Springs to examine that place and plant a battery; when I arrived at Fishing Creek, I found the Seventeenth Ohio retreating and on this side of the creek; this was owing to disobedience of orders by Captain Dillion, of the First [Ky.] Cavalry, whom I ordered on Monday to proceed to Mill Springs, there encamp, and,if any attempt was made by the enemy to cross the river, to dispatch that fact to me. Instead of obeying, he encamped only 2 miles from Fishing Creek, without even the precaution of throwing out pickets, and the enemy, it is reported, crossed in force to this side last night. In regard to the order sent to Colonel Connell to march to Mill Springs, I inclose you his letter.

I met Captain Dillion on this side of the creek with his company, and on my interrogating him “why he had not obeyed my order,” he replied there was danger, and on that account had not proceeded.

I have ordered Colonel Hoskins’ regiment down to Fishing Creek, and will try to push on and see what the enemy is doing.

The rumor is that 2,000 of the enemy’s cavalry have crossed, but to keep them from crossing in too large a force for my men I have sent for General Carter’s Tennessee regiments and the Thirty-third Indiana.

The Thirty-eighth and Seventeenth Ohio are very short of ammunition, {p.475} which fact was reported to me just yesterday. My position for defense is worse even than at Wild Cat.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

CAMP AT FISHING CREEK, December 5, 1861. (Received December 6, 1861.)

General SCHOEPF, Commanding Camp Goggin:

GENERAL: On yesterday I moved forward with the artillery to take position at Mill Springs, according to your order, having sent the cavalry the evening before; they however did not proceed more than 2 miles.

I advanced to within 24 miles of the Ford at Mill Springs with my whole force, and went forward with Captain Ricketts and Lieutenant Fife, of artillery, to the Ford to make a personal reconnaissance. Found their pickets within 100 yards of the Ford, on this side; endeavored to avoid them, and took the woods on the left hand and spent about twenty minutes examining their position, and found it too strong and the enemy too numerous to face with our small force.

You have been misinformed as to the possibility of securing a good position that any small force can hold at that point. The rebel camp completely overlooks the bluffs on this side, and it is impossible to take position upon them without being exposed to their full view and in range of all their arms. Upon attempting by myself to pass to the right bluff near the creek I was fired upon by a body of their cavalry, who were just coming up the hill at the Ford within 50 yards of me. They followed, firing deliberately as I spurred my horse back. In turning a sharp angle my saddle turned, girth broke, and I was thrown within 100 yards of them, and but for the noble conduct and cool bravery of Captain Ricketts I would have been killed or captured. He got off his horse and waited until I ran up to him and gave me his horse, while he escaped into the woods.

I found no tenable position at all between Mill Springs and Fishing Creek, and certainly none at or near Mill Springs or mouth of Meadow Creek.

The rebels have already several boats and cross the Ford with ease. Their cavalry can cross in a few minutes.

Captain Fullerton made diligent inquiry as to their force, and reports to me that he has no doubt that there are twelve regiments at Mill Springs. They have very extensive encampments.

We have not a very strong position here, but it is better than any we can get between here and Mill Springs, and if we had a force to throw across the creek I think we could make a very strong resistance.

Finding ourselves in an exposed condition, where we could in a few minutes be completely surrounded and the rebels beating to arms, with cavalry across the Ford in our front, and night just upon us, my own judgment, supported by the opinion of all the officers of my command, influenced me to fall back, and finding no place where I could make a stand and save my train except this, I moved back here during the night quietly and in good order; my men and teams terribly fatigued with 25 miles’ rough marching and counter-marching.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. CONNELL, Colonel Seventeenth Ohio Regiment.

{p.476}

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 23.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 5, 1861.

...

X. The Twelfth Brigade is detached from the First Division and will report direct to these headquarters.

XI. The Eleventh Brigade is for the present placed under the command of Brigadier-General Thomas.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 24.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 5, 1861.

...

F. The Seventeenth Brigade, consisting of the Fifteenth Kentucky, Third Ohio, Tenth Ohio, Thirteenth Ohio, is assigned to the Third Division, and will assemble at Elizabethtown as soon as equipped and transportation is furnished. The senior officer will take command.

The Kentucky regiment will not move until mustered into United States service.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY], Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, December 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: The enemy have crossed the Cumberland, as near as I can learn, with four regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and eight pieces of artillery. As there was no position near the river that could have been held by the small force under me (not 1,900), I deemed it my duty to move back about 3 miles beyond Somerset to a very fine position, that commands the Crab Orchard road and also the road to Stanford, where I now am, and shall await my re-enforcements, and will then move forward.

The position at Fishing Creek was untenable, on account of three roads flanking us, all leading to the different ferries, which rendered it impossible for me to distribute my few men with any hope of success.

The movement of last night was not known to the enemy until this morning.

The enemy had 3,000 encamped about 3 miles west of us, and, as I learned from scouts, they were still crossing and moving down the river banks, where they drove in our pickets and took possession of the ferries at Hudson’s and also the one at Patterson’s, both of which have roads leading to the main road, about one mile in my rear, which has no place for artillery to operate effectively.

I could have held a position where the enemy is encamped, had it not been for the unpardonable disobedience of Captain Dillion to occupy the point opposite Mill Springs, when I positively ordered him to do so. I have ordered him to report himself to me, when I shall order him in {p.477} arrest and send him to Lebanon, hoping that something may be done to prevent such flagrant disobedience in the future.

Our pickets were firing until late in the night, but without any damage to us, our men reporting to have killed a few of the enemy.

Day before yesterday a messenger from you reported to me that he had lost the dispatch you sent by him, and yesterday a gentleman found one on the road, directed to me, containing invoices from the quartermaster, which was also sent by a messenger. The messenger I sent you day before yesterday has also lost my dispatch to you. All of these men belong to Wolford’s cavalry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

–––

CAIRO, ILL., December 6, 1861.

Major-General HALLECK:

Telegraphed to General McClellan that there are twelve gunboats, of which three are in commission and nine in the contractors’ hands. Three of the latter have guns on board and are kept ready for defense here. If the contractors hand over three of the latter boats by the 18th instant I will have all of them ready for active service in ten days, provided the Department me additional 1,100 men required to man them.

There is less prospect of an attack from Columbus than I expected when in Saint Louis; still we have two gunboats lying off Fort Holt ready for defense, also the gunboat Saint Louis, yet in the contractors’ hands; has her armament on board and is ready for defense. I am still very much embarrassed in getting the boats ready for want of possession of the wharf-boats. The last two gunboats from Saint Louis not yet received.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

–––

DECEMBER 6, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

Efforts are made to secure appointment of certain brigadiers for Kentucky. I would advise you to receive them with great caution. We have enough very poor ones already. Zollicoffer, as I expected, is making demonstrations to stop our blockade of the coal trade on the Cumberland; has opened with his artillery from the other side on the small camp near Somerset. He will do no great harm. I am throwing up a small field work there, which will command the river and make a few companies secure. No other news.

Have you received my two last letters?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

–––

LEBANON, KY., December 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have just received a dispatch from General Schoepf. He reports the enemy crossing the Cumberland 6 miles below Somerset. He has with him one battery of artillery, the Seventeenth and Thirty-eighth Ohio, {p.478} and Hoskins’ regiment; has ordered to his relief the two Tennessee regiments from London and the Thirty-third Indiana, and I have ordered there three days since the Thirty-first and Thirty-eighth Ohio and Hewett’s battery of artillery. Shall I go forward with any of my regiments here?

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, December 6, 1861.

General THOMAS:

Telegraph General Schoepf’s letter. Does he ask for re-enforcements? Can the troops at London go directly to Somerset?

D. C. BUELL.

–––

[DECEMBER 6, 1861.]

General BUELL, headquarters:

The troops at London can go directly to Somerset, as I am informed.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., December 6, 1861. (Received, Lebanon December 6, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

Send no more re-enforcements to General Schoepf until you report to me; his force was sufficient at first.

Order General Boyle to proceed to Columbia to-morrow and keep his scouts well out towards the Cumberland. Caution all officers to ascertain and report facts, not merely forward rumors. See that no more troops march without ammunition.

Direct General Schoepf to arrest and forward charges against Captain Dillion.*

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See Schoepf to Thomas, December 5, 1861, p. 474.

–––

HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, Ky., December 6, 1861. (Received December 9, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE B. THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Lebanon:

GENERAL: The orders received last night from departmental headquarters require me to remain in front of Cumberland Gap, for the purpose, in part, of keeping out marauders and protecting the loyal citizens.

This morning, having learned that Barboursville was threatened by a small force, I ordered the Third Kentucky Regiment to march to its protection. Colonel Garrard was directed to employ some mounted {p.479} men for scouts and pickets to be used in the direction of Cumberland Ford.

But for the orders received from Louisville the First East Tennessee Regiment would have moved this morning towards Somerset and the Second East Tennessee and Third Kentucky would have followed in the morning. I received about noon a dispatch from Brigadier-General Schoepf, requiring me to join him as soon as possible. If I had no conflicting orders from you I should have gone willingly, but did not think myself at liberty to do so under the circumstances, but wrote him that if he still desired me to join him after knowing what my orders were from headquarters, I should of course go.

I heard to-day, upon what is represented to me as perfectly reliable authority, that three rebel regiments reached Cumberland Gap on the 4th instant. Hampton’s Legion arrived there on the 3d, with a large amount of ammunition.

At Morristown, Jefferson County, East Tennessee, report says there were five regiments, whose destination is Kentucky, via the Gap.

The rebel general Crittenden had been at the Gap, but left to bring up his brigade. I fear that we cannot do a great deal towards resisting the force the enemy is accumulating at and about the Gap.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding East Tennessee Brigade.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 39.}

HDQRS. FIRST Div., DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Lebanon. December 6, 1861.

I. In compliance with Special Orders, No. 19, from department headquarters, Brig. Gen. George H. Thomas assumes command of the First Division, Department of the Ohio, organized-as follows:

  • First Brigade.
    Brig. Gen. A. SCHOEPF, commanding.
    • 33d Indiana Regiment Volunteers, Col. John Coburn
    • 17th Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. J. M. Connell.
    • 12th Kentucky Regiment Volunteers, Col. W. A. Hoskins.
    • 38th Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. E. D. Bradley.
  • Second Brigade
    Col. M. D. MANSON, commanding.
    • 4th Kentucky Regiment Volunteers, Col. S. S. Fry.
    • 14th Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. J. B. Steedman.
    • 10th Indiana Regiment Volunteers, Col. M. D. Manson.
    • 10th Kentucky Regiment Volunteers, Col. J. M. Harlan.
  • Third Brigade.
    Col. ROBT. L. MCCOOK, commanding.
    • 18th U. S. Infantry, Colonel Carrington.
    • 2d. Minnesota Regiment Volunteers, Colonel Van Cleve.
    • 35th Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. F. Van Derveer.
    • 9th Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. R. L. McCook.
  • Twelfth Brigade.
    Actg. Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER, commanding.
    • 1st East Tennessee Regiment Volunteers, Col. R. K. Byrd.
    • 2d East Tennessee Regiment Volunteers, Col. J. P. T. Carter.
    • 6th. Kentucky Regiment Volunteers, Col. T. T. Garrard
    • 31st Ohio Regiment Volunteers, Col. M. B. Walker.
  • [Unattached.]
    • 1st Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, Col. F. Wolford.
    • Squadron Indiana Cavalry, Captain Graham.
    • Battery B, 1st Ohio Artillery, Capt. W. E. Standart.
    • Battery C, 1st Ohio Artillery, Capt. D. Kenny.
    • Battery B, Kentucky Artillery, Capt. J. M. Hewett.
    • Maj. W. E. Lawrence commanding artillery.
{p.480}

VII. Until further orders the First Brigade will take post at Somerset, Ky., Second and Third Brigades at Lebanon, and Twelfth Brigade at London.

...

XI. Captains Standart’s and Hewett’s batteries of artillery, Major Lawrence commanding, and the First Kentucky Cavalry, Col. F. Wolford commanding, are temporarily assigned to duty with the First Brigade, and will report to Brigadier-General Schoepf for duty at Somerset, Ky.

XII. The squadron of Indiana cavalry, Captain Graham commanding, and Battery C, First Ohio Artillery, will report for duty at division headquarters.

By order of General Thomas:

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

WASHINGTON, December 7, 1861.

General D. C. BUELL:

We have just had interviews with the President and General McClellan, and find they concur fully with us in respect to the East Tennessee expedition. Our people are oppressed and pursued as beasts of the forest. The Government must come to their relief. We are looking to you with anxious solicitude to move in that direction.

ANDREW JOHNSON. HORACE MAYNARD.

–––

DECEMBER 7, 1861.

General MCCOOK, Camp Kevin:

Send forward a brigade and a battery to Munfordville, to take a good position and protect the bridge. Move your division up to Bacon Creek, leaving a small guard over the bridge at Nevin. Keep us informed, and be ready at all times to act promptly.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

LEBANON, December 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL:

General Schoepf reports that enemy having crossed the Cumberland as near as he could learn with four regiments of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and eight pieces of artillery, and as there was no position near the river that could be held by his small force, he fell back, on the night of the 5th, about 3 miles this side of Somerset to a very flue position, commanding the Crab Orchard and Stanford road, where he would await his re-enforcements and then move forward. Three roads flanking his position on Fishing Creek rendered it untenable. The enemy had 3,000 employed about 3 miles west of his position on Fishing Creek, and his scouts reported them still crossing and moving down the river, driving in his pickets and taking possession of the ferries at Hudson’s and Patterson’s from which roads lead to the main road 1 mile in rear of his present position.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

{p.481}

–––

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 7, 1861.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. R. Army, Dept. Hdqrs., Louisville, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: The present state of affairs in the vicinity of Somerset I think will justify me in sending the Twelfth Brigade* to that place, without attracting attention. It should be removed from London on account of the extreme difficulty in hauling subsistence over the road from that place to Crab Orchard, and being at Somerset would diminish the distance and labor of supplying the troops in advance one-half.

At present it is exceedingly difficult, with the limited means of transportation we have, to keep the troops supplied. If the general approves, I will direct General Carter to move his brigade to Somerset and concentrate the other two at this point.

General Carter reports having in his camp some rebel prisoners, and Colonel Wolford has sent one to me. Shall I forward them to Louisville?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

* See Buell to Thomas, December 9, p. 485.

–––

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOEPF, Commanding, Somerset:

GENERAL: The Thirty-first Ohio, ordered to march to your relief, was stopped by order of General Buell, and will not probably march, inasmuch as you have the two Tennessee regiments. With your present force you will be able to keep the enemy in check until General Buell’s plans are more fully matured.

In the mean time arrest and forward charges against Captain Dillion, and [let] your information in regard to the movements of the enemy be as reliable as possible.

Ammunition for the Seventeenth and Thirty-eighth Regiments will be forwarded to-day.

By order of Brig. Gen. G. H. Thomas:

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, December 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: In my communication stating that I had ordered the Tennessee regiments to re-enforce me I neglected to say that my order also stated not to come if there were any conflicting orders from you.

As soon as I received the dispatch saying you had sent no re-enforcements I countermanded my previous order to the Tennessee regiments.

Having no reliable cavalrymen to carry my dispatches I must have recourse to the mail, as it is more certain.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General. {p.482}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 8, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: I have just got in a man who spent yesterday in Columbus. He reports the enemy strongly fortified there, with fifty-four pieces of heavy ordnance-less than I have understood heretofore they had. In addition to this they have ten batteries of light artillery, with forty-seven regiments of infantry and cavalry, all armed. There is not the slightest intention of attacking Cairo, but the strongest apprehension exists that Columbus is to be soon attacked. I believe that I have full means of keeping posted as to what is going on south of this point and will keep you fully informed.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

LOUISVILLE, Ky., December 8, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

MY DEAR FRIEND: I have received your letter of the -, and thank you very cordially for it. Such encouragement would make a good lieutenant of almost any man, and robs him of all claim to credit, no matter what he may accomplish. A good programme does not always result to our entire satisfaction, but I shall work very hard not to disappoint your confidence altogether.

We are gradually getting into position. As fast as the troops get their outfit they are moving into place, and in a few days all that have arrived will have gone. The quartermaster’s department does not quite work up to my exaction, but perhaps I am a little unreasonable. We are greatly in want of staff officers and brigadiers. The latter I am loath to nominate to you until I know the men better. I have been approached in behalf of some who I am satisfied are unfit, and who I understand are now being urged by their friends for appointments. I certainly hope they will have to wait until they are tried. One of them is Colonel Burbridge, a relative of Governor Wright. As for staff officers, quartermasters, &c., I have proposed, in dispatches to the Adjutant-General, either that some shall be sent out speedily, or that I may be authorized to appoint, subject to confirmation, and order their pay for the time they serve. This plan seems to have the advantage of affording the opportunity of dropping those who do not turn out well.

The Kentucky troops, which have heretofore been scattered all over the State in innumerable fragments, are gradually getting into regimental organizations, so that I can do something with them, though only a few regiments will probably be in a condition to advance. They will not be useless, however.

I suffer annoyance yet from the officiousness of Governors. They send their staff officers to look after the interest of their troops, exchange their arms without my knowledge, and keep up a communication in other matters which they have no business with. I stop these things when they come to my knowledge, and after a while will be able to correct them entirely.

{p.483}

The return which I sent you yesterday, imperfect as it is, will show you something of us on paper. I look upon it as something of a success to have been able to show anything at all; but you will see that we have not attained yet to the first indication of efficiency-regularity and accuracy in returns. We will be more satisfactory in a few days.

We are beginning to be a little animated. The other night a party of the enemy came within some 10 miles of us and burned a small bridge over Bacon Creek, which will be repaired in three or four days, and I discovered that they designed to destroy the piers of the Green River Bridge, the rebuilding of which is to be commenced in a few days. That would have embarrassed my prospective movements, and so I have had to put aside the inertion which I was anxious to pursue for the present; I have moved McCook’s division forward to Bacon Creek, with a brigade in advance at Munfordville. This will stir our neighbors up a little, but it cannot be helped.

Then, again, Zollicoffer’s force has crossed near Somerset, it is said, with six regiments and eight guns. I content myself with sending sufficient re-enforcements under Schoepf to check him. I do not mean to be diverted more than is absolutely necessary from what I regard as of the first importance-the organization of my forces, now little better than a mob. I could fritter the whole of it away in a month by pursuing these roving bugbears.

I had a remarkable example of impudence in my neighbor Buckner last night. It was a request that his wife, two other ladies a Confederate Army surgeon, and the corpse of his child might be allowed to pass to Louisville. I directed McCook to decline his request courteously, and courteously conduct his messenger to the other side of Green River before daylight.

Cannot you do something for Fry? I shall write again very soon. I hear nothing of the Randall companies.

Truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

–––

DECEMBER 8, 1861.

Hon. Mr. MAYNARD and Governor JOHNSON, of Tennessee, Washington:

I have received your dispatch.* I assure you I recognize no more imperative duty and crave no higher honor than that of rescuing our loyal friends in Tennessee, whose sufferings and heroism I think I can appreciate.

I have seen Colonel Carter, and hope he is satisfied of this.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Of November 7, p. 480.

–––

DECEMBER 8, 1861.

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

What troops are probably with Schoepf now? What others are on the way? Are the Thirty-first Ohio and the Tennessee [regiments] moving? Have you further news from Schoepf?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.484}

–––

LEBANON, December 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL:

The two Tennessee [regiments], armed with muskets; the Seventeenth and Thirty-eighth Ohio Regiments, Thirty-third Indiana, armed with rifle muskets, and the Thirty-fifth Ohio, and Hoskins’ regiment are with Schoepf by this time or should be. He has also Standart’s Ohio and two sections of Hewett’s Kentucky artillery, and some of Wolford’s cavalry. The Thirty-first Ohio has not moved since your order to remain at Dick Robinson. It is armed with the rifle musket, caliber .58. This is well supplied with ammunition.

Have not heard from Schoepf since last night. A telegraph to Colonel Walker from you would reach him in three hours from Nicholasville.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Vols.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, December 8, 1861. (Received Lebanon, December 8, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

The affairs at Somerset are annoying, but I do not intend to be diverted more than necessary from more important purposes. I [suppose] Schoepf will be able to drive the enemy across the river again.

Keep an eye on Columbia, and be prepared to push a brigade or two rapidly to that point.

Organize and equip your brigades as rapidly as possible. See that they have ammunition.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

–––

WASHINGTON, December 8, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

GENERAL: I have your letter of the 23d ultimo.* The same mail brought other letters, giving me sad accounts of that horrible night march from London.

You are still farther from East Tennessee than when I left you nearly six weeks ago. There is shameful wrong somewhere; I have not yet satisfied myself where. That movement so far has been disgraceful to the country and to all concerned. I feel a sense of personal degradation from my own connection with it greater than from any other part of my public actions. My heart bleeds for these Tennessee troops. I learn they have not yet been paid, and are left without either cavalry or artillery at London, and not permitted to do what is their daily longing-go the relief of their friends at home. With Nelson and the measles and blue-grass and nakedness and hunger and poverty and home-sickness, the poor fellows have had a bitter experience since they left their homes to serve a Government which as yet has hardly given them a word of kindly recognition. The soldiers of all the other States have a home government to look after them. These have not, and but for Carter, who has been like a father to them, they would have suffered still more severely. That they at times get discouraged and out of heart I do not wonder. My assurances to them have failed so often, that I should be ashamed to look them in the face.

{p.485}

I have not seen the newspaper strictures you refer to; but I can easily understand their character. Before I left the West I saw articles in the Cincinnati papers of a most mischievous character and tendency, and I thought I had arranged to have the writers hunted out and whipped; but I suppose it was not done. I mentioned the matter to General McClellan one day. Said he, “Why does he not expel them from his camps?” A professed newspaper correspondent is a public nuisance and should be abated accordingly.

I cannot approve your determination simply to “obey orders.” The country has conferred upon you high rank in her armies, and she has a right to expect that you will bring all your abilities to her aid in sustaining her flag. You do wrong in allowing personal indignities, come from what quarter they may, to diminish your activity in her service.

With renewed assurance of confidence and sympathy, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HORACE MAYNARD.

* Not found.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 9, 1861. (Received Washington, December 9, 1861.)

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I wrote you last night; received your two letters to-day. Will write again to-night.

Our ill-timed friends have destroyed the railroad bridge over the Whippoorwill, near Russellville. I tried to stop it, but was too late.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, December 9, 1861.

General THOMAS:

Will determine in regard to the movement of the Twelfth Brigade, which you suggest, when I hear whether the Tennessee regiments moved on Schoepf’s call. Have you heard whether they did? What news from him?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISA, KY., VIA MAYSYILLE, December 9, 1861.

General BUELL, Commanding:

I have reliable information that the secessionists are 4,000 strong in Prestonburg, Ky., with a re-enforcement near at hand of 2,000, and six pieces of artillery; Jenkins’ 1,200 cavalry composing a part.

In haste, yours,

L. T. MOORE.

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HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH BRIGADE, Somerset, Ky., December 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division, Lebanon:

GENERAL: We arrived here this afternoon. On the forenoon of the 7th instant I received a dispatch from Brigadier-General Schoepf, telling me he had fallen back 3 miles from Somerset, and requiring me to join him “instantly.”

{p.486}

I broke up camp at once and started the First and Second East Tennessee Regiments. A messenger was sent to overtake Colonel Garrard, with orders for him to return, bring forward the remaining public stores, and join me with as little delay as possible.

This morning, when 12 miles from this place, I received another dispatch from Brigadier-General Schoepf, to the effect that Colonel Garrard was to remain at either London or Pittman’s. In compliance with it I forwarded orders to Colonel Garrard, requiring him to remain at one of those places.

My brigade is temporarily broken up, and I should like, if consistent with the exigencies of the service, to have it brought together as soon as possible.

From the best information I have had our position is rather a critical one; the force of the enemy-even at the lowest estimate-is nearly double ours, and they are but some 7 miles off. We certainly need re-enforcements, and I hope they will be sent forward before we are attacked by such unequal odds.

The road between this and London is passable by wagons. There is much delay at the river and some very steep and rough hills; still they can be passed with moderate loads. Artillery would have some trouble in overcoming some of the hills.

There is another road called the Old Road, which is some 6 miles nearer-37 miles-than the one via Sublimity, but is rough, although, from all I have been able to learn, the hills are not so steep.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Twelfth Brigade.

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SOMERSET, KY., December 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division, Kentucky:

GENERAL: Yours of the 7th is at hand. In a hasty note of the 8th I stated to you the state of affairs about Somerset. I have little to communicate in addition to what I then wrote, viz, that the enemy is on this side of the river and within 7 miles of us. His force, from the most reliable information, consists of nine regiments of infantry, 3,500 cavalry, and twelve pieces of artillery.

My force, including the Tennesseeans, just arrived, will not amount to more than 5,000. I have no cavalry that can be relied on. I have ten pieces of artillery.

My command is necessarily scattered, having several points to defend, it being uncertain by which of the several approaches to the village the enemy will make his appearance.

From the above you must see the necessity of my being immediately re-enforced. My communications for the last seven or eight days have, I think, fully shown this necessity.

I shall meet the enemy, be the result what it may.

I have ordered Captain Dillion to report to your headquarters in arrest. Charges will be forwarded per next mail.

We received about two days’ supply of provisions from Lebanon today. We were entirely out.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Brigade.

{p.487}

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LEBANON, KY., December 9, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL:

Have not heard from General Schoepf since his fall-back, except that he had countermanded the order for the movement of the Tennessee regiments. He has no confidence in his cavalry, and sent his dispatch by mail.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, Ky., December 9, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: I learn from Judge Green, of Russell, a most reliable citizen and truly loyal, that the rebels under Generals Zollicoffer and Cullom, after crossing the Cumberland, have sent part of their forces on this side the river, in direction of this place. He believes it is the purpose of the enemy to move on this point. I hardly think they will venture by the Somerset and Columbia road to this place. I have thrown out scouts on that road and to two other points on the Cumberland.

General Cullom-Bill Cullom-former Clerk of Congress-joined Zollicoffer last Tuesday or Wednesday with 4,000 men. This is reliable; I have it unmistakably. Mr. Rufus Ingram, brother-in-law of Cullom, informs me of the certainty of it. He says they have 11,000 men, pretty well armed, with eight or twelve guns. Zollicoffer has united with his forces those of General Cullom and Colonel Stanton.

You cannot drive him back with less than 10,000 troops. If you do not prepare to do this, the enemy will be in the center of the State.

Respectfully,

J. T. BOYLE.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 10, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

MY DEAR FRIEND: As I informed you by telegraph, I received your letters of the 3d and 5th. I have by no means been unmindful of your wishes in regard to East Tennessee, and I think I can both appreciate and unite in your sympathy for a people who have shown so much constancy. That constancy will still sustain them until the hour of deliverance. I have no fear of their being crushed. The allegiance of such people to hated rulers, even if it could be enforced for the moment, will only make them the more determined and ready to resist when the hour of rescue comes.

The organization of the division at Lebanon has been with special reference to the object which you have so much at heart, though fortunately it is one which suits any contingencies that can arise. I shall hasten its preparation with all the energy and industry I can bring to bear. The plans which I have in view embrace that fully; but the details and the final determination, while there is yet time to watch the progress of circumstances which might affect our plans vitally, I think I should lack that ordinary discretion by which I hope to retain your confidence if I did not reserve. When the preparation of that division is complete, which I hope will be very soon if I then see reasons why it should be merged into the general line of operations I will give you the reasons, and you shall be the judge of them; and if you do not see force in them, I assure you I will pursue your views with as much zeal {p.488} and hopefulness, and perhaps more energy, than if I entirely concurred in them. You do not know me well yet if you think I cannot do this.

And now for the other side of the field: I feel more anxiety about it than any other, because I have less control over the means that ought to bear on it, and have less knowledge of their details if I had the control. I do not know well-scarcely at all-the description and capacity of the gunboats and transports that are to be used, and I do not know anything about the quality of the troops and officers. I have not seen Smith for seven years, and am afraid to judge him. I have never rated him as highly as some men. The expedition requires nothing more, as matters now stand, than ordinary nerve and good judgment and ability to command men. The troops ought of course to be the best we can command. The object is not to fight great battles and storm impregnable fortifications, but by demonstrations and maneuvering to prevent the enemy from concentrating his scattered forces. In doing this it must be expected there will be some fighting; it may be pretty good fighting. I suppose that 10,000 men, with two batteries, would not be too great an estimate for each of the rivers, if the enemy should do all that he probably can do. The precise manner of conducting the expeditions depends so much on local knowledge that I can hardly venture on its details; but at least the expeditions should go as rapidly as possible to the nearest point to where the road crosses the peninsula; that is, to Dover and Fort Henry. And the first thing there to be done is to destroy the bridges and ferries; then act momentarily on the defensive, unless the weakness of the enemy or a trepidation in his force should give a good opportunity to attack. I think the first serious opposition will be found at Fort Henry and at an island battery 4 or 5 miles below Dover, but my information is not very complete as to the strength of these works. It would probably be necessary to stop there. Fort Henry is said by civilians to be strong. I cannot learn yet the number of guns.

There have been some 7,000 troops there. We will probably find that number there. It is about 6 miles below the railroad bridge. I should not expect to meet any considerable force at Dover, but perhaps 7,000 or 8,000 at Clarksville, where they are fortifying. If they succeed in getting out of Bowling Green, which I believe they will try to do as soon as they see us advancing unless their force and armament are increased, of course the number at Clarksville may be expected to be greater.

The demonstration on Columbus and the Mississippi should at least be on such a scale that it can be converted into a real attack if they destroy anything; better still if it can attack in any event.

You must be patient if you find my letter vague and unsatisfactory. I have had to satisfy a deputation, acting under a joint resolution of the Legislature, that it was hardly necessary or expedient at this time to appoint a certain person “provost-marshal, with all proper power, and giving to him such military force as he may deem essential for a prompt and proper enforcement and execution of the laws and a suppression of all lawless and marauding excursions into Northeastern Kentucky.” I believe I succeeded pretty well, and perhaps after that I ought not to have attempted a coherent letter. Your own judgment will satisfy its deficiencies. Please have Rosecrans take care of his revolted subjects along the Big Sandy. We are established at Munfordville.

Truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

P. S.-It will seem rather wordy for me to say that early action is of the greatest importance when I am myself unable to appoint a day; but not a day should be lost.

{p.489}

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LOUISVILLE, December 10, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I have not overlooked Prestonburg, but their tardiness in organizing has prevented me from using readily the only troops I have available for that service. One regiment, Colonel Moore’s Kentucky, has already been ordered there; is indeed now at Louisa, being mustered in. I shall send another infantry regiment and two or three squadrons of cavalry, that will make a force fully equal to the demand of the people interested in that section.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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[DECEMBER 10, 1861.-From McClellan to Halleck, in relation to airs in Missouri and contemplated co-operation with Buell, see Series I, Vol. VIII.]

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HEADQUARTERS, December 10, 1861, (Received Lebanon, December 10, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

Order five companies of Wolford’s cavalry to march forthwith to Prestonburg or Piketon, moving by way of Danville, Lexington, and Mount Sterling, the lieutenant-colonel to command.

Take the companies from Campbellsville or Columbia, as you think best.

By command:

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. S. VOLUNTEERS, Columbia, Ky., December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Headquarters, Lebanon, Ky.:

SIR: My scouts sent out yesterday at noon, under Captain Owens, of Colonel Wolford’s cavalry, have just returned, and report the enemy across the Cumberland on this side. The scouts approached within 6 miles of the enemy’s camp. Their camp is 31 miles of this place, near the Columbia and Somerset road.

Captain Owens is a native of Pulaski County, and is thoroughly acquainted with the country and distances and with all the people. He learned from a trustworthy Union citizen in the vicinity of their camp that most if not all of their forces had crossed the Cumberland. They claimed to have others yet to cross. They claimed to have 30,000 men. Captain Owens believes they have from 10,000 to 12,000 men. They effected the crossing by an extensive raft of logs.

The rebels beat up for recruits in Wayne County last week and enlisted over 200 men. Their forces are increasing from recruits of rebels in Kentucky and new forces from Tennessee.

The enemy are between General Schoepf and the forces here. It is believed and understood to be their purpose to hold with part of their force the forces of General Schoepf in check, and with the greater portion of their army move on Columbia, and, cutting us off, join Buckner’s {p.490} forces or hold this section, and prevent a flank movement on Bowling Green.

Would it not be well to increase the force here, and throw sufficient numbers here to protect the sick and stores, and move on the enemy by the road to Somerset, General Schoepf making a simultaneous movement upon them from the other side? I notify you now that the enemy is in force on this side the Cumberland, and will most probably move in this direction.

The forces here are greatly disabled by sickness. The morning report showed over 1,000 sick and absent, and the strength of the forces here does not exceed 2,500 effective men who could be brought into action, exclusive of some 300 of Wolford’s cavalry and including Haggard’s cavalry.

The forces here cannot fall back with all their sick and stores. Three of the regiments have no ambulances, and some have no wagons, and only one, the Nineteenth Ohio, is supplied fully with transportation. The sick and the stores here must be protected.

Concentrate your forces here and with General Schoepf and move them simultaneously upon the enemy, and you will effectually cut him off. If this is done, it must be done immediately. I shall expect forces to defend this place and move on the enemy. If you have a brigadier-general of experience, you can place the forces under his command, or I will lead them with such ability as I possess.

Let me hear from you.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. S. ARMY, Columbia, Ky., December 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Lebanon, Ky.:

SIR: I inclose you letter from Mr. George Bryan, clerk of Russell County, Kentucky, a man well known to me to be honest, true, and trustworthy. His information confirms and is corroborated by report of my scouts, except as to the number of the enemy’s force.

A captain of Tennessee militia, who was notified to draft one-half his command and report to headquarters at Monroe, Overton County, Tennessee, reported here with 44 of his men. He expects 160 more en route for these headquarters.

The enemy are drafting the loyal citizens of Clinton and Wayne. Probably the 200 recruits reported as obtained in Wayne were drafted and impressed.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Acting Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

JAMESTOWN, KY., December 9, 1861.

Col. T. E. BRAMLETTE, Columbia, Ky.:

DEAR COLONEL: I have the following facts reliable, viz: Zollicoffer’s forces are all across Cumberland River, except the Mississippi regiment and about 300 men under Colonel McRea; the latter are camped at Hiram Hall’s, in Wayne. The Mississippi regiments are camped at Mill {p.491} Springs. There are about 5,000 across in camp on the hill opposite Mill Springs.

This comes from a gentleman just in from Wayne, who lives near Hall’s. He says he has been at Mill Springs and saw all that he reports, and knows that it is true. He was there when the scouting party came in that had the brush at Rowena on Sunday; they reported one of their number killed, one horse wounded, and several pistols and guns lost, and some other minor injuries received. They rear and curse and swear vengeance against Rowena.

Yours, &c.,

GEORGE BRYAN.

P. S.-He says nine regiments have gone up to Mill Springs; thinks there are about 6,500 or 7,000 in all Zollicoffer’s forces.

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CAMP WOOD, Bacon Creek, December 11, 1861.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff:

I wish authority to call upon Colonel Turchin’s force, if necessary. Seventy-five rebel cavalry came up to Woodsonville at 5 a.m. this morning, got behind a house, and fired a volley. Our pickets returned it. The rebels fled. Hindman encamped at Bear Wallow last night with 4,000 men. I will watch him.

MCCOOK.

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CAMP NEVIN, December 11, 1861.

Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I am all right and safe here. A return would almost be disastrous to my division unless some serious flank movement is taking place. I hope the general will rescind the order. How far shall I fall back?

MCCOOK.

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LEBANON, December 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

Have just received a dispatch from General Boyle. His scouts sent out on the 9th had returned and reported the enemy this side of the Cumberland, within 30 miles of Columbia. Captain Owens, of Wolford’s cavalry, is a native of Pulaski. He learned from a trustworthy Union citizen in the vicinity of their camp that most if not all of their forces had crossed the Cumberland. They claimed to have others yet to cross. They claimed to have 30,000 men. Captain Owens believed they had from 10,000 to 12,000. General Boyle asks me for re-enforcements. I have sent a copy of his communication by mail.* Have not heard from Schoepf. Should have done so by this time.

GEO. H. THOMAS.

* See p. 489.

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HEADQUARTERS, December 11, 1861. (Received Lebanon, December 11, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

Does General Boyle report the enemy advancing on Columbia? At what place or on what road are they? What kind of troops are they composed of?

{p.492}

Order General Boyle to take a strong position where he is and fortify himself.

Order General Ward to move his command forward at once to Green River, so as to be ready to re-enforce Columbia in case of an actual attack.

Be prepared to move promptly in any direction, but keep up the regular duties of your command. Can you not communicate speedily with Schoepf through Liberty? Answer.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LEBANON, December 11, 1861.

General D. C. BUELL:

General Boyle believes the enemy will advance on Columbia by the Somerset road. They are infantry, artillery, and cavalry. He believes they will attempt to hold Schoepf in check with a part of their force and advance on Columbia with the main body. Cannot now communicate with Schoepf by Liberty; that road leads through the enemy’s lines.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 11, 1861. (Received December 12, 1861.)

General THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

SIR: I am fully satisfied General Zollicoffer’s forces do not exceed 7,500. They are increasing from the drafted recruits from Tennessee and some from Kentucky.

A spy sent to Mill Springs says the force is not over 7,500, and he believes it is about 6,500, though enemy represent it very much larger. He says that only about one-half had crossed the river.

I learn satisfactorily that the force is increased daily by accessions of new recruits, ill-clad and poorly armed, and many without arms.

There is no doubt the enemy expect to furnish supplies up the Cumberland, such as arms, clothing, &c. The enemy have eight pieces of artillery, two large guns, and six 6-pounders.

Wolford has moved the larger part of his forces to Billy Williams’ on Green River. The others will move as soon as transportation can be had. I have directed him to report to me daily as to movement of the enemy. He is only 16 miles from this place, in direction in which I have been sending scouts.

I have no quartermaster, no commissary, no blanks of any kind. Can you have them furnished?

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL: Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I this morning ordered Capt. R. C. Webster, assistant quartermaster, to repair to Somerset and report to Brigadier-General {p.493} Schoepf for duty on his staff, directing Captain Webster to hire as many wagons as he could procure in the neighborhood of Nicholasville and Danville, to be used in transporting provisions, ammunition, and other supplies from Nicholasville to Somerset. It will be as much as we can do here, with the means at the disposal of the quartermaster’s department, to keep up a supply at Somerset and to enable me to move from here with my command. It is absolutely necessary that the wagons and teams required for by Captain Gillem when in Louisville should be forwarded to this place as rapidly as possible.

I sent dispatches last night to Generals Boyle and Ward immediately after the reception of the telegram from you.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Vols.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. S. VOLUNTEERS, Columbia, Ky., December 12, 1861.

General THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have kept scouts in the direction of Glasgow and Edmonton, and yesterday morning my men returned after visiting Edmonton. The enemy had been there the day before with 160 cavalry. They evidently purpose to control or prevent the election for member of the Legislature on Saturday. I have intended to send several hundred cavalry to Edmonton on Saturday morning.

Rev. Mr. Crenshaw, of Louisville, a Methodist circuit rider or elder, is here this evening from Glasgow this morning. He informs me that Colonel Hindman passed up from Bowling Green with 7,000 men,with the view of marching on this place. He was at a place called Horse Well and near Bear Wallow, moving in this direction.

The secessionists at Glasgow expected a collision here to-day and an easy victory. Mr. Crenshaw did not see the infantry forces, but he saw and counted 350 Texas Rangers, or cavalry troops. They were to join Hindman. The rebels at Glasgow understood your forces are in possession of Munfordville and with forces south of Green River.

I have scouts out in direction of Edmonton, Glasgow, and Greensburg, besides toward the Cumberland.

It seems to me that the forces here ought to have accession of at least a battery of artillery. We certainly need such arm of defense here now.

If Hindman shall be found advancing upon us, I will order up the forces from Campbellsville.

Colonel Hobson is now at Green River Bridge, about 13 miles from this place. I think he should locate several miles this side the bridge, leaving a company to guard the bridge until some other takes his place.

Respectfully,

J. T. BOYLE, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. S. VOLUNTEERS, Columbia, December 12, 1861.

General THOMAS, U. S. A.

Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: I directed Colonel Bramlette, with two companies from his regiment and two companies from the Nineteenth Ohio, to proceed on {p.494} the Pulaski or Somerset road and take and occupy the most available position of defense, having regard to water, &c., and to take with him Lieutenant Bonter, (?) temporarily on my staff, a fine engineer, to aid him.

After an examination of the grounds, we regard the most available point of defense at and near the crossing of Russell’s Creek, on the Somerset road, northeast of and near the town. Such defenses as will be required can soon be formed. With a battery of artillery the place can be held against considerable odds. Can we not be supported with a battery?

The rebel cavalry who crossed the Cumberland into Russell County have, it is reported, killed 50 or 60 of the loyal and defenseless citizens. I ordered part of Wolford’s and part of Haggard’s cavalry to the relief of the country. Can I at my discretion move one or more regiments to or in the direction of Cumberland, to give protection to the country on the Cumberland and hold the enemy in check?

If General Schoepf is moving on the enemy from the other direction, can I not be ordered up to attack from this side simultaneously, the movement being understood by General Schoepf?

If there is not reason to expect an attack here or a very early movement forward, I desire leave of absence for several days. I have no uniforms, no clothing, and no arms. I have no uniform or arms of any kind. There are other reasons rendering it necessary for me to be absent for some days which I do not give.

Colonel Beatty, of Nineteenth Ohio, was mustered into service August 10, but has no commission yet. Colonel Bramlette’s commission is of 10th. September, 1861.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Acting Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. B. VOLUNTEERS, Columbia, Ky., December 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: General Boyle directs me to say your dispatch and order of 11th instant is just received and acted upon. A force is detailed to commence the work immediately.

The general further directs me to say that reliable information, obtained from various sources, reports the enemy’s cavalry, 500 strong, on this side the Cumberland River, at Creelsborough and Rowena. They have seized many citizens and one sick soldier of Colonel Wolford’s command.

On receipt of the news last night the general ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Letcher, with a portion of Colonel Wolford’s cavalry remaining here and a portion of Haggard’s regiment, to march to Creelsborough and Rowena. Colonel Wolford, who had advanced to Williams’, according to your orders, was sent down to co-operate with Letcher, and Colonel Haggard, who was conveying a large party of Tennesseeans from Burkesville to this place, was also ordered in that direction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.495}

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LEBANON, December 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

Dispatch from General Boyle just received. His spy sent to Mill Springs, just returned, reports the enemy not over 7,500 strong, according to their statement. Spy believes they are not over 6,500. He was through their camp. They have but eight pieces of artillery.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, U. S. VOLUNTEERS, Columbia, Ky., December 12, 1861.

General WARD, Near Green River Bridge-

GENERAL: General Boyle directs me to write that your communication is received, and, should occasion demand, notice will be immediately given you of the necessity of the advance of your command.

The rebel cavalry have ravaged the country on this side the Cumberland River in the neighborhood of Jamestown and Rowena in a rapid march, killing some citizens and making prisoners of others. Colonels Wolford and Haggard are in close pursuit.

Scouts report the rebels advancing from Glasgow towards this place and citizens confirm the report. No alarm is felt, however. It is said 7,000 are under Hindman at Bear Wallow and Horse Well.

Advices of all movements of the enemy have been transmitted to division headquarters.

The general requests that you will urge the commanding general of this division to send forward to this point a battery and one or two more well-drilled regiments.

Respectfully, &c., your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH BRIGADE, Near Somerset, Ky., December 12, 1861. (Received December 16, 1861.)

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: Since my arrival at this place I have received Special Orders, No. 23, detaching the Twelfth Brigade from First Division, and requiring me to report direct to department headquarters.

The consolidated reports of the First and Second East Tennessee and Third Kentucky Regiments were forwarded direct to department headquarters. Is it necessary for me to send duplicates to headquarters First Division?

Reports this afternoon say that the rebel Zollicoffer is throwing up defenses this side the river, near Mill Springs. If this is the case, he could be readily captured by sending a force from Columbia via Jamestown to Monticello and taking him in rear.

Unless there is a prospect of doing something very soon, I wish to return to my position in front of Cumberland Gap.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Twelfth Brigade.

{p.496}

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 12, 1861. (Received December 16, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, Lebanon:

GENERAL: Having obtained much information relative to the face of the adjacent country, its roads, streams, and crossings, together with the ranges and haunts of the enemy, I would respectfully offer the following suggestion:

Let a respectable force move from Columbia along the road leading to Somerset until it reaches the salt-works, at the head of Fishing Creek; by this time its movements will have attracted the attention of the enemy, now on the river near the mouth of this creek.

At this moment let me cross the river with the principal part of my force at a point due south of Somerset (which I can do). The enemy, on being crowded by the Columbia force, will attempt to recross the river, when, with that force in his rear and mine in front (south side of the river), his capture must be certain.

What do you say to this plan?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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[DECEMBER 12, 1861.-General Orders, No. 24, Department of the Missouri. See Series I, Vol. VIII, p. 431.]

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DECEMBER 13, 1861.

General MCCOOK, Camp Kevin:

I shall have a regular pontoon bridge ready for Munfordville to-morrow, but may not send it for the present. Will Johnson’s arrangements make a bridge that can be depended on permanently? I don’t want anything done in front that will attract any more attention than can be avoided, but be vigilant and ready, without even letting your command know it. Where is cross-roads?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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DECEMBER 13, 1861.

General NELSON, New Haven:

Get your division in hand at the earliest possible moment, so that if called on it may move at once. Report by telegraph and mail what you require-ammunition, transportation, &c.

Examine at once the roads in front of you in all directions.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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DECEMBER 13, 1861.

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

What is your latest news from Schoepf, and what does he say? Has he changed position? What is the enemy’s position?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.497}

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, Ky., December 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Headquarters Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: I inclose note from Colonel Haggard. See it; read it. Send me two regiments and at least one battery. We will go to the devil before we retreat from here. We can’t retreat. The responsibility be on the proper authorities. Shall we be attacked by Zollicoffer and by Hindman at same time? Send us two regiments and two batteries, in addition to the small force of General Ward and we will take both and move to Glasgow.

My pickets from direction of Glasgow and Edmonton have not returned this morning. I have no news from that direction. If the enemy crosses the Cumberland, I move the forces under my command and give battle at all hazards.

Send up a battery or section of battery. I see no reason in retaining all means of defense and attack at Lebanon, as they must some time be moved in this section.

If you have the power, I shall expect a battery and re-enforcements.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

CREELSBOROUGH, December 13, 1861-1 a.m. (Received December 13, 1861.)

General BOYLE:

DEAR SIR: We reached this place at dark, expecting an attack every moment since our arrival. I placed pickets out upon every road reaching this place.

Our pickets from the Rowena road have just come in, bringing us information that is reliable that 300 men had crossed the river at that point this evening and a large force on the opposite bank were crossing (said to be 3000 at least). Their pickets came in the hearing of ours and returned towards Rowena.

Had you not better send us all the cavalry under your command in Columbia? They have killed several persons at that point and robbed the citizens of the town. Write me immediately what to do.

D. R. HAGGARD, Colonel Cavalry.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 13, 1861. (Received December 14, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Since I wrote you my scouts have returned, and up to 11 o’clock there is no reliable news of interest. My last contains all up to this writing, 2 o’clock p.m.

There are many rumors of advance of the enemy, but I regard them as unfounded; yet there is a prevailing belief here that we are in danger of an attack.

Colonel Wolford was here this morning. The remainder of his cavalry have gone, with their transportation, to Green River, in Casey County. {p.498}

Wolford was at Jamestown yesterday. The rebels left between 19 o’clock and daylight, before he reached there. They went up the Cumberland on this side. They came down from opposite Mill Springs and passed down to Rowena, at which place they destroyed the ferry flatboats and canoes gathered there, and killed several Home Guards and robbed the citizens. They robbed several of the stores and houses in Jamestown and made the women give up the shirts and other clothing of their husbands. Jonathan Williams, an old citizen and many years sheriff of this county, was killed. He was a quiet, inoffensive old man, but true to his country.

Colonel Wolford expresses the belief that the enemy have a considerable cavalry force on this side at Mill Springs and only a small body of infantry.

Respectfully,

J. T. BOYLE.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, Ky., December 13, 1861. (Received December 14, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: The people, even the good Union people, circulate the most devilish lies in regard to the enemy, and our own scouts, without they are selected with care, are not reliable. We have had every form of rumor in the last two days, and nearly the whole of them are false. The rebels were at Rowena, and shot two or three men, but killed none. They wounded old man Williams and took him off. They robbed several stores and houses in Jamestown and took off a good deal of clothing. They took off a number of horses with them, and it is reported took off eleven of the citizens.

The scouts and people from Monroe and Allen Counties say there is no enemy in that direction. I keep scouts out for from 12 to 25 miles and even farther. I think it likely the enemy have 350 Texas Rangers in Metcalfe County to-night. They intend to defeat the election. I had purposed to send more cavalry down to enable the people to hold the election. I may send a force to one precinct in the morning.

Colonel Hindman is still at Bear Wallow, so far as I can learn. I cannot hear of any advance in this direction; he cannot be far from the railroad and not very distant from Munfordville. I believe it is a feint, to deceive his men with the idea that they are to fight.

Captain Flynt addressed a note to the colonel of the Fifty-ninth Ohio in regard to their wagons. I ordered the colonel to retain the wagons, and he is in no sense to be blamed. I did it for the reason that they have not the necessary transportation, and that there was reason to believe it would be required here.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LEBANON, Ky., December 14, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

The five companies of First Kentucky Cavalry have not arrived here yet. General Boyle wrote me day before yesterday that he had sent {p.499} Colonel Wolford towards Jamestown to watch the enemy. The whole regiment was absent when the order reached Columbia. I think it likely they will be here by to-morrow or next day.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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LEBANON, Ky., December 14, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have received no letter from General Schoepf since the 10th. An officer was here yesterday direct from the Thirty-fifth Ohio. He left Somerset on the 12th. General Schoepf believed at that time that the enemy was returning across the Cumberland, but he could get no positive information, as he could not rely on his cavalry. Schoepf’s position is on Fishing Creek, between Somerset and Mill Springs.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 14, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOEPF, Commanding at Somerset, Ky.:

GENERAL: General Boyle writes me from Columbia that the enemy’s cavalry came down the Cumberland from Mill Springs as far as Jamestown, doing much damage, but returned between 12 o’clock and daylight on the night [morning] of the 12th. He further says that Colonel Wolford reported to him that there is a considerable force of cavalry encamped on this side of the Cumberland, opposite Mill Springs, and that very few of the infantry have crossed.

I also learn from a man who says he has been into their camp that their force is not over 6,500, if that. They have but eight pieces of artillery. I have written to General Buell about the cavalry, but I am afraid with but little success. He has no cavalry which can be relied on very much, and has ordered five companies of Wolford’s cavalry to go to Prestonburg.

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 14, 1861. (Received December 18, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Since my last communication things have been quiet about Somerset.

This evening my scouts brought in a contraband-a colored boy, about 26 years of age, who states that he is or was the servant of Lieutenant Allen, of a Tennessee regiment, C. S. Army. This boy was sent out from the enemy’s camp about 12 m. to-day with the dinner of his master (Lieutenant Allen), then on picket guard, but, mistaking his road, fell into the hands of our scouts.

{p.500}

This is quite an intelligent boy, and gives the following statement: The enemy are principally on this side the river, fortifying at a point near Mill Springs and expecting an attack from us. His force consists of one Alabama regiment (-); one Mississippi regiment (Newman); one Tennessee regiment (Stanton); one Tennessee regiment (Murray); one Tennessee regiment (Curran); one not known (Shaw); one regiment cavalry (Tennessee), Colonel Bridgman; one regiment cavalry, Tennessee (-); three single companies cavalry, Captains Sanson, Bledsoe, and (-). Major Helveti was shot in the arm, and (with 15 men of the Thirty-fifth Ohio) will be sent to Nashville to-day. They have eight pieces of artillery-two brass 6-pounders, four iron guns, is not certain as to their caliber-and two short brass pieces (howitzers). They have two regiments on the other side of the river (infantry and one company of cavalry), the latter kept as scouts.

What shall I do with the contraband?

Very respectfully, yours,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, December 15, 1861-12 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Captain Prime and a Major Helveti were taken prisoners at Somerset It was not reported to me until I inquired, seeing it published. We are gradually moving up, and have occasionally a few shots with pickets. We shall in a few days have two bridges over Green River; have one now at Munfordville. I shall commence a general inspection this week.

Zollicoffer, whose force may be 6,000 or 7,000, has gone back to his bridge at Mill Springs. Schoepf is between Somerset and Fishing Creek.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, December 15, 1861. (Received, Lebanon, December 15, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

I want more frequent and accurate information from Somerset. Direct General Schoepf to communicate with you daily and to ascertain what the enemy are doing.

Require the same of General Boyle.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LEBANON, December 16, 1861.

General BUELL:

Latest news from General Schoepf, December 12, just received. Enemy encamped at mouth of Fishing Creek. He thinks they can be captured by sending a force against them from Columbia, whilst he crosses the river at Somerset and gets in their rear.

General Boyle writes from Columbia, December 15, that his scouts can neither hear nor see anything of the enemy in the direction of Glasgow or Burkesville. Will send copy of General Schoepf’s communication by mail.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

{p.501}

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DECEMBER 16, 1861.

General MITCHEL, Elizabethtown:

Send one of your brigades to Bacon Creek in the morning, and move your entire division to the same point as soon as convenient.

Captain Bush’s battery will go to that point by the train to-morrow morning, to join your division.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., December 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Would it interfere with your operations if the valley of the Sandy, west of the Big Sandy, should be placed under General Rosecrans?

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 17, 1861-5 p.m.

LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington:

Not directly, but the operations in the valley of the Sandy involve to some extent the central part of Kentucky, which cannot well be separated from my contract. I have just organized a brigade for service in the valley of the Sandy, and am this moment giving instructions to the commander, Colonel Garfield, of the Forty-second Ohio, a promising officer, whom I have called here for that purpose. His regiment is on the Sandy by this time, where it will unite with Moore’s Kentucky regiment, now there, and Lindsey’s Kentucky regiment, now at Greenupsburg. The other regiment, the Fortieth Ohio, will be at [?] 11 p.m. to-morrow. A squadron of Ohio cavalry will be on the Sandy by Thursday, and the three squadrons of Wolford’s Kentucky cavalry will move up through Mount Sterling. These dispositions will, I think, be sufficient for the occasion. I can strengthen them somewhat, if necessary.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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DECEMBER 17, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

McCook’s division, Munfordville; Mitchel’s at Bacon Creek. We are doing pretty well. Zollicoffer is either retiring across the Cumberland or is prepared to do it at the approach of any superior force. Any more formidable demonstrations against him would only harass my troops and derange my plans. I am letting him alone for the present.

McCook reports:

The rebels attacked my pickets in front of the railroad bridge at 2 p.m. to-day. The picket consisted of four companies of the Thirty-second Indiana, Colonel Willich, under Lieutenant-Colonel Von Trebra. Their forces consisted of one regiment Texas Rangers, two regiments infantry, one battery (six guns). Our loss, Lieutenant Sachs and 8 enlisted men killed and 16 wounded. The rebel loss, 33 killed, including Colonel Terry, of Texas, and about 50 wounded. The rebels ingloriously retreated.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.502}

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HDQRS. ELEVENTH BRIGADE, DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Columbia, Ky., December 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: General Boyle is very unwell, and directs me to inform you that nothing important has occurred lately. A brush took place between our pickets 8 miles out at the forks of the Glasgow and Edmonton roads, and a party of Texan Rangers, who had made a circuit through the woods and came on them from towards Columbia. One man on each side was killed, and Captain Frain, formerly connected with the quartermaster’s department in Colonel Grider’s regiment, taken prisoner by the rebels. He is a most worthy citizen from Monroe County, and has contributed more to the aid of the Government than any man in this section of the country.

A considerable body of cavalry pursued the marauders, but only succeeded in retaking the stock which had been driven off.

General Boyle directs me to say that he has already been ordered by General Buell to send daily communications to General McCook, to be transmitted to department headquarters. The general suggests that it would be better and more expeditious to communicate by mail, which reaches Lebanon daily at noon and Columbia at night; or, if you prefer it, he will send a messenger daily to meet yours at Campbellsville, at Redmond’s Tavern, to exchange messages.

The general suggests whether it would not be better to order Wolford’s cavalry to Jamestown, in Russell County, 4 miles this side the Cumberland River, or to Rowena, on that stream. They are better acquainted than any other troops with all the roads and by-paths for many miles in that direction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: General Boyle directs me to say that the pickets from near the Cumberland are in, and report a desperate skirmish and hand to hand fight between two of Colonel Haggard’s men and a small party of rebels. The men were in a house when attacked, and succeeded in killing six rebels, with the loss only of two fingers to one man. The affair took place on Marrowbone Creek.

The pickets report that Zollicoffer, with his whole force, has crossed the Cumberland at Fishing Creek and marched toward Somerset. This is corroborated by citizens.

A cannonading was heard during the whole of Monday in the direction of Somerset. No other news.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LEBANON, KY., December 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, U. S. A.:

SIR On Sunday December 14,9 o’clock a.m., I left Camp Carroll, on Muldraugh’s Hill, with a detachment of 25 men of Company E, Tenth {p.503} Indiana Regiment, with instructions to scour the country in the neighborhood of Saloma. (Saloma is situated on the Nashville road, about 2 miles west of the Lebanon and Columbia Turnpike, and is 5 1/2 miles from the top of Muldraugh’s Hill.) I reached the little village of Saloma at 11 o’clock a.m. Here I could not find out anything of importance, and concluded to go farther.

Persons whom we met on the road informed me that a party of Confederate soldiers, several hundred strong, had stopped at the house of a certain Dan. Williams, about 9 miles southwest from Saloma, on the Nashville road. These statements were confirmed by some of William’s own neighbors whom we met, and the number of troops was stated to have been 140 men (Texan Rangers, who had crossed Green River at the mouth of Little Barren River).

I went on and arrived at Williams’ house about 4 o’clock p.m. On reaching the premises the inmates, who used very violent language, acknowledged that the rebels had stopped there on the night of Friday, December 12. The road and fence near the house bore unmistakable signs of the late presence of a large body of cavalry. I was further informed that several of General Ward’s scouts (Captain Payne) had been captured within a hundred yards of the house but a few weeks ago.

Mr. Mitchell, a neighbor of Williams’, told me that Williams was now in the Confederate Army, and that on this account General Ward had confiscated some slaves and horses belonging to Williams. I went to the stables, and found there 3 horses, 3 mules, and 2 colts, which I took.

Having instructions to return the same night, and not deeming it safe to go farther (we had marched about 16 miles), I turned back, and rejoined the force under the command of Captain Carroll, encamped on Muldraugh’s Hill, twenty-five minutes after 8 o’clock, and delivered the live stock to him.

Yours, very respectfully,

LEWIS JOHNSON, First Lieutenant Company E, Tenth Indiana.

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CAMP WILLIAMS, December 17, 1861.

General THOMAS:

GENERAL: My pickets report an advance of the enemy on Somerset, and that there was heavy firing of cannon in that direction from about 11 o’clock yesterday until dark. I hope General Schoepf has given them a good whipping.*

Your obedient servant,

FRANK WOLFORD, Colonel First Kentucky Cavalry.

* Some personal matter omitted.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 35.

HEADQUARTERS DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 17, 1861.

...

VII. A brigade is hereby formed for duty in Eastern Kentucky, to be constituted as follows:

  • Eighteenth Brigade.
    Colonel GARFIELD, commanding.
    • 42d. Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Garfield.
    • 40th. Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Cranor.
    • 14th. Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, Col. L. T. Moore.
    • - Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Lindsey.
{p.504}

Captain McLaughlin’s squadron of Ohio cavalry and three squadrons (six companies) of the First Kentucky Cavalry (Colonel Wolford’s) are attached to the brigade.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 17, 1861. (Received December 20, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Dept. of the Ohio, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Since my last nothing of interest has occurred. Colonel Hoskins’ regiment, Twelfth Kentucky, reoccupies its former position on the river bank.

I shall move forward at day-light to-morrow with four regiments by three different routes in the direction of the enemy’s camp for the purpose mainly of driving in his pickets, gaining information of his strength and position, and of presenting to him an offensive attitude. It may be that the information thus gained will be of that nature as to induce me to attack him in his fortified position at Mill Springs.

I will report to you on my return to-morrow the result of my reconnaissance.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Brigade.

P. S.-Major Coffee, with the regimental band of the First Kentucky Cavalry (Wolford’s), arrived this evening, in search of his regiment, but I could give him no information on the subject.

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DECEMBER 18, 1861.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, U. S. A., Washington, D. C.:

The Western Virginia batteries which you ordered do not come. I hear nothing of the Randall companies.

It is of the greatest importance that I should have more force of a good quality in the quartermaster’s department. Our transportation will never be ready. I need also a quartermaster, commissary, and ordnance officer to move with me. Can you give me McFerran for one?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 18, 1861. (Received December 18, 1861.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: General Boyle directs me to say that Colonel Wolford sent a courier to these headquarters at 1.30 o’clock a.m. with the intelligence {p.505} of the enemy’s advancing towards his position from Jamestown. He did not think the danger threatening enough to ask for re-enforcements.

The general sent out scouts on the various roads leading in that direction, who so far have reported no enemy found. Scouting parties of marauders are scouring the whole country. They even approach within 20 miles of this place and slaughter hogs, to transport to the Cumberland. This is done in the direction of Glasgow. The general desires me to say that Colonel Haggard’s cavalry are neither fully mounted nor armed. They have only 390 horses for a full regiment, and are not nearly all supplied with weapons. The general wishes to know if they cannot be armed and mounted, and if they are not to be attached to his brigade. It will be difficult to get horses here, as many have been bought up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 18, 1861. (Received December 19, 1861.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: General Boyle directs me to say that the rebels are plundering and devastating the country near Edmonton. They seize all the hogs in the country, slaughter them, and pack them with the salt they force the farmers and country merchants to give them. There is no cavalry force here sufficient to clear the country of the marauders, Colonel Haggard’s cavalry not being nearly all armed, and it is too distant to send infantry, before whom the enemy’s cavalry will clear the country and immediately reappear when our soldiers have returned to camp.

General Boyle directs me to say that he will march two regiments to Edmonton to correct this evil unless specially ordered to desist.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN BOYLE, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 18, 1861. (Received December 20, 1861.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon:

GENERAL: In my communication of yesterday I suggested that I intended to crowd the enemy to-day.

Accordingly at sunrise this morning I proceeded by two columns, one of three regiments and four pieces of artillery under my immediate command and the other of two regiments and two pieces of artillery under command of General Carter.

Proceeding about 3 miles, the road became impassable for artillery and the pieces were left, while I advanced with the infantry to a point about 6 miles farther and about 2 1/2 miles from the enemy’s fortified position near Mill Springs, at which point we came in contact with the {p.506} enemy’s cavalry, and a few shots were exchanged between them and a small detachment of mine under Major Coffee.

General Carter, advancing on the other road (to the south of my route and nearly parallel), proceeded to within about the same distance of the enemy’s position, when he met with about 80 of his cavalry, but having no cavalry, General Carter could only use his artillery at long range across Fishing Creek against him, dispersing his cavalry, however, and causing him to make a hasty retreat.

From my own observation, as well as from reliable information obtained from different sources, it is evident that if the enemy will not come out for a field fight, which he does not seem inclined to do, he can only be taken at the point of the bayonet under many disadvantages, and a probable heavy loss of life on our side.

The country adjacent to his intrenchments is of that broken and hilly nature that it would be difficult to get artillery in a commanding position, and, if got there, would be in great danger of being lost unless we were positively certain of success, a retreat with any degree of promptness being impracticable. If, however, we should drive him from his intrenchments, his next move would be to recross the river, and, if he succeeded in doing so, would instantly shell us out of his works from the commanding cliffs on the opposite side of the river.

Again, if I were to cross the river at Waitsborough some 12 miles above Mill Springs, and place myself in his rear on the cliffs and open on him from that point, he would then push his way unmolested to the north and east, and become a troublesome visitor along the route from Somerset to London and toward Cumberland Gap.

Under these circumstances I hardly know what move is best to be made. With my present force I can hold him in check where he is, and perhaps whip him if I can coax him out, which I shall still try to do.

In a former communication you spoke of Wolford’s cavalry joining me. It would be extremely desirable to have at least four companies of good cavalry. The two which I have are poorly clad, and armed with only a musket, wholly unsuited to that arm of service. Can you not give me four of Wolford’s best companies, with suitable arms? With this addition to my command I should be in a much better condition for service. Major Coffee could command this battalion, and the two companies now here could join their regiment and provide themselves with clothing and more suitable arms.

I avail myself of the mail facilities between this point and your headquarters, for the reason that I have no horses suitable for express services, and the difference in time being so small that not much would be gained by using express.

Should anything urgent occur, however, I will forward by special express by hiring a horse.

I inclose a note just handed me by Colonel Hoskins, now encamped near the river at Waitsborough.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. TWELFTH REGIMENT KENTUCKY VOLUNTEERS, December 18, 1861.

Brig. Gen. ALBIN SCHOEPF:

GENERAL: To-day I took six of my companies and one section of Captain Hewett’s battery and proceeded in the direction of Waitsborough, {p.507} leaving the battery and one company on the bluff. With the remaining five companies I proceeded to Waitsborough, but saw no rebels. I found at the river three ferry-boats, which I rendered unseaworthy before leaving my old camp, but not so much so, however, but that they can be repaired in a few hours, which I should have had attended [to] to-day, but hearing the cannonading at Fishing Creek, I hastened back to camp in anticipation of marching orders.

If it be true, as reported, that there is a rebel force of only two regiments at Mill Springs, and that their whole transportation train is at that point, would it not be well to move three regiments with one of the batteries across the river upon them at Mill Springs, while the remaining force could annoy them in front?

Should we gain possession of Mill Springs, I have no doubt we could shell their fortifications on this side the river, while the loss of their army stores, artillery, and transportation train at Mill Springs, consisting of several hundred wagons, would be a blow from which this division of their army could not recover.

I learn there is also a small boat at a point just above the shoals and one other at Steigall’s, making in all five boats, in which the artillery and infantry (without baggage train) could be crossed in a few hours, and make the march to Mill Springs in four or five hours.

I hope you will pardon me for thus obtruding my suggestions upon you.

W. A. HOSKINS, Colonel Twelfth Kentucky Regiment.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 18, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: A man sent by me to Columbus, Ky., and who spent several days there, and also a man who deserted this morning from the steamer Grampus, have been in-one this afternoon, the other this evening. They both confirm the report that three of the gunboats have left for the south, and that a great many of the troops are gone. Three regiments, however, have gone but 8 miles to Camp Burnett, on the Clinton road. Three more have gone to re-enforce Bowen at Feliciana. One reports that he heard that the Federals had taken Fort Jackson. I am not aware that any of our naval expeditions have been out long enough to make this story probable, but give it for what it is worth. It confirms news reported by me a few days since.

The army is reported to be composed of boys, badly disciplined and drilled and badly off for shoes. Clothing is coming in from the country, particularly from Arkansas. Many articles of a soldier’s rations are becoming scarce, but corn meal and beef are yet abundant. If salt can be kept out, however, they will have some difficulty in saving their bacon.

There are seven companies of the Forty-Fifth Regiment Illinois Volunteers at Camp Douglas, with improved arms for 1,000 men and clothing for the same, who are anxious to come here. If they could consistently be sent before being mustered into the service of the United States I would be much pleased. This application is made because the desire to come has been expressed by the senior officers of this regiment.

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General Commanding.

{p.508}

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, December 19, 1861. (Received December 20, 1861)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL:* ... As far as I can ascertain, there is no certainty that Zollicoffer is on the other side of the Cumberland. My information one day is that Zollicoffer’s whole force [is] on this side and the next day that his whole force is on the other side. I have received a letter from the Cumberland, informing me that W. G. Brownlow was in Fentress County, Tennessee, advancing this way with 1,500 to 2,500 men. I heard two days ago that Brownlow was certainly in jail in Knoxville, and no doubt felt that he would be hung.

There is no reliable news here of interest, except that Morgan or some other rebel is ravaging the county of Metcalfe and toting off the stock of all kinds. Zollicoffer is sending large trains of wagons both into Tennessee an I to Celina on the river to be shipped south.

My messenger returned without meeting the messenger from your headquarters.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-You will do me a personal favor and the public a service if you will see that Bramlette and his field officers are supplied with tents and are left without excuse for not staying in camp.

* Some matters of detail omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 19, 1861. (Received December 25, 1861)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: To-day has passed without anything worthy of note. I have seen nothing and heard nothing of the enemy.

One of my regiments is scouting in the direction of the enemy’s camp to-night, and may bring in something of interest by morning.

A party of Colonel Hoskins’ men returned this morning from a two days’ scout on the south side of the river, bringing nine Belgium rifles and a few blankets and knapsacks, taken in a slight skirmish with the enemy on that side of the river.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 37.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 19, 1861.

...

XII. The Eleventh and Twelfth Brigades (Boyle and Carter) will report direct to this office and receive orders from these headquarters.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.509}

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WASHINGTON, D. C., December 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. O. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Do you need more regiments than are now under your orders; if so, how many?

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 21.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

I am not willing to say that I need more regiments. I can use more with decided advantage if they can be sent. There ere extravagant rumors and great alarm in regard to an invasion of Eastern Kentucky. I regard the rumors as greatly exaggerated. I have no faith in the reports of very heavy columns, but I have no doubt of demonstrations in that direction, and would like to be able to remove even the apprehension of danger.

My inquiry of the Governor of Ohio in regard to his available regiments, if your dispatch alludes to that, was only precautionary, looking beyond the Cumberland, and regarding the campaign up to it as probably brief. The force to operate in that direction should at least not be reduced by detachments. It ought rather to be increased. I will write by mail.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LEBANON, KY., December 20, 1861.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Nothing additional from Somerset up to 17th instant. General Boyle reports all quiet near Columbia. Citizens near Edmonton report constant depredations by the rebels.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS, Lebanon, Ky., December 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. ALBIN SCHOEPF, Commanding at Somerset, Ky.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 18th was received yesterday. When you reported to me some days since the position of Zollicoffer I immediately telegraphed to General Buell, and suggested making a move on the enemy in front whilst you crossed the river and attacked him in the rear, but have received no answer from him.

Under the circumstances I think it will be best to keep a close watch on him, and if you can draw him out or catch him off his guard attack him.

It may be that General Buell wishes him to be detained on the Cumberland until the troops on the line to Nashville are ready to move. He has not communicated any of his plans to me, but requires that I shall keep my troops together and be prepared to move promptly in any direction. I will try to send you two of Colonel Wolford’s companies from his camp, but you will find them but little better than those you have.

{p.510}

General Boyle writes me that his scouts report that Zollicoffer is sending a large number of wagons to Celina, on the Cumberland, to be shipped west.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 21, 1861. (Received December 24, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS,

GENERAL: Since my last nothing of interest has occurred. The enemy remains quietly in the vicinity of Mill Springs, in his fortified position. Our pickets sometimes come in view of each other about midway, but I have no information to induce me to think that he meditates an attack, while I have refrained from attacking him for reasons before suggested, namely, nothing would be gained by taking his fortified position, while a certain heavy loss of life on our part must necessarily be sustained.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 22, 1861.

General THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon:

SIR: Acting Brigadier-General Carter reports that by your orders it is forbidden to receive fugitive slaves into camp, and that occasionally slaves belonging to rebels in East Tennessee make their escape from their owners and apply to him for protection and are employed by officers as servants.

The general directs that exceptions be made in regard to fugitives in such cases.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, December 22, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

A deserter from the Confederate Army has been in this evening. He reports that the militia from Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana are flowing into Columbus by every boat and every train. They are armed with muskets, shot-guns, and ordinary rifles. He also reports the sinking of submarine batteries, shortness of provisions in Columbus, and discontent among the troops.

It has been reported to me that a trade is being carried on with the South by the way of Jonesborough, in this State, thence to the Mississippi {p.511} River and through Missouri; also that an armed body of desperadoes infest the Illinois shore where these goods are crossed. I have ordered a company of cavalry, raised in the neighborhood of Jonesborough, to the scene of these infractions of the law, with the hope of breaking up this traffic and this body of men. The cavalry will leave to-morrow, taking with them ten days’ rations.*

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Some personal matter omitted.

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DECEMBER 23, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. A.:

MY DEAR FRIEND: I thought proper to give a more regular direction to my reply to the Adjutant-General’s telegraphic inquiry in regard to troops for Kentucky. Depend on my extreme caution and allow me after all to put it into your hands for such disposition as you may think proper. I am about to start to Lebanon to look into Thomas’ division. The little affair in front of Munfordville was really one of the handsomest things of the season. Our neighbors in part begin to show signs of being interested. They are destroying the railroads and receiving some re-enforcements; not, I think, to any great amount yet. A dispatch of the 13th, from Memphis, states that 10,000 have been sent to Bowling Green from Columbus, but I do not hear of their arrival. I shall write you soon.

Truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL, P. S.-I wrote at length several days ago, since your letter of the 8th.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 23, 1861.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Some explanation of the condition of things here will enable the General-in-Chief to decide upon the question submitted in your telegraph as to the necessity of more troops in this department.

Our returns show an aggregate of some 70,000-about 57,000 for duty. In these are included several Kentucky regiments not yet mustered in, but doing duty-at least one regiment of cavalry, that is worthless for the present (the Pennsylvania regiment)-and some ten raw regiments from Indiana and Ohio, that I have taken at the solicitation of their Governors, for the purpose of removing them from the demoralizing influences of home and to put them under some system of discipline. These troops, although unfit at this time for active service, have nevertheless a certain moral effect, and are even practically useful as guards to depots, &c. More Kentucky regiments are being consolidated and organized, but the process is tedious, and they generally lack discipline and preparation more than the other troops.

The efficient force may be set down now at about 50,000. Its condition, as regards discipline, may be inferred from the fact that, although it has greatly improved, there are still 5,500 officers and men absent with leave and 1,100 without leave, and there is not much difference between the two classes.

In coming through Cincinnati from Western Virginia some of the {p.512} Ohio regiments dispersed, and of some that came through to this place officers and soldiers put themselves on the cars and went off in contempt of authority until they were stopped by the provost-guard. But this condition of things, I feel assured, is changing. I have found it necessary to make some summary examples, and have instituted courts-martial and board of examination, which will work some good results at least.

In none of the armies of the Government is there so great a lack of experienced officers in every branch of the service. One of the greatest evils I have to contend with is the ill-judged interference of the State authorities for what they erroneously consider the welfare of their troops. A system of direct communication and administration has been going on between them. Agents of various descriptions are sent among the troops, and the effect is in the last degree ruinous. It originated, perhaps, in a want of the proper means of administration on the part of the Government at first, and will, I have no doubt, soon cease. In fact, I think is already in a fair way of disappearing.

The plan which I propose for the troops here is one of defense on the east and of invasion on the south. For the latter I think it will not be necessary for me to do more than suggest that the force ought to be increased rather than diminished. However, a timely and efficient cooperation from other quarters will materially affect this question. For the former I do not think a large force is necessary. An inroad (I should rather say a raid) is now threatened by the way of Prestonburg and Whitesburg. The numbers are variously estimated by rumor. My supposition is that there may be 3,000 men at Whitesburg, and that there probably are 2,000 near Prestonburg. I have no fear that either of them will make any considerable advance into the State even against a weak opposition, but they depredate upon the frontier counties and produce suffering and alarm.

I have now one squadron of Ohio cavalry and one Ohio and two Kentucky regiments of infantry at the mouth of the Sandy to move on Prestonburg, and three squadrons of Kentucky cavalry and one regiment of Ohio infantry moving in the same direction by the way of Paris and Mount Sterling. My orders, on the return of General Nelson, were for one regiment to remain at Prestonburg, and that at the time was supposed to be sufficient, and perhaps would have been if it had remained there; but it was withdrawn to Louisa by the State authorities, to be mustered in and recently, on the appearance of the force at Prestonburg, retired to the mouth of the Sandy.

It has been so inconvenient to take extraordinary precautions against invasion from the east that I considered it wiser to trust to the chances that they would not be necessary. If I had the means I would put an efficient brigade to operate towards Whitesburg, though it will probably not be necessary if the operations towards Prestonburg are entirely successful, because that will endanger the rear of the rebel force at Whitesburg.

In the absence of such means as I would wish I do not despair of getting together some force that will answer the purpose in a less satisfactory manner, if necessary. I have a new, but I am told a very good Ohio regiment at Lexington, which can operate in either direction, and hope soon to have more Kentucky regiments that I can use for the same purpose.

The brigade which I had organized in the Cumberland Gap route has been partially deranged by the unauthorized call of General Schoepf on it to re-enforce Somerset. I shall reinstate it as soon as possible.

{p.513}

It can hardly be necessary for me to add that, unless some considerable success is gained in the operations this winter towards Tennessee, large re-enforcements will be required in the spring.

With regard to the attitude of the people of Kentucky, I believe the mass of them are loyal to the Union; and this is not confined to the old men, as has been asserted. Evidence of it may be found in the fact that some 20,000 troops, composed of the best material in the State, are now being organized, and the number could be largely increased. But there are communities in which the rebel element predominates, and it acts with the greatest boldness, from the fact that many of the loyal men have entered the service of the Government.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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COLUMBIA, KY., December 23, 1861. (Received December 25, 1861.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

The enemy is closing in upon us; his pickets are near us in three directions, viz, Grider’s Ferry, on the Glasgow road, and Somerset. A skirmish took place this evening at Grider’s Ferry between 4 of our cavalry and 1 Home Guard against 15 of the enemy. The firing was across the river; 2 or 3 of the enemy and 1 horse killed; no injury to our men. The enemy fled, but returned with re-enforcements, and I have ordered four companies of cavalry to sustain our men.

In direction of Somerset, about 25 miles from this, 500 of the enemy have been encamped for two days. In direction of Glasgow some 200 have been encamped for several days, 20 miles off.

Haggard’s cavalry are not in condition for service. His horses are not shod, and it seems impracticable to get it done here. Wolford’s cavalry is too remote for any available use, imbedded in the Green River hills.

Typhoid fever is striking our men a heavy blow; 233 of my regiment now down, and dying daily. My loss is greater here than during all the preceding service. Unless we are moved the regiment will soon become greatly weakened. While marching we never have any sick; when we stop the men sicken and fall like leaves. Safety to human life, aside from the defense of the country, demands our moving. If we cannot get to move upon the enemy, it is our earnest desire that he will move on us, and the sooner the better for us. We would rather die in battle than on a bed of fever.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH BRIGADE, Somerset, December 23, 1861. (Received December 25, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Captain Fry, Company F, Second Regiment East Tennessee Volunteers, was detailed for special service in October last, by {p.514} your orders, and left for Tennessee in company with my brother, Rev. W. B. Carter. I fear that he has been captured by the rebels,and, if not, that he is so environed by them as to leave but little hope of his being able to return to his regiment. His company is of course still without a captain. I wish your advice as to whether it will or will not be advisable, under the circumstances, to have the position filled by a new appointment. I write at the request of the colonel of the Second Regiment.

We are still lying idle, hoping that some move is in progress from Columbia to get in Zollicoffer’s rear. The position he holds is said to be a very strong one, and our force in comparison to his is too weak to justify making a diversion so as to attack on both sides the river at same time or to even assault his works on this side. Such, at all events, seems to be the view held by those who ought to have the means of knowing.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Twelfth Brigade.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FIRST DIV.,.DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Somerset, Ky., December 23, 1861. (Received December 24, 1861.)

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division, Lebanon, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: In reply to your communication of the 22d instant I would beg leave to state that upon the arrival of Captain Prime, on or about the 2d December, I proceeded with him to examine the banks of the Cumberland River, with a view of selecting a location for the closed work ordered in your communication of the 30th November.

After a careful examination of the ground Captain Prime was convinced that the river bank presented no suitable location for a work of this nature within the neighborhood where it was desirable to have it.

The ground immediately on the river was too low, and liable to a plunging fire from the enemy’s guns on the opposite bluff, while the bluff on this side the river was too elevated to get a sufficient depression of the gun to make it effective on any part of the river, which facts were stated in a communication from Captain Prime to the general commanding the department direct after being submitted to me for perusal.

On the 4th instant Captain Prime, while reconnoitering the enemy’s position some 12 miles lower down the river, was (with Major Helveti, First Kentucky Cavalry) captured by the enemy, and the fact reported to the commander of the division in my communication of the 8th instant, this time being allowed to elapse before reporting the case, in the hope that they were only out off from their party and would make their way back to camp.

The intrenching tools arrived some ten days since.

I await further orders.

Quiet has prevailed around Somerset for the past three days. My scouts extend to the river on the south and to Fishing Creek on the west, sometimes coming in view of the enemy’s scouts on the west side of the creek.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

{p.515}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 22.}

HDQRS. DIST. SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, December 23, 1861.

In pursuance of Special Orders, No. 78, from headquarters Department of the Missouri, the name of this military district will be known as the District of Cairo, and will include all the southern part of Illinois, that part of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River, and the southern counties of Missouri south of Cape Girardeau.

The force at Shawneetown will be under the immediate command of Col. T. H. Cavanaugh, Sixth Illinois Cavalry, who will consolidate the reports of his command weekly and forward to these headquarters.

All troops that are or may be stationed along the bank of the Ohio, on both sides of the river, east of Caledonia and to the mouth of the Cumberland, will be included in the command, having headquarters at Paducah Ky.

Brig. Gen. E. A. Paine is assigned to the command of the forces at Bird’s Point, Mo.

...

For the information of that portion of this command newly attached the following list of staff officers is published:

Capt. John A. Rawlins, assistant adjutant-general.

Capt. Clark B. Lagow, aide-de-camp.

Capt. William S. Hillyer, aide-de-camp.

Maj. John Riggin, jr., volunteer aide-de-camp.

Capt. R. B. Hatch, assistant quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers, chief quartermaster.

Capt. W. W. Leland, commissary subsistence U. S. Volunteers, chief commissary.

Capt. W. F. Brinck, ordnance officer.

Surg. James Simons, U. S. Army, medical director.

Asst. Surg. J. F. Taggart, U. S. Army, medical purveyor.

Maj. I. N. Cooke, paymaster.

Col. J. D. Webster chief of staff and chief of engineers.

By order of U. S. Grant, brigadier-general commanding:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, December 24, 1861.

General BUELL, Lebanon and Lebanon Junction:

Nothing reported from Munfordville. McCook this afternoon reported the enemy as having retired beyond Cave City. Enemy’s pickets at Bell’s, 5 miles below Cave City, and that they were obstructing the turnpike. Also that Floyd, with his brigade, had arrived at Bowling Green. McCook asked authority to work on railroad bridge over Green River.

JAMES B. FRY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 25, 1861.

Hon. R. C. WICKLIFFE, House of Representatives, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR SIR: I have received your letter of the 19th instant, inclosing the copy of a bill now pending in the Senate for raising 20,000 twelve-months volunteers in Kentucky for the defense of the State. You have {p.516} done me the honor to ask my views in regard to the measure. I regret that they must differ from your own and from the high authority of the Military Committee and the vote of the House.

The proposition is open to grave objections. It will not produce efficient troops, and will soon break up the regiments already raised. The existing laws for organizing volunteers are better, and under them any necessary force can easily be raised in Kentucky. The special object of the force will operate against its utility. Troops whose obligations are tacitly confined to a sectional object are not apt to conform efficiently to a control whose object is national. In general terms, the force which the bill proposes to create is open to the objections on the score of efficiency and economy, which apply to all temporary levies; and, in addition, is liable to others growing out of peculiar circumstances. I should deprecate the effect of them on Kentucky herself. The war, I hope and believe, will not long remain within her borders; and while it does it is not necessary that it should have entirely the character of civil war.

There is another objection which, although founded as I believe on weighty reasons, partakes perhaps too much of the nature of a sentiment to appear becomingly in an answer to your inquiry. I deprecate the plan of throwing the defense of a State upon her own people. I would see the national force extending protection to every section and the people of every State uniting for the defense of the nation. The claiming of troops according to States is to my mind fraught with evils of serious magnitude, and at least it certainly does impair their tone and efficiency. The effect of the opposite course is always harmonizing and beneficial.

I can hardly expect that any of these reasons will strike you with all the strength of my convictions, and I submit them with great apprehension, lest I may be considered to have stepped beyond the limits which your letter contemplated for me.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 25, 1861. (Received December 27, 1861.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, &c., Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: Nothing has occurred during the last twenty-four hours to attract attention. Everything remains as at last report in my camp, and as far as I can learn the same may be said of that of the enemy.

I shall make another effort to-morrow to draw him out for a fair fight, but with what success I know not, but will report the result.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, December 26, 1861.

General D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

I inclose you herewith an order defining the limits of my command.* The object is that you may know its extent and to express to you a {p.517} desire to co-operate with you as far as practicable, especially in suppressing the smuggling that is now being carried on along the Ohio to some extent with the enemy. I would respectfully request a copy of such orders as you may have published on this subject.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See p. 515.

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COLUMBIA, Ky., December 26, 1861. (Received December 27, 1861.)

General GEORGE, H. THOMAS:

The section of artillery under command of Lieutenant Nell was forwarded this morning, as directed. Lieutenant Nell is not able to accompany his pieces, as you will perceive from inclosed certificate of assistant surgeon. Lieutenant Nell has had an attack of fever and not yet recovered. Although on foot and in the camp, he is very feeble, and I fear about to have a relapse. He will be forward, you may rely upon, fully as soon as he ought to in his condition.

The rumor reached here this evening that General Nelson had reached Glasgow. Heavy cannonading was heard here for some six hours on the 24th, which we understand was about Cave City. The enemy had his scouts near us again last night; ours fired on them 8 miles from here, but did no execution, save run them, so far as known.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

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PADUCAH, December 27, 1861.

Brigadier-General CULLUM and General D. C. BUELL:

The whole force at Camp Beauregard commenced going to Bowling Green on the 25th instant. It consists of Bowen’s division, say, eight regiments, 6,000 men, with twelve field guns and 500 horse, ordered to be at Bowling Green by the 29th instant. This is reliable.

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP BOYLE, December 27, 1861-9 p.m.

General THOMAS:

The enemy is at Jamestown, 18 miles from here, some 3,000 strong. He has ascertained the strength and position of Colonel Wolford’s camp, and threatens to destroy that before moving farther. He has 1,700 mounted men, armed mostly as infantry. With such force Wolford would be cutoff without remedy; I have ordered him under the circumstances of necessity to move up here with his stores and troops, to cooperate with me in an attack upon the enemy, should he move toward Burkesville or this place. I would not be surprised if the whole of Zollicoffer’s forces were to be on us in two or three days. They must be retiring from before Somerset, either intending to attack here or move down the river to Burkesville, and thence to join Buckner. In either case we intend here to meet him. Our situation is, however, somewhat critical-no artillery, and threatened on both flanks by superior numbers, and nobody to help us.

We will, however, strike a blow, even if left to ourselves, that shall {p.518} terrify the rebel hell-hounds wherever they hear of us. Retreat we will not, and if they come upon us we will fight the fight of desperation to win. We have too much stores here to leave, too many sick to move, and they must and shall be defended with the last life we have to spare; and if we, after the frequent notifications of our position to division and department headquarters, are cut to pieces for the want of the necessary means of defense, the fault will not be ours.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., December 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, &c., Lebanon, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have sent out small parties for the last two days before the enemy’s position, but he has made no response so far. I have set a trap for his scouts (about 40 men) to-night; if I succeed, it may induce him to attempt a retaliation, ending in a-general fight.

Having reason to believe that he contemplates going into the coal business on the Cumberland, I shall send out a party to-morrow and destroy the boats alongshore to the coal banks.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 23(1/2).}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., December 27, 1861.

The issuing of proclamations or other similar addresses to the public by generals or other subordinate officers in this department is prohibited.

By command of General Buell:

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 26.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, December 28, 1861.

Whereas there are now at Cape Girardeau, Paducah, Smithland, and Cave in Rock, places within this military district, many persons who have been driven from their homes and deprived of the means of subsistence by the acts of disloyal citizens of Kentucky and Missouri, and their substance taken for the support of a rebellion against this Government, humanity dictates that these people should be comfortably supported, and justice demands that the class of persons who have caused their sufferings should bear the expense of the same:

It is ordered, therefore, that at the place named suitable quarters shall be provided and contributions collected for their support, and accounted for in the manner prescribed in General Orders, No. 24, from headquarters Department of the Missouri, with this addition:

Persons of Northern birth and education who are liable to assessment {p.519} under this order will be taxed 50 per cent, more than Southern men of their class and means.

The refugees at Cave in Rock will be invited and means of transportation provided to Smithland or Paducah.

These contributions will be collected as far out as the military arm can securely extend, and at these distant points will be assessed and collected without the intervening of time between assessment and collection.

Commanding officers at Paducah, Ky., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., are particularly charged with the execution of this order.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LEBANON, Ky., December 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Colonel Bramlette writes at 7 [9] p.m. last evening, confirming his report of yesterday, that the enemy are at Jamestown, about 3,000 strong. Shall I move down to Columbia to Bramlette’s aid? One brigade might be moved and let supplies follow.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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LOUISVILLE, December 28, 1861. (Received Lebanon, December 28, 1861.)

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

Yes, go on, not to his aid, but to the object we discussed; that is what I want done, and to be entirely successful it must be conducted with secrecy and without any tarrying on the road.

Order supplies to be purchased there as well as sent.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP BOYLE, December 28, 1861.

Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS:

The pickets sent out bring in the news that the rebels have fallen back from Jamestown 7 miles, having been frightened by the picket fight at Jamestown, by the impression that the forces here were near Jamestown and in front of their movement.

They will now most likely recross to the south side of the river at Mill Springs, being in 7 miles of that crossing, which is in their possession. They are evidently greatly disturbed by their position, and I think it very probable will now retire, by the same route they came into Kentucky. That they are retreating or about to do so I am well satisfied from the accounts I get of their recent acts in Clinton. They are now seizing everything they can carry off. The inhabitants are fleeing from before their marauding parties, that devastate as they go. This is an evidence of their retiring, being the course pursued by them as they leave. The forces that were at Jamestown are the same that composed the advance guard when they first invaded Kentucky, viz, Stanton and Murray’s regiments, with the addition of McRea’s regiment of cavalry {p.520} added to the cavalry of Bledsoe. That they purposed passing down the river on the north side is ascertained to be certain, and were deterred by supposing that the Third Kentucky, Haggard’s, and Wolford’s regiments were intercepting them.

I think it possible they may attempt to pass back through Wayne, Clinton, and Cumberland by Burkesville. I will take steps to watch, and if such movement is attempted, will intercept and thwart it at Burkesville.

You may be assured, general, that while I am in the service obedience to orders will mark my actions. But these devils who infest the country make me very impatient to get after them and amongst them, and I can but give [expression] to my anxiety to move upon the marauding traitors.

Colonel Wolford is still at his camp on Green River and will remain there until otherwise ordered from headquarters. His position is dangerous, if the enemy choose to avail themselves of his isolation. It is the most indefensible position that could be selected in 10 miles of that place, and places him where all escape could be wholly out off.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

DECEMBER 29-7 o’clock.

No change since yesterday. The rebels occupy the same position and are seizing all in their reach.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 29, 1861-12 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I had designed 12,000, but when so much depends on circumstances which may arise while our transportation is getting ready it would be vain to say the enemy is not idle; and, as he travels only by railroad, when he gets started he travels faster. I am writing you to-night. Schoepf is not incompetent, but has not shown much enterprise at Somerset. I must reserve my judgment about him. Loath to recommend any colonels yet.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., December 29, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

MY DEAR FRIEND: It startles me to think how much time has elapsed since my arrival and to find myself still in Louisville. I certainly have had a good deal to do and have been very busy about it, but I am satisfied that very few men accomplish as much as is possible, and I cannot assume to be an exception. It has taken time to get necessary supplies, but transportation is the great trouble I have to deal with. Swords is physically unequal to the emergency, and he has but few assistants. I telegraphed you last night that it would be necessary to make a change, though I did it with very great regret. Dickerson, I am assured, is capable, and he has at least the merit of physical vigor. I hope the transfer will have been made at once. The shortcomings of subordinates I always regard as the fault of the commander, and so I desire to make no excuse for my tardiness out of these delays.

{p.521}

I have this moment received your dispatch. I intend a column of 12,000 men, with three batteries, for East Tennessee; but, as I have telegraphed you, it is impossible to fix a time for it to be there, so much depends on the circumstances which may arise in the mean time.

My unavoidable advance to Green River has thoroughly startled the enemy and he is strengthening himself in men and positions rapidly. C. F. Smith telegraphs me that two brigades, with twelve guns, say 6,000 men, were ordered from Camp Beauregard to be at Bowling Green yesterday, and I have information that Floyd’s division, say 6,000, arrived last Thursday. I have information also of the arrival of 10,000 men from Mississippi; but they may be those that Smith tells me of, though my information is that they came through Nashville, which would make it somewhat doubtful. At all events there are doubtless 30,000 men now at Bowling Green; and, unless checked by strong demonstrations and attacks on Columbus and the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers, the number can easily be increased to 50,000 or even 60,000 before I can get there. These facts make the co-operation I have in former letters mentioned as important quite essential now to any great success. It is quite essential, too, that the success should be speedy, or otherwise the enemy will be so strong in West Tennessee and Kentucky from Bowling Green to Columbus as to increase our work vastly.

It is my conviction that all the force that can possibly be collected should be brought to bear on that front of which Columbus and Bowling Green may be said to be the flanks. The center, that is, the Cumberland and Tennessee where the railroad crosses them, is now the most vulnerable point. I regard it as the most important strategical point in the whole field of operations. The possession of it secures their force and gives access through the two rivers to the very center of their power. While they hold it, at least two-thirds of the whole force on that front may safely be considered available for any one point that is threatened. This I am satisfied you have seen, and that you perceive the importance of co-operation against the center and flanks.

The movement on East Tennessee attacks their rear, and, if property supported, promises great results. The first 12,000 must probably be followed by others, particularly as it will be unsafe, if not absolutely impossible, to carry along the outfit for 10,000 men. With it the column would employ some 1,200 teams of all descriptions and occupy a stretch of road that the troops could not protect, to say nothing of the difficulty of foraging so many animals in a country which affords but scanty supplies. These arms must therefore be taken in by installments, or strongly protected at depots, where the volunteers can be organized to receive them.

In any event I must tell you what I have been unwilling to do all along, that you will require more troops in Kentucky. Don’t acknowledge this, however, but act on it.

Let me stop for to-night. It is 3 o’clock, and I have to get up at 5 to go to Green River, where McCook telegraphs me he is threatened by a strong force.

Truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

–––

DECEMBER 29, 1861.

General MCCOOK, Munfordville:

How far on the other side of the river would it be necessary for you to go to secure a strong position or prevent the enemy from taking one?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

{p.522}

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CAMP WOOD, December 29, 1861.

General D. C. BUELL:

The hills rise about 2,000 yards in front of me and continue in succession to Cave City. To resist an attack and secure the bridge I am stronger on this side. Only one hill commands my camp, and it is about 1 1/2 or 2 miles off. I have not reconnoitered beyond the first range. I can have a beautiful play of artillery on the approach to the bridge.

I can take no position in front that cannot be turned by a superior force. My cavalry pickets extend beyond the upper pike.

MCCOOK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville December 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division, Lebanon:

GENERAL: I send you a sketch of the country about Somerset which shows more of the roads than your map.* We conversed about the movement upon Zollicoffer through Columbia, and if you remember my idea it is hardly necessary to add anything on the subject.

It is for you to move against his left and endeavor to cut him off from his bridge, while Schoepf, with whom of course you must communicate, attacks in front.

The map will indicate the proper moves for that object. The result should be at least a severe blow to him or a hasty flight across the river. But to effect the former the movement should be made rapidly and secretly, and the blow should be vigorous and decided. There should be no delay after your arrival. It would be better not to have been undertaken if it should result in confining an additional force merely to watching the enemy.

Take such portion of the cavalry from Columbia as you think necessary. Draw all the supplies you can from the country and move as light as possible.

Having accomplished the object, be ready to move promptly in an, direction, but wait until you hear from me, unless circumstances should require you to move without delay, as I may want you to proceed from there to the other matter about which we have conversed.

Acknowledge the receipt of this by telegraph and report frequently Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* To appear in Atlas.

–––

LEBANON, December 29, 1861-7.20 p.m.

General D. C. BUELL:

Have just received a dispatch from Colonel Bramlette, dated to-day. He reports a skirmish between a party of Haggard’s cavalry and a large party of the enemy last night at Jamestown, 18 miles east of Columbia. Major Owsley, who commanded the party, reports that he learned from their color-bearer, who was mortally wounded, that they were on their way to Burkesville. This is confirmed by a note from a Mr. James McKinstry, a citizen of Jamestown, who reports that the enemy had two regiments, and told him they were on their way to Burkesville.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

{p.523}

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, December 29, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOEPF, Commanding First Brigade, Somerset, Ky.:

GENERAL: The commanding general of the division directs me to say that he will leave this place on Tuesday for Columbia, and will, if possible, intercept Zollicoffer, who is reported to be marching in that direction. He desires you to keep a good lookout for him, and, if marching as reported, to push him with your troops in the direction of Columbia.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, December 29, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

On Thursday night I left here to visit Shawneetown and all other points occupied by troops within this military district on the Ohio River. At Shawneetown I found a regiment of cavalry with but few arms, and five companies of the regiment that have not yet been mustered into the service of the United States; also a regiment of infantry, claiming to number over 800 men, still in the State service, with about 400 muskets, that I had previously sent there from arms that had been turned in by troops here to receive better arms. These troops have a large steamer at their service, for which they seem to have no other use than to send up the river after hay for the cavalry horses. The steamer appears to have been chartered by State authority. As a claim will likely come against the Government for all money paid in this way, I would recommend that the Governor of the State be requested to send a mustering officer to muster these troops into the service of the United States, and I can then supply their wants without keeping a large steamer expressly for that purpose.

At Cave in Rock there are many refugees, who have been driven from their homes in Kentucky, and are now living in the cave in very destitute circumstances. The country on the Kentucky side has been nearly stripped of all supplies, the secessionists receiving hay and the Unionists driven from their homes. This portion of Kentucky is within the Department of the Ohio, but is remote from any of the troops of that department. The citizens are very clamorous for Federal protection. There is an encampment of rebels at Hopkinsville, said to number about 3,000 men, poorly armed and equipped,who, if driven out, would save this portion of the State much annoyance. Camp Beauregard (Feliciana) has been entirely evacuated, the troops going to Bowling Green. This gives re-enforcements to that point of about 7,000 men.

Finding cavalry much needed both at Paducah and Smithland, I have ordered up five companies from here; also ordered two companies to Cape Girardeau, to replace those ordered to Carondelet.

There is evidently great dissatisfaction among the troops of General Jeff. Thompson. There have been recently between 300 and 400 of his men come into Cape Girardeau and voluntarily applied to take the oath of allegiance to the Government. They express themselves anxious to retire to their homes and live in quiet.

I have had a man in Columbus last week who succeeded in completing {p.524} a map of the enemy’s works, which I have every reason to believe is as accurate as it is possible to get before Columbus falls into our possession.

The floating battery has been removed to New Madrid. Many of the best-disciplined troops have been removed, and their places supplied by militia. This informant says that he heard a planter remark that many of the troops were now distributed in squads of 20 and over upon the plantations in the South to repress insurrection. Being able to speak the German language, he learned that there are about 1,200 of that nationality who, with some 600 Irish, intend to turn upon the garrison as soon as they feel there is any security in doing so when an attack is made. I am well aware, however, that it will not do to rely upon this sort of support.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., December 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I received your letter of the 29th with the map. Have made arrangements to move as light as possible, and hope to get started to-morrow, although with raw troops and raw mules I fear there will be some difficulty. I have but few wagons over and above the regimental wagons. The provisions will have to be hauled with hired teams until Captain Mackay can have time to break in his raw mules, which I fear will delay us much longer than we should be delayed. I have been told that the country we are going to is very poor, and it will be necessary to pass through speedily should we attempt to penetrate to Knoxville. I will therefore submit for your consideration if it would not be a better move for my main force to go down the river (should we succeed with Zollicoffer) as far as Burkesville, take to that place subsistence enough to last us to Nashville, place the subsistence on flat-boats, and march with a light train in two columns one on each side of the river; the provisions and extra forage being floated down the river in boats under a strong guard.

The enemy being thus threatened on their rear and right, would greatly aid your advance in their front, and should they make a determined stand at Bowling Green, I might with my column cut off their retreat at Gallatin.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

WASHINGTON, D. C., December 31, 1861.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General McClellan is sick. Are General Buell and yourself in concert? When he moves on Bowling Green, what hinders it being re-enforced from Columbus? A simultaneous movement by you on Columbus might prevent it.

A. LINCOLN.

(Similar dispatch to Buell same date.)

{p.525}

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, Somerset, Ky., December 31, 1861. (Received January 4, 1862.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Kentucky Division:

GENERAL: I have received your instructions of 30th instant. Have heard of Zollicoffer’s contemplated move to-day, but doubt whether he will move towards Columbia; he not having had the courage to accept the invitation of my small force, would barely place himself in the unsafe position between our combined forces.

I have scouts out on the Harrison road, and as soon as he attempts to move I will be apprised of it in time to act in concert with you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, U. S. Vols., Commanding First Brigade.

–––

Abstract from return of the District of Cairo, commanded by Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant,for the month of December, 1861.

Station.Present for duty.Pieces of field artillery.
Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.Aggregate.
Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men.
Bird’s Point, Mo.1393,2283975892124,3856
Cairo, Ill1763,8194387471025,0216
Cape Girardeau, Mo.541,2981123061831,782
Fort Holt, Ky.671,346614931061,677
Mound City, Ill.29524553
Shawneetown, Ill33923956
Total46510,2151322,9342560314,37412

Distribution of troops in the District of Cairo, December 31, 1861.

  • BIRD’S POINT, MO.
    • 8th Illinois, Col. R. J. Oglesby.
    • 11th Illinois, Col. W. H. L. Wallace.
    • 20th Illinois, Col. C. C. Marsh.
    • 22d Illinois, Col. H. Daugherty.
    • 10th Iowa, Col. N. Perczel.
    • 7th Illinois Cavalry (battalion).
    • 1st Illinois Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. Ezra Taylor.
    • 1st Illinois Light Artillery, Battery C, Capt. Charles Houghtaling.
  • CAIRO, ILL.
    • 18th Illinois, Col. M. K. Lawler.
    • 27th Illinois Col. N. B. Buford.
    • 29th Illinois, Col. James S. Rearden.
    • 31st Illinois, Col. John A. Logan.
    • 48th Illinois, Col. I. N. Haynie.
    • 4th Illinois Cavalry.
    • 1st Illinois Light Artillery, Battery G, Capt. A. O’Leary.
    • 2d Illinois Light Artillery, Battery E, Capt. A. Schwartz.
  • CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO,
    • 17th Illinois, Col. L. F. Ross.
    • 11th Missouri, Col. J. B. Plummer.
    • 7th Illinois Cavalry (detachment).
    • Murdock’s Mounted Rifles.
    • 2d Illinois Light Artillery, Battery F, Capt. John W. Powell.
    • Campbell’s Battery.
  • FORT HOLT, KY.
    • 7th Illinois, Col. John Cook.
    • 28th Illinois, Col. A. K. Johnson.
    • 2d Illinois Cavalry (two companies).
    • 1st Illinois Light Artillery, Battery D, Capt. E. McAllister.
    • 30th Illinois, Col. P. B. Fouke.
  • MOUND CITY, ILL.
    • 10th Illinois, Col. J. D. Morgan.
  • SHAWNEETOWN, ILL.
    • 6th Illinois Cavalry, Col. T. H. Cavanaugh.
{p.526}

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WASHINGTON CITY, January 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville:

General McClellan should not yet be disturbed with business. I think you better get in concert with General Halleck at once. I write you tonight.* I also telegraph and write Halleck.

A. LINCOLN.

* Not found.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., January 1, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President:

There is no arrangement between General Halleck and myself. I have been informed by General McClellan that he would make suitable disposition for concerted action. There is nothing to prevent Bowling Green being re-enforced from Columbus if a military force is not brought to bear on the latter place.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON CITY, January 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General McClellan should not yet be disturbed with business. I think General Buell and yourself should be in communication and concert at once. I write you to-night and also telegraph and write him.

A. LINCOLN.

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LOUISVILLE, January 1, 1862-11 p.m.

President LINCOLN:

I have already telegraphed General Halleck with a view to arranging a concert of action between us and am momentarily expecting his answer.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

–––

SAINT LOUIS, MO., January 1, 1862.

To His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President:

I have never received a word from General Buell. I am not ready to co-operate with him. Hope to do so in few weeks. Have written fully on this subject to Major-General McClellan. Too much haste will ruin everything.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., January 1, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

GENERAL: In compliance with your instructions I have advised Captain Fry of the state of things about Somerset today, which amounts to nothing positive relative to the enemy further than a strong probability that he has no intention of moving from the vicinity of Mill {p.527} Springs unless he is crowded, in which case he will probably recross the river. At present, however, it appears evident that he is preparing for winter quarters where he is. Your movement may change his plans.

I am credibly informed that Buckner sent to him very recently requesting a few regiments to re-enforce him, which request was not complied with, Zollicoffer declining to move in that direction either in whole or in part.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade.

–––

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, January 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, U. S. A., Louisville, Ky.:

It is represented that the citizens of Union and Crittenden Counties, Kentucky, suffer much from depredations by rebels, and need protection. What do you think of sending two unemployed regiments from Illinois under your orders to be used for their protection? Answer soon.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have had no instructions respecting co-operation. All my available troops are in the field except those at Cairo and Paducah, which are barely sufficient to threaten Columbus, &c. A few weeks hence I hope to be able to render you very material assistance, but now a withdrawal of my troops from this State is almost impossible. Write me fully.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

–––

PADUCAH, KY., January 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM:

A reconnaissance to within a few miles of Camp Beauregard shows that the troops that left for Bowling Green have been replaced by two-months’ men from Mississippi. Pillow’s division ordered to Bowling Green, but returned, and go in winter quarters.

C. F. SMITH.

[Repeated by General Cullum to General Buell January 3.]

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, January 3, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: It is of the greatest importance that the rebel troops in Western Kentucky be prevented from moving to the support of the force in front of General Buell. To accomplish this an expedition should be sent up the Cumberland River, to act in concert with General Buell’s command, of sufficient strength to defeat any force that may be brought {p.528} against it. The gunboats should be supported by at least one and perhaps too divisions of your best infantry, taken from Paducah and other points from which they can best be spared. At the same time such a demonstration should be made on Columbus as will prevent the removal of any troops from that place; and, if a sufficient number have already been withdrawn, the place should be taken. It may be well also to make a feint on the Tennessee River, with a command sufficient to prevent disaster under any circumstances.

As our success in Kentucky depends in a great measure on our preventing re-enforcements from joining Buckner and Johnston, not a moment’s time should be lost in preparing these expeditions.

I desire that you give me at once your views in full as to the best method of accomplishing our object, at the same time stating the nature and strength of the force that you can use for the purpose and the time necessary to prepare.

Very respectfully,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

JANUARY 3, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

Two regiments alone could only remain at Caseyville through the inactivity of the superior force of the enemy at Hopkinsville. That is possible; but if it should happen otherwise, it would be inconvenient to re-enforce them. It would not be quite so bad at Uniontown. The frequent presence of a gunboat up the river would have almost as good an effect.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., January 3, 1862.

General CULLUM, Chief of Staff, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Do I understand that one division has come to Bowling Green, and that another (Pillow’s) was ordered, but countermanded, or that no re-enforcements at all have come from Camp Beauregard? Where does Pillow go into quarters and what is his strength?*

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See Smith to Cullum, January 2, p. 527.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 3, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A., Commanding Department of Missouri:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I received your dispatch, and with more delay than I meant proceed to the subject of it, in compliance with your request, and I may add also at the wish of the President. I do not underrate the difficulties in Missouri, but I think it not extravagant to say that the great power of the rebellion in the West is arrayed on a front, the flanks of which are Columbus and Bowling Green and the center about where the railroad between those points crosses the Tennessee {p.529} and Cumberland Rivers, including Nashville and the fortified points below. It is, I have no doubt, within bounds to estimate their force on that line at 80,000 men, including a column about Somerset, Ky. In rear of their right flank it is more. Of this force 40,000 may be set down as at Bowling Green, 20,000 at Columbus, though you doubtless have more information on that point than I have, and 20,000 at the center. Considering the railroad facilities, which enable the enemy to concentrate in a few hours on any single point of this front, you will at once see the importance of a combined attack on its center and flanks, or at least of demonstrations which may be converted into real attacks, and fully occupy the enemy on the whole front. It is probable that you may have given the subject, as far as Columbus and the center are concerned, more attention than I have. With reference to the former at least I can make no more than the general suggestion already expressed, that it should be fully occupied.

The attack upon the center should be by two gunboat expeditions, with, I should say, 20,000 men on the two rivers. They should of course be organized with reference to the depth of water in the rivers, and whether they should be of equal or unequal strength would depend on that and other considerations, and can hardly be determined until the moment of departure. The mode of attack must depend on the strength of the enemy at the several points and the features of the localities. It will be of the first importance to break the railroad communications, and, if possible, that should be done by columns moving rapidly to the bridges over the Cumberland and Tennessee. The former probably would not be reached at first, being some 31 miles above the first principal battery that I know of, at Dover. The other is 18 miles above Fort Henry, the first I know of on the Tennessee.

If the expeditions should not be strong enough to do the work alone, they should establish themselves firmly at the nearest possible point, and remain at least until they ascertained that re-enforcements from my columns or some other source would not reach them. By resisting they could establish themselves permanently under the protection of the gunboats.

I say this much rather to lay the subject before you than to propose any definite plan for your side.

Whatever is done should be done speedily, within a few days. The work will become more difficult every day. Please let me hear from you at once.

Very truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 51.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 3, 1862.

1. Brigade the Nineteenth is hereby constituted as follows:

  • Col. W. B. HAZEN, 41st Ohio Volunteers, commanding.
    • 41st Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Hazen
    • 46th Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Fitch.
    • 47th Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Slack.
    • 6th Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Whitaker.

...

By command of General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General. {p.530}

HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, January 4, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

I have no other information than that sent, which was in the exact words received. General Smith can perhaps give you more particulars.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

–––

COLUMBUS, KY., January 4, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I send you the inclosed, which has just reached me. It is from one of the most reliable men in Kentucky, cashier of the Branch Bank of Louisville at Burkesville:

The recent rains will raise the river so that Zollicoffer cannot be re-enforced for several days and by a rapid movement upon him his forces on this side the river might be cut off and captured before aid could be thrown across to him, and then the re-enforcements could be met and also cut off or driven back. The rise in the river will temporarily destroy their floating bridge.

In haste, respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel Third Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

–––

WASHINGTON, January 4, 1862.

General BUELL:

Have arms gone forward for East Tennessee? Please tell me the progress and condition of the movement in that direction. Answer.

A. LINCOLN.

–––

LOUISVILLE, KY., January 5, 1862.

To the PRESIDENT:

Arms can only go forward for East Tennessee under the protection of an army. My organization of the troops has had in view two columns with reference to that movement: a division to move from Lebanon and a brigade to operate offensively or defensively, according to circumstances, on the Cumberland Gap route; but it was necessary also to have regard to contingencies which, before the transportation, arms, &c., could be ready, might require a modification of the plan. The time and manner of the movement must still be subject to such contingencies, though I hope to inaugurate it very soon. Our transportation and other preparations have been delayed far beyond my expectations and are still incomplete. The arms-foreign ones, requiring repairs-arrived a week or more ago, and are now being put in order by the ordnance officer.

While my preparations have had this movement constantly in view I will confess to your excellency that I have been bound to it more by my sympathy for the people of East Tennessee and the anxiety with which you and the General-in-Chief have desired it than by my opinion of its wisdom as an unconditional measure. As earnestly as I wish to accomplish {p.531} it, my judgment has from the first been decidedly against it, if it should render at all doubtful the success of a movement against the great power of the rebellion in the West, which is mainly arrayed on the line from Columbus to Bowling Green, and can speedily be concentrated at any point of that line which is attacked singly.

D. C. BUELL.

[Confidential.]

WASHINGTON, Monday, January 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: You will have learned ere this that Colonel Cross has been ordered to relieve Colonel Swords, and that two or three active young quartermasters from the Regular Army have been ordered to report to you. Two hundred wagons from Philadelphia have been ordered to you, and Meigs is stirring up the country generally to procure means of transportation for you. There are few things I have more at heart than the prompt movement of a strong column into Eastern Tennessee. The political consequences of the delay of this movement will be much more serious than you seem to anticipate. If relief is not soon afforded those people we shall lose them entirely, and with them the power of inflicting the most severe blow upon the secession cause.

I was extremely sorry to learn from your telegram to the President that you had from the beginning attached little or no importance to a movement in East Tennessee.* I had not so understood your views, and it develops a radical difference between your views and my own, which I deeply regret.

My own general plans for the prosecution of the war make the speedy occupation of East Tennessee and its lines of railway matters of absolute necessity. Bowling Green and Nashville are in that connection of very secondary importance at the present moment. My own advance cannot, according to my present views, be made until your troops are solidly established in the eastern portion of Tennessee. If that is not possible, a complete and prejudicial change in my own plans at once becomes necessary.

Interesting as Nashville may be to the Louisville interests, it strikes me that its possession is of very secondary importance in comparison with the immense results that would arise from the adherence to our cause of the masses in East Tennessee, West North Carolina, South Carolina, North Georgia, and Alabama, results that I feel assured would ere long flow from the movement I allude to.

Halleck, from his own account, will not soon be in a condition to support properly a movement up the Cumberland. Why not make the movement independently of and without waiting for that?

I regret that I have not strength enough to write a fuller and more intelligible letter, but this is my very first effort at writing for somewhat more than two weeks.

In haste, my dear general, very truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

* See Buell to McClellan, January 13, 1862, p. 548.

{p.532}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 6, 1862.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your excellency’s letter of the 1st instant* on the subject of a concert of action between General Halleck and myself.

I had already written to him on the subject, which, as you rightly suppose, is of the very highest importance.

With very high respect, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found, but see telegram, p. 526.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 6, 1862.

To His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

In reply to your excellency’s letter of the 1st instant,* I have to state that on receiving your telegram I immediately communicated with General Buell and have since sent him all the information I could obtain of the enemy’s movements about Columbus and Camp Beauregard. No considerable force has been sent from those places to Bowling Green. They have about 22,000 men at Columbus, and the place is strongly fortified. I have at Cairo, Fort Holt, and Paducah only about 15,000, which, after leaving guards at these places, would give me but little over 10,000 men with which to assist General Buell. It would be madness to attempt anything serious with such a force, and I cannot at the present time withdraw any from Missouri without risking the loss of this State. The troops recently raised in other States of this department have without my knowledge been sent to Kentucky and Kansas.

I am satisfied that the authorities at Washington do not appreciate the difficulties with which we have to contend here. The operations of Lane, Jennison, and others have so enraged the people of Missouri, that it is estimated that there is a majority of 80,000 against the Government. We are virtually in an enemy’s country. Price and others have a considerable army in the Southwest, against which I am operating with all my available force.

This city and most of the middle and northern counties are insurrectionary-burning bridges, destroying telegraph lines, &c.-and can be kept down only by the presence of troops. A large portion of the foreign troops organized by General Frémont are unreliable; indeed, many of them are already mutinous. They have been tampered with by politicians, and made to believe that if they get up a mutiny and demand Frémont’s return the Government will be forced to restore him to duty here. It is believed that some high officers are in the plot. I have already been obliged to disarm several of these organizations and I am daily expecting more serious outbreaks. Another grave difficulty is the want of proper general officers to command the troops and enforce order and discipline, and especially to protect public property from robbery and plunder. Some of the brigadier-generals assigned to this department are entirely ignorant of their duties and unfit for any command. I assure you, Mr. President, it is very difficult to accomplish much with such means. I am in the condition of a carpenter who is required to build a bridge with a dull ax, a broken saw, and rotten timber. It is {p.533} true that I have some very good green timber, which will answer the purpose as soon as I can get it into shape and season it a little.

I know nothing of General Buell’s intended operations, never having received any information in regard to the general plan of campaign. If it be intended that his column shall move on Bowling Green while another moves from Cairo or Paducah on Columbus or Camp Beauregard, it will be a repetition of the same strategic error which produced the disaster of Bull Run. To operate on exterior lines against an enemy occupying a central position will fail, as it always has failed, in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred. It is condemned by every military authority I have ever read.

General Buell’s army and the forces at Paducah occupy precisely the same position in relation to each other and to the enemy as did the armies of McDowell and Patterson before the battle of Bull Run.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 926.

[Indorsement.]

The within is a copy of a letter just received from General Halleck. It is exceedingly discouraging. As everywhere else, nothing can be done.

JANUARY 10, 1862.

A. LINCOLN.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have delayed writing to you for several days in hopes of getting some favorable news from the Southwest. The news received to-day, however, is unfavorable, it being stated that Price is making a stand near Springfield, and that all our available forces will be required to dislodge and drive him out. My advices from Columbus represent that the enemy has about 22,000 men there. I have only about 15,000 at Cairo, Fort Holt, and Paducah, and after leaving guards at these places I could not send into the field over 10,000 or 11,000. Moreover, many of these are very imperfectly armed. Under these circumstances it would be madness for me to attempt any serious operation against Camp Beauregard or Columbus. Probably in the course of a few weeks I will be able to send additional troops to Cairo and Paducah to co-operate with you, but at present it is impossible; and it seems to me that if you deem such co-operation necessary to your success your movement on Bowling Green should be delayed. I know nothing of the plan of campaign, never having received any information on the subject; but it strikes me that to operate from Louisville and Paducah or Cairo against an enemy at Bowling Green is a plain case of exterior lines, like that of McDowell and Patterson, which, unless each of the exterior columns is superior to the enemy leads to disaster ninety-nine times in a hundred.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

I wish you to make a demonstration in force on Mayfield and in the direction of Murray. Forces from Paducah and Fort Holt should meet at Mayfield and threaten Camp Beauregard and Murray, letting it be {p.534} understood that Dover is the object of your attack. But do not advance far enough to expose your flank and rear to an attack from Columbus, and by all means avoid a serious engagement.

Make a great fuss about moving all your forces towards Nashville, and let it be so reported by the newspapers.

Take proper precaution to deceive your own men as well as the enemy. Let no one, not even a member of your own staff, know the real object. I will send you some forces from this place to increase the deception. Let it be understood that 20,000 or 30,000 men are expected from Missouri, and that your force is merely the advanced guards to the main column of attack. The object is to prevent re-enforcements from being sent to Buckner. Having accomplished this, you will slowly retire to your former positions, but, if possible, keep up the idea of a general advance.

Be very careful, however, to avoid a battle; we are not ready for that; but cut off detached parties and give your men a little experience in skirmishing.

If Commodore Foote can make a gunboat demonstration at the same time it will assist in carrying out the deception.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 6, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dept. of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: From information just received from Columbus the garrison there is now reduced from what it was a few weeks ago by the withdrawal of the sixty-days’ men, who are supposed many of them to have gone to Camp Beauregard. This leaves a force of probably thirty regiments in Columbus. General Pillow has resigned and gone to his home, in consequence of being ordered to Bowling Green.

The rebels have a chain across the river about 1 mile above Columbus. It is sustained by flats at intervals, the chain passing through staples placed about the water’s edge, the chain passing under the boats. Between each pair of the boats a torpedo is attached to the chain, which is expected to explode by concussion.

An experiment was made with one of these machines about ten days ago by directing a coal-boat against it. The experiment resulted satisfactorily to the enemy. The position of them being so distinctly marked cannot be regarded as much of an obstacle. Others are supposed to be planted in the river above these, not so distinctly located. From information received through a gentleman up from Memphis there are about 600 torpedoes in the river from Columbus to that city.

There are quite a number of soldiers in the guard-house here for desertion, disorderly conduct, &c. I would suggest, in view of the difficulty of getting men for the gunboat service, that these men be transferred to that service; also that authority be given to transfer unruly men hereafter. I have spoken to Commodore Foote on the subject, and I believe it meets with his approval.

If it meets with the approval of the general commanding the department, I would be pleased to visit headquarters on business connected with this command.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

{p.535}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, January 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

A gentleman called yesterday from Kentucky, stating he had been sent by one of your officers to ask more troops. How many more do you want and of what kind? We are exceedingly anxious to have some result in Kentucky, especially towards East Tennessee.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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LOUISVILLE, January -, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

No person has been sent to ask for more troops. Undoubtedly there ought to be more, and better artillery and better cavalry, but I shall work with what I have, and as soon as possible. Concert of action, by which the enemy may be prevented from concentrating his whole force from Columbus to Bowling Green on one point of attack, would have the same and a better effect than more troops immediately here.

D. C. BUELL.

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WASHINGTON, January 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Please name as early a day as you safely can on or before which you can be ready to move southward in concert with Major-General Halleck. Delay is ruining us, and it is indispensable for me to have something definite. I send a like dispatch to Major-General Halleck.

A. LINCOLN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 7, 1862-(midnight).

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President, Washington:

I have asked General Buell to designate a day for a demonstration to assist him. It is all I can do till I get arms. I have no arms. I have sent two unarmed regiments to assist in the feint. I wrote you yesterday and will write again to-night.*

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* Letter not found

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HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH BRIGADE, Columbia, Ky., January 7, 1862.

General THOMAS:

SIR: A rebel steamboat passed Burkesville yesterday at 12 o’clock, loaded with men and cannon and other arms, clothing, &c.

I send 300 cavalry to heights on this side to intercept it, if possible. I will move with 300 of Third Kentucky and the Nineteenth Ohio to an advantageous position at the mouth of Renick’s Creek, 4 miles above Burkesville, on the Cumberland. I shall move the whole force here to Burkesville. It is only 4 miles farther from Glasgow than Columbia. I am not willing to see the Cumberland surrendered, without a struggle, to Zollicoffer and the rebel invaders. If this movement is wrong, it can {p.556} be censured. I know it will be right if we whip the scoundrels and wrong if otherwise. More boats are expected up. If we delay much longer the enemy will have time to bring his re-enforcements from Texas and Louisiana.

We have no cannon, and must rely on our rifles to take off the men from the boats. With one piece of artillery the boats could be torn to atoms or sunk.

Can you not send me a section of a battery? I have ordered your commissary to supply rations to the troops about to move.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. T. BOYLE, Acting Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, Somerset, January 7, 1862. (Received January 8, 1862.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: I have received your instructions of January 1, 1862, yesterday.

On the 1st I made a sketch of the enemy’s position and a statement of my views of an advantageous attack. You having received from General Buell orders how to attack-I send you this now not as a suggestion but as information of the country surrounding the enemy. The position at Somerset, while it may be regarded as a strong position for a force of 7,000 or 10,000 infantry, with one or two batteries, is assailable with a less force, from the fact that there is no one point of sufficient strategic importance upon which the whole force could be concentrated and command the surrounding heights. It is also rendered assailable from the number of approaches to the place, passable roads for infantry, cavalry, and artillery leading into Somerset from every direction.

The same may be said of the position of the rebel forces stationed at Mill Springs, upon the south side of the Cumberland River, and at Beech Grove, upon the north side of the river. At Mill Springs the rebel force is represented as numbering 3,000, at which point they have constructed earth fortifications upon three sides; the north angle of the square being fortified by the precipitous bluffs of the Cumberland River.

The area embraced within said fortifications cannot be less than 400 acres, making a line to be defended of 1 1/2 miles. The fortifications on the north side the river extend across a narrow neck of land between the main Cumberland River and White Oak Creek, and consist of intrenchments about 1 mile in length.

The timber upon the north of the intrenchments for a distance of three-fourths of a mile has been thrown so that there is no approach except by the narrow road in front, while the hope of a flank movement is futile as the precipitous bluffs of the Cumberland upon the east and those of White Oak Creek upon the west render a flank movement of infantry impossible.

Had we a force of 10,000 men at this place we could then station behind fortifications at the two crossings of Fishing Creek (Hudson’s and Salt works), 2,500 each, while with the remaining force of 5,000 we could cross the Cumberland at Waitsborough upon coal-barges, with which a bridge could soon be constructed, and by a forced march of the 5,000 infantry and two batteries secure the position A, which commands both the Mill Springs and Beech Grove encampments; also the crossing {p.537} at Mill Springs. Once the fire was opened upon them at Mill Springs, should they attempt to recross, the forces from the north side the Cumberland having only three small flats of capacity insufficient to cross 50 men each and requiring fully one-half hour to cross and recross the whole force would fall an easy prey to us. They have also a large quantity of army stores collected at Captain West’s, consisting of bacon, wheat, corn, &c., while their main transportation train at Mill Springs, consisting of 1,000 wagons, horses, mules, and cattle, is certainly an object of acquisition. Should Zollicoffer not attempt to recross the Cumberland upon our opening fire upon Mill Springs, but remain an idle spectator until that place was reduced, our guns could then be turned upon him, and the distance across to his encampment from point A not exceeding 14 miles, it would be within range of our guns.

The movement above indicated is preferred from the fact that it will in the first place secure a position which will command both encampments, and at the same time cuts off the retreat of the forces at Mill Springs, while, should Zollicoffer attempt to escape by abandoning his intrenchments and a move north, he would either fall upon our strong position at Fishing Creek or else move in the direction of Jamestown, either of which would prove alike disastrous to him.

I would suggest that the movement should be made without baggage train, and, as position A is distant from Somerset only 18 miles, we might move down to the-Cumberland at Waitsborough and make a feint by throwing up fortifications until night-fall, when our boats should descend to that point, the bridge be constructed, and the crossing effected in about four hours.

In the mean time a reliable force, consisting of one or two companies, should be crossed at the north of the South Fork of the Cumberland, and fall into the main road at Weaver’s, 7 miles from Waitsborough, returning in the direction of Waitsborough, taking in the rebel pickets as they return, which if accomplished the position A could be secured by a march of three hours from Waitsborough. I inclose you the sketch referred to in my letter.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

* See p. 946.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Jib.:

Your instructions of the 6th were received this morning and immediate preparations made for carrying them out. Commodore Foote will be able to co-operate here with three gunboats. Two others will go up the Tennessee, with a transport accompanying, having on board a battalion of infantry and one section of artillery. General C. F. Smith will move upon Mayfield, and the cavalry from here and probably two regiments of infantry will effect a junction with him there. From this point I have instructed General Smith to threaten Camp Beauregard and Murray, but in such a way as to make it appear that the latter and probably Dover [Fort Donelson] are the points in the greatest danger. General Smith is informed that re-enforcements are to arrive from Saint Louis, and that I will occupy the ground from Fort Jefferson to Blandville, and cut off all probability of an attempt to get on his flank or in his rear from {p.538} Columbus. The continuous rains for the last week or more have rendered the roads extremely bad, and will necessarily make our movement slow. This, however, will operate worse upon the enemy, if he should come out to meet us than upon us.

I will probably send two steamers to a point below Island No. 1, where there is a better road leading directly to Columbus, and one leading into the back country, intersecting other roads leading to the same place. The troops on these steamers will be fully protected by the gunboats, and will not go far from their transports.

I have not prepared instructions for the troops moving from this place, as I will be along and may have to vary from any plan that could now be drawn up. This movement will be commenced to-morrow, and every effort made to carry out your design.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., January 8, 1862.

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division, Columbia, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: To-day’s work consists in making a reconnaissance with a large force (sent out last night) in front of the enemy’s position at Fishing Creek, and the capture of two of his cavalry, with the supposed wounding of several others. My object was to cut off and secure his foraging train, but the bad roads and high water in the creeks prevented my plans being fully carried out.

Heavy firing has been heard during the day in the direction of Mill Springs, but it is supposed to be in honor of the day, as there can be none of our forces in that vicinity.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. S. EVERETT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 8, 1862.

...

VII. The following organization of brigades will be observed until further orders:

  • Twentieth Brigade.
    Colonel FORSYTH, commanding.
    • 64th Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Forsyth.
    • 65th Regiment Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Harker.
    • 51st. Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Streight.
    • - Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Landram.
  • Twenty-first Brigade.
    Colonel CARR, commanding.
    • 40th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Wilson.
    • 57th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Colonel McMullen.
    • 58th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Carr.
    • 24th Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Grigsby.

VIII. The Eighth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers (Colonel Barnes) and Lieutenant-Colonel Boone’s battalion of Kentucky volunteers are assigned to the Sixteenth Brigade.

IX. Brigadier-General Ward is assigned to the command of the Sixteenth {p.539} Brigade and such other troops as may be posted to guard the line in front of Louisville; headquarters at Elizabethtown.

X. The following troops are attached to the Twelfth Brigade, Brigadier-General Carter commanding, and will proceed to London, Ky., viz: The Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Ray; the Sixteenth Ohio Volunteers, Colonel De Courcy; Wetmore’s battery of Ohio volunteer artillery, and Major Munday’s battalion of Kentucky cavalry.

The Forty-ninth Indiana will march via Springfield, Lebanon, and Danville. The Sixteenth Ohio will march from Lexington direct. The battery and the battalion of cavalry will move by rail to Lebanon and march thence via Danville to London.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Buell:

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., FIRST DIV., DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Somerset, Ky., January 8 [9], 1862.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: The fruits of my reconnaissance, referred to in my note of last night, amounted to only 2 cavalry captured, with the supposed wounding of several others, the bad roads and high water in the creek preventing a more successful result. My men returned without loss and in good spirits, except that they evidently felt that they ought to have accomplished more, but, under the circumstances I believe they did all that could have been expected. When the present storm abates they may make another effort.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 9, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Washington:

GENERAL: Yours of the 3d was received last evening and has received my most careful consideration. I have already written to you and to the President (at his request) in relation to the subject-matter of your letter. I will briefly state what I have done and had proposed doing.

On the 6th instant I wrote the inclosed communication to General Grant,* and on the 7th telegraphed to General Buell to “designate a day for the demonstration.” To assist this I ordered two unarmed regiments from Springfield to General Grant, to receive their arms as soon as we could procure them, and we are arming two regiments at Benton Barracks, to be immediately sent to Cairo. One additional regiment will be withdrawn from the Iron Mountain Railroad and one from the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, making six in all. As soon as we receive arms two more regiments can be sent from Benton Barracks. The insurrection in the northeast is not yet entirely suppressed. General {p.540} Henderson had an engagement yesterday near Mexico, and captured 40 prisoners, He expected another fight this morning. If any of our troops are withdrawn from there at present the scattered insurgents will collect, and again destroy the railroad and telegraph line. We may expect, however, that most of these gangs will be broken up in the course of the next two or three weeks.

Price’s army is still near Springfield. His forces are variously estimated from 12,000 to 40,000. About 50 miles farther south it is said there is a force of 18,000 Arkansas, Texan, and Indian troops marching to his assistance. Such is the substance of the telegrams from General Curtis and Colonel Steele. In order to ascertain the truth as to Price’s position and numbers as nearly as possible, I sent out the cavalry from Rolla to drive in his pickets and feel his position and strength, intending to move the infantry and artillery to their support. On receiving the President’s telegrams I suspended the latter movement, and for several days have heard nothing from Carr’s cavalry. If Price should be found to have anything like his reputed forces, it would probably be necessary to send against him also most of the available forces near Sedalia not now absent north of the river pursuing rebel bands and bridge-burners. For the reasons already given, these troops are still held in position.

If the troops at Sedalia and Rolla are not either sent against Price or put in position to keep him in check, he will unquestionably return to the Missouri River, where he will be received by a very large mass of insurgents, who have concealed arms and ammunition. This information comes from so many reliable sources that I cannot doubt its correctness. The question is therefore a very plain one. If a sufficient number of troops are to be withdrawn from Missouri at the present time to constitute an expedition up the Cumberland strong enough to afford any reasonable hope of resisting an attack of the enemy, we must seriously peril the loss of this State. I can make with the gunboats and available troops a pretty formidable demonstration, but no real attack. The gunboats are not yet ready, but probably will be within a week or two. With good luck here, and the receipt of the 11,000 arms ordered by you a month ago, we can by the early part of February throw some 15,000 or 20,000 additional troops on that line. If you insist upon my doing this now, your orders will be obeyed, whatever may be the result in Missouri.

Advices received yesterday from Cairo are to the effect that no large forces have moved from the vicinity of Columbus in the direction of Bowling Green.

Pillow was ordered forward, but, disapproving the order, he resigned and went South.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 533.

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CAIRO, ILL., January 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

The fog is so dense that it is impossible to cross the river. This will defer any movement for one day. A steamer is now lying across the channel at Dogtooth Bend, which will prevent re-enforcements arriving by river until she is removed. Have re-enforcements started?

U. S. GRANT.

{p.541}

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CAIRO, January 9, 1862.

Commodore ANDREW H. FOOTE, Commanding Cairo Flotilla:

Full directions have been given for the movement of troops on the expedition just fitting out. It will commence this evening by the advance under General McClernand taking position at Fort Jefferson. Will you be kind enough to direct such of the gunboats as you may think it expedient to send to accompany the transports and occupy a position for their protection?

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 9, 1862.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding, Cairo, Ill.:

As soon as ready for the move, your command will proceed to Fort Jefferson and encamp for the night. The cavalry, artillery, and transport wagons (empty) will land at Fort Holt, and will proceed from that point to Fort Jefferson. The ammunition may be divided, if necessary, among the accompanying wagons sufficiently to lighten the pieces and caissons to make their transportation practicable. On the arrival of troops from Bird’s Point at Fort Jefferson to-morrow morning the advance will be moved to Elliott’s Mill. The arrangement of guards is left with the commander of the advance.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 9, 1862.

General E. A. PAINE, Commanding Second Brigade, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

On the arrival of transports at Bird’s Point you will cause the artillery, cavalry, and transport wagons to be ferried to Fort Holt and go into camp for the night immediately below there. Before having the wagons cross move everything aboard the transports that can be dispensed with, leaving sufficient guard from each company on board to look after the company property. In the morning everything crossed to Fort Holt will proceed to Fort Jefferson. As the roads will be heavy, it may be necessary for the artillery to distribute their ammunition among the wagons accompanying. With the balance of your command now under orders you will proceed by transports to the same place and there await further orders.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 9, 1862.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

Owing to the density of the fog it will be impossible to make any movement here to-day. This will delay your movements also, it being {p.542} desirable to effect a junction at Mayfield. As the matter now stands, the column leaving Paducah need not start until Saturday. If there should be future delay, I will telegraph you.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Camp near Columbia, January 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. ALBIN SCHOEPF, Commanding at Somerset:

GENERAL: Your communication of the 7th instant, submitting a plan of the enemy’s intrenchments, has been received at the hands of Captain Hall. Your views appear to me excellent, provided the bridge of boats can be secured from freshets. It is General Buell’s desire, however, that we should not cross the river unless absolutely necessary. His plan was that by marching from this place I should threaten his left flank whilst you attacked him in front.

Do you consider his position impregnable from attack in front? If so, let me know by messenger as soon as you can. We have had very bad weather since the 1st, and have another obstacle to-day in the rising of the creek near here. I am in hopes, however, that we shall be able to march to-morrow.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE, Mouth of Abbott’s Creek, January 9, 1862.

Colonel SHELDON, Commanding Brigade:

DEAR SIR: We have been here about an hour. We were attacked by the enemy’s scouts, who were lying in ambush at Abbott’s Gap, 1 mile back. Our boys behaved admirably. The enemy ran; we pursued. Took a musket and a horse, and have put the boys up on a hill in the woods to bivouac. The enemy is encamped 3 miles from here, up Abbott’s Creek, at a point called Copperas Lick. Our boys are very weary, but I think we shall move on before daybreak. Their cannon are behind, and they will have a great deal of difficulty in transporting them. We have now a better hope than ever of making them fight. I want you to follow us with every available man that the quartermaster can feed just as soon as you call the men up from their beds and get hard bread in their haversacks. Get everything in good shape as possible, but hurry, hurry, hurry.

A messenger has just reached me from Major McLaughlin, saying he has sent for re-enforcements. I hope you have sent them already. If any good men are left, send them to me. Now or never we must strike them.

Ever, yours,

J. A. GARFIELD, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

{p.543}

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SAINT LOUIS, January 10, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

Do you insist upon my withdrawing troops from Missouri for the purpose indicated in your letter of the 3d instant? If so, it will be done, but in my opinion it involves the defeat of the Union cause in this State. I will write more fully what I have done and can do to assist D. C. Buell.

H. W. HALLECK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Troops at Cairo and Paducah are ready for a demonstration on Mayfield, Murray, and Dover. Six additional regiments will be there next week. Fix a day when you wish the demonstration, but put it off as long as possible, in order that I may increase the strength of the force.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

Re-enforcements are received [delayed?], and arms. Delay your movement until I telegraph. Let me know when the channel is clear.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, January 10, 1862.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

A telegraph just received from General Halleck notifies me of a delay in sending re-enforcements from Saint Louis, and directs that no advance be made until further notice from him. If the telegraph is in working order when the notice is received, I will inform you by that uncertain means of communication, if not, by express.

To add to our difficulties, a steamer has got aground about 20 miles above here, where the channel is very narrow, and swung around so as to entirely cut off navigation from here during the present low stage of water or until removed. I have sent a steamer to her relief.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. T. L. CRITTENDEN, Commanding Fifth Division, Calhoun, Ky.:

SIR: The general commanding directs that you move your division without delay to South Carrollton or near there. Take a strong position on the north side of the river which can be held by a small force.

{p.544}

Take your bridge with you or provide other means of crossing rapidly.

Leave a regiment at Calhoun to guard the lock.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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CAMP WOOD, Munfordville, January 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

Hindman’s brigade, about 3,000, are at Bell’s. Breckinridge, with his brigade, at Oakland. I know nothing positive in regard to the force at Bowling Green; suppose 35,000 or 40,000.

The railroad is destroyed from Horse Cave for about 3 miles. The tunnel track is torn up and tunnel blasted full of rock, timber out over the pike, and ditches dug across the road this side of Bell’s. None of the other roads have been. I have sent a trusty man by Glasgow to Scottsville. He should be back to-day. The tête-de-pont is progressing finely. It will be longer than I expected. I have not yet completed the transfer, but will complete to-morrow. Working the men will prove a great sanitary measure.

I was on the other side when the message came.

A. MCD. MCCOOK, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

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Abstract from returns of the District of Cairo, Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant commanding, for January 10, 1862.

Station.Present for duty.Pieces of field artillery.
Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.
Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men.
Bird’s Point, Mo.1383,2314589410261
Cairo, Ill.2044,143611,15011145
Cape Girardeau Mo.511,2151123061836
Fort Holt, Ky.721,3277152382
Paducah, Ky.2485,09332841830212
Smithland, Ky.17357361382
Total73015,3661593,328411,05518

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

I can hear nothing from Buell, so fix your own time for the advance. Three regiments will go down on Monday.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.545}

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, January 11, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A., Saint Louis, Mo.:

The following dispatch is from General Buell. Does it meet your views?

Raw troops do not add much to our strength for active operations. Why not send them into garrison at Cairo and Paducah, and let the older troops take the field, as the Confederates are doing? I refer to the Illinois regiments ordered here.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General

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HEADQUARTERS, Somerset, Ky., January 11, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, near Columbia, Ky.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 9th, by Captain Hall, was duly received. You ask whether I consider the position of Zollicoffer impregnable in front. I would not like to say positively that such was the case; but I may safely say that to carry his position must be attended with heavy loss of life on our part.

There is no possible chance of maneuvering with infantry in front of his works, while artillery could be of no use, from the impossibility of securing any point from which it could be used to advantage, with an almost certainty of losing it in the event of our failing to carry the enemy’s works at the first onset. If it is deemed not best to cross the river, the next thing to be done is to find some accessible point on the west side of White Oak Creek from which our artillery could be brought to bear with force on his works, in the mean time crowding him in front and flank with our infantry. By this means we may draw him out for a field fight. The immediate occupancy by artillery of one or more suitable points on the river below Mill Springs, for the purpose of stopping his steamers, is a matter which in my opinion should not be overlooked, as, with the present condition of the roads, it is through this channel that he must necessarily draw his supplies. I send you three men to-day who are acquainted with the country west of White Oak Creek, and who can be of service to you as you approach that line. Please keep me advised of your approach and plans, that I may act promptly and in concert with you.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General, Commanding at Somerset.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 12, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Before the receipt of your telegram directing delay in the demonstration previously ordered, I had commenced by sending a portion of my command immediately under General McClernand to Fort Jefferson. As it would be attended with a good deal of trouble to bring these troops back and have a demoralizing effect on them besides, I have left them there. They occupy a good camp ground, and have Mayfield Creek, a stream not fordable, between them and the enemy. {p.546}

Yesterday three of the enemy’s gunboats came up to reconnoiter, but finding two of ours lying below the camp they did not venture near enough to see our position or for our gunboats to engage them effectually. They placed themselves across the stream at very long range, and by the time Captain Porter and Lieutenant Paulding, commanding the gunboats, weighed anchor and got under headway they were off. Captain Porter chased them under their guns at Columbus, one shot certainly, and he thinks two, taking effect upon one of their boats, disabling her to some extent, if not entirely, for present use. Captain Porter pulled up and brought with him one of their buoys, intended to mark the location of their torpedoes or the channel to navigate to avoid them. Re-enforcements starting from Saint Louis on Monday, as I am advised by your telegram, I will commence the move again on Tuesday.

I have just learned through the Memphis Appeal, and also from a man who has just made his way from New Orleans and who spent Thursday and Friday at Columbus, that, seven regiments have left Columbus recently for Bowling Green. I am now inclined to believe that the garrison of Columbus is now weaker than it has been for several months back. It is also probable that the best-armed and best-drilled troops have been taken.

I have placed Captain Hatch, assistant quartermaster, in arrest, and directed him to turn over all public property to Capt. A. S. Baxter, assistant quartermaster. This was done on notice from Washington that charges would be preferred against the former, and, if not already in arrest, he should be so placed at once. Every day develops further evidences of corruption in the quartermaster’s department, and that Mr. Dunton, chief clerk, if not chief conspirator, is at least an accomplice. I have ordered his arrest and confinement.

I have telegraphed you requesting that no more vouchers given here by the quartermaster be audited for the present. This was intended to mean those given by Captain Hatch. As his conduct will probably be the subject of legal investigation, I forbear saying all that I fear is true. I address the commanding general in person, deeming this a matter which should only be known to such persons as he may desire should know it. I have directed the books and safe of Captain Hatch to be taken possession of and kept guarded until orders are received disposing of this matter.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, January 12, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL:

How are your transportation preparations progressing?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN

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LOUISVILLE, January 12, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

I am sorry to say not as rapidly as the necessity for it. With the present condition of the roads it is by no means sufficient.

D. C. BUELL

{p.547}

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., January 12, 1862-11 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I have received your letter, and will at once devote all my efforts to your views. Will write to-night.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, January 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

MY DEAR GENERAL: Your telegram asking for six more batteries is received. I have taken measures to have them ordered to you at once, and will endeavor to order two more to you to-morrow. I hope you will ere long receive the two regular companies from Fort Randall.

You have no idea of the pressure brought to bear here upon the Government for a forward movement. It is so strong that it seems absolutely necessary to make the advance on Eastern Tennessee at once. I incline to this as a first step for many reasons. Your possession of the railroad there will surely prevent the main army in my front from being re-enforced and may force Johnston to detach. Its political effect will be very great. Halleck is not yet in condition to afford you the support you need when you undertake the movement on Bowling Green, Meigs has sent to you the 400 wagons for which requisition was made. Should the supply of Government wagons be insufficient, I would recommend hiring private teams. If the people will not freely give them, why, then, seize them. It is no time now to stand on trifles. I think Ohio can now give you five or six new regiments, that can at least guard your communications, and are probably about as good as the mass of the troops opposed to you.

I am now quite well again, only somewhat weak. Hope to be in the saddle in a very few days.

In haste, truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, January 13, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: Your telegram of the 10th would have been replied to ere this but for the fact that my state of health has thus far permitted me to attend only to the most pressing business. I do not think you had read my letter of the 3d with much care when you sent the telegraphic reply. My letter states what I consider it desirable to accomplish, and in conclusion I ask your views and the time necessary to prepare, as well as the force you can use for the purpose. If you can spare no troops it is only necessary to say so, and I must look elsewhere for the means of accomplishing the objects in view. There is nothing in my letter that can reasonably be construed into an order requiring you to make detachments that will involve the defeat of the Union cause in Missouri.

{p.548}

I have now to request that, if you have not already done so, you will send to me as soon as possible a statement of the numbers, positions, and conditions of the troops in your department, together with the same information in regard to the enemy, as far as you can give it.

I am, very truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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LOUISVILLE, January 13, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

MY DEAR FRIEND: I did not mean to be understood in my dispatch to the President as attaching little importance to the movement on East Tennessee; on the contrary, it is evidently of the highest importance, if thoroughly carried out; but I believe that if the other object were attained the same result would be accomplished quite as promptly and effectually. I have taken no step thus far that has not had that in view also. It is certainly more favorable to its success that my whole attention has seemed to be devoted to Bowling Green, for it has had the effect to withdraw nearly the whole of the enemy’s attention from East Tennessee, while an apparent preparation for it on our side would have made its force more formidable. As I told you in my dispatch I shall now devote myself to it, contenting myself, as far as Bowling Green is concerned, with holding it in check and concealing my design as long as possible.

The presence of Zollicoffer at Mill Springs, although an obstacle, I do not regard as altogether unfortunate, as it affords a reason for sending a considerable force to that point. He has intrenched himself on both sides of the river which is readily navigable, and affords him facilities for supplying himself from Nashville. I have sent Thomas there, with the remainder of his division, in all some 14,000 men and twenty-six pieces of artillery and have ordered a brigade and battery to the river at Jamestown, by which I hope to stop Zollicoffer’s supplies through that channel. As soon as our means of transportation will permit I will establish a depot at Somerset and commence our movement. At present it is with the greatest difficulty that the troops are supplied, and I am quite sure that I have not let the subject of transportation rest. Colonel Swords is now sick and has evidently not been able to work. I am afraid Cross will not be much better. The Tennessee arms are being unpacked and put in order and forwarded to Lebanon.

It is not too early to consider some matters connected with this movement. The first column may be from 8,000 to 10,000 strong, but it should be promptly supported and its communications kept open. It will no doubt very soon draw off some of the force now in front of us, but at first we cannot reduce the force on Green River very much. I shall have to take a division from there unless we succeed in destroying Zollicoffer’s force entirely, which perhaps is too much to calculate upon.

By the organization of the Kentucky regiments and the introduction of raw regiments from Ohio and Indiana our numerical strength has suddenly risen from 70,000 to 90,000. It is unnecessary to say that a large proportion of this is unfit for active operations. However it will answer a certain purpose. It is organized into twenty-three brigades, {p.549} and, say, six divisions, with only sixteen batteries. It ought to be increased to eight divisions, and the artillery ought to be nearly doubled, say in all 120,000 men. Then not less than three divisions will be required in front of Bowling Green, not less than three for East Tennessee and its communications, one at Columbia and Jamestown, and one in reserve. The Columbia line is more important than may at first seem to you. It is a turnpike, connecting directly with Lebanon. Monticello, just opposite, is an important point which I am anxious to seize if I have the force. It is at the foot of the mountains, and controls the route up the Cumberland on that side, besides being in a loyal and productive part of the State.

I need more good staff officers in every department.

I am glad to see you getting up again.

Truly, yours,

D. C. BUELL.

P. S.-The plan of any colonel, whoever he is, for ending the war by entering East Tennessee with his 5,000 men light-that is, with pack-mules and three batteries of artillery, &c.-while the rest of the armies look on, though it has some sensible patent ideas, is in the aggregate simply ridiculous

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CAMP WOOD, January 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding:

My man left Bowling Green yesterday morning. He says they are not re-enforcing. They have no guns on Baker’s Hill that can be seen. They are not doing any additional work to strengthen their position. Floyd is at Bowling Green. McCulloch is not there. Breckinridge is at Oakland, Hindman’s headquarters. At Bell’s he gave notice to the people of Cave City to move immediately; that every house that would serve for headquarters or hospital would be burned. There is no obstruction on the roads this side of Bowling Green, save a little this side of Bell’s-trees cut and ditches dug. I have had the amount of damage to railroad estimated at about a half mile in all, but in detached places. I have a Louisville Courier of the 11th instant. Extract puts the percentage of sick altogether too large; the number of dead from disease is deplorably great. They are not fortifying at Davis Hill, below Glasgow.

MCCOOK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 13, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: On account of the time that would be occupied in preparation and the notice it would attract, it would not be advisable to cross the river as you propose. General Schoepf’s suggestion, though it is open to the objection of dividing your force widely, seems plausible, but so much depends on locations and other circumstances which can only be ascertained on the grounds, that it is impossible to decide well without nearer observations. The matter, therefore, must be left to your judgment. Your messenger’s description of the ground rather inclines me to my first idea about it, but I must leave it to your own discretion.

I have ordered two more regiments and two batteries to join you; but {p.550} if you see an opportunity, lose not a day. The enemy will profit more by it than you will. You will be superior in artillery, at any rate, I suppose.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIV., DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Camp near Webb’s Cross-Roads, Ky., January 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: After two days of the hardest work I have reached this place, 16 miles from Columbia, with the advance brigade of my division; the provision and ammunition train, with a portion of our brigade, is still in the rear, and will probably not reach here to-night.

The road, which has been represented as good, is the worst I ever saw, and the recent rains have made it one continuous quagmire from Columbia to this place.

We are still 17 miles from the position of the enemy by the shortest road, viz, that across the headwaters of the Wolf Creek, leaving Harrison to the left. This road is represented by my scouts as much worse than the roads the command has already passed over.

It is next to impossible to procure either forage or subsistence in the country, and entirely impracticable to haul either over the road at this season of the year. It is therefore necessary to do one of two things-either to go to Jamestown and eventually down the river to Burkesville, thereby cutting off all communication between Mill Springs and Nashville by the river, or work our way by this road to Somerset and join General Schoepf. We can never get supplies in any other way.

Should my division proceed on to Somerset it would be impossible to get down the river by the road on this side during the winter; and as Schoepf’s force is sufficient to keep the enemy in check, I would respectfully suggest that the troops now with me proceed at once to Jamestown and eventually to Burkesville, from which point their services can be made available in any operations in the direction of Bowling Green.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIV., DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Camp at Webb’s Cross-Roads, Ky., January 13, 1862.

Brigadier-General SCHOEPF, Commanding at Somerset:

GENERAL: I received yours of the 11th to-day, by Captain Hall. When I last wrote you I was in hopes of being near Somerset by this time, but the heavy rains have injured the roads so much that it will be impossible to say now when I can be in your vicinity. We have already been three days in making 16 miles, and our ammunition and provisions are far behind now-probably will not be up by to-morrow night. Should I ever succeed in getting near you, I will send a messenger to let you know. I wrote to General Buell five days since, submitting {p.551} your proposition of crossing the river and attacking from the bluffs of Meadow Creek, but have received no reply from him up to this time. As soon as I hear I will write you the result.

I have not had time to converse with the men you sent me fully, but if it be possible to approach the enemy by way of White Oak Creek I should like to have them as guides.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 13, 1862.

During the absence of the expedition now starting upon soil hitherto occupied almost solely by the rebel army, and where it is a fair inference that every stranger met is our enemy, the following orders will be observed:

Troops in marching will be kept in the ranks, company officers being held strictly accountable for all stragglers from their companies.

No firing will be allowed in camp or on the march not strictly required in the performance of duty.

Whilst in camp no permits will be granted to officers or soldiers to leave their regimental grounds, and all violations of this order must be promptly and summarily punished.

Disrepute having been brought upon our brave soldiers by the bad conduct of some of their numbers, showing on all occasions when marching through territory occupied by sympathizers of the enemy a total disregard of rights of citizens, and being guilty of wanton destruction of private property, the general commanding desires and intends to enforce a change in this respect.

Interpreting confiscation acts by troops themselves has a demoralizing effect, weakens them in exact proportion to the demoralization, and makes open and armed enemies of many who, from opposite treatment, would become friends, or at most non-combatants.

It is ordered, therefore, that the severest punishment be inflicted upon every soldier who is guilty of taking or destroying private property, and any commissioned officer guilty of like conduct, or of countenancing it, shall be deprived of his sword and expelled from the camp, not to be permitted to return.

On the march cavalry advance guards will be well thrown out; also flank guards of cavalry or infantry when practicable.

A rear guard of infantry will be required to see that no teams, baggage, or disabled soldiers are left behind.

It will be the duty of company commanders to see that rolls of their companies are called immediately upon going into camp each day and every member accounted for.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 14, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

The troops from Saint Louis expected to-day have not yet arrived. I have, however, commenced the move directed a few days since with. {p.552} out them, occupying to-night Blandville, Elliott’s Mill, and Fort Jefferson.

Yesterday a reconnoitering party of cavalry, supported by infantry, went within 3 miles of Columbus, driving in the enemy’s pickets.

To-day I accompanied Commodore Foote, with the gunboats Essex, St. Louis, and Tyler, to within 1 1/2 miles of the batteries at Columbus. A few shells were thrown around the batteries by the Essex and St. Louis, with what effect I cannot tell. The enemy replied with two or three shots without effect. In making this move I found myself much embarrassed by deficiency in the quartermaster’s department. Captain Kountz, who was recently sent here as master of transportation, from his great unpopularity with river men and his wholesale denunciation of everybody connected with the Government here as thieves and cheats, was entirely unable to get crews for the necessary boats. I was compelled to order that boatmen, if they declined serving voluntarily, should be put aboard the boats and made to serve as prisoners. Many expressed a willingness to serve if I said so, but would not work under the captain, and others left the city, as I am informed, solely to avoid the possibility of having to serve under his direction. He seems to have desired to be placed on duty here for no other purpose than to wreak his revenge upon some river men whom he dislikes, and to get into the service of Government a boat in which he has an interest, either as owner or a former proprietorship, not yet settled for. He has caused so much trouble and shown such a disregard for my orders, that I have been compelled to order his arrest. I would respectfully ask that he be ordered to another field of duty. As I shall be off to-morrow morning charges cannot be preferred until my return, and it is embarrassing to the service just at this time to have courts-martial sitting. I respectfully submit this matter to the general commanding the department for his decision.

Colonel Cavanaugh, commanding a regiment of cavalry now stationed at Shawneetown, has received a telegraphic order from Springfield, Ill., to report himself there to organize a brigade, his regiment to form a part, to be reported for orders to General Buell. As his services can be spared for a few days I have given him leave to go to Springfield, but informed him that his regiment cannot be moved without orders coming through headquarters of the department. The colonel desires me to say that he has a decided preference for remaining in this department. This, however, I do not regard, as it is his duty to go where ordered and where his services can be of the most value.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 14, 1862.

Col. JOHN COOK, Commanding Forces, Fort Holt, Ky.:

Your command will march to-morrow to Blandville, leaving Fort Jefferson at 10 o’clock a.m.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.553}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 14, 1862.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding Advance Forces, Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

In accordance with previous instructions, encamp at or near Blandville to-night.

To-morrow march with your entire command from 7 to 10 miles, on the most practicable route to Mayfield, probably through Lovelaceville. Next morning start two regiments of infantry and all the cavalry but four companies to join General Smith at Mayfield. At the same time send out a good portion of the cavalry you expect to retain on a reconnaissance towards Columbus, and leave anything but an appearance of an intention to return this way with a portion of your force until you actually start on the return. In the afternoon say, starting at 12 m., return again to Blandville. You will there find additional forces, and will receive directions for future movements.

Should I not be with you, you may find it necessary to vary the above instructions. It is not expected that the force thrown forward to Mayfield will be sent in the face of a large army or that you will remain off from the balance of the troops and so remote from the base of our line to receive an attack from a superior force.

The arrangement in this respect will have to be left to your judgment, knowing that you will be better able to judge of the feasibility of the plan indicated than any one not present could be.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. E. A. PAINE, Commanding Forces, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

To-morrow march your command to Blandville, leaving one regiment of infantry and one squadron of cavalry at Fort Jefferson and to guard the road at Elliott’s Mill. Have all the approaches from Columbus watched, so as to avoid all chance of surprise. You will receive further instructions at Blandville.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 14, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

General C. F. Smith reports, January 10, that no troops have left Columbus for Bowling Green save the two regiments reported two weeks ago.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

{p.554}

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WASHINGTON, D. C., January 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri, Saint Louis:

My letter of 3d was not intended to direct or advise you to strip Missouri of troops so as to endanger the safety of the State. It was only to indicate to you the objects in view and to obtain your views, as well as to learn what troops you had disposable for the movement. I wrote on 13th fully. Shall I forward mortars for rafts and how many? Have new arms arrived and how many more do you need?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD BRIGADE, January 15, 1862.

General THOMAS:

SIR: Colonel Wolford has returned from a scout. He says that he went to Harrison; from there to the Wolf Creek road; then to Logan’s; from there 4 miles down the Mill Springs road; then back.

He says that he saw nothing, and could hear nothing, and that there were no pickets on any of the roads over which he went; that there were no horse-tracks on the roads made since the rain. This would seem to indicate that Zollicoffer had departed, if it were not for other reliable news just received by me from one whom I sent out this morning. Old man Foster says that last night the enemy came in very considerable force, some three regiments, on the McLennan Hill, situated between Forbush and Wolf Creek, about 1 mile from the river. This afternoon the whole body took back towards their camp by way of the road between Forbush and White Oak (Robertsport road). They were compelled to go that way on account of the river having risen.

This evening at sundown they were passing toward White Oak Creek, within 8 miles from their camp, whipping and pressing their teams very hard. They are now out of our way I think. What a nice thing we have missed by not having means of getting news! Now, I hardly think that he could have come out to attack us, or they would not have brought the wagons. This would look as though he had not known of our presence until to-day, and then he took back. I will have my advance and pickets keep a sharp lookout should an attack be contemplated.

If he comes this way we can whip all of them without any trouble in the position we have.

I send you this that you may take such steps as seem proper.

I have no news from the camp of the enemy other than what you are in possession of. I am about satisfied that he has not to exceed 5,000, all told. I will give you the particulars when I see you.

Yours, truly,

R. L. MCCOOK.

P. S.-I think we could not intercept the train now, as we would have to go by the Mill Springs road to head them off a march of 16 miles.

{p.555}

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE, Somerset, January 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Eastern Division:

GENERAL: I received yours of the 14th instant, and in reply to your inquiries regarding the practicability of sending boats down the river to Mill Springs I could not take the responsibility of advising it from the knowledge I have of the enemy’s position at that place. Please advise me which route you are going to take. If to Somerset I would advise you to take the road north by Adams’ Mill, as the Columbia road is now impassable even for empty wagons.

It would be very important for me to know the strength and disposition of your command in case of a simultaneous attack upon the enemy. We can barely obtain forage, the roads being very bad. Provisions are very scarce, and complaints are made daily of our troops taking them without pay. Grow’s train has been taken from our lines and transferred to the London road.

The brigade quartermaster has only a few wagons and fewer mules. It is extremely important that the disbursing officers should be provided with funds, as the inhabitants complain bitterly of having their property taken without compensation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP IN FIELD, O’Neill’s Mill, January 16, 1862.

Col. C. C. MARSH, Twentieth Illinois Volunteers, Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

You will send the accompanying dispatch to Colonel Johnson, at Elliott’s Mill, as soon as possible. Let six of your companies of your regiment be got ready and moved as soon as possible to join Colonel Johnson’s command at Elliott’s Mill, where they will camp for the night, leaving the remaining force to garrison Fort Jefferson. Have three or four cavalrymen stationed at Fort Jefferson, to bring any dispatches which may come there for me. If you have no cavalry for the purpose, you can detain the cavalry which carry you this dispatch, if you have no other.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

WM. S. HILLYER, Aide-de-Camp.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS CAMP IN FIELD, O’Neill’s Mill, January 16, 1862.

Col. A. K. JOHNSON, Commanding U. S. Forces, Elliott’s Mill,Ky.:

You will push out a strong party of cavalry and infantry for reconnaissance on Columbus road for 4 or 5 miles towards Columbus or as far as can be done with security, taking no baggage, and return to camp at your present position to-night. Six companies of Colonel {p.556} Marsh’s Twentieth Illinois Volunteers will join you at Elliott’s Mill to-night.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

WM. S. HILLYER, Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 16, 1862.

Brig. Gen. T. J. WOOD, Commanding at Bardstown:

SIR: The general commanding desires to have the road from Danville to Somerset put into good order, and for this purpose he assigns you to the duty and to the command of the troops to be engaged in it. You will therefore at once proceed to Lebanon, and move with the Twentieth Brigade, Colonel Forsyth, and begin the work from Danville; 1,000 axes, 1,000 picks, 500 shovels, and 500 spades were ordered to Colonel Forsyth from this place to-day, and will reach him to-morrow. The Twenty-first Brigade, Colonel Carr, will be under your command, but remain at Lebanon, unless you find it necessary (which it is hoped will not be the case) to call upon it to aid in the work. Turn over the command at Bardstown to the senior officer, and give him such instructions as may seem to be necessary.

The general directs me to impress upon you the importance of the work proposed, as the supply of our troops depends upon its successful and early completion. The road must be corduroyed and, if necessary, from one end to the other, using for this purpose logs split so as to make a species of puncheon floor, and making the road not less than 16 feet wide. You are aware of the difficulties and dangers to animals in passing over a road of this nature unless it is well made, and the general therefore trusts to your judgment and experience in such matters to accomplish the object he has in view without giving you more detailed instructions. Any demands you may make for tools or appliances will be as promptly complied with as possible. General Thomas has orders to work in like manner on the Somerset end of the same road. It is hoped and presumed this duty will not occupy more than ten days, and your present assignment must be regarded as special and temporary. You will please report progress daily, if practicable, and on the completion of the work report by letter or telegraph for further orders. The general is conscious of the difficulties to be met in the task imposed upon you, but trusts to their being overcome.

Draw your supplies from Lebanon.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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BACON CREEK, January 16, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL:

The reconnaissance shall be promptly made. All roads are now equally impassable for trains, and must be built as I described. Two wagons broke down between my headquarters and the depot. I will make a wooden road tomorrow.

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

{p.557}

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JANUARY 16, 1862.

General MCCOOK, Munfordville:

Can you ascertain anything about the enemy’s position at Oakland-the order in which their troops are disposed? Make the effort.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP WOOD, January 17, 1862.

General BUELL:

My latest information was that Breckinridge’s headquarters were at Wilder’s house. His regiments were scattered along the pike. I will do my best. Bell yesterday was blowing up the turnpike below Cave City, and felling trees over old Lexington road, leading from Bell’s to Horse Well and Bear Wallow. All well and quiet.

MCCOOK.

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HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES, In Field, January 17, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

On Tuesday General McClernand moved from Fort Jefferson to near Blandville with over 6,000 men. On Wednesday his position was occupied by General Paine with a force of about 2,000, General McClernand moving with his brigade toward Milburn, Fort Jefferson and Elliott’s Mill being occupied during this time by two infantry regiments and some cavalry and artillery. The bridge at Coathe’s Mill was also guarded by one regiment.

On this day (Wednesday) I visited all the different commands except the one at Elliott’s Mill, and returned for the night to Coathe’s Mill. Written instructions were left with General McClernand to move on to Milburn, and from there send a dispatch across to General Smith (one already prepared), and to return to Blandville by route east of Mayfield Creek. This would take two days, bringing him into Blandville tonight. Reconnaissances were made by our troops to within 1 1/2 miles of Columbus and to below the town along the railroad. All was quiet, and as yet no skirmish has taken place, unless it was with General McClernand’s command, which I do not think likely to-day.

Yesterday, having my forces between me and the enemy, I made a reconnaissance of about 35 miles, taking my staff and one company of cavalry with me. I find that the Mayfield Creek is fordable at but few points from its mouth up as far as I went, and at these points the water is up to the saddle-skirts and the banks very steep.

To-day I have reconnoitered the roads south of the creek and to the Mississippi River at Puntney’s Bend. Having ridden hard during the day, and finding that I should be late returning, I sent a note to Captain Porter, of the Navy, requesting him to drop down to Puntney’s Bend and for a steamer to accompany him to bring myself and escort up to Fort Jefferson. On turning the point in sight a rebel gunboat was discovered and a cavalry force of probably 100 men on shore. I got in probably twenty minutes after the rebel cavalry had fled.

To-morrow I shall visit all points occupied by the Cairo forces and the next day commence a movement back to old quarters, unless orders {p.558} are received requiring a change. I heard from Columbus yesterday. No force has left there for some days. They were strongly apprehensive a few days ago of an attack, but thought most of the forces threatening there had gone to Mayfield.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 17, 1862.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: I have received your letter of 13th from Webb’s Cross-Roads. You will before this have received my letter of same date, sent with your messenger. I hope that letter will have determined your action. It is not sufficient to hold Zollicoffer in check; he must be captured or dispersed. I think his situation offers the opportunity of effecting the former.

If you consider your force insufficient, telegraph me from Somerset. The lines have been extended to that point. It will not be advisable to march your command to Somerset, but rather take a position in front of the enemy, so as to draw your supplies from Somerset and be in a convenient position to move down upon him.

I am assured that you can get an abundance of forage from the country in the direction of Liberty. If you can buy meal, don’t haul flour. It is necessary to subsist your command, but it is not necessary that the established ration be followed exactly. I am aware that the roads are in a horrible condition. They must be improved. The only way to do that effectually, where trains are to pass over them several times, is to corduroy or puncheon them 16 feet wide. I have given orders for this to be done on the Danville and Somerset road.

General Schoepf sends a regiment on that duty from Somerset, and General Wood, with three regiments, is to do the same from Danville. See that it is pushed forward energetically from Somerset. It ought to be completed in a few days. Take sure means of informing yourself constantly of the movements of the enemy and apprise me daily by telegraph. You could not march to Burkesville, and it is not desirable that you should be there.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, Calhoun, January 18, 1862.

J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: My entire command is now here. The Fourteenth Brigade, under Colonel Jones, and Jackson’s cavalry reached here yesterday evening.

On the 16th instant we crossed the river at Calhoun and marched to Sacramento, with all our wagons, bringing nothing but a little forage. The roads of course are bad, but we got there without accident or damage. Colonel Cruft’s command was so conducted as to occupy the town before the inhabitants were aware of the approach of troops.

{p.559}

The order to march, though dated the 10th, did not reach me until the 14th. This made me, of course, more anxious to be rapid in my movement. To do this I was forced to cross at Calhoun and march to South Carrollton, on the south side of the river. I considered this movement imprudent unless South Carrollton was first occupied. For this reason Cruft’s command was sent by the steamboats and barges, as the only expeditious way of occupying the town. I confess to great anxiety of mind when I saw over 2,000 troops crowded on the boats, and determined that, except on a great emergency, I would not start such another expedition. In the present condition of the road it would have taken me five or six days to reach this place, marching by the north side of the river.

My command is now in South Carrollton, on the south side of the river. This is, I am aware, in violation of General Buell’s order, at least the spirit of it. It is impossible to execute the order, there being no strong position on the north side of the river in the vicinity of South Carrollton.

Unless I occupied this place, 1,000 men could have stopped me from crossing at any point where there is a road by which I could march. This is a position of great strength, and my command ought to hold it against 15,000 good troops.

If I must move to the north side of the river, I will be compelled to go at least 2 miles back to find ground high enough to camp on, and it would take me two days to cross the river here if ordered to advance. I consider my command safe here. I assure you I have endeavored to obey orders, and have done so as far as practicable-obeying what I considered most important where all could not be obeyed. I could not have secured a passage across the river at or near this place by occupying any position in the vicinity of South Carrollton, on the north side of the river.

For miles around this place, on the north side of the river, the land is flat, and so low as to overflow when the river is up. If I move over and cross this flat, as I should be compelled to do, and the river should rise, I could not cross at all.

South Carrollton is situated on a hill, rising abruptly from the river, 150 feet high. There are only two ways of approaching the place from the south-one the road by which I came, through a swamp, and which could be defended by a small force; the other through a wooded country and up hill.

Captain Edwards, of the U. S. Army, doubtless known to you as an educated and accomplished soldier, fully concurs in my views as to the strength of the place. With another battery of artillery it seems to me I could hold the place until starved out, and as it is can hold it against any force the enemy can send.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP IN FIELD, January 18, 1862.

Col. JOHN COOK, Commanding U. S. Forces, Elliott’s Mill, Ky.:

You will move your command, if possible, across the creek and to Fort Jefferson, starting early to-morrow morning. If it is not practicable {p.560} to cross the creek, then move down the bottom to Puntney’s Bend and a steamboat protected by gunboat will be sent to bring you off. Send dispatch with information which route you will take.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

WM. S. HILLYER, Aide-de-Camp

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP IN THE FIELD, Near Blandville, January 18, 1862.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding Advance Forces:

The object of the expedition having been accomplished, all the forces will now be withdrawn to their former positions as expeditiously as practicable. A guard will be left at this (O’Neill’s) mill and at the bridge above until you have passed, and none of the forces will leave Fort Jefferson until your advance has arrived there. There are some supplies here for a portion of your command, and I should have been glad could you have made this point to-night. If the state of the roads, however, make it impracticable, it will make no material difference.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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JANUARY 19, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Care of General Schoepf, Somerset:

The re-enforcements ordered to you were ten pieces of artillery and De Courcy’s and Ray’s regiments. The latter has since been put under Wood’s command, to work on the road. Order it forward if necessary. One of the batteries (Mack’s regular) is following on your route. It had better be soon posted.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 19, 1862.

General E. A. PAINE, Commanding Second Brigade, Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

You will proceed to Bird’s Point as soon as practicable with a portion of your command-as much as can be taken-with their baggage, with the transportation supplied. On your arrival all citizen prisoners against whom you have no charge will be released, and all negroes who have flocked into camp will be permitted to return to their masters.

I learn from Colonel Perczel that there are many of this class now in camp who have flocked there through fear. Some discretion will have to be used in forcing these people out of camp now that they are in. I would require all, however, who have masters in camp to take their negroes with them.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.561}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Camp in Field, January 19, 1862.

Captain PORTER, U. S. N., Commanding Gunboats off Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

Colonel Cook being unable to cross Mayfield Creek, it will be necessary for him to march his command to Puntney’s Bend to embark. Will you please move down opposite that point for his protection? A steamer will follow about 10 o’clock to take the command on board.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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[JANUARY 20, 1862.-For Halleck to McClellan, referring, in connection with Missouri affairs, to operations on the Mississippi, Cumberland, and Tennessee Rivers, see Series I, Vol. VIII.]

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Camp at Callaway, Ky., January 22, 1862.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters District of Cairo, Cairo, Ill.:

SIR: Finding it would take the greater part of to-day to distribute our stores, I went up in the Lexington to have a look at Fort Henry. As the river is now 14 feet above its very low stage a week since, we took the right-hand (our right) channel of the island, just below the fort, and got about 2 1/2 miles from it, drawing a single shot from the enemy, which fell, say, half a mile short; this in response to four several shots fired at them. There were evidently from 2,000 to 3,000 men there. The appearance of the work corresponds, as far as could be discovered with the rough sketch that General Grant has seen in my quarters at Paducah. The hill on the west bank, which commands the fort some 60 feet or so, seems to be covered by a thick growth of timber. Judging by the number of roofs seen in the fort it must cover considerable space.

I think two iron-clad gunboats would make short work of Fort Henry. There is no masked battery at the foot of the island, as was supposed, or, if so, it is now under water. Two stern-wheel steamers were at the fort, but moved away rapidly at our first gun.

The Dunbar, a fast side-wheel steamer, plies up and down, and was chased last evening by the Lexington without effect. She is sail to be armed with two 12-pounder rifled guns. The commander of the Lexington thinks she has not been altered in any way.

I shall resume my march at 8 o’clock to-morrow morning, at which time the Lexington and transport Wilson will start for Paducah, carrying some sick men and the mail.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 22, 1862.

Brigadier-General GRANT, Cairo:

All additional forces sent to you will be stationed at Smithfield, {p.562} where preparations will be made for a large encampment. You have permission to visit headquarters.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., January 22, 1862.

General THOMAS:

My dispatch of yesterday advised you that you were to follow the enemy; whether that shall take you beyond Monticello must depend on your finding him embodied and the ability to supply yourself. You will have to depend very much on the country. At any rate occupy Monticello, which I want to hold.

Take a strong position to secure communication with Somerset and with the river at Jamestown, where a force has been posted to command the river. Strengthen the position at Monticello so that a brigade can hold it. Open communication with Jamestown. Establish a regiment and a battery of rifled guns with time fuses on the neck of Horse Shoe Bend,so as to command the river up and down and guard the road. Let your engineers get up a floating bridge of at least two boats there and at Somerset, and also a substantial pontoon bridge at each. Push these matters with the greatest possible energy. Put the roads in order wherever you go. Observe that you may find some of the enemy about Monticello, and it is not improbable that supplies were on the way to General Zollicoffer by land, which you may be able to capture.

Inform me what force seems to be necessary at Monticello. Study the roads thoroughly and report.

Look out for a strong position on the river to protect the route and depot near Somerset.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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DANVILLE, KY., January 22, 1862.

General THOMAS, Commanding Headquarters First Division, Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: The bearer of this note is Mr. J. B. Harned, of Paris, Ky., for whom I vouch as a worthy and loyal man, and to whom I have given this writing, that he may obtain your protection, in case he should stand in need of it, during a trip of necessary business to Somerset, a delay of some days there, and on his return.

He goes to Somerset in order to have an extensive library and other effects, now much exposed there, packed up, and, if possible, removed to this place. He goes by my direction, at the request of my friend the Rev. Dr. R. W. Landis, now in the military service of the country as chaplain to Colonel Merrill’s regiment of cavalry, in Missouri, who is the owner of the library, papers, and other effects.

I take leave, in case this note should fall into your hands, to add my congratulations to those of the whole country on the occasion of the victory you have just gained. As yet we know only that the victory is complete. Beyond that we have only innumerable rumors. None of them mention any accident to you or any of your staff. My hope, therefore, is that my son has not only behaved himself well, but {p.563} that the good fortune of being one of your victorious column is rendered complete by his passing through his fist battle unhurt.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

ROBT. J. BRECKENRIDGE.

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JANUARY 23, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

Report by mail, of which the following is synopsis:

Infantry present for duty and fit for the field, 41,563; infantry present, raw, not fit for the field, 20,393; cavalry present for duty, fit for the field, 2,549; cavalry present, raw or not organized, 5,251; artillery present for duty and fit for the field, 2,038, 108 guns; artillery present, raw or not organized, 708, 40 guns. In these statements the sick and absent are not included.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP WOOD, Munfordville, Thursday, January 23, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL:

Your man is here; goes up in morning train. Twelve thousand infantry and 1,000 cavalry left Bowling Green for Paris, Tennessee River, under Buckner and Floyd. Whole force, 40,000. Three thousand at Russellville, from Tennessee, under Harris, fortifying Nashville, Johnston and Hardee still at Bowling Green. Sixty-four pounders sent back to Nashville. Sixty-days’ men all gone home. Provisions plenty. Dying eighteen per day. No troops at Glasgow.

MCCOOK.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Somerset, Ky., January 23, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have positive information that it is almost impossible to subsist a large force at Monticello, and as the roads are now almost impassable, it would be extremely difficult to forage animals at this place for some time. I have every reason to believe that the roads leading into Tennessee are in the same condition as the one over which my division has just passed, and the enemy having passed over those roads, our chances for subsistence and forage would be but poor.

I would therefore again respectfully suggest that I may be permitted to move down the river with my troops, taking our subsistence and forage in flat-boats, and co-operate with the main army against Bowling Green.

Zollicoffer’s forces are entirely dispersed; they threw away their arms and disbanded, and should we go into East Tennessee now there would be no enemy to encounter. General Carter’s brigade might go to encourage the citizens and to take them arms and ammunition, but I do {p.564} not believe that any stronger force will be needed, especially if Middle Tennessee is threatened by my force.

Burkesville is one of the strongest positions on the river, and could be easily fortified so as to prevent all possibility of getting above. To procure forage it is necessary to send for it 15 miles, and the roads are so difficult that by the time the wagons reach here the teams have nearly consumed their loads.

I send Captain Gillem to explain verbally to you the difficulties I have to encounter and what still lies before me if I am required to advance into Tennessee.

Very respectfully,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, South Carrollton, Ky., January 24, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I am, of course, very anxious to hear from department headquarters. I am, I think, strongly posted, and could not, I believe, have crossed the river at any time since my arrival because of the great rise in the waters.

The river still continues very high, and I could not now bridge it with boats. If attacked here, I must win the fight; the low lands are so covered with water that a retreat would be very difficult.

I am informed and believe that a considerable number of troops went from Bowling Green to Riverside the day before yesterday (the 22d). They may have gone farther, but the secessionists at Greenville say they are coming here to attack me. I can’t say I expect them, but am preparing to receive them, and, if they come, hope to give them a handsome reception.

Quite a number of persons from different places in this vicinity and one from near Rochester have reported to me to-day that they had heard cannon firing all day in the direction of Bowling Green. This has greatly distressed me. If so, orders for me have miscarried. I cannot believe that I would be left here to do nothing while a battle was being fought at Bowling Green.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SOMERSET, January 24, 1862. (Received January 27, 1862.)

General D. C. BUELL, Commanding:

My scouts have returned and report the roads from this place to Monticello in an almost impassable condition. The enemy have entirely dispersed and gone to their homes. At Monticello they destroyed the carriages of four guns. General Schoepf starts to-day with his brigade for Monticello. I have left Colonel Manson, with his brigade, at enemy’s entrenched camp, collecting the public property, which will require four or five days to accomplish. The engineers have commenced on the flying {p.565} bridges at Waitsborough, and will progress with them as rapidly as possible. If I had two engines, the engineers could build two steamers in a short time. They would be of very great importance in our operations on the river.

Very respectfully,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Somerset, Ky., January 24, 1862.

Surg. D. B. CLIFF:

The general commanding the division grants you permission to accompany the remains of General Zollicoffer and Lieut. Bailie Peyton to Louisville, Ky. Transportation for this purpose will be furnished you from the quartermaster’s department. An escort of 1 sergeant and 6 men will be detailed to accompany you as far as Lebanon, Ky., and a transportation pass over the railroad to Louisville.

Upon your arrival at Louisville you will at once report in person to General D. C. Buell, commanding the Department of the Ohio, and, with his consent, can proceed to Nashville with the remains.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 25, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I returned this evening to Cairo, leaving the last of the troops from here at Fort Jefferson. They will be brought back to-morrow. The effect of the demonstration made by the troops upon the enemy cannot be positively stated, but there is but little doubt that Columbus was re-enforced, likely from Union City and Camp Beauregard. Several persons came into our lines from Columbus while we were out, and two gentlemen are in to-day from New Orleans. All agree in saying that public confidence in ultimate success is fast on the wane in the South. The expedition, if it had no other effect, served as a fine reconnaissance.

I have nothing official from General Smith but understand that Camp Beauregard was destroyed. The detachment of troops from Paducah that went up the Tennessee landed 2 1/2 miles from Fort Henry and General Smith will reach Paducah with all his force to-morrow. I will then prepare a report of the entire expedition, unless the general commanding department shall see fit to permit me to visit headquarters, as I have before desired.

I have this evening issued a circular, calling upon the company and regimental commanders for a list of river and sea-faring men of their respective commands who are willing to transfer to the gunboat service. Men are absolutely necessary before the gunboats, now nearly ready for use, can be used. I contemplate transferring such men as desire it to that service, subject to the approval of the department commander.

{p.566}

I would call the attention of the commanding general to the conduct of an association of engineers in the city of Saint Louis, who are interfering with men of their calling entering the service of the United States. Captain Porter, U. S. Navy, reports a case in point. He says that he sent to Saint Louis for an engineer for the tug Sampson. One was engaged, but, upon being informed by the association that they held a mortgage upon his property and would foreclose it if he accepted such service was forced to decline.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER, Commanding Twelfth Brigade:

GENERAL: I have ordered your brigade to return to the Cumber land Gap route.

Take four of your best regiments, and perhaps four companies of your cavalry, if it should have come up, and by a prompt movement seize and hold Cumberland Gap, fortifying yourself strongly. Bring two sections of your artillery up to support you, leaving the other section, one company of cavalry, and one regiment of infantry at your depot of supplies, which, until you are surely established, had better remain at London, and afterwards move up perhaps to Barboursville.

I need not advise you how your advance upon the Gap should be conducted. Your baggage and a few days’ provisions, protected by five or six companies of infantry, might move up to the fords, so as to be near at hand. From there your main column should move without baggage, except entrenching tools, and five days’ rations in haversacks.

Your attack should be by skirmishers on the sides of the mountains, while a strong force in reserve holds and advances on the road. These details must be determined according to the circumstances as you find them.

The great difficulty which we have to contend with is that of supplying troops operating over so long a route, with the roads as bad as they are now at this season.

You must practice the most stringent economy in every article of supplies. Haul nothing that can be procured in the country or that can possibly be dispensed with. Detail a suitable number of trustworthy and efficient officers from your command to establish depots of forage along the route, say about three between Richmond and the Gap. It will be necessary to keep small guards at these depots.

It is difficult to lay down precise rules to govern you in the position which you are expected to take. With your force alone it is hardly to be expected, unless the enemy is weaker than is probable, that you should undertake any extensive operations.

The destruction of the railroad line through Tennessee is always important, but that, if you can attempt it at all, must be done by management or the rapid movement of a small force, rather than by any movement of your main force.

As a matter of policy, if for no other reason, and in order not to excite the rebel authorities to increased persecution of the loyal people {p.567} by way of retaliation, you are to refrain from any unnecessarily harsh course towards the former. Restrain your troops from committing outrages upon persons or property, and make no arrests, unless of those who are engaged in war against your command or who are otherwise working actively against its comfort or safety.

Be vigilant, look well to the discipline and instruction of your troops, and report frequently.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SOMERSET, KY., Sunday, January 26, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL:

There are no supplies at this place. The road to Stanford will not be finished for ten days. The roads leading into Tennessee are in very bad condition. It is necessary to have the means of crossing the river, which we shall have as soon as we can get the cables from Louisville. I have sent an officer for them to-day. I have already ordered the road up the South Fork to be examined, and expect to know all about it day after to-morrow.

I have not been able to get a more complete list of the number of the killed and wounded than the one telegraphed on 21st. Hope to have it by to-morrow morning. The work of collecting together and securing the property captured Ilas prevented Colonel Manson from handing in his report. He will do so to-morrow. I will then complete and forward my report. Can I send at once all the prisoners to Louisville except the wounded and those detailed to nurse them?

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., January 26, 1862-7.30 p.m.

General THOMAS:

Start General Carter’s brigade to London, Ky., at once, with at least three days’ rations in haversacks and five in wagons. They must move as rapidly as possible, without absolutely forcing their march. Conceal the movement from your captives. Yes; forward the prisoners.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Somerset, January 26, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: The commissary reports to me that he cannot furnish General Carter’s brigade with more than two days’ rations. The subsistence stores are still behind and come in very slowly. I can forward the prisoners day after to-morrow, and probably Carter’s brigade next day.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.568}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 27, 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The natural expectation that our success at Somerset would be followed rapidly by other successful operations against the enemy makes it proper that I should state for the information of the General-in-Chief the circumstances which, I fear, must to some extent disappoint that expectation. My order to General Thomas to march and, in conjunction with General Schoepf, attack the enemy at Mill Springs was dated the 29th of last month, and General Thomas accordingly marched from Lebanon on the 1st instant. The roads were then comparatively good, and I hoped that the limited amount of transportation we had been able to get up would enable him to move promptly and accomplish his work completely in ten days. By that time I hoped also that we would have accumulated transportation enough to enable us to act vigorously upon the heels of the success which I calculated upon; but the bad weather set in the very day of his departure, and instead of ten days to accomplish the whole work it took him eighteen days to get on the ground and eight days’ hard work to make the last 40 miles.

Although I had long since, with our present organization of the quartermaster’s department, almost despaired of getting on anything like an efficient footing in the matter of transportation for the whole force, yet the result has been even worse than I expected, and the almost impassable condition of the roads has rendered double the allowance necessary. With all the means we have it has been barely possible to keep the force at Somerset from starving, and at times for several days some of them have been on half rations. The country yields but little besides corn, and that in so small a quantity, that it is with difficulty forage can be obtained for the animals. I have now four regiments engaged in corduroying the road to Somerset for a distance of some 40 miles.

Under these circumstances any advance beyond Somerset is as present impossible, though I had instructed General Thomas on going there to be prepared to move into East Tennessee or in any other direction that circumstances might require. I am making every effort to remedy this condition of things, but it is not to be concealed that the difficulties are very great. Colonel Swords has here been assiduous and anxious, but his health has not been equal to the labor, and his assistants have been totally inadequate, both in number and in experience.

The General-in-Chief is advised that in carrying out his views it was my purpose to move upon East Tennessee on two routes. The column on the Cumberland Gap route I have put in motion; the other is detained by the circumstances I have described. The first alone cannot be expected to penetrate the State, but it will at least encourage the loyal inhabitants and guard Kentucky against invasion by that route.

This is not as favorable a result of our efforts as I should like to present, but they have not been altogether without fruits, and I feel assured that the difficulty of moving large bodies of troops in the winter upon long lines of communication on common dirt roads, and through a country which affords but meager supplies, will be rightly appreciated.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.569}

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, South Carrollton, January 27, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have received information from Hopkinsville that Colonel Forrest, with his cavalry, has it in contemplation to attempt to destroy Lock No. 1 on Green River. They have destroyed all the bridges on Pond River, which would prevent any attempt on my part to cut them off, as that stream is a deep, muddy one, and only fordable in a few places at low water. At present the locks are perfectly safe, as the water is 10 feet deep on them; but should the water fall while the armies are in their present positions, they could easily effect their object before I could possibly assist the small party stationed there.

I do not think I ought to weaken my strength here by sending away permanently a strong detachment, and would most respectfully suggest that 200 or 300 men be sent from Indiana for that purpose. There are some slight fortifications there, and that number of men could defend the place against such cavalry as could be sent against them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, South Carrollton, January 27, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have heard that a large force from Bowling Green had come under Buckner to Russellville, with a view to intercept me if I advance or come here and attack me if I remain for any length of time where I am.

I am strongly posted and am making my position stronger by erecting earthworks on the heights for the protection of the men.

I should have no apprehension for the result if attacked by 15,000 men, the reported force of the enemy with which we are threatened, but shall, of course, use every exertion to become still stronger.

If I am to remain here any time a few guns in position would aid me immensely.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, January 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. T. L. CRITTENDEN, Commanding Fifth Division, South Carrollton:

SIR: It is presumed that you have before this received the general’s dispatch of the 24th [[26th] instant, directing the return of your division to Calhoun, and the general trusts that you have complied with it.

Your position at South Carrollton (being on the south side of Green River, which is impassable at this time) is a very unsafe one, and you {p.570} will lose no time in moving your command to Calhoun and placing yourself on the north side of Green River.

If you should be attacked or too seriously threatened to undertake this move with time to accomplish it, you must, of course, defend yourself to the last extremity in the strongest position you can take, and see that the enemy does not cut your line of communication at or near Calhoun. It is hoped, however, that you will move to Calhoun promptly and without interference.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, South Carrollton, January 28, 1862.

General BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of the 26th instant was received before daylight this morning, and the barges and steamboats are now being loaded with commissary stores and forage. I shall get the supplies which I have of these things to Calhoun before night I hope, and the boat back during the night. I hear of no advance of the enemy, and unless I do, will march back, as soon as I can rid myself of every incumbrance, by the road I came. It is a very bad road, but the best and much the shortest. It would be almost impossible for me to cross the river here, because of the steep and muddy banks and the high water. I shall endeavor to have every possible arrangement made to cross the wagons and troops with dispatch as soon as they arrive opposite to Calhoun.

Owing to the terrible condition of the roads between here and Calhoun I shall send my camp equipage by the boats, so as to have my wagons light as possible. I shall send down at least a regiment in the same way, with instructions to construct a bridge of the boats by the time I arrive with the troops and train, and if the current of the river is too swift for the bridge, to make the best possible arrangements for ferrying.

This evening or to-morrow morning I will send Colonel Jackson, with 500 cavalry, to Greenville, to remain there until I leave here with the column, and then march to Sacramento by the road leading from Greenville to that place.

This, I think, will certainly conceal my movement until I have actually started, and protect me on the only quarter from which I could be surprised and harassed by cavalry. I anticipate, however, no difficulty except from the roads and river, though I will prepare as well as I can for every kind of difficulty.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

N. B.-I cannot send you a telegram, because I cannot spare a boat, and the high water has obstructed the right road to Evansville. I hope this letter will reach Owensborough to-night, and, if so, it will be the quickest way in which I can communicate with you.

Respectfully,

T. L. C.

{p.571}

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CLERK’S OFFICE OF THE COURT OF APPEALS, Frankfort, Ky., January 28, 1862.

General THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: I have been waiting for some days to read your official report of the great victory obtained over the rebels by the troops under your command on the 19th instant, but I can no longer delay to present you my hearty congratulations on the glorious event, so crushing and complete.

Four States are entitled to the special credit-Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky-but your whole army has covered itself with glory.

Very truly, your most obedient servant,

LESLIE COOMBS.

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WASHINGTON, January 29, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK and Brigadier-General BUELL:

A deserter just in from the rebels says that Beauregard had not left Centreville four days ago, but that as he was going on picket he heard officers say that Beauregard was under order to go to Kentucky with fifteen regiments from the Army of the Potomac.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 30, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief of the Army, Washington:

GENERAL: I inclose herewith a copy of instructions sent this day to General Grant in relation to the expedition up the Tennessee River against Fort Henry. As Fort Henry, Dover [Fort Donelson], &c., are in Tennessee, I respectfully suggest that that State be added to this department.

General Grant has already been re-enforced with eight regiments of infantry, and several others, with three batteries of artillery, are under orders to join him. I will send down every man I can spare. Information is received to-day that Brigadier-General Price, son of the major-general, is again organizing insurgents in Howard and Chariton Counties, and that the rebels are becoming more bold since our troops have been sent south. I therefore think it unsafe to withdraw many more until the State militia can take their place. The militia dare not or will not organize in counties not occupied by our troops. To facilitate this organization it becomes necessary to scatter the volunteers over a very large tract of country. This is unfortunate, but unavoidable.

Fort Henry has a garrison of about 6,000, and is pretty strongly fortified. Possibly re-enforcements may be sent from Columbus as soon as we move. If we can reach the railroad this may be prevented, as the country roads are almost impassable.

The troops from Rolla are advancing in the direction of Springfield, but necessarily move very slowly. Greenville, south of Ironton, is occupied by our cavalry, and an infantry regiment is ordered to re-enforce them. This movement is necessary to break up the rebel organizations in the counties of Wayne and Butler.

The roads south of the Tennessee River are almost impassable. General Smith reported on his recent reconnaissance up that river {p.572} that the road was horrible, and new tracks had to be cut through the woods. It took an entire day for-one brigade to move 3 miles.”

Permanent crews for the gunboats are being rapidly organized. The mortar boats cannot be used in the Tennessee or Cumberland, and I doubt if they will ever be of much use in the Mississippi. Neither navy nor army officers have much faith in them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 30, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo:

Your letter of the 28th, in relation to Colonel Cavanaugh’s command is received. You will organize your command into brigades and divisions, or columns, precisely as you may deem best for the public service, and will from time to time change such organizations as you may deem the public service requires, without the slightest regard to political influences or to the orders and instructions you may have heretofore received. In this matter the good of the service, and not the wishes of politico-military officers, is to be consulted.

Get all the troops you can from Illinois, and organize and supply them the best you can when you get them. Don’t let any political applications about brigades and divisions trouble you a particle. All such applications and arrangements are sheer nonsense and will not be regarded.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 30, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Your telegraph respecting. Beauregard is received. General Grant and Commodore Foote will be ordered to immediately advance, and to reduce and hold Fort Henry, on the Tennessee River, and also to out the railroad between Dover and Paris. The roads are in such condition as to render all movements exceedingly slow and difficult.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 30, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army:

MY DEAR FRIEND: I inclose you an extract from a letter I have just received from an intelligent and well-informed person I have at Paducah. I believe his suggestion to be feasible at this time in whole or in part, and I don’t hesitate to urge the attempt. It should be done promptly, as the present stage of water in the rivers renders useless all the obstructions that have been placed in them.

The destruction of the bridges and the boats on the Cumberland and

{p.573}

Tennessee Rivers is an object the importance of which cannot be overrated. It is well worth the risk of losing a gunboat or so.

I have written to General Halleck on this subject, and do not hesitate to recommend it to your prompt consideration.

I have just received your dispatch about Beauregard. I will try to write to-night at length about matters here.

Very truly,

D. C. BUELL.

[Inclosure.]

General Smith reconnoitered Fort Henry. He says two of the new gunboats could go right up and shell it out in two hours. The site of the old masked battery, a few miles below, being about 14 feet under water, the gunboat (on which he was) went within long range of the main work and threw a few shells, one of which burst right over the works, to draw their fire. The fort replied with one shot, which fell far short. General Smith says there must be five acres in the work, and that it is full of houses. The force appears to be not less than 3,000, their tents showing upon the higher ground back of the fort. General S. thinks there are no works on the west side of the river, but I still incline to think there are. He suggests that two new gunboats could run the gauntlet of the fort and destroy the bridge across the river above. No doubt of it; but they might as well shell out the fort, and then tugs could go up to assist the slower gunboats in the ascent, and going to the bridge would do little good without going to Tuscumbia to take the steamboats.

It could all be done with ease on this high tide and with perfect safety. It is altogether probable that the Lexington or Conestoga (old boats) could run up in the backwater to the bridge of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, near Tuscumbia, and destroy it.

Two new gunboats, one old one, and 500 troops on one transport up Tennessee River can shell out Fort Henry, destroy the bridge, run up the river to Tuscumbia, and the troops can land and destroy two or three bridges near the river along there. The expedition would meet no opposition above Fort Henry; and if he will send two or three bomb-barges soon, they can run over the Muscle Shoals on this tide and destroy the long bridges at Decatur and Bridgeport, Ala., closing in Middle Tennessee. I believe the Conestoga or Lexington could at present run over Muscle Shoals. I believe an equal force of gunboats could clear out the Cumberland on the water of the next ten days to the point where General Thomas has possession of it. It would not be necessary for more than one new gunboat to accompany the old one on the Tennessee farther up than Fort Henry.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., January 30, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: I venture to inclose to you an extract from a letter I have received from an intelligent and well-informed person at Paducah.*

I believe his suggestions to be feasible to a considerable extent, if {p.574} not throughout, and I hope you will see enough in it to give it a prompt trial.

The destruction of the bridges on the Cumberland and Tennessee alone is an object the importance of which cannot well be overrated, and is well worth the risk of losing more than one or two gunboats.

The present condition of the rivers I believe makes it practicable at this time. It requires no unusual preparation, and should be executed promptly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

* See inclosure above.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 30, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have ordered an advance of our troops on Fort Henry and Dover. It will be made immediately.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., January 30, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Please let me know your plan and force and the time, &c.

BUELL.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 31, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Movement already ordered to take and hold Fort Henry and cut railroad between Columbus and Dover. Force about 15,000; will be re-enforced as soon as possible. Will telegraph the day of investment or attack.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, January 31, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Do you consider active co-operation essential to your success, because in that case it would be necessary for each to know what the other has to do?

It would be several days before I could seriously engage the enemy, and your operation ought not to fail.

The operation which was suggested in my letter yesterday would be an important preliminary to the next step.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

{p.575}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 31, 1862.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

On Monday next I expect to start from Smithland, Paducah, and this place some 15,000 men for Fort Henry, to take and occupy that position. Full instructions will be received from General Halleck in the morning. At the present I am only in possession of telegraphic orders to take and hold it.

If my instructions contain nothing to change the plan I would adopt, I will want a brigade from Paducah, and all the command from Smithland except the Fifty-second Illinois, and one battalion to be designated by yourself. These troops will take with them all their baggage, but no baggage train; these being left, to be taken up afterwards.

I do not regard over a squadron of cavalry being necessary for the whole command in taking the position. All that might afterwards be required can be sent from here.

The troops going from your command may take with them such rations as they have on hand at the time of starting, not less than two days’ supply, however, preparation being made here for issuing at the place of debarkation. A supply of ammunition will also be taken from here, but every regiment should take with them all they have on hand, and not less than 40 rounds.

Should I not be able to write more definitely by to-morrow’s boat, I will telegraph during the day if a change from the above is necessary. But very little preparation is necessary for this move; and, if possible, the troops and community should be kept from knowing anything of the design. I am well aware, however, that this caution is entirely unnecessary to you.

It is impossible to spare a boat just now to run exclusively between Paducah and Smithland; but until one can be sent, the steamer from here can continue her trips to the latter place upon your order as often as necessary.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, January 31, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Inclosed herewith I send you a communication from General Smith* containing the latest and most reliable information I have from the Upper Tennessee. I am quietly making preparations for a move, without as yet having created a suspicion even that a movement is to be made. Awaiting your instructions, which we expect in the morning, I have not made definite plans as to my movements, but expect to start Sunday evening, taking 15,000 men. I would move by steamer as far as practicable, taking but little cavalry and but little land transportation, expecting to forward these afterwards. I shall go in person, and take with me either General McClernand or General Smith, to command after my return. I will report from this until Saturday by telegraph.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

{p.576}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, January 31, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo:

The Twenty-fifth Indiana Infantry and three batteries leave here on steamer to-morrow morning. The Thirty-second Illinois leave Springfield to-day, and the Forty-ninth Illinois and a battalion of artillery by Sunday or Monday; all for Cairo. Keep me informed by telegram of all your movements.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, January 31, 1862.

General THOMAS:

The two regiments belong to General Carter’s command and must go with it. Inform General Carter that Humphrey Marshall proposes to winter at Whitesburg; tell him his depot at London must be fortified and the command vigilant. Has any force gone to Monticello? What word from the South Fork road, and what do you learn in regard to supplies on the route?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SOMERSET, KY., January 31, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL:

I intended to start General Schoepf’s brigade yesterday to Monticello, but the roads are in such a condition that supplies did not reach here in time. He will cross the river to-day and start to-morrow, or as soon as the weather will permit. It still continues to rain, keeping the roads as bad as ever.

The man I sent to examine the South Fork road has not yet returned. I shall need an extra regiment to guard this depot when we leave.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, January 31, 1862.

General THOMAS:

Stop the movement of General Schoepf’s brigade until further orders.

JAMES B. FRY, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Co-operation at present not essential. Fort Henry has been re-enforced, but where from I have not learned. The roads are in such horrible condition as to render movements almost impossible on land. Will write you fully my plans as soon as I get your letter of the 30th ultimo. Write me your plans, and I will try to assist you.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.577}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Commanding, Cairo:

GENERAL: You are authorized to withdraw Colonel Ross’ regiment, Seventeenth Illinois, from Cape Girardeau for the Tennessee expedition as soon as they are wanted. The remaining forces are sufficient for that place.

Your requisitions for horses, mules, wagons, &c., cannot be filled immediately. By using steamers on the river, and as the troops will not move far from their supplies and water transportation, much of the usual trains can be dispensed with for several weeks. Don’t cumber up the expedition with too large a train. The object is to move rapidly and promptly by steamers, and to reduce the place before any large re-enforcements can arrive.

Very respectfully,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I will leave here to-morrow night. Force larger than Colonel McPherson supposed could be taken by 3,000.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, February 1, 1862.

General JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding, Cairo, Ill.:

The troops of your division will be held in readiness to move by steamer to-morrow, taking with them all their camp and garrison equipage, three days’ rations and forage, and not to exceed four teams to each regiment. The necessary instructions in this regard have been given those troops not formerly of your command. One regiment of infantry and Dickey’s cavalry will be left to garrison Cairo, for want of transportation.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, February 1, 1862.

General E. A. PAINE, Commanding Bird’s Point, Mo.:

In the assignment of commanders to brigades I have placed you in immediate command of Cairo and dependencies.*

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Detailed instructions omitted.

{p.578}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, February 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

I am instructed by Brigadier-General Grant to say that the preparations for reducing Fort Henry required of you will be the same as stated in his communication of yesterday, with the exception that you will take all the available forces, including cavalry, which can be spared from Paducah and Smithland, leaving only such forces as may be absolutely necessary to hold these places against attack.

[JNO. A. RAWLINS,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, February 1, 1862.

For the temporary government the forces of this military district will be divided and commanded as follows,to wit:

The First Brigade will consist of the Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Regiments of Illinois Volunteers, Schwartz’s, and Dresser’s batteries, and Stewart’s, Dollins’, O’Harnett’s, and Carmichael’s cavalry, Col. R. J. Oglesby, senior colonel of the brigade, commanding.

The Second Brigade will consist of the Eleventh, Twentieth, Forty-fifth, and Forty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Fourth Illinois Cavalry, Taylor’s and McAllister’s artillery (the latter with four siege guns), Col. W. H. L. Wallace commanding.

The First and Second Brigades will constitute the First Division of the District of Cairo, and will be commanded by Brig. Gen. John A. McClernand.

The Third Brigade will consist of the Eighth Wisconsin, Forty-ninth Illinois, Twenty-fifth Indiana, four companies of artillery, and such troops as are yet to arrive, Brig. Gen. E. A. Paine commanding.

The Fourth Brigade will be composed of the Tenth, Sixteenth, Twenty-second, and Thirty-second Illinois, and Tenth Iowa Infantry, Houghtaling’s battery of light artillery, four companies of the Seventh and two companies of the First Illinois Cavalry, Colonel Morgan commanding.

Gen. E. A. Paine is assigned to the command of Cairo and Mound City and Colonel Morgan to the command of Bird’s Point.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Yours of the 30th ultimo is just received. At present it is only proposed to take and occupy Fort Henry and Dover [Donelson], and, if possible, cut the railroad from Columbus to Bowling Green. The roads are in such a horrible condition that troops cannot move by land. How far we may venture to send the gunboats up the river will be left for after consideration. The mortar boats are a failure; they cannot be taken up the river, and it remains to be determined whether the gunboats are worth half the money spent on them. Only a portion of {p.579} them have yet received crews. The garrison of Fort Henry at last accounts was 6,000. It may be further re-enforced from Columbus.

Keep me informed of your forces and plans, and I will endeavor to assist you as much as possible. If we take Fort Henry and concentrate all available forces there, troops must be withdrawn either from Bowling Green or Columbus to protect the railroads. If the former, you can advance; if the latter we can take New Madrid and cut off the river communication with Columbus. But it will take some time to get troops ready to advance far south of Fort Henry.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I leave at Cairo and defenses eight regiments of infantry, six companies of cavalry, two companies of artillery, and the sick of the entire command. More troops should be here soon if a change of commander is expected at Columbus.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

I think a column should move from Smithland between the rivers if the road is practicable. Nearly all your available cavalry could take that route and be supplied, at least partly, by the boats on the river. Make your force as large as possible. I will send more regiments from here in a few days.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Cairo, February 2, 1862.

On the expedition now about starting from Smithland, Paducah, Cairo, Bird’s Point, and Fort Holt the following orders will be observed:

1. No firing, except when ordered by proper authority, will be allowed.

2. Plundering and disturbing private property is positively prohibited.

3. Company officers will see that all their men are kept within camp, except when on duty.

4. Rolls will be called evening and morning and every man accounted for, and absentees reported to regimental commanders.

5. Company commanders will have special care that rations and ammunition are not wasted or destroyed by carelessness.

6. Troops will take with them three days’ rations and forage, all camp and garrison equipage, and not to exceed four teams to each regiment.

7. Regimental commanders will be held strictly accountable for the acts of their regiments, and will in turn hold company commanders accountable for the conduct of their companies.

{p.580}

Capt. W. W. Leland commissary of subsistence, is appointed chief commissary in the field.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FEBRUARY 2, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Somerset:

What now is the condition of the roads? How soon could you march and how long do you suppose it would take you to reach Knoxville Are your supplies accumulating in sufficient quantity for a start? How is the road in advance likely to be affected by the passage of successive trains? What dependence can you place in supplies along it, particularly forage? Do you hear of any organization of a force there? Where is Crittenden? Are the fugitives getting together again? What progress has been made in improving the road to Somerset? Please answer at once.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., February 3, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

The destruction of the bridges on the Tennessee and Cumberland by gunboats I believe to be feasible. The gunboats can at this stage of the water run past the batteries at night without great risk. This accomplished, the taking and holding Fort Henry and Dover [Fort Donelson] would be comparatively easy. Without that I should fear the force you name could not hold both points. It will not do to be driven away. You had best count on meeting a re-enforcement of 10,000 from Bowling Green at this time, besides what may arrive from Virginia with Beauregard, who is said to bring fifteen regiments with him. In fact 10,000 men under Buckner and Floyd left Bowling Green on the 22d ultimo to go, it was said, to Paris, though they stopped at Russellville. That may have been because your force went back. I do not hear of the Virginia re-enforcement having started yet.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 3, 1862.

ANDREW H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer, Paducah:

General Grant is authorized to furnish men for temporary gunboat duty by detail. Men will be sent from here as soon as collected. Arrange with General Grant for temporary crews, so that there may be no delay.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.581}

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PADUCAH, February 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Will be off up the Tennessee at 6 o’clock. Command, twenty-three regiments in all.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Near Fort Henry, Tenn., February 4, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

This morning the debarkation of one division, under General McClernand, took place 3 miles below Fort Henry, nearly in view of the rebel batteries. Not having sufficient transportation for all the troops, the larger portion of the steamers have to return to Paducah for the remainder of the command, under General Smith. I went up on the Essex this morning with Captain Porter, two other iron-clad boats accompanying, to ascertain the range of the rebel guns. From a point about 1 mile above the place afterwards decided on for place of debarkation several shells were thrown, some of them taking effect inside the rebel fort. This drew the enemy’s fire, all of which fell far short, except from one rifled gun, which threw a ball through the cabin of the Essex and several near it.

I expect all the troops by 10 a.m. to-morrow. Enemy are represented as having re-enforced rapidly the last few days. General L. Tilghman commands Fort Henry.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 4, 1862.

General MCCOOK, Munfordville:

Try to ascertain whether the rebels have made any preparation for defense this side of Bowling Green by throwing up works or felling trees. Learn if they are doing anything in that way around Bell’s and Bowling Green.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Somerset, Ky., February 4, 1862.

His Excellency DAVID TOD, Governor of the State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 28th of January, inclosing a copy of the resolution of thanks of the General Assembly of the State of Ohio to myself and Cols. J. A. Garfield, and R. L. McCook, together with the officers and [men] of our command, for recent victories in Kentucky over the enemies of the Union.

It will afford me the greatest pleasure to comply with the request of the General Assembly to publish the resolution of thanks to my division, and I have the honor to request that you will convey to the General Assembly the sincere thanks of the officers and men of my command, as well as myself, for the complimentary manner in which they have approved {p.582} our endeavors to reinstate the Constitution and laws over our distressed country.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, February 4, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding:

DEAR GENERAL: You will need no assurance that I was delighted at the intelligence conveyed by your letter of the 22d ultimo,* more than confirming what had been matter of rumors. During a conference with the Secretary of War the morning after I received it I read it to him. At his request I left it in his hands and he has just returned it after retaining a copy. Hence my delay in replying.

You have undoubtedly fought the great battle of the war. The country is still reverberating the shout of victory. The more we hear of the engagement the greater its magnitude appears.

I was much gratified to learn to-night from Mr. Speed, of Louisville, that you had sent Generals Schoepf and Boyle forward to Monticello with a large force, and that you were yourself actively engaged in pushing forward a column into Eastern Tennessee, for I know well enough that, winter though it is, rough as the ways are, you will not stop until Knoxville is in your possession and that line of railroad in your grip.

The advance into that region will necessarily involve some measures looking to the civil administration of the country. The mails should go simultaneously with the troops, and yet care should be taken that the rebels should not be benefited thereby. Trade, too, will naturally follow, to a limited extent at least; the Union people should as far as practicable be relieved from the inconveniences to which they have been subjected by the double rigors of external circumvallation by the Government and of domestic oppression by the secession domination, but care must be taken that it be not made a medium of contraband operations.

To look after these matters properly you might, I should think, employ with advantage some civilians, particularly some of the residents, being careful to select only persons both intelligent and reliable.

I am exceedingly anxious to be with you, but matters of great moment are just now before Congress, and seeing how partially our part of the country is represented in it, I dislike to leave.

Your own views on these matters would greatly interest me, and I beg you will favor me with them.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HORACE MAYNARD.

P. S.-Yesterday the Senate confirmed your nomination as brigadier-general.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE, Camp Buell, February 4, 1862.

Col. D. W. LINDSEY, Commanding Twenty-second Kentucky Volunteers:

You will immediately move your command to Piketon, and select some good place for a temporary camp a short distance away from the {p.583} village, and require all your officers and men to encamp in tents. Direct your surgeon to obtain some appropriate building to be used as a temporary hospital. Your regiment will act as advance guard of the brigade, which will follow you soon.

Aside from the necessary picket service I desire you to use all means in your power to obtain accurate and reliable information of the whereabouts and strength of the enemy, and particularly to ascertain what rebel forces, if any, are occupying the Sounding Gap. Report to me by return of boats the condition of the country so far as you may have found. You are strictly charged to restrain your command from all depredations on private property of citizens. There are said to be marauding bands of the enemy in that locality. Capture or disperse them. There is a large number of loyal citizens who will aid you as scouts till our cavalry can join you.

Respectfully, yours,

J. A. GARFIELD, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

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[FEBRUARY 5, 1862.-McClellan to Buell misplaced. See p. 473.]

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SAINT LOUIS, February 5, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Gunboats supplied with temporary crews and in the field. Mortar boats of no use at present. Enlistments for regular crews going on rapidly. Bombardment of Fort Henry now going on. Our troops have landed 3 miles below.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 5, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville:

Our advance column is moving up the Tennessee-twenty-three regiments. More will soon follow. Can’t you make a diversion in our favor by threatening Bowling Green?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 5, 1862.

General HALLECK:

My position does not admit of diversion. My moves must be real ones, and I shall move at once unless I am restrained by orders concerning other plans. Progress will be slow for me. Must repair the railroad as we advance. It must probably be twelve days before we can be in front of Bowling Green.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 5, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

It is reported that 10,000 men have left Bowling Green by railroad to {p.584} re-enforce Fort Henry. Can’t you send me some infantry regiments from Ohio? Answer.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., [February] 5-7 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Halleck telegraphs that report says 10,000 men left Bowling Green by railroad to re-enforce Fort Henry, and asks for regiments from Ohio. If report true, can you not assist by a demonstration in direction of Bowling Green? Communicate with Halleck and assist him if possible. Please reply.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 5, 1862-7 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Have telegraphed Buell to communicate with you, and suggested demonstration on Bowling Green. Have just moved eight regiments from Ohio into Western Virginia. Cannot well spare more thence from Buell unless absolutely necessary. Please communicate fully with Buell and with me.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, February 5, 1862-42 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I am communicating with him [Halleck]. Bowling Green is secure from any immediate apprehension of attack by being strongly fortified behind a river, by obstructions on the roads for nearly the whole distance between us (40 miles), and by the condition of the roads themselves; can only be threatened with heavy artillery. No demonstration, therefore, is practicable. I will send him a brigade.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 5, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I will re-enforce your column by a brigade from Green River if you find that you absolutely require it; otherwise I have use for it. Do I understand you are moving up the Tennessee River only? You must not fail.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 5, 1862.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER AT PADUCAH, KY., For General Grant:

Ten thousand men have left Bowling Green to re-enforce Fort Henry. Order forward all your available troops as rapidly as possible. I send {p.585} down the Fourteenth Iowa to-day, the Forty-third Illinois to-morrow, and the Second Iowa in a few days.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 5, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

The delay caused by want of transportation, and when that shall be remedied the insuperable obstacles to the advance of a suitable column into East Tennessee in the present condition of the roads, impel me to proceed at once against Bowling Green, leaving the other to be resumed when it is possible. I am unwilling to seem to swerve from the execution of your plan without advising you of the meaning of it and knowing that you will acquiesce in the necessity for it. Since I commenced this dispatch General Halleck telegraphs me: “Our advance column is moving upon the enemy. Can’t you make a diversion in our favor by threatening Bowling Green?” My position does not admit of diversion; my moves must be in earnest, and I propose to move at once. Our progress will not be rapid, for the railroad has to be repaired as we go, but we will try to make it sure. I hope General Halleck has weighed his work well. Please answer.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 5, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Indianapolis:

I want all the infantry regiments at Cairo you can possibly send me there, in order to re-enforce the column now moving up the Tennessee River. Ten thousand men have been detached from Bowling Green by railroad to re-enforce Fort Henry. Send me all the re-enforcements you can, as I wish to cut the enemy’s line before Beauregard arrives.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GEN. FIELD ORDERS, No. 1.} HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Camp in Field, near Fort Henry, Feb. 5, 1862.

The First Division, General John A. McClernand commanding, will move at 11 o’clock a.m. to-morrow, under the guidance of Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson, and take a position on the roads from Fort Henry to Fort Donelson and Dover.

It will be the special duty of this command to prevent all re-enforcements to Fort Henry or escape from it; also to be held in readiness to charge and take Fort Henry by storm promptly on receipt of orders.

Two brigades of the Second Division, General C. F. Smith commanding, will start at the same hour from the west bank of the river and take and occupy the heights commanding Fort Henry. This point will be held by so much artillery as can be made available and such other troops as in the opinion of the general commanding Second Division may be necessary for its protection.

The Third Brigade, Second Division, will advance up the east bank {p.586} of the Tennessee River as fast as it can be securely done, and be in readiness to charge upon the fort or move to the support of the First Division, as may be necessary.

All of the forces on the west bank of the river not required to hold the heights commanding Fort Henry will return to their transports, cross the river, and follow the First Division as rapidly as possible.

The west bank of the Tennessee River not having been reconnoitered, the commanding officer intrusted with taking possession of the enemy’s works there will proceed with great caution and such information as can be gathered and such guides as can be found in the time intervening before 11 o’clock to-morrow.

The troops will move with two days’ rations of bread and meat in their haversacks.

One company of the Second Division, armed with rifles, will be ordered to report to Flag-Officer Foote as sharpshooters on board the gunboats.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Camp near Fort Henry, Tenn.,Feb. 6, 1862.

A. H. Markland, esq., special U. S. mail agent, will take charge of all mail matter from and to the troops composing the present expedition, and make such arrangements as he may be authorized by the Department to make to forward the same.

All Government boats are commanded to carry all mail matter and such persons as may have charge of the same under directions of Mr. Markland, free of charge to and from all points to which said boats may be plying.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 6, 1862.

General BUELL:

Telegram received. My dispatch of last night will show that you meet my views. Draw in from Ohio and Indiana what you need. I telegraph to the Governors to aid you. I need not urge you to delay the move on East Tennessee as little as possible. I fully appreciate the obstacles. Same thing here. Communicate often.

MCCLELLAN.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 6, 1862. (Received, Washington, D. C., Feb. 6-6.30 p.m.)

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Fort Henry is largely re-enforced both from Bowling Green and Columbus. They intend to make a stand there. Unless I get more forces I may fail to take it, but the attack must help General Buell to move forward. Our troops landed 3 miles below the fort and the gunboats are bombarding it. I am sending every available man from Missouri. {p.587} I was not ready to move, but deemed best to anticipate the arrival of Beauregard’s forces.

H. W. HALLECK.

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WASHINGTON, February 6, 1862.

General BUELL:

Halleck telegraphs that Fort Henry is largely re-enforced from Columbus and Bowling Green. If road so bad in your front, had we not better throw all available force on Forts Henry and Donelson? What think you of making that the main line of operations? Answer quick.

MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, February 6, 1862.

General BUELL:

If it becomes necessary to detach largely from your command to support Grant, ought you not to go in person? Reply, and, if yes, I will inform Halleck. Your last dispatch received. What heavy artillery will you eventually need?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 6, 1862. (Received 10 p.m.)

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

If you can give me, in addition to what I have in this department, 10,000 men, I will take Fort Henry, cut the enemy’s line, and paralyze Columbus. Give me 25,000, and I will threaten Nashville and cut off railroad communication, so as to force the enemy to abandon Bowling Green without a battle.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 6, 1862-7 p.m.

General HALLECK:

Buell telegraphs roads are impassable to Bowling Green. Has sent you a brigade. I have placed nine additional regiments at his disposal to send to the Tennessee River or use himself if he can advance on Bowling Green, Buell will assist you. Is a sudden dash on Columbus practicable if Buell can send the troops? I will push Hitchcock’s case. Yours of to-day received.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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LOUISVILLE, February 6-12 p.m. (Received February 7, 1862-11.30 a.m.)

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

This whole move, right in its strategical bearing, but commenced by General Halleck without appreciation-preparative or concert-has {p.588} now become of vast magnitude. I was myself thinking of a change of the line to support it when I received your dispatch. It will have to be made in the face of 50,000 if not 60,000 men, and is hazardous. I will answer definitely in the morning.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

The enemy is concentrating his forces on Fort Henry by railroad. It is said that Beauregard arrived there last night, but without his troops. The bombardment is now going oil. The boats are in the Tennessee and the troops between that and the Cumberland. From what part of Green River can you advance a brigade to co-operate? If necessary, I can throw a column across the Cumberland to facilitate the movement.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I propose to send the brigade by water from the mouth of Green River, to form a junction with you.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 6, 1862-6.30 p.m.

General HALLECK:

Besides the brigade from Green River I can send you two regiments from Indiana and six from Ohio. Telegraph the Governor of Ohio the point at which you will have his regiments. Those from Indiana I have directed to Cairo, hearing that you want them there. Please let me know what you do. All these troops are raw, you know, and without any brigade organization. For the present I will request the Governor to arrange them in brigades, and direct the senior colonel to take command. Do you require light batteries?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 6, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL. Louisville:

Send the brigade up the Cumberland, and I will have a gunboat at Smithland to protect the transports. They can land near Dover and operate on either side, as may be required. If we can reduce Fort Henry the gunboats will proceed up the river to destroy all bridges. I am satisfied that the enemy intend to make a desperate stand at that place, and will re-enforce it from Bowling Green and Columbus.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.589}

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LOUISVILLE, February 6, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Do you say send the brigade up the Cumberland River to land near Dover? Is not the enemy in possession of the route across from Dover? Please describe Grant’s position and the enemy’s.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 6, 1862.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Somerset:

Move your division with all possible dispatch back to Lebanon. Further orders will meet you there. Leave one regiment to collect and guard the public property until relieved by one from Wood’s brigade, and then join you.

Lose no time. What amount of property and provisions is there on hand? What means have you prepared for crossing the river?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 6, 1862-7 p.m.

Gov. DAVID TOD, Columbus, Ohio:

General McClellan telegraphs me that you have six regiments subject to my call. Please arrange them in two brigades, so as to place the most capable colonel in command in each as far as relative rank will permit, and move them with all possible dispatch to such points as General Halleck may designate. They should be supplied with ammunition-at least 40 rounds.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SOMERSET, February 6, 1862-11 p.m.

General D. C. BUELL:

Have on hand nearly 100,000 rations of small stores; not more than five days of bread.

Have been able to move but little of the captured property in consequence of the heavy and continuous rains. There are four ferryboats being built, but none finished. A coal-boat is now used for crossing.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, Calhoun, February 6, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Your telegram ordering my command back to this place also directed me to have Hawkins’ brigade in readiness to move to Louisville. I suppose that you intended the Fourteenth Brigade, and wrote Hawkins instead of Jones, who is in command of this brigade.

{p.590}

The country all around is flooded and impassable. The rebels have burned all the bridges on Pond River, a small stream, but deep; fordable when the waters are low at but few places, and not now to be forded at all. Pond River empties into Green River 10 miles below this place, and runs nearly parallel with Green River from its source to its mouth.

If a rebel force should attempt to go to Henderson I could only meet them by going down the river. I am confident that no troops but cavalry would attempt to go to Henderson; but I have been notified several times that the rebel cavalry contemplated this enterprise. In my opinion a single regiment at this place is enough to protect the lock, and twenty regiments here can do no more. If it is not your design to move this column south from some point on this river at an early day, I respectfully suggest that it would be well to send a regiment to Henderson.

I am, general, impatient, of course, at the inactivity of my command, but feel nothing like the spirit of complaint. We were all cheered by the order to advance, and naturally depressed by the order to return. But although my position at South Carrollton was naturally strong and had been strengthened by some field works, yet your order for me to return was not altogether unexpected, and my judgment approved the order, unless you could have sent some re-enforcements to my command.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 7, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Fort Henry is ours. The flag of the Union is re-established on the soil of Tennessee. It will never be removed.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, February 7, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Comdg. Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General McClellan congratulates you on the success of the expedition and desires that Fort Henry be held at all hazards. Will give further instructions to-day about further movements.

A. V. COLBURN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 7, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Fort Henry will be held at all hazards. It is said that the enemy is concentrating troops by railroad to recover his lost advantage. If General Buell cannot either attack or threaten Bowling Green on {p.591} account of the roads, I think every man not required to defend Green River should be sent to the Tennessee River or Cumberland River. We can hold our ground and advance up these rivers. The enemy must abandon Bowling Green. If he does not, he is completely paralyzed. He will concentrate at Dover, Clarksville, or Paris, or fall back on Nashville. In either case Bowling Green will be of little importance. He ought to concentrate at Dover, and attempt to retake Fort Henry. It is the only way he can restore an equilibrium. We should be prepared for this. If you agree with me, send me everything you can spare from General Buell’s command or elsewhere. We must hold our ground and cut the enemy’s lines. I am sending everything I can rake and scrape together from Missouri.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY, February 7, 1862-7.15 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Dispatch received. I congratulate you upon the result of your operations. They have caused the utmost satisfaction here. I would not undertake a dash at Columbus now. Better devote everything towards turning it; first collecting a sufficient force near Forts Henry and Donelson to make success sure.

Either Buell or yourself should soon go to the scene of operations. Why not have Buell take the line of Tennessee and operate on Nashville, while your troops turn Columbus? Those two points gained, a combined movement on Memphis will be next in order. The bridges at Tuscumbia and Decatur should at all hazards be destroyed at once.

Please number telegraphic dispatches and give hour of transmittal. Thank Grant, Foote, and their commands for me.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 7, 1862.

Brigadier-General GRANT or Flag-Officer FOOTE, Fort Henry:

Push the gunboats up the river to cut the railroad bridges. Troops to sustain the gunboats can follow in transports.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 7, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Gunboats and cavalry ordered up the Tennessee River to destroy bridges. I think the enemy is collecting forces at Paris to prevent this by threatening our right flank. Paris must be taken. I am throwing in additional forces as rapidly as possible, and want all I can get. Fort Donelson will probably be taken to-morrow. Possibly a dash can be made on Columbus, but I think not. It is very strong. I shall endeavor to cut the railroad at Union City, and if possible occupy New Madrid, so as to cut off supplies by the river; but these movements {p.592} must depend upon the arrival of troops and the condition of the roads, which are now almost impassable.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Fort Henry is ours. The enemy is retreating on Paris, pursued by our cavalry. He has been compelled to abandon a part of his artillery. The gunboats will proceed up the river as far as may be safe. It is believed that the enemy is concentrating his forces at Paris, to operate on our flank. It will require every man we can get to hold him in check there, while a column is sent up the Tennessee or Cumberland or both, to destroy bridges. We are much in want of artillery. Send down as many light batteries as you can spare. General Grant expects to take Fort Donelson (at Dover) to-morrow. If troops are sent up the Cumberland they will be preceded by gunboats.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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FEBRUARY 7, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I congratulate you on your success. Considering the uncertainty of forming a junction, I ordered the brigade from Green River to go up the Tennessee. The boats start to-night to take them on board.

I have no light batteries to send you now.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Your letter of the 5th just received.* I agree with you entirely. Bowling Green must be given up if we can hold our position. The enemy will concentrate at Nashville, Clarksville, or Paris, or will attempt to regain his lost advantage at Fort Henry or Dover-I think the latter. It is all-important that we hold our position and advance toward Nashville. I fear I may not be able to do this without more troops. If from the condition of the roads you can neither threaten nor attack Bowling Green nor follow him to the Cumberland, I advise the sending of every man not necessary to sustain your line on Green River down the Ohio, to operate up the Cumberland or Tennessee. If we can bold Fort Henry and move up these rivers, you will have no further difficulty about Bowling Green. The enemy must abandon it and fall back. If he moves all his forces against me on the Tennessee I may not be able to resist him, but will do everything in my power. I have only 15,000 men at Fort Henry and Dover. I throw out these suggestions for your consideration. If you can help me still further I know you will do so.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 936.

{p.593}

SAINT LOUIS, February 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: My telegrams of to-day are so full that I have very little to add in answer to your letter of the 5th. You say you regret that we could not have consulted on this move earlier. So do I, most sincerely. I had no idea of commencing the movement before the 15th or the 20th instant till I received General McClellan’s telegram about the re-enforcement sent to Tennessee or Kentucky with Beauregard. Although not ready, I deemed it important to move instantly. I believe I was right. We must hold. Fort Henry must be held at all hazards. I am sending there every man I can get hold of, without regard to the consequences of abandoning posts in this State. If the rebels rise, I will put them down afterwards. Grant’s force is small-only 15,000. Eight thousand more are on the way to re-enforce him. If we can sustain ourselves and advance up the Cumberland or Tennessee, Bowling Green must be abandoned. I suppose the mud there, as it is here, is too deep for movements outside of railroads and rivers.

The enemy has the railroads, and we must use the rivers-at least for the present. Unfortunately our gunboats are badly disabled. They will be repaired as soon as possible. In the mean time we must push on with infantry and artillery on transports-I have no train, and most of the regiments are without means of transportation on land. I hope you will help us all you can. I deem the holding of Fort Henry of vital importance to both of us.

I write in great haste, but you will understand the purport of what I wish to express.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY, February 7, 1862-7.15 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.

Why not take the line of the Tennessee with your command and operate on Nashville, while Halleck turns Union City and Columbus?

I have directed him to destroy bridge at Decatur if possible to reach it. After carrying Nashville and Columbus a combined attack on Memphis could be made; it would easily fall if bridge at Decatur destroyed.

Call for all available troops in Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan.

Please number and give hour of transmittal of telegraphic dispatches.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 7, 1862-9 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

I cannot, on reflection, think a change of my line would be advisable. I shall want eighteen rifled siege guns and four companies of experienced gunners to man them. I hope General Grant will not require further re-enforcements. I will go, if necessary.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

{p.594}

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CAIRO, ILL., February 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Comdg. U. S. Forces on Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers:

By direction of Major-General Halleck I am here with his authority to give any necessary orders in his name to facilitate your very important operations. Do you want any more cavalry? If so, General Halleck can send you a regiment from Saint Louis. I have directed General Paine to send you, as soon as transportation can be provided, the Thirty-second and Forty-ninth Illinois and Twenty-fifth Indiana. The Fifty-seventh Illinois will be here on Wednesday, en route to join you. Several regiments are about moving from Saint Louis to add to your forces. Please ask Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson whether he wants intrenching tools or anything else I can supply.

G. W. CULLUM, Brig. Gen. Vols., U. S. Army, Chief of Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 8, 1862-9 a.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I am concentrating and preparing, but will not decide definitely yet.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 8, 1862.

To the SECRETARY OF WAR, Washington:

Brigadier-Generals Sherman, Pope, Grant, Curtis, Hurlbut, Sigel, Prentiss, and McClernand, all in this department, are of same date, and each unwilling to serve under the other. If Brig. Gen. E. A. Hitchcock could be made major-general of volunteers and assigned to this department it would, satisfy all and reconcile all differences. If it can be done there should be no delay, as an experienced officer of high rank is wanted immediately-on the Tennessee line.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis. February 8, 1862-12 m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Yours of the 7th, 8 p.m., is received. I am decidedly of opinion that if General Buell cannot move on Bowling Green, all his available forces not required to guard Green liver should be transferred to the Cumberland, to move by water on Nashville. With the enemy in force at Columbus and Bowling Green on my flanks I cannot advance on Nashville without more troops. The enemy would be certain to cut me off from my base. I shall go to Fort Henry on Monday or Tuesday. The disabled gunboats cannot be repaired for some days, giving time for the transfer of what forces can be spared from Kentucky.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.595}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 8, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have considered with due deliberation that part of your telegram of yesterday in relation to General Buell’s coming, to the Cumberland River and taking command of the expedition against Nashville. General Sherman ranks General Buell, and he is entitled to a command in that direction. I propose, with due deference to your better judgment, the following plan, as calculated to produce unity of action and to avoid any difficulties about rank and command: Create a geographical division, to be called Western Division, or any other suitable name, and to be composed of three departments, viz: Department of the Missouri, including the present Department of Kansas and the States of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, and Arkansas; Department of the Mississippi, including the remainder of the present Department of the Missouri and West Tennessee; Department of the Ohio, to be the same as at present, with the addition of East Tennessee. If we penetrate into Alabama or Mississippi, they can be assigned according to circumstances. General Buell would then retain his present command, with a small addition; General Hunter could take the new Department of the Missouri, which, I have no doubt, would be more agreeable to him than his present position; and General Hitchcock, if you can get him appointed, could take the new Department of the Mississippi. I have no desire for any larger command than I have now, but it seems to me that this would produce greater concert of action, give more satisfaction to General Hunter, and economize your labor, as all your orders for the West would then go through a single channel. Moreover, where troops of different departments act together, as they must on the Cumberland and Tennessee and on the frontiers of Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas, they would be under one general head. This would avoid any clashing of interests or difference of plans and policy.

I make these suggestions for your consideration.

If General Hitchcock cannot be appointed, General Sherman could take the Department of the Mississippi. His health is greatly improved.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 8, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Commanding Fort Henry:

If possible, destroy the bridge at Clarksville. It is of vital importance, and should be attempted at all hazards. Shovels and picks will be sent you to strengthen Fort Henry. The guns should be transferred and arranged so as to resist an attack by land. The redan on south bank should be arranged for same object. Some of the guns from Fort Holt will be sent up. Re-enforcements will reach you daily. Hold on to Fort Henry at all hazards. Impress slaves of secessionists in vicinity to work on fortifications. It is of vital importance to strengthen your position as rapidly as possible. When slaves are so impressed, they should be kept under guard and not allowed to communicate with the enemy, nor must they be allowed to escape. Where {p.596} supplies are taken from Union men, they should be paid for either in money or proper vouchers. Where taken from secessionists, they must be receipted for and duly taken up on the proper returns.

You must cut the enemy’s telegraph lines whenever you can. Keep me informed of all you do as often as you can write or telegraph.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 8, 1862.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE W. CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

A brigade sent by Buell is coming down the Ohio to report at Smithland. Order them up the Tennessee to General Grant. Shovels go down to-day for use at Fort Henry. Send up picks from Cairo; also two guns from Fort Holt. All heavy guns in Fort Henry should be transferred to land side, to resist an attack from Bowling Green or Columbus. Push on the telegraph line with all possible dispatch.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, Tenn., February 8, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Yours of yesterday’s date is received. The cavalry which General Halleck can spare from Saint Louis might be used to advantage after a while possibly as soon as they could be got ready. At present we are perfectly locked in by high water and bad roads, and prevented from acting offensively, as I should like to do. The banks are higher at the water’s edge than farther back, leaving a wide margin of low land to bridge over before anything can be done inland. The bad state of the roads will then prevent the transportation of baggage or artillery. I contemplated taking Fort Donelson to-day with infantry and cavalry alone, but all my troops may be kept busily engaged in saving what we now have from the rapidly-rising waters.

Yesterday my cavalry went to within a mile of Fort Donelson. All the enemy’s pickets were driven in, but no definite information received of the number of the enemy. The force from here, however, had all joined the force at Fort Donelson, and if any re-enforcements were on the way for this place no doubt they have been or will go there also.

All the gunboats are gone from here. Captain Phelps started with the three old boats the evening after the battle, or rather capture I should say, and will no doubt go to the head of navigation. I sent after him a transport, with some infantry, to disable the railroad bridge, but getting off some hours later than the gunboats and finding a rebel force at the bridge, they returned without accomplishing the object. I sent up yesterday the only remaining iron-clad boat, and as she has just made her appearance, I will await her report and finish.

The railroad bridge is disabled. Some commissary stores and quartermaster property were also taken.

The steamer which will carry this will leave in a very short time, so that I will not be able to send any additional report to General Halleck. I would be obliged, therefore, if you would send this, or a copy, {p.597} or such portion of it as you think might interest the general commanding the department.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 8, 1862-4.30 p.m.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I notified you that two Indiana and six Ohio regiments were subject to your call for the Tennessee River. Have you received them? Please tell me from time to time the details of Grant’s movements as much as possible, so that I may act to suit the circumstances.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, February 8, 1862.

General THOMAS:

Do not lose any time, but come on to Lebanon as promptly as possible. I may want you immediately.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

The two Indiana regiments are coming by railroad; hear nothing of the six from Ohio. Are these in addition to the brigade spoken of by you as coming down the Ohio? I hear nothing of the brigade. Grant was near Dover yesterday, the 8th; hear nothing more. Mud very deep, and movement slow.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

McPherson has reconnoitered to within 1 1/2 miles of Fort Donelson and had skirmish with pickets. High water and mud prevent transportation of Grant’s baggage and artillery. Have taken twelve field guns abandoned by rebels. Telegraph wires between Forts Henry and Donelson pulled down. Trestle from abutments of Tennessee bridge to high land destroyed, but fine bridge left uninjured. Gunboats in pursuit of rebel steamers; understand one burned to escape capture. Will send Forty-eighth Indiana, Thirty-second Illinois, and two heavy guns to-day by Empress, making five regiments sent from here.

G. W. CULLUM, Brig. Gen. Vols., U. S. Army, Chief of Staff.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

All additional stores should be sent to Paducah. The First Nebraska leave to-night; the Second Iowa will follow to-morrow night. General {p.598} McClellan gives hopes of adopting my plan entire, by sending a part of Buell’s army to the Cumberland. If so, look out fir lively times. The gunboats should be prepared for the Cumberland with all possible dispatch. Hitchcock is appointed.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 9, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

If three gunboats can be spared from Cairo and made efficient, I wish them sent up the Cumberland to Dover and Clarksville. Consult Commodore Foote and let me know when and how many can go.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I telegraphed you this morning, and find my dispatch not sent at 8 this evening. I have already consulted with Foote, anticipating your orders. He can’t send gunboats up Cumberland. Will see him again.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 9, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

No force at Commerce Point, where all contraband from Illinois is landed for rebels. Four companies of Second Illinois Artillery, 425 men and sixteen guns, sent to north of Fort Holt on high ground, it being the order of General Grant on leaving to retain them here. German recruits may have been recently distributed to regiments. Captain Rodgers, of provost-marshal’s department, reports a gang of K. G. C. at Ironton, Randolph County, Illinois. Mortar boats being experimented with. Essex will have to go to Saint Louis for repairs of boiler, &c. Forty-eighth Indiana arrived here with 900 men and but 400 arms. Have directed Colonel Buford to supply them with 500 from 600 altered Harper’s Ferry muskets he has on hand having just been supplied with Enfield rifles.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff.

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 9, 1862.

All regimental officers will immediately take up quarters with commands and not board on steamers, as the general commanding regrets to see has been done.

No officer will be allowed to go aboard any steamers except where his duty carries him.

Commanders of regiments will see that this order is properly executed.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.599}

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 5.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 9, 1862.

The pilfering and marauding disposition shown by some of the men of this command has determined the general commanding to make an example of some one, to fully show his disapprobation of such conduct. Brigade commanders, therefore, will be held accountable for the conduct of their brigades, regimental commanders for their regiments, and company commanders for their companies. If any one is found guilty of plundering or other violation of orders, if the guilty parties are not punished promptly the company officers will be at once arrested, or if they are not known the punishment will have to come upon the regimental or brigade commanders. Every offense will be traced back to a responsible party.

In an enemy’s country, where so much more could be done by a manly and humane policy to advance the cause which we all have so deeply at heart, it is astonishing that men can be found so wanton as to destroy, pillage, and burn indiscriminately, without inquiry.

This has been done but to a very limited extent in this command so far, but too much for our credit has already occurred to be allowed to pass without admonition.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FEBRUARY 10 [17], 1862-9 a.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

It is said that Beauregard is preparing to move from Columbus either on Paducah or Fort Henry. Do send me more troops. It is the crisis of the war in the West. Have you fully considered the advantage which the Cumberland affords to the enemy at Nashville? An immense number of boats have been collected, and the whole Bowling Green force can come down in a day, attack Grant in the rear, and return to Nashville before Buell can get half way there. The bridges are all destroyed and the roads rendered impassable. If Buell must move by land, why not direct him on Clarksville? I can do no more for Grant at present. I must stop the transports at Cairo to observe Beauregard. We are certainly in peril. Telegraph to General Hitchcock officially, informing him of his appointment, and assign him to duty in this department.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 10, 1862-12 m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Colonel Holt and others say that troops cannot move by land in Kentucky before well into April. If sufficient forces are sent to the Cumberland, we can by that time be in the heart of Tennessee. Give us the means and we are certain to give the enemy a telling blow.

We have just taken Poplar Bluff and Doniphan, capturing Major Jennings and 29 men of the rebel army.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.600}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 10, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Persuade Flag-Officer Foote, if possible, to send gunboats up the Cumberland. Two will answer, if he can send no more. They must precede the transports. I am straining every nerve to send troops to take Dover and Clarksville. Troops are on their way. All we want is gunboats to precede the transports. Show him this.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 10, 1862.

Flag-Officer FOOTE, Commanding Flotilla:

I have been waiting very patiently for the return of the gunboats under Commander Phelps, to go around on the Cumberland, whilst I marched my land forces across to make a simultaneous attack upon Fort Donelson. I feel that there should be no delay in this matter, and yet I do not feel justified in going without some of your gunboats to co-operate. Can you not send two boats from Cairo immediately up the Cumberland? To expedite matters, any steamers at Cairo may be taken to tow them. Should you be deficient in men, an artillery company can be detached to serve on the gunboats temporarily.

Please let me know your determination in this matter, and start as soon as you like. I will be ready to co-operate at any moment.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, February 10, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Just received your dispatch. I ordered six regiments from Ohio, two from Indiana, and the brigade (four regiments) from Green River; in all, twelve regiments. The boats for the Green River brigade left here the night of the day you called for them, and were to ascend the Tennessee River. May have been delayed a little at Green River. The Ohio regiments, it appears, did not understand your call as definite. I dispatched last night to hasten them forward. May I ask what force you leave at Paducah? It is exposed to Columbus, is it not? How many gunboats have you? It may affect my movement.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT:

If possible destroy the bridge at Clarksville. Run any risk to accomplish this. Strengthen land side of Fort Henry, and transfer guns to resist a land attack. Picks and shovels are sent. Large re-enforcements will soon join you.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.601}

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SAINT LOUIS, February 10, 1862.

General GRANT or Flag-Officer FOOTE:

Push the gunboats up the river to Cut the railroad bridges. Troops to sustain the gunboats can follow in transports.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 7.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 10, 1862.

The troops from Forts Henry and Heiman will hold themselves in readiness to move on Wednesday, the 12th instant, at as early an hour as practicable. Neither tents nor baggage will be taken, except such as the troops can carry. Brigade and regimental commanders will see that all their men are supplied with 40 rounds of ammunition in their cartridge-boxes and two days’ rations in their haversacks. Three days’ additional rations may be put in wagons to follow the expedition, but will not impede the progress of the main column.

Two regiments of infantry will remain at Fort Henry, to be designated from the First Division, and one brigade at Fort Heiman, Ky., to be designated by General Smith, commanding.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 8.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 10, 1862.

The Seventeenth, Forty-third, and Forty-ninth Regiments Illinois Volunteers, commanded by the senior colonel will form the Third Brigade, First Division, of the Army in the field.

The Fourteenth Iowa, Twenty-fifth and Fifty-second Indiana Volunteers Birge’s Sharpshooters, and one battalion Curtis’ Horse will form the Fourth Brigade, Second Division.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDNANCE DEPOT, Louisville, Ky., February 10, 1862.

General J. W. RIPLEY, Washington:

SIR: Ten thousand stand of small-arms are needed to supply the place of defective arms now in the hands of the troops in this department. Please inform me when they can be sent.

Very respectfully,

T. EDSON, Lieutenant of Ordnance.

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FEBRUARY 10, 1862-1.30 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

My ordnance officer has by my direction made frequent report of the Worthless character of certain arms sent here and the necessity for {p.602} more. Gets no answer. The muskets sent to Kentucky are unsafe and demoralize the troops. Proposed to alter them, but received no answer. Ought to be replaced at once.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 10, 1862-7 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Dispatch received. It contains the first intimation I have had of character of arms. I will take immediate steps to remedy the evil. Communicate your wants direct to me. Reports to bureaus are apt to be buried.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE, Camp Buell, February 10, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Your letters of 20th and 24th* were received on the 4th instant, and on the same day seven companies of Colonel Lindsey’s regiment, which had been left at Louisa, moved up the river to Piketon, being joined at this place by three companies already here. At my request Col. J. A. J. Lightburn, of the Fourth Virginia Regiment, stationed at Ceredo, sent two companies to Louisa to protect our stores there, allowing the whole of Colonel Lindsey’s command to move together. I have also sent the Fortieth Ohio Infantry and one company of McLaughlin’s cavalry forward to Piketon. The Forty-second Ohio and the remaining company of McLaughlin’s cavalry will move forward to-morrow.

In order to protect my flank in this forward movement I sent Lieutenant-Colonel Letcher, of the First Kentucky Cavalry, with his command, on the 31st ultimo,to West Liberty, with instructions to keep up a series of scouting expeditions in that vicinity and towards Whitesburg and Piketon, and keep me informed of all movements of the enemy in that direction, and also to suppress any uprising in Magoffin and neighboring counties.

I communicated with General Rosecrans to ascertain whether any part of his command was in position to protect my left flank, and whether he had any communication with the Ohio River. In a letter bearing date February 4 he informed me that a detachment of his force is at Raleigh, Va., and he hopes to advance his lines within the next four weeks.

I have left the Fourteenth Kentucky at this point to guard our stores. We have used every available means to bring our supplies up the river, and several hundred tons are now here.

Colonel Marshall, of the Sixteenth Kentucky, reported to me by a special messenger on the 29th ultimo. I ordered him immediately to put his command in readiness to join me. He has not yet reported himself in readiness to move.

From scouts sent out by Colonel Lindsey since he reached Piketon the report is confirmed that at least one of the Virginia regiments has {p.603} gone home. On Monday, the 3d instant, it was at Gladesville, en route for Abingdon. Part of the brigade is still in the vicinity of Whitesburg and part is supposed to be holding Pound Gap, which is reported to be strongly fortified.

There are no present indications of Marshall’s intention to regain his foothold on East Kentucky. There is a marked change in the feeling of the citizens of Sandy Valley in favor of the Government. Deserters continue to deliver themselves up in greater numbers than ever; 37 from one company of Colonel Williams’ regiment have delivered themselves up.

If we are to advance far beyond Piketon it will be imperatively necessary that we be furnished with another squad of cavalry, for, as I intimated in a former report, a part of those under my command are of but little value to the service.

To obtain possession of the Pound Gap I would again suggest the importance of giving me a battery of light howitzers.

The roads beyond Piketon are more tolerable than those this side, and artillery can be made very serviceable in that region.

Yours, truly,

J. A. GARFIELD, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

* Not found

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SAINT LOUIS, February 11, 1862.

Flag-Officer ANDREW H. FOOTE ,Cairo:

I think some of the gunboats should be sent up the Cumberland, with the least possible delay, to attack Fort Donelson. Transports will be waiting at Paducah to follow them. It is of vital importance that Fort Donelson be reduced immediately.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The gunboats Lexington, Tyler, and Conestoga, under Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, agreeably to my orders, have proceeded up the Tennessee River, and destroyed or captured all the rebel boats, broke up their camps, and made prize of their fine new gunboat. They went up as far as the river was navigable. I move up to-morrow in another direction.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 11, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM and Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo:

Push forward the Cumberland expedition with all possible dispatch. In addition to the land forces at Paducah and on their way from Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, I shall send one regiment from here on Thursday, one on Friday, and one on Saturday. Push ahead boldly {p.604} and quickly. I will give you plenty of support in a few days Time now is everything for us. Don’t delay one instant.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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FORT HENRY (via CAIRO), February 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Every effort will be put forth to have Clarksville within a few days. There are no negroes in this part of the country to work on fortifications.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 11, 1862.

Flag-Officer ANDREW H. FOOTE, Cairo:

You have gained great distinction by your capture of Fort Henry. Everybody recognizes your services. Make your name famous in history by the capture of Fort Donelson and Clarksville. The taking of these places is a military necessity. Delays add strength to them more than to us. Act quickly, even though only half ready. Troops will soon be ready to support you.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I am ready with three gunboats to proceed up the Cumberland River, and shall leave here for that purpose in two hours-8.30 p.m.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 11, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

One armored gunboat gone from Tennessee to Cumberland and three unarmored to follow. Three armored leave here to-night instead of Thursday for same destination. All the enemy’s boats on Tennessee destroyed, camps broken up, and a fine new rebel gunboat captured. General Paine returned. Has secured store-houses at Paducah.

G. W. CULLUM, Brig. Gen. Vols., U. S. Army, Chief of Staff.

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CAIRO, February 11, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Is General Grant strong enough and quite ready for the Cumberland and Donelson movement? Position is said to be strong, and we should be strong enough to be very certain of success. The news from Lieutenant {p.605} Phelps in Tennessee is cheering. Victory seems to crown all our efforts.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Three or four gunboats will be ready to ascend the Cumberland by the last of the week and more can soon follow. Get no advices from those up the Tennessee to destroy bridges. Have stopped all transports at Paducah to go up the Cumberland. Paducah is perfectly safe. Can’t you come with all your available forces and command the column up the Cumberland? I shall go to the Tennessee this week.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 9.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 11, 1862.

The following changes and additions are made to present brigade organizations:

The Thirty-second Illinois Volunteers will be added to the Third Brigade, First Division; the Fifty-second Indiana will be transferred to Third Brigade, Second Division; and Seventh Iowa from the Third Brigade, Second Division, to the Fourth Brigade, Second Division.

The Second Iowa Regiment will be attached to this brigade immediately upon arrival.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, February 11, 1862.

The troops designated in General Field Orders, No. 7, will move tomorrow, as rapidly as possible, in the following order:

One brigade of the First Division will move by the Telegraph road directly upon Fort Donelson, halting for further orders at a distance of 2 miles from the fort. The other brigades of the First Division will move by the Dover or Ridge road, and halt at the same distance from the fort, and throw out troops so as to form a continuous line between the two wings.

The two brigades of the Second Division now at Fort Henry will follow as rapidly as practicable by the Dover road, and will be followed by the troops from Fort Heiman as fast as they can be ferried across the river.

One brigade of the Second Division should be thrown into Dover to cut off all retreat by the river, if found practicable to do so.

The force of the enemy being so variously reported it is impossible to give exact details of attack, but the necessary orders will be given on the field.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.606}

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SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Henry, Tenn., February 11, 1862.

...

2. Brig. Gen. L. Wallace, having been designated to remain behind during the expedition against Fort Donelson, will assume command of all the forces at Fort Heiman and Fort Henry. He will encamp all troops arriving to the best advantage for self-defense.

...

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FEBRUARY 11, 1862.

General WOOD, Lebanon:

Trains will be in readiness to transport your division (Twentieth and Twenty-first Brigades) to Bacon Creek, as follows: 10 o’clock a.m., tomorrow (the 12th), two regiments, baggage and train; 3 o’clock a.m. (the 14th), three regiments, &c.; 11 o’clock a.m. (the 13th), two regiments, &c.; total, seven regiments.

The utmost punctuality and order must be observed. The baggage must be on the wagons, ready to be rolled at once on the cars. Under no circumstances must the baggage be thrown on loose, and the cars must be released as soon as they reach their destination.

Encamp your division at Bacon Creek until further orders, and be always ready to move at a moment’s notice.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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ORDNANCE OFFICE, Washington, February 11, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

SIR: Your telegram to General McClellan of the 10th instant has been referred to this office. In answer I have to state that on Lieutenant Edson’s requisition of November 24, 1861, 10,000 small-arms of the kind designated at Army Headquarters (Austrian rifle muskets) were ordered to be sent to you. These were represented to be good arms. On receipt of information from Lieutenant Edson that they were defective in the cone-seats and required new ones, which he could have fixed to them, he was authorized to have the alteration made. On a recent requisition for 5,000 revolvers and 5,000 carbines the whole of the pistols were ordered, and as many of the carbines as were on hand or could possibly be obtained were ordered to be sent to Louisville, to be followed by the residue of the 5,000 as soon as possible. Although we have out contracts and orders for a large number of carbines, their deliveries are not sufficient to meet the many calls for this kind of arm, and all that can possibly be done is to supply them as fast as received. Those purchased in Europe to meet immediate demands (by Mr. Schuyler) have turned out unserviceable.

All the muskets made at Springfield Armory are ordered to be sent here as fast as finished, and requisitions for other places can only be {p.607} filled by arms not made by the Government, of the best kind and quality it is possible to procure by purchase or contract. This Department is desirous of filling all requisitions with the best supplies, and has used and is using all the means within its control to do so. Such supplies are not always to be had on any terms or by any exertions to procure them as rapidly as they are called for.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. W. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 12, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Cairo:

I am re-enforcing General Grant as rapidly as possible. A large force is coming down the Ohio. Where can I communicate with you by letter to-night or to-morrow?

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., February 12, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I shall determine on my ultimate movements the moment I have something in regard to your position on the Tennessee River. In the mean time I am advancing in some force on Bowling Green, and preparing the rest of my force for either alternative. It seems to me you cannot well direct your re-enforcements up the Cumberland River. Is it certain that they can form a junction by that route? They certainly can by the other.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 12, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Gunboats have destroyed everything on the Tennessee to Florence in Alabama. They could not get past the Muscle Shoals. Expedition started up the Cumberland last night, led by three gunboats, under Commodore Foote. It is reported that 40,000 rebels are at Dover and Clarksville. If so, they have all come from Bowling Green. If you conclude to land the column on the Cumberland, come at once, with your spare forces.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 12, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Your dispatches just received. Will move on the line of the Cumberland River or Tennessee River, but it will take ten days at least to effect the transfer of my troops. They are moving now as fast as possible to the railroad. Why is it necessary to use the Cumberland? {p.608} Where are the re-enforcements to land, where form a junction, and by whom are they commanded? Have you any map of the ground? If so, please send it to me.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 12, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

General Grant has invested Fort Donelson on the land side, but he cannot transport his siege artillery from Fort Henry. Half of the country is under water. Sending the forces around by the Cumberland was a military necessity. There was some risk, but it could not be avoided. We must make the attack before the enemy has time to strengthen their works and increase the armament.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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NAVY DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 12, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to subjoin a telegraphic dispatch from Flag-Officer Foote, from the tenor of which you will perceive that the matter demands immediate attention.

I am, with high respect, your obedient servant,

G. V. FOX, Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

CAIRO, ILL., February 11.

I trust that the 600 sea-faring men will immediately be sent to us. I am off again to-night with other gunboats, and have to transfer the men again, which causes the greatest dissatisfaction among them, and 30 have run from one steamer to avoid transfer. We suffer for want of men.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 12, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT:

Like yourself, I am most too busy to write a word. I am now sending everything up the Cumberland by General Halleck’s direction. Flag-Officer Foote left at 9 last night with three armored gunboats, and must now be on the way to Fort Donelson, which, with their aid, I hope to hear you have taken in a few days, and the backbone of secession broken. I am sending re-enforcements up very fast. Let me know your wants. I will write Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson in a short time.

G. W. CULLUM.

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FEBRUARY, 13-7.15 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

How many batteries have you fully equipped and ready for the field? What number of cavalry, armed, equipped, and mounted? How many infantry?

{p.609}

Watch Fort Donelson closely. I am not too certain as to the result there.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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NEAR FORT DONELSON, February 13, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Send all troops to arrive to Fort Henry. They can be transferred here, if required, and there is now appearance that that point is in danger. One gunboat should be there.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, ETC., February [13th or 14th], 1862.

MARKLAND, Special Mail Agent:

Send the mail steamers as soon as possible after receiving this.

All is well here, but we have a powerful force [in front of us]. Johnson, Buckner, Floyd, and Pillow are all said to be here.

U. S. GRANT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 13, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

General W. T. Sherman is assigned to the command at Paducah. One regiment and battery leave here to-day and two more will follow immediately. They will touch at Cairo and Paducah. Stop them, if you fear an attack and want them.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 13, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville:

The attack will be made on Fort Donelson to-day by the joint land and naval forces, or if not to-day certainly to-morrow. Would it not be possible to make a cavalry demonstration on Bowling Green? A mere feint might help. I have no maps other than the general ones in book-stores. Why not come down and take the immediate command of the Cumberland column yourself? If so, I will transfer Sherman and Grant to the Tennessee column.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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FEBRUARY 13, 1862.

Colonel BRUCE, Commanding Brigade, Bardstown:

March for Louisville with all the effective men of your brigade tomorrow morning. You must reach here early on Sunday without fail. {p.610}

Your brigade must have 100 rounds ammunition. If you have not got it, make requisition and send an officer ahead to see to it.

Inform Colonel Lytle of this. Report.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, February 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. WILLIAM NELSON, Commanding Division:

GENERAL: The force under your command will consist of the two brigades of your division now with you, three field batteries, embarking here, and a brigade from Green River, under General Crittenden. The transports for the latter will start down this evening, and take the brigade on board to-morrow. I will instruct him to proceed at once to Smithland, if he is ready before you pass, and there await your arrival, unless he should receive instructions to push forward. The same instructions will be given to the batteries that embark here.

Ammunition and supplies for ten days are being put on board here. A regular quartermaster will accompany them and report to you. Keep your transports in company, move with the least possible delay, and inquire at Smithland for instructions for your further movements, in regard to which I have telegraphed General Halleck. If you meet no instructions there, proceed up the Cumberland to the point of debarkation of the other troops, near Fort Donelson, and report to the officer in command.

It is unnecessary to suggest to you to keep boats of the same regiment and brigade together, so that your debarkation may be conducted without confusion.

Another brigade of General Crittenden’s division is already there. If circumstances will permit, ask to have it reunited under your command. If you pass Smithland before General Crittenden, leave instructions there for him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding Department.

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BELL’S TAVERN, KY., February 13, 1862-3.20 p.m.

General BUELL:

The Third Division, in compliance with your orders, commenced its march this morning, and at 7 a.m. the advance guard, consisting of Colonel Turchin’s brigade, Kennett’s cavalry, and Loomis’ battery, had passed the bridge at Rowlett’s Station. The cavalry are already in advance of this place, and the head of the column of infantry and artillery is just in sight. We camp in this vicinity to-night, and resume the march in the early morning.

The enemy burned the station and platform last night, and all agree that Hindman and all other troops have passed Barren River, and many assert that Bowling Green has been evacuated. The tunnel has not been injured; the months north and south are blocked with heavy stones and the rails are torn up. The repairs can be easily made with a {p.611} proper force in a single week, and I think and hope it wilt be commenced immediately. We can neither repair the railroad nor the telegraph line until we shall make a halt of some days. The Engineers and Mechanics have been of the greatest service in clearing fallen timbers from the road. It is now in good condition, and we have met with almost no delay. I send back in the morning supply trains to Green River. Our troops commence their march with songs and shouts, and while I am writing I hear the band of the advance column.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 13, 1862-11 p.m.

General O. M. MITCHEL, On the march:

I have just received your dispatch, and am gratified, but not surprised, at the spirit with which your troops advance. Be watchful, and be sure of what is ahead and on your flanks. Make good use of your cavalry. The railroad company will commence repairs to-morrow. It may not be advisable to continue them farther than to the tunnel, until it is certain that they might not be as useful against you as for you in some turn of events, which you would have to guard against.

The work on the telegraph will also be commenced to-morrow. The workmen will require protection. Wood will have his division at Munfordville to-morrow. My instructions mentioned Dripping Springs as the point to which you might advance for the purpose of discovering the movements of the enemy, but that is by no means obligatory on you, if you see cause to stop short of that. It is not intended nor is it advisable that you should be greatly exposed in the present stage of the plan of operations which I have in view.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., February 14, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington ton, D. C.:

Twenty-two light batteries in the field; five light batteries in preparation for the field; two siege batteries, eight pieces, in preparation for the field. Two companies of regular cavalry, aggregate 88, arrived from Leavenworth yesterday, armed, equipped, and mounted. No other cavalry in the department completely armed, equipped, and mounted. Carbines received yesterday for one regiment; nine other regiments are mounted and partially armed; three of them under tolerable discipline, the other six raw and uninstructed. Pistols and carbines are wanted for nearly all. Forty-three thousand three hundred infantry fit for the field and for duty. Seventy-one thousand infantry for duty armed, but raw and uninstructed, though actually in the field.

D. C. BUELL, Major-General.

{p.612}

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SAINT LOUIS, February 14, 1862-5 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

We have at Cairo and moving south twelve batteries and about sixty guns. Some are without horses, and can be used only in field works at present. Send me all you can. Can’t you spare some troops from the Potomac? I am not strong enough if the enemy concentrates on me.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF TEE ARMY, February 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

Please inform me as soon as possible what re-enforcements have been sent from your command in Kentucky to the expeditions up the Cumberland and Tennessee; also what have been sent by you from other States. Ten thousand muskets have been ordered to Columbus, Ohio.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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LOUISVILLE, February 14, 1862-6 p.m. (Received 4 a.m. February 15.)

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

I have sent one brigade from Kentucky and eight regiments from Ohio and Indiana. I have made preparation and start myself on Monday with two divisions, but intelligence from them or from my advance towards Bowling Green in the mean time may affect that matter.

General Grant cannot any longer be in danger. From what I have heard within three days, he must have some 30,000 men. The only apprehension I have now is for his gunboats. My advance will be within 15 miles or less of Bowling Green to-night, which was as far as I meant it should go, except for reconnaissance, until matters were closed up a little in the rear; but General Mitchel has information which may carry him farther and affect my movements.

General Halleck telegraphs me that General Grant would attack yesterday or to-day. There is not more than 10 feet in the Cumberland River now. It will take two months or more to prepare the gunboat; by that time I hope the navigation of these rivers or the Ohio River will no longer require that sort of protection; but it is best to be prepared. I believe such boats will be more efficient every way.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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FORT HENRY, February 14 [12], 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

We start this morning for Fort Donelson in heavy force. Four regiments from Buell’s command and two from Saint Louis arrived last night and were sent around by water. I hope to send you a dispatch from Fort Donelson to-morrow.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

{p.613}

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NEAR FORT DONELSON, TENN., February 14, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK, Comdg. Department of the Missouri, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: Five gunboats and twelve transports arrived this morning and will materially strengthen us. The enemy have been receiving heavy re-enforcements every night since the investment commenced. They are now all driven inside their outer works, which, however, cover an extensive area. It was impossible, in consequence of the high water and deep sloughs, to throw a force in above Dover to cut off their re-enforcements. Any force sent for such a-purpose would be entirely away from support from the main body.

Last night was very severe upon the troops. At dusk it commenced raining, and in a short time turned cold and changed to snow and sleet. This morning the thermometer indicated 200 below freezing.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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NEAR FORT DONELSON, February 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Floyd arrived at Donelson to-day with 4,000 men. Generals Johnson, Buckner, Floyd, and Pillow are said to be there. I have but one gunboat to-day. We have had considerable skirmishing, Losing some 10 or 12 killed and about 120 wounded. Rebel loss probably much heavier. I am hourly looking for more gunboats and re-enforcements.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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NEAR DONELSON, February 14, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Our troops now invest the works at Fort Donelson. The enemy have been driven into their works at every point. A heavy abatis all around prevents carrying the works by storm at present. I feel every confidence of success and the best feeling prevails among the men.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, In Field, near Fort Donelson, February 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo, ill.:

I hope you will direct Captain Turnley to forward the transportation belonging to the troops here as rapidly as possible. It is now almost impossible to get supplies from the landing to where our troops are. We will soon want ammunition for our 10 and 20 pounder Parrott guns, and already require it for the 24-pounder howitzers. I have directed my ordnance officer to keep a constant watch upon the supply of ammunition, and to take steps in time to avoid a deficiency.

Appearances indicate now that we will have a protracted siege here. The ground is very broken, and the fallen timber extending far out {p.614} from the breastworks, I fear the result of an attempt to carry the place by storm with raw troops. I feel great confidence, however, of ultimately reducing the place.

As yet I have had no batteries thrown up, hoping with the aid of the gunboats to obviate the necessity. The present high water has prevented my extending the right to the river.

Colonel Webster is now making a reconnaissance with a view of sending a force above the town of Dover to occupy the river bank.

Please inform General Halleck of the substance of this.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 14, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

Sherman is assigned to command of District of Cairo and Grant to command of District of West Tennessee.* Arm the Forty-eighth Indiana and let them take the field, reprimanding Lieutenant-Colonel Henry, of the mortar boats. Stop all improper telegrams. Get rid of lame ducks the best way you can. A fine battery leaves here this afternoon. Six hundred sailors are on their way from New York by railroad. Keep Lieutenant Lyford.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* By General Orders, No. 37, of same date. See Series I, Vol. VIII, p. 555.

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HEADQUARTERS OF TEE ARMY, Washington, February 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: I have just received your gratifying dispatch that our forces occupy Springfield, and am in hourly expectation of having similar news in regard to Fort Donelson. Your proposition in regard to the formation of a Western Division has one fatal obstacle, viz, that the proposed commander of the new Department of Missouri ranks you. I would be glad to hear from you in detail as to the troops from your department now in the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers.

Do you learn anything as to Beauregard’s whereabouts and what troops (if any) he took with him?

What disposition do you intend to make of Hitchcock? If you do not go in person to the Tennessee and Cumberland, I shall probably write Buell to take the line of the Tennessee, so far as Nashville is concerned. If his advance on Bowling Green must be done, it may well be necessary to throw a large portion of the troops up the Tennessee, in which case he is entitled to their command.

Burnside has been very successful. All seems to go well.

Very truly, yours,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

{p.615}

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FEBRUARY 14, 1862.

General MCCOOK, on the march:

Halt where you are. Mitchel’s report from the front indicates that we may be saved our trouble. He says Hindman has destroyed the railroad bridge and told some one the turnpike bridge was to be destroyed last night. Be ready to move in either direction, and ascertain where your transports are.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Forward to General McCook by special messenger in all haste.

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OPPOSITE BOWLING GREEN, February 14, 1862-12 m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

Learning by our scouts this morning that there was a chance to save the turnpike bridge, we have moved forward the advance guards at forced marches. We are a little late to save the bridge; it was burned this morning about daylight. We are now shelling the enemy at the depot, where the locomotives, with steam on, are distinctly visible with our glasses. We hope to prevent the enemy from removing their supplies, which are said to be very abundant. Our engineers and mechanics will soon enable us to cross the river, which we will do promptly so soon as the enemy are driven out. We will then commence work on the railroad and telegraph line.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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LEBANON, February 14, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Want of trains is delaying the movement in a most unlooked-for, uncontrollable manner. Regiments have been waiting at the depot for nearly twenty-four hours. Must delay occur by such detention for the want of arrangements in the meeting-of trains en route? One train with troops of my division was detained two hours at the Junction. Four regiments have gone and the fifth is embarking and will get off, I trust, in a short time. Railway agent says it will be impossible to have transportation ready for remaining two regiments before to-morrow morning. Movement will be conducted as rapidly as transportation is ready.

TH. J. WOOD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., February 14 [?], 1862.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington:

The following is the force in the whole of the late Department of the Ohio, as nearly as can be ascertained at present:

{p.616}

Ninety-two regiments infantry, 60,882 for duty; 79,334 aggregate, present and absent.

Eleven regiments, one battalion, and seven detached companies cavalry, 9,222 for duty; 11,496 aggregate, present and absent.

Twenty-eight field and two siege batteries, 3,368 for duty; 3,953 aggregate, present and absent.

The above figures include battalions of the Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Regular Infantry and two companies of Regular Cavalry. Will report more particularly by letter.

The data are found in great detail in last departmental return, except that eight regiments were detached for operations against Fort Donelson, and have not been returned.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

LOUISVILLE, February 15, 1862-12.15 a.m. [?].

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Mitchel’s division, by a forced march, reached the river at Bowling Green to-day and is making a bridge to cross. The enemy burned the bridge at 1 o’clock in the morning and were evacuating the place when he arrived.

D. O. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Everything looks well. Grant says we can keep them in till mortar boats arrive, Commodore Foote will immediately return from Cairo with two more gunboats. Troops are moving very rapidly to Fort Donelson.

H. W. HALLECK.

–––

Saint Louis, February 15, 1862-11 a.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I have no definite plan beyond the taking of Fort Donelson and Clarksville. Subsequent movements must depend upon those of the enemy. He is undoubtedly evacuating Bowling Green, but whether to fall back on Nashville or to concentrate on me is uncertain. I have only about 30,000 men in the field but am pushing forward re-enforcements as rapidly as possible. The siege and bombardment of Fort Donelson are progressing satisfactorily.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862-4 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Garrison of Fort Donelson is 30,000. Enemy has completely evacuated Bowling Green, and is concentrating on the Cumberland. I must have more troops. It is a military necessity.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.617}

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WASHINGTON, February 15, 1862-8 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Have telegraphed to Buell to help you by advancing beyond Bowling Green on Nashville; or, if that be too slow, via Cumberland.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862-8 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

General Buell telegraphs that he purposes to move from Bowling Green on Nashville. This is bad strategy. Moreover, the roads are very muddy and all the bridges destroyed. His forces should come and help me to take Fort Donelson and Clarksville and move on Florence Ala., cutting the railroad at Decatur. Nashville would then be abandoned, precisely as Bowling Green has been, without a blow.

With troops in mass on the right points the enemy must retire, and Tennessee will be freed, as Kentucky has been; but I have not forces enough to make this new strategic move and at the same time observe Columbus. Give me the forces required, and I will insure complete success. Price is still in retreat, with General Curtis in pursuit.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

–––

FEBRUARY 15-10 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Buell will move in force on Nashville as rapidly as circumstances will permit. If Grant’s position renders it absolutely necessary Buell will re-enforce him with three brigades and three batteries to-morrow, but I think them better employed in the direct advance upon Nashville.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

WASHINGTON, February 15-11 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Yours of 8 p.m. received. Your idea is in some respects good. But if Buell can rapidly advance on Nashville he will take it and cut off the enemy who are near Fort Donelson, if they do not retreat immediately. His advance in force beyond Bowling Green will at once relieve Grant. His orders are to re-enforce Grant if he cannot reach Nashville in time. The immediate possession of Nashville is very important. It can best be gained by the movement I have directed. The possession of Decatur will not necessarily cause the rebels to evacuate Nashville; you must also threaten to occupy Stevenson to accomplish that. I do not see that Buell’s movement is bad strategy, for it will relieve the pressure upon Grant and lead to results of the first importance. If the destruction of the railroad is so extensive as to make the operation impracticable or very difficult and slow, I have provided for the alternative in my instructions to Buell. Enable Grant to hold his own, and I will see that Buell relieves him. The Decatur movement and one on Memphis are the next steps in my programme.

{p.618}

I am arranging to talk with Buell and yourself over the wires to-morrow morning, and would be glad to have you at the telegraph office when all is ready. Buell will also be in Louisville office, and we can come to a full understanding.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

CAMP NEAR FORT DONELSON, February 15, 1862.

ANDREW H. FOOTE, Commanding Officer Gunboat Flotilla:

If all the gunboats that can will immediately make their appearance to the enemy it may secure us a victory. Otherwise all may be defeated. A terrible conflict ensued in my absence, which has demoralized a portion of my command, and I think the enemy is much more so. If the gunboats do not show themselves, it will reassure the enemy and still further demoralize our troops. I must order a charge to save appearances. I do not expect the gunboats to go into action, but to make appearance and throw a few shells at long range.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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PADUCAH, February 15, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Arrived at Paducah. All quiet. Nothing on the road from Blandville or Mayfield. Nothing new from the Cumberland or Tennessee. I don’t think the mortar boats can be brought upstream; the current is too strong. Left Lyford last night hard at work, but making no progress. I think General Tilghman and prisoners had better be sent to Cairo and there offered terms. If officers elect to go on parol to Cincinnati, they could go by rail.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 15, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Paducah, Ky.:

Send up regiment from Smithland, leaving a guard for stores, &c. Use your discretion about one from Paducah. One regiment and two batteries leave here to-morrow. If troops can reach Grant sooner, turn them all up the Tennessee. Consult him on this immediately. I am hurrying off re-enforcements with all possible dispatch. Telegrams about movements should be in cipher.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Camp near Fort Donelson, February 15, 1862.

General LEW. WALLACE, Commanding Fort Henry, Tenn.:

Send a company of cavalry on one of the transports up the Tennessee River to destroy railroad bridges, the position of which will be indicated {p.619} by Captain Gwin, commander of gunboat Tyler. Charge the officer of the company sent that the district of country into which they are going is strongly Union, and they should be on their good behavior, and disprove the lying reports made against our forces by the secessionists.

I hope to hear a good report from this expedition, not only of the favorable impression made, but work done.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, ill.:

General Halleck telegraphs me that you are assigned to the new Military District of West Tennessee, and General W. T. Sherman to relieve you of the charge of this. Another quartermaster will be sent to you in a few days to relieve Captain Baxter.

Capt. W. W. Leland, assistant commissary of subsistence, was ordered by me on the 13th instant to report to you for duty in the field without a moment’s delay. Go on as you have commenced in your glorious work. I expect to learn to-morrow that Fort Donelson is ours and the center of the enemy’s line is broken and their right and left isolated and in retreat, leaving no hostile foot on the soil of Kentucky. You are in the great strategic line. The telegraphic line is completed and in working order to Smithland, and is being rapidly pushed on to your headquarters.

Tell Lieutenant-Colonel McPherson that his engineers should strengthen the land defenses at Fort Henry and remove his heavy guns there. I have sent two 32-pounders from Fort Holt.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General, and Chief of Staff.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Commanding District of West Tennessee:

Glad to have your encouraging letter of yesterday, which I will forward to General Halleck. Don’t be rash; for, having the place completely invested, you can afford to have a little patience. I have ordered all the transportation I can lay my hands upon. The ammunition you want is not here nor scarce any ordnance stores of any kind. I have sent an urgent telegram to General Halleck. You must not keep the steamers I send up to you, or I’ll be deprived of all means of supplying you with troops, ammunition, forage, food, &c. Every boat I have taken and am crowding everything, but there are no steamers now disposable.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General, Chief Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

I advised you that I was preparing to go to the Cumberland or Tennessee as a main line-of-operations, and I should have-embarked tomorrow {p.620} with two divisions. The evacuation of Bowling Green leaving the way open to Nashville makes it proper to resume my original plan. I shall advance on Nashville with all the speed lean. Three brigades, however, and three batteries, under General Nelson, will embark for the Cumberland to-morrow. I shall recall him if I find Grant is not in danger. General Thomas passes through Lebanon for the advance today, and Wood’s, a raw division, reaches Green River to-day. Both of these are moving from the Somerset line. McCook will be at Bowling Green day after to-morrow, unless inability to supply him until the railroad is repaired compels him to stop. Carter is at London yet, getting ready to advance. Garfield, by my direction, is resuming his pursuit of Marshall to Whitesburg. Will write to-night.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 15, 1862-8 p.m.

Brigadier-General, BUELL, Louisville:

Halleck telegraphs 30,000 rebels in Fort Donelson, and that they are concentrating on the Cumberland; does not say where. He asks for more troops. Can you push on Nashville or Clarksville by way of Bowling Green in time to help him? If not, how soon can you re-enforce Grant? The advance on Nashville appears most decisive. Answer. Communicate with Halleck.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 15-10 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Yours of to-day received. The movement on Nashville is exactly right. If Grant’s safety renders it absolutely necessary, of course re-enforce him as you propose. But the great object is the occupation of Nashville. If that is gained, or even when your advance from Bowling Green is well marked, they will abandon Donelson, if the way is open for it. Do you need more rolling stock on the railroad and how much?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 15, 1862-12 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

It will take a week to repair the road to Bowling Green. No formidable advance can be made until that is done; but I expect my demonstration at an advance to weaken their hold on Clarksville and Donelson unless they can drive Halleck out absolutely, and if they can do it at all they can do it without any great delay. I cannot get as definite information from him as I would like. He must have at least 30,000 men. The division I am sending, which will be there Wednesday, will add 10,000. Is it possible that will not be sufficient? If not, what will be? We need rolling stock greatly. I will ascertain how much. I will try to use Green River for getting present supplies.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

{p.621}

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LOUISVILLE, February 15, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Our advance reached the river in front of Bowling Green yesterday. The enemy burned the turnpike bridge at 1 o’clock yesterday morning and evacuated the place. Our troops are building a bridge to cross. I had made arrangements to operate up the Cumberland, and would have had two divisions at the river to embark to-morrow and Monday, but this evacuation of Bowling Green makes it proper to resume my original line on Nashville. The only question now is as to General Grant’s safety. If he can hold his position a few days the main force of the enemy must fall back from there to protect Nashville. Can he do that? What sort of a position has he and what force? What officers are with him? Are there gunboats on both rivers to protect him? Please answer immediately. It will be several days before I can advance in force beyond Bowling Green, but I shall order a brigade forward as soon as we can cross.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

The forces from Bowling Green are concentrating at Clarksville. The garrison of Fort Donelson is estimated at 30,000. Unless I can have more assistance the attack may fail. The place is completely invested and four sorties have been repulsed. If possible send me more aid. No more troops can be sent from Cairo without danger from Columbus. The gunboats are all at Fort Donelson, but we find great difficulty in getting up the mortar boats against the current.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 15, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

One division (twelve regiments and three batteries), under General Nelson, embark for the Cumberland to-morrow. I should have embarked myself at the same time with two divisions, to make the Cumberland a line of operations, but the evacuation of Bowling Green by the enemy and our own occupation of it yesterday make it proper to direct my whole force through that point.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

Your telegram about division relieves me greatly. To move from Bowling Green on Nashville is not good strategy. Come and help me take and hold Fort Donelson and Clarksville and move to Florence, cutting the railroad at Decatur and Nashville must be abandoned precisely as Bowling Green has been. All we want is troops in mass. {p.622} Come on the right points, and the enemy is defeated with scarcely a blow; but I have not forces enough to make this new strategic move and at the same time observe Columbus. Come and help me, and all will be right. We can clear Tennessee as we have cleared Kentucky.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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FEBRUARY 15, 1862-5.30 p.m.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Dispatch received. Steamers leave here this evening to take a brigade on board at Green River, under command of General Crittenden. To-morrow two brigades and three field batteries will embark 25 miles below here, the whole under the command of General Nelson. Have them instructed at Smithland which river to ascend and where to land.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF TEE ARMY, February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: The General-in-Chief directs me to inform you that within the past three weeks 5,517 revolvers have been sent to you, together with about 2,000 carbines. Yesterday 10,000 Austrian rifles were sent to the Governor of Ohio. To-day 4,000 single-barreled pistols, 5,000 sabers, 16,000 Prussian muskets, and 5,000 Springfield muskets (as fast as they are manufactured) have been ordered to be sent to you. More goods arms of all kinds will be sent as fast as they are manufactured.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. V. COLBURN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. T. L. CRITTENDEN, Commanding Division:

GENERAL: My telegraphic instructions will have advised you that you are to embark the effective force of the brigade (four regiments of infantry) now with you for service near Fort Donelson, under the command of General Nelson. Do so as rapidly as possible, and then proceed to Smithland and await the arrival of General Nelson if he should not have preceded you, unless you receive other orders from General Halleck or the officer in command near Fort Donelson.

General Nelson will ask to have the two brigades of your division reunited, if the circumstances will permit, on your arrival.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding Department.

{p.623}

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FEBRUARY 15, 1862-3 p.m.

General MCCOOK, Munfordville:

Try to be at Bowling Green day after to-morrow, leaving whatever assistance may be required for the railroad and telegraph people. Take the whole of your supply train and keep it going. If you cannot keep up your supplies you may stop at the Dripping Springs; leave your batteries at the break in the road, where they can be easier foraged until it is repaired. The three batteries of Nelson’s division leave with Wood’s division at Munfordville.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 15, 1862.

General NELSON, Elizabethtown:

Move rapidly to the month of Salt River, so as to embark for the Cumberland to-morrow. Take no wagons except your baggage train. Send all others to Munfordville. Your ammunition train will be made up and put on board here, as well as three batteries. If any batteries or other troops are on the road order them back to Munfordville, and report by telegraph what they are, and as well as in regard to your movements.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 15, 1862.

General THOMAS, Lebanon:

The railroad cannot transport you as rapidly as is necessary; therefore march your whole division, via Bardstown and New Haven, to Green River, so as to get across to the line of the railroad at Munfordville, then forward to Bowling Green. Move as light as possible, replenishing your supplies at Bardstown and New Haven. Take all the quartermaster’s train you can with you. Start to-day, and move rapidly. Send forward your quartermaster to procure forage on the road.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF TEE OHIO, Lebanon, Ky., February 15, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Colonel Landram reports to me that all the public property at Mill Springs, except some tobacco, clothing, and wagons, has been removed. I have directed him to send the clothing and tobacco to Somerset and store them subject to your order. I made an arrangement with Mr. A. R. West to collect the wagons and hold them subject to your order.

Colonel Landram asks authority to sell them to the citizens of the adjoining counties, and I have directed him to write you on the subject. {p.624} The wagons are of but little use to us and might probably be sold to advantage there. He wishes orders also as to his remaining at Mill Springs with his regiment. He reports that it will be impossible to subsist his regiment there, owing to the condition of the roads and want of transportation, and asks permission to return to Somerset as soon as all the property is removed.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington, February 16, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

You have Fort Donelson safe, unless Grant shall be overwhelmed from outside; to prevent which latter will, I think, require all the vigilance, energy and skill of yourself and Buell, acting in full co-operation. Columbus will not get at Grant, but the force from Bowling Green will. They hold the railroad from Bowling Green to within a few miles of Fort Donelson, with the bridge at Clarksville undisturbed. It is unsafe to rely that they will not dare to expose Nashville to Buell. A small part of their force can retire slowly towards Nashville, breaking up the railroad as they go, and keep Buell out of that city twenty days. Meantime Nashville will be abundantly defended by forces from all South and perhaps from here at Manassas. Could not a cavalry force from General Thomas on the Upper Cumberland dash across, almost unresisted, and cut the railroad at or near Knoxville, Tenn.? In the midst of a bombardment at Fort Donelson, why could not a gunboat run up and destroy the bridge at Clarksville? Our success or failure at Fort Donelson is vastly important, and I beg you to put your soul in the effort. I send a copy of this to Buell.

A. LINCOLN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 16, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

I am perfectly confident that if Buell moves from Bowling Green on Nashville we shall regret it. Think of it before you approve. I am certain that if you were here you would agree with me. If I had any doubts I would not insist. Fort Donelson and Clarksville are the key-points. Since the evacuation of Bowling Green the importance of Nashville has ceased.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., February 16, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

Hard fighting at Fort Donelson on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. At 5 p.m. yesterday we carried the upper fort, where the Union flag was flying last night. Telegraph line will reach Fort Henry on Tuesday. I am still decidedly of the opinion that Buell should not advance on Nashville, but come to the Cumberland with his available forces, {p.625} united to Grant we can take and hold Fort Donelson and Clarksville, and by another central movement cut off both Columbus and Nashville. Until Columbus is cut off we must retain large forces at Cairo Bird’s Point, Paducah, and Fort Henry. This is too great a loss of force on our side.

Commander Foote cannot return for some days. Four gunboats badly disabled. We have been obliged to break up two artillery companies for the gunboats and mortar boats. Have had no communication from Grant for three days, and cannot give the number of troops that have joined him. It is almost impossible to get the mortar boats up the river; they move very slowly. Can’t expect much more aid from the Navy for several days. The mass of the force from Bowling Green are at Fort Donelson and threatening us from Clarksville.

I am also guarding Danville to prevent re-enforcements from Columbus. Have constructed a battery above Fort Donelson on the river to cut off communication with Clarksville and Nashville.

Unless we can take Fort Donelson very soon we shall have the whole force of the enemy on us. Fort Donelson is the turning point of the war, and we must take it at whatever sacrifice. Our men are in excellent spirits and fight bravely.

H. W. HALLECK.

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WASHINGTON, February 16, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Your dispatch received. Not too long. I appreciate your difficulties. Have heard that upper battery at Donelson is taken by our forces. Should Donelson fall, you will move on Nashville by either route which may at the time be quickest. A part of the column moving from Bowling Green towards Nashville might relieve Donelson, but the direct move on Nashville is the most important.

MCCLELLAN.

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FORT DONELSON (via SMITHLAND), February 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK:

We have taken Fort Donelson and from 12,000 to 15,000 prisoners, including Generals Buckner and Bushrod [R.] Johnson; also about 20,000 stand of arms, 48 pieces of artillery, 17 heavy guns, from 2,000 to 4,000 horses, and large quantities of commissary stores.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 13.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Donelson, February 16, 1862.

The Second Division will occupy the right of the works, including Fort Donelson, and will be located to the best advantage for defense and comfort. General Smith, commanding the division, will designate the place for each brigade.

The First Division will occupy grounds at the south end of the works, and will be located by Brig. Gen. John A. McClernand, commanding. {p.626}

All public property will be collected and turned over to Capt. A. S. Baxter, assistant quartermaster.

Pillaging and appropriating public property to private purposes is positively prohibited. Officers are particularly enjoined to see to the enforcement of this order.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS, No. 10.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CAIRO, Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 16, 1862.

1. In order to secure the glorious victory acquired by our arms and to perpetuate it, the general commanding deems it highly important that the utmost vigilance should be observed to guard all points captured. It is ordered, therefore, that General L. Wallace return to Fort Henry, Tenn., with two brigades of his command and Willard’s and Bulliss’ batteries. Curtis’ Horse is attached to the command of General Wallace.

2. Generals McClernand and Smith will each detail from their respective commands 100 men as extra-duty men, to report at once to Capt. A. S. Baxter, assistant quartermaster, for the purpose of collecting and preserving the public property captured at Fort Donelson.

3. All prisoners taken at the surrender of Fort Donelson will be collected as rapidly as practicable near the village of Dover, under their respective company and regimental commanders, or in such manner as may be deemed best by Brig. Gen. S. B. Buckner, and will receive two days’ rations, preparatory to embarking for Cairo. Prisoners are to be allowed their clothing, blankets, and such private property as may be carried about their person, and commissioned officers will be allowed their side-arms.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Washington, [February 16 (?), 1862].

BUELL:

If I can send you motive power and cars to Bowling Green by way of Green River, can you not at once advance on Nashville in force without waiting for repairs of road? Time is now everything. If Nashville is open the men could carry their small rations and bread, driving meat on the hoof. Leave tents and all baggage. If you can occupy Nashville at once it will end the war in Tennessee.

MCCLELLAN.

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FEBRUARY 16, 1862-11 a.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Give me in detail your situation and that of the enemy. Whither did he go from Bowling Green?

I wish the position of things in full.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

{p.627}

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FEBRUARY 16, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

My dispatch of yesterday gives in detail the position of my troops.* You will observe that they are converging on Bowling Green, preparatory to an advance on Nashville. I hope to facilitate our progress materially by throwing boats above the broken lock while the river is up, which by transshipment will enable us to get many of our supplies that way, and give us that as well as the railroad.

Boats will start up to-day. The last of the enemy’s forces are supposed to have gone to Nashville from Bowling Green. I had no report from Mitchel last night. Will soon have the wires up to him.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See p. 619.

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FEBRUARY 16, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

I have no definite information in regard to Grant’s position-Halleck only states that he has completely invested the fort-nor do I know his force. My estimate is that he has at least 30,000. The division I am starting to-day and to-morrow will add 10,000 and three field batteries. I have repeatedly inquired of Halleck for the very information you ask for, but with little or no success.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP WOOD, Munfordville, February 16, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL:

A dispatch just in from General Mitchel, dated Bowling Green, February 16, 4.30 a.m. He has now five infantry and one cavalry regiments in Bowling Green. He asks me to forward forage and subsistence. He also recommends a strong and immediate demonstration upon Nashville. I send this at Mitchel’s request. Can you not have one of the passenger trains taken off the railroad and send the locomotive here to work. We cannot get any of the engineers of the road to do anything here, and have great reason to doubt the loyalty of some. I will work a regiment per day on the railroad and push matters with all possible haste. The railroad is all right below Bell’s.

MCCOOK.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 17, 1862-10 a.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

It is said that Beauregard is preparing to move from Columbus either on Paducah or Fort Henry. Do send me more troops. It is the crisis of the war in the West. Have you fully considered the advantage which the Cumberland River affords to the enemy at Nashville? An immense number of boats have been collected, and the whole Bowling Green force can come down in a day, attack Grant in the rear, and {p.628} return to Nashville before Buell can get half way there. The bridges are all destroyed and the roads rendered impassable. If Buell must move by land, why not direct him on Clarksville? I can do no more for Grant at present. I must stop the transports at Cairo to observe Beauregard. We are certainly in peril. Telegraph to General Hitchcock, officially informing him of his appointment, and assign him to duty in this department.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 17-10.30 a.m.

Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Saint Louis:

Please consult Buell about removing engines and cars from Kentucky Central to the Nashville Railway. He has my plans. Better at once have cars and engines altered for five-foot gauge.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 17, 1862-10.30 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Please give me your reasons more fully for objecting to Buell’s plan. Give facts on which your opinion is based.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 17, 1862-1 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Make Buell, Grant and Pope major-generals of volunteers and give me command in the West. I ask this in return for Forts Henry and Donelson.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis February 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

Stop all forces required to resist Beauregard.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February -, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, ill.:

Find contrabands, and put them at work to pay for food and clothing. I can get no communication with Buell.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.629}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 17, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Paducah, Ky.:

All troops from Kentucky will be sent up the Cumberland. All others will be stopped at Paducah to await further orders. Watch Beauregard’s movements from Columbus and report by telegram your forces at Paducah; also report all you can stop there. I am not satisfied with present success. We must now prepare for a still more important movement You will not be forgotten in this.

R. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 17, 1862.

By virtue of directions from Headquarters Department of the Missouri, dated February 15, 1862, the undersigned has been assigned to the command of the new Military District of West Tennessee; limits not defined.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 17, 1862.

The general commanding takes great pleasure in congratulating the troops of this command for the triumph over rebellion gained by their valor on the 13th, 14th, and 15th instant.

For four successive nights, without shelter, during the most inclement weather known in this latitude, they faced an enemy in large force in a position chosen by himself. Though strongly fortified by nature, all the safeguards suggested by science were added. Without a murmur this was borne, prepared at all times to receive an attack, and with continuous skirmishing by day, resulting ultimately in forcing the enemy to surrender without conditions.

The victory achieved is not only great in breaking down rebellion, but has secured the greatest number of prisoners of war ever taken in one battle on this continent.

Fort Donelson will hereafter be marked in capitals on the maps of our united country, and the men who fought the battle will live in the memory of a grateful people.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, February 17, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

I think it will be necessary to issue some of the Tennessee arms. We require them immediately. For what purpose are the 10,000 stand of arms sent to Columbus [Ohio]?

D. C. BUELL.

{p.630}

–––

FEBRUARY 17-7.30 a.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville:

To arm ten Ohio regiments reported without arms. Make the best use you can of the arms you have. I have ordered 3,500 first-rate rifled arms to you at once, 16000 good Prussian smooth bores, and the next 5,000 made at Springfield.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

–––

LOUISVILLE, February 17, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

As the object of the re-enforcements I have been sending you was to assist at Fort Donelson and succor the force there if necessary and as they are no longer required for that object, we had best consult about further operations, as well for the great object as to determine the disposition to be made of the re-enforcements, which, if they have not gone beyond reach, I have thought it advisable to stop until we understand each other. The object of both our forces is, directly or indirectly, to strike at the power of the rebellion in its most vital point within our field. Nashville appears clearly, I think, to be that point. Now, on your side, Clarksville intervenes. It will probably be pretty strongly fortified towards you, but mainly on this side of the river. It has not heretofore had any defenses on the south side, but it may be expected that at least a strong bridge-head will be thrown up on that side and perhaps even somewhat extensive works, as the railroad bridge affords them the means of communication, though not a very secure one.

My impression is that the place could be easily invested on that side, so as to cut off their river communication and without risk of the investing force being disturbed in the rear, the country in that direction being broken and the roads bad. They would still have, however, the railroad via Hadensville and Springfield on the north side. That route is exposed to my attack, and whenever I advance against it, either at Clarksville, Nashville, or any other point, they must fall back, unless succored by a force through Nashville that I cannot beat. It is to be observed also that I should be exposed to a combined resistance both from such a force and most of the Clarksville force, which would not be in great danger from your side of the river.

There can be no doubt that heavy re-enforcements will be thrown into Nashville from all quarters east and south. These considerations seem to require a large force on my line, which in fact is one on which a large force can be employed; the reverse of the case on your side. The difficulty on this side is one of transportation, and it is a very serious one. To depend on wagons at this season for a large force seems out of the question, and I fear it may be two weeks before I can get a bridge over the Barren River, so as to use the railroad beyond. I shall endeavor, however, to make an advance in less or much force before that time. According to this view of the problem, I have thought it would be best for my troops to return. Let me hear your views.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.631}

–––

BOWLING GREEN, February 17, 1862-2 a.m.

General D. C. BUELL:

Our scouts have returned this evening, bringing intelligence that the town of Franklin is now clear of the enemy. They are pushing on for Nashville.

A company of Kennett’s cavalry advanced upon the turnpike 2 1/2 miles beyond Woodburn, and learned the above facts. Two regiments of the Nineteenth Brigade are now encamped in Bowling Green, having carried on their shoulders their baggage and camp equipage across the river over a temporary foot bridge, constructed upon the ruins of the railroad bridge. They will move forward to-morrow, transporting their baggage upon platform cars on the railroad. The Second Ohio Regiment, Colonel Harris, which was ordered to remain at Bell’s, was directed to-day to join the brigade. We are now-11 o’clock p.m.-calking a flat-boat sufficiently large to take over our artillery. It will be used as a ferry-boat. We are also building a floating bridge, but as the current is very swift, I have doubts of its success. The enemy cut down large timber across the road to the ford; a fact we discovered this evening. After completing the ferry we will clean out these obstructions and start another ferry at the ford, using the large flat-boat at the mill.

I hope by Tuesday morning to have passed the entire division, with its baggage, across the river, and intend to throw forward a brigade on the Russellville road, one on the turnpike, and one on the Nashville road some 10 miles from Bowling Green, and within supporting distance of each other. We have no hay, and there is none at Munfordville. We are obtaining a sufficient supply of corn from the country. I ventured to suggest Bowling Green was strongly fortified. There are two lines of natural defenses, which, if properly occupied, will render the position exceedingly strong.

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 17, 1862-8.15 p.m.

General CRITTENDEN, Calhoun: (Care of quartermaster, Evansville; to be forwarded in haste.)

Suspend your movement until further orders, but keep ready to embark, and report by telegraph the position of your command. Detain the boats until you hear further from me.

Is Green River in such a stage that boats can pass over the dams, and have boats started for Bowling Green?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 18, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

You could not have received my telegram of yesterday, No. 20,* when yours was sent. That gives my reasons for wishing General Buell to move on Clarksville. They are not changed by the taking of Fort Donelson.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See p. 627.

{p.632}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 18, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Can’t you march on Clarksville and then go up the river to Nashville? We ought to be nearer together, so that we can assist each other. Had the enemy thrown his forces rapidly down the river he could have crushed me at Fort Donelson, and have returned to Nashville before you could have reached that place.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 18, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I have received one dispatch from you of this date, but I infer that it was not written in answer to mine of last night, and therefore wait to hear further from you on the subject. I have telegraphed General Nelson to stop at Smithland until I hear from you. I agree with you as to the importance of our getting nearer each other. The difficulty in marching on Clarksville from Bowling Green is that the road is a common mud one and at this time impassable. That objection might be overcome if I could move light, with the certainty of meeting supplies at a point on the river; as, for example, if the enemy should retire from Clarksville, so that I could find you there. What do you think, if I can get away, of our meeting at Smithland personally, and going up to Grant to study the ground?

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 18, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

To remove all questions as to rank, I have asked the President to make you a major-general. Come down to the Cumberland and take command. The battle of the West is to be fought in that vicinity. You should be in it as the ranking general in immediate command. Don’t hesitate. Come to Clarksville as rapidly as possible. Say that you will come, and I will have everything there for you. Beauregard threatens to attack either Cairo or Paducah. I must be ready for him. Don’t stop any troops ordered down the Ohio. We want them all. You shall have them back in a few days. Assistant Secretary of War Scott left here this afternoon to confer with you. He knows my plans and necessities. I am terribly hard pushed. Help me and I will help you. Hunter has acted nobly, generously, bravely. Without his aid I should have failed before Fort Donelson. Honor to him. We came within an ace of being defeated. If the fragments which I sent down had not reached there on Saturday we should have gone in. A retreat at one time seemed almost inevitable. All right now. Help me to carry it out. Talk freely with Scott. It is evident to me that you and McClellan did not at last accounts appreciate the strait I have been in. I am certain you will when you understand it all. Help me, I beg of {p.633} you. Throw all your troops in the direction of the Cumberland. Don’t stop any one ordered here. You will not regret it. There will be no battle at Nashville.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 18, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Act in my name, and assume command over any and all. A large force passed Memphis four days ago-fifteen steamers, loaded with troops, to re-enforce Columbus. Look out for an attack on Cairo or Paducah. Get ready immediately. Use my name in any order you issue. We must be ready for them. I am collecting and sending every man I can find.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 18, 1862.

Brigadier-General GRANT, in the Field:

Don’t let gunboats go higher up than Clarksville. Even there they must limit their operations to the destruction of the bridge and railroad, and return immediately to Cairo, leaving one at Fort Donelson. Mortar boats to be sent back to Cairo as soon as possible.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

General Sherman will send this to General Grant with all possible dispatch.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 18, 1862.

All commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates are prohibited from entering the town of Dover or any houses therein situated without permission in writing of their regimental commanders.

All captured property belongs to the Government, and no officer, noncommissioned officer, or private will be permitted to have or retain possession of captured property of any kind.

Any officer violating the above order will be at once arrested. Any non-commissioned officer or private will be arrested and confined in the guard-house, and all captured property taken from them and turned over to the district quartermaster.

Colonel Leggett is hereby appointed to see to the strict enforcement of the above, using his whole command for that purpose, if necessary.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 18, 1862.

Hereafter, until otherwise ordered, guard duty will be performed as follows:

All the outer guard duty will be performed by the First and Second

{p.634}

Divisions and Colonel McArthur’s brigade, which for the present will be attached for orders to the Second Division.

The First Division will guard all roads and passes into the intrenchments from the river above Dover to the road leading west to Fort Henry.

The Second Division, with the brigades attached, will guard from the Fort Henry road to the river below the fort, and furnish the guard for the fort.

The Fourth Division, now organizing, will furnish all other guards, such as for the commissary and quartermaster stores at steamboat landing, hospitals, &c.

Brig. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut will have special charge of the interior police regulations of the camps inside of the grounds occupied by the other division.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 18, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

General O. M. Mitchel reports from Bowling Green yesterday as follows:

We have reliable information that the enemy has fallen back from Clarksville and was concentrating heavy force at Nashville, and justifying the railroad engineers’ reports that four days since a fleet of fifteen boats passed Memphis, ascending the river.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP JOHN Q. ADAMS, February 18, 1862.

General D. C. Buell:

With incredible labor, in rain and mud, our ferries, two in number, have been established, our roads are completed, our trains and artillery are in motion. I hope to accomplish the crossing of the entire baggage trains, with the artillery, to-day. Forty wagon loads of supplies, giving us two days’ rations, will be up this morning. One hundred and twenty additional teams will arrive during to-day, and to-morrow I shall advance the head of the column some 20 miles, leaving this position to be occupied by McCook.

My ammunition, requiring 30 wagons for its transportation, is stored at Green River, under a guard, and I hope may be brought forward by rail. Our cartridge boxes and limber-chests are full.

I learn from reliable-source that no enemy can be found short of Clarksville, and very few are there.

I shall await your orders with anxiety as to the final direction you will give my column. Our troops have been worked up to their highest endurance by rapid marches, outpost and fatigue duty, and the rest of a day or two awaiting orders will be of great service.

The turnpike bridge should be rebuilt at the earliest possible moment. I find that our ferry-boats are not to be relied upon for the passage of an army. I have neither time nor material for constructing a better mode of crossing. I trust the railroad and telegraph line will soon be {p.635} in working order. Colonel Smith, of the Thirteenth Ohio, reports the locomotive on the track, which-was struck by one of our shells, can be repaired in a single day. One or two others I hope may be found worth repairing.

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 19, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

I have seen message to General Buell. Do you mean that his whole command should go from Bowling Green to Clarksville, or that the general in person should go to the Cumberland and take command of forces now there, his own column from Bowling Green to co-operate with Cumberland column, in such manner as he (Buell) may decide, to clear out the Cumberland, including Nashville? Answer definitely the points as stated in this message. The general desires to meet your views fully. Answer immediately.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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LOUISVILLE, February 19, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

I have arranged to transfer from other roads 9 large engines and 250 cars. Will provide others as needed. Railroad bridge across the Tennessee destroyed by fire. Communication by rail between Columbus and Nashville is entirely destroyed. Buell immediately needs re-enforcements. Will they come?

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 19, 1862.

N. B. BAKER, Des Moines, Iowa:

The Second Iowa Infantry proved themselves the bravest of the brave. They had the honor of heading the column which entered Fort Donelson.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL:

Assistant Secretary Scott will explain to you all my views. I will meet you anywhere you may appoint.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

Re-enforcements have reached Columbus and steamers have fired up for a move against us. Don’t stop any of your troops coming down, {p.636} but send them on as rapidly as possible. They are bound to attack us somewhere from Columbus. Show this to Scott.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

All troops at Smithland or on the Ohio River should come to Paducah or Cairo, as you may deem best. I have authority of Secretary of War for this. If necessary, countermand, in the name of Secretary of War, all orders issued by General Buell or any one else about the troops halting or returning to Kentucky.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 19, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

Look out for Columbus. Send down boat to reconnoiter. Hold all troops ready for an attack on Paducah or Cairo. Fifteen steamers loaded with troops from New Orleans have reached Columbus.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. DAVID HUNTER, Commanding Department of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth:

To you more than to any other man out of this department are we indebted for our success at Fort Donelson. In my strait for troops to re-enforce General Grant I appealed to you. You responded nobly and generously, placing your forces at my disposition. This enabled us to win the victory. Receive my most heartfelt thanks.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

–––

SAINT LOUIS, MO., February 19, 1862-4 p.m.

General MCCLELLAN:

Yours of the 14th just received. Hitchcock will take command here as soon as he gets his orders. I think Hunter will consent to go under me and command the central column. If not, leave him where he is. It was decided in the Mexican war that regulars ranked volunteers, without regard to dates. This decision, if sustained, makes everything right for the Western Division. Give it to me, and I will split secession in twain in one month.

H. W. HALLECK.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., February 19, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

Columbus has been strongly re-enforced from New Orleans. They have steam up on all their boats ready for a move-probably on Cairo.

{p.637}

This will render it necessary for me to withdraw a part of my force from Forts Henry and Donelson. Do send me more troops. I have sent every organized regiment from Saint Louis. This place is virtually without a garrison. Buell cannot move on Nashville for two or three weeks. Let him help me, and we will cut the line between Columbus and -* and paralyze both places.

H. W. HALLECK.

* Illegible cipher word; probably standing for Nashville.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, February 19, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Brig. Gen. Charles F. Smith, by his coolness and bravery at Fort Donelson when the battle was against us, turned the tide and carried the enemy’s outworks. Make him a major-general. You can’t get a better one. Honor him for this victory and the whole country will applaud.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 19, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Louisville, Ky.:

Have just heard that the railroad bridge at Decatur across the Tennessee is destroyed. Communication between Columbus and Nashville is thus cut off. If General Buell will come down and help me with all possible haste we can end the war in the West in less than a month.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 19, 1862.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Paducah:

Don’t let any troops go north to Kentucky, but hurry them down to Paducah and Cairo. Look out sharp for a movement from Columbus.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 19, 1862.

General G. W. CULLUM, Chief of Staff, Department of the Missouri:

GENERAL: Clarksville is evacuated, and I shall take possession on Friday next, with one division, under General Smith. If it is the desire of the general commanding department, I can have Nashville on Saturday week. To do this I will have to retain transportation as it arrives. Please inform me early of the desire of the general commanding on this point-at as early a day as possible.

As soon as I got possession of Fort Donelson I commenced sending the sick and wounded to Paducah, as seems to have been the desire of {p.638} General Halleck. No distinction has been made between Federal and Confederate sick and wounded. Generally the prisoners have been treated with great kindness, and I believe they appreciate it. Great numbers of Union people have come in to see us, and express great hope for the future. They say secessionists are in great trepidation-some leaving the country, others expressing anxiety to be assured that they will not be molested if they will come in and take the oath.

The amount of supplies captured here is very large-sufficient probably, for twenty days for all my army. Some articles will be deficient, such as coffee. Of rice I don’t know that we will want any more during the war. I think I will send you the tail of the elephant to-night or in the morning at furthest.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 19, 1862.

General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding District of Cairo, Paducah, Ky.:

Send all re-enforcements up the Cumberland. I shall occupy Clarksville on Friday and Nashville Saturday week, if it meets the approval of General Halleck. I have written him to that effect.

I feel under many obligations to you for the kind tone of your letter,* and hope that, should an opportunity occur, you will win for yourself the promotion which you are kind enough to say belongs to me. I care nothing for promotion so long as our arms are successful and no political appointments are made.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 19, 1862.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding Second Division:

Hold your command in readiness to take possession of Clarksville and garrison it. I would suggest the propriety of appointing some lieutenant to act as division quartermaster and one to act as division commissary. Ten days’ rations should be taken to issue after arrival, besides what the troops may have when they leave here.

There are no Confederate troops at Clarksville at present, but it may be a matter of importance to us to move there as rapidly as possible. You can commence this movement as soon as practicable after transportation can be provided.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 43.}

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 19, 1862.

The major-general commanding the department congratulates Flag-Officer Foote, Brigadier-General Grant, and the brave officers and men {p.639} under their commands, on the recent brilliant victories on the Tennessee and Cumberland.

But the war is not yet ended. Prepare for new conflicts and new victories. Troops are concentrating from every direction. We shall soon have an army which will be irresistible. The Union flag must be restored everywhere, and the inthralled Union men in the South must be set free. The soldiers and sailors of the Great West are ready and willing to do this. The times and places have been determined on. Victory and glory await the brave.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., February 19, 1862-4 p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Our news is not very definite. It indicates that the enemy are concentrating at Nashville and fortifying beyond Franklin. They have destroyed everything like a bridge, however small.

Not a large force at Clarksville. The gunboats, backed by General Grant’s troops, can, I think dispose of them easily. I did not succeed in getting boats up Green River, but may on another rise.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 19, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I thank you for your friendly offices. Supposing it would not be required in your advance up the Cumberland, and as it is required for an advance from Bowling Green, I this morning ordered Nelson to return with his troops.

On the receipt of your dispatch this moment, inferring that you are in danger, I have countermanded my last order and directed Nelson to receive orders from you at Paducah. I am in doubt about your meaning. Is it that I should come personally and ascend the Cumberland to Clarksville, or that I should bring my troops around that way, or that I should move them toward Clarksville from Bowling Green? I cannot get any more troops to the river to embark in less than six days-say eight or ten days to the Cumberland.

Do you know that the enemy is preparing to make a serious stand at Clarksville? My information, as far as it goes, is that he has but a small force at Clarksville and is concentrating at Nashville. Tell me what reliable information you have about it, and definitely what you want.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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FEBRUARY 19, 1862-5 p.m.

General CRITTENDEN, On Transports at Smithland:

Your orders to return here are countermanded. Receive orders from General Halleck. Stop all the troops that are with you.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.640}

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FEBRUARY 19, 1862-5 p.m.

General NELSON, Commanding Division, Evansville:

Your orders to return here are countermanded. Proceed with your whole force to Paducah, and receive orders from General Halleck. Intercept and take with you all troops that may have started back.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FEBRUARY 19, 1862.

General THOMAS, Lebanon and Bardstown:

Stop the head of your column and let the rear close up at Bardstown, and halt there until further orders; but be ready to move again at a moment’s notice.

Report definitely where your troops are.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1862.

General BUELL:

Halleck says Columbus re-enforced from New Orleans, and steam up on their boats ready for move-probably on Cairo. Wishes to withdraw some troops from Donelson. I tell him improbable that rebels re-enforced from New Orleans or attack Cairo. Think [they] will abandon Columbus.

What force have you in Bowling Green, what in advance of it, and where to-day? How soon can you be in front of Nashville, and in what force? What news of the rebels? If the force in West can take Nashville or even hold its own for the present, I hope to have Richmond and Norfolk in from three to four weeks. Answer.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, February 20, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

Dispatch of yesterday received. I doubt purpose of rebels to attack Cairo. More probably intend abandoning Columbus. Have too few troops at New Orleans to spare any.

This army moves very shortly. As soon as I hear from Buell will communicate again. Have sent all arms asked for new regiments in the West. Do not withdraw troops from Donelson until I hear from Buell to-day.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Buell has gone to Bowling Green. I will be in communication with him in a few minutes, and we will then arrange. The fall of Clarksville {p.641} confirms my views. I think Cairo is not in danger, and that we must now direct our efforts on Nashville. The rebels hold firm in at Manassas. In less than two weeks I shall move the Army of the Potomac and hope to be in Richmond soon after you are in Nashville. I think Columbus will be abandoned within a week. We will have a desperate battle on this line.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 20, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

It is absolutely necessary that the gunboats and mortar boats should all be ready for service by Monday morning. Call on Chicago for the mechanics and material required. Use the telegraph. Communicate with William B. Ogden, of Chicago.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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FEBRUARY 20, 1862.

Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Louisville:

Telegram received. Increase rolling stock on Nashville Railroad. At present no troops will move from East. Ample occupation for them here. Rebels hold firm at Manassas Junction.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862-8 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington, D. C.:

I must have command of the armies in the West. Hesitation and delay are losing us the golden opportunity. Lay this before the President and Secretary of War. May I assume the command? Answer quickly.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Get gun and mortar boats ready as soon as possible. Tell Commodore Foote or ranking naval officer to telegraph to Cincinnati for all mechanics they want. They must work day and night. Send all spare gun and mortar boats to make a demonstration on Columbus to-morrow. Let the mortar boats anchor, under the protection of the gunboats, near enough to throw shells into the place, but run no risks. It is reported that they are sending their guns to Memphis. This can be ascertained by a judicious demonstration.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.642}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Louisville, Ky.:

I mean that Buell should move on Clarksville with his present column; there unite his Kentucky army and move up the Cumberland, while I act on the Tennessee. We should then be able to co-operate.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 20, 1862-7 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

Your dispatch of this date to General Buell received. He is at Bowling Green to-day; will return on Saturday. He received dispatch from General Halleck last night saying that either Cairo or Paducah was threatened from Columbus. General Buell had no news from Columbus, but hardly thought an advance from that point probable, unless the enemy had more gunboats than we were aware of. He, however, ordered Nelson’s division, which had been stopped at Evansville on account of the fall of Fort Donelson, to proceed at once to Smithland, and receive orders from General Halleck.

Mitchel’s division, 10,000 fighting men, at Bowling Green, with a brigade advanced towards Nashville-I don’t know how far-and a force towards Russellville. McCook’s division, 15,000 fighting men, at or near Bowling Green to-night. Large details aiding to repair the railroad. Thomas’ division just arriving at Bardstown; will be eight or nine days’ march from there to Bowling Green. Wood’s division, raw troops, at Munfordville, three or four days’ march from Bowling Green.

General Buell does not think he can advance on Nashville in force without the use of the railroad, and he and Colonel Scott, Assistant Secretary of War, have gone to look into and hasten the work upon it. The additional rolling stock has been ordered.

No news from the rebels since General Buell last telegraphed you. He is beyond the reach of telegraph or your message would be forwarded. He is driving the work on railroad and telegraph as rapidly as possible. Will deliver your message for report as soon as he returns or comes within reach.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 20, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

General Buell is at Bowling Green, 40 miles beyond telegraph. Your message I forwarded by telegraph and swift express. He may be back on Saturday.

We have now two divisions, 25,000 fighting men, at Bowling Green. Colonel Scott is with General Buell.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

{p.643}

–––

LOUISVILLE, February 20, 1862-12 p.m.

General BUELL, Bowling Green: (To be forwarded by swift messenger.)

The following just received from General Halleck, viz:

We are in possession of Clarksville, in large force, with plenty of supplies. Move to that place rapidly by forced marches and effect a junction. Send all available troops around that can reach there by water sooner than by land. Don’t hesitate a moment. If you will come we are sure of Nashville and Columbus, and perhaps Memphis also. Answer yes or no.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

Thomas had one regiment and one battery at Bardstown to-day. I have taken no action on General Halleck’s message. General McClellan wanted you at Jeffersonville to-night at 10 o’clock, to talk.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., February 20, 1862.

General HALLECK:

General Nelson’s command has but ten days’ supply of provisions. They will depend upon you, as none are sent from here to the Cumberland.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 20, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Louisville, Ky.:

Have taken Clarksville, with large supplies. General Curtis has again defeated Price. Am short of steamboat transportation. Send steamers down the Ohio; also stores, if Buell moves on Clarksville. If he will not move I shall try to carry out my plans without him. Hesitation and delay are losing us the golden opportunity. Can’t you assume the responsibility of ordering the move? See my dispatch to him of this evening.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 20, 1862.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Commanding District West Tennessee:

I have received with the highest gratification your reports and letters from Fort Donelson, so gallantly captured under your brilliant leadership. I, in common with the whole country, warmly congratulate you upon this remarkable achievement, which has broken the enemy’s center, dispersed the rebels, and given a death-blow to secession. The prisoners by thousands have arrived here, and will be sent off by to-morrow to their respective destinations.

{p.644}

I have directed the 5,000 blankets and 1,000 overcoats to be sent to you. Very few blankets are in this office, General McClernand having taken them all. If none are to be found to supply your wants here I will order them sent from headquarters.

Supplies of nearly all kinds have been forwarded to you. The teams you wish have been sent. The sick and wounded ale well provided for at Paducah, Mound City, and here. If we have too many to look after we will send them to Cincinnati and Saint Louis. Doctors nurses, and all kinds of assistance and sympathy have been freely and generously offered.

Your letter of the 19th gives glorious news and an earnest of continued success.

We have newspaper reports which state 2,000 Tennesseeans have come in to you and laid down their arms.

Again congratulating you and assuring you of my continued esteem, I am, &c.,

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General, &c.

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CAIRO, February 20, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Navy officers report it impossible to get gun and mortar boats ready for ten days. Six mortar boats up Cumberland, and of the only four ready here three are aground, and possibly cannot be got off. The river falling fast. Gunboats much damaged in battle. Four up Cumberland, and must have four to watch movements from Columbus. Had spy there Tuesday night, and have scouts near to-night.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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UNITED STATES FLAG STEAMER CONESTOGA, February 20, 1862 (via Cairo, February 21).

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY:

We have possession of Clarksville. The citizens being alarmed, two-thirds of them have fled; and having expressed my views and intentions to the mayor and Hon. Cave Johnson, at their request I have issued a proclamation,* assuring all peaceably-disposed persons that they may with safety resume their business vocations, requiring only the military stores and equipage to be given up, and holding the authorities responsible that this shall be done without reservation.

I left Fort Donelson yesterday with the Conestoga, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, and Cairo, Lieutenant-Commander Bryant, on an armed reconnaissance, bringing with me Colonel Webster, of the Engineer Corps, and chief of General Grant’s staff, who, with Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, took possession of the principal fort and hoisted the Union flag. A Union sentiment manifested itself as we came up the river.

The rebels have retreated to Nashville having set fire, against the remonstrance of the citizens, to the splendid railroad bridge across the Cumberland River.

{p.645}

I return to Fort Donelson to-day for another gunboat and six or eight mortar boats, with which I propose to proceed up the Cumberland.

The rebels all have a terror of the gunboats. One of them a short distance above Fort Donelson, had previously fired an iron-rolling mill belonging to Hon. John Bell, which had been used by the rebels.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer Naval Forces.

(Copy to General Halleck.)

* See p. 423.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1862-12.30 a.m.

General G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

Gun and mortar boats must be ready in much less than ten days. Call on Chicago for assistance; we cannot now stand on forms. From two to four gunboats and a few mortar boats would secure evacuation of Columbus. You need have no fear for Cairo if you have a respectable garrison there. The enemy will not attack you.

Ten days to prepare boats is inadmissible; they must be ready by Monday, if you have to take the affair in charge yourself.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1862-12.30 a.m.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Buell at Bowling Green knows more of the state of affairs than you at Saint Louis. Until I hear from him I cannot see necessity of giving you entire command.

I expect to hear from Buell in a few minutes. I do not yet see that Buell cannot control his own line. I shall not lay your request before the Secretary until I hear definitely from Buell.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1862-1 a.m.

General BUELL:

Telegraph me at least once every day the position of your own troops, that of the rebels, and the state of affairs. Unless I have this detailed information I cannot tell whether it is necessary or not to suspend or abandon my own plans here. Neither Halleck nor yourself give me as much detailed information as is necessary for me. This is the critical period, and I must be constantly informed of the condition of your affairs.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

(Similar dispatch, same date, to Halleck.)

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., February 21, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

Curtis has taken Bentonville, with wagons and baggage and a large flag which was floating on the court-house.

{p.646}

Had he better proceed to Fayetteville or stop and hold the mountain passes, while I send 4,000 men from Ironton and Doniphan to take Pocahontas and Jacksonport and destroy their supplies? I prefer the latter, but Curtis advises an advance to Fayetteville.

One of my scouts was in Columbus. During the night of the 18th some high officer arrived, and immense cheering at railroad depot-said to be for Beauregard. Nineteen steamers in the river. No preparations either for advance or retreat.

Navy officers say they cannot repair the gunboats in less than ten days.

E. W. HALLECK.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21-7.30 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I think you are entirely right in not wishing to push Curtis beyond Bentonville. No necessity for anything more than a party of cavalry at Fayetteville. The true line of advance into Arkansas is by Pocahontas and Jacksonport; there you seriously threaten Memphis. Tomorrow I shall hear definitely from Buell what he can do. I think our next move must be on Nashville with least possible delay. As soon as we can move a column on Humboldt or vicinity Columbus will fall. Hurry repairs of gunboats; work on them day and night. As soon as enough of them are ready to protect mortar boats send latter to shell Columbus.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1862-9.30 p.m.

General BUELL:

The advance on Nashville is of the greatest importance. If you can make it by the line of the Cumberland more rapidly than by Bowling Green at once change your line of operations, and I will direct Halleck’s troops on Memphis and Columbus.

What is Thomas’ division doing at Bardstown? Rapid movements are now necessary. If railroad to Nashville is destroyed, take the line of Cumberland River. I repeat, both Halleck and yourself keep me too much in the dark. Your reports are not sufficiently numerous or explicit.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 21, 1862.

General HALLECK:

What more have you from Columbus? You do not report either often or Cully enough. Unless you keep me fully advised, you must not expect me to abandon my own plans for yours.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN

{p.647}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 21, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, General-in-Chief, Washington:

GENERAL: For the events of the last two weeks I must refer you to my telegrams, having had no time to write. Our successes on the Tennessee and Cumberland and in the Southwest, together with the stringent measures taken here, have completely crushed out the rebellion in this city and State; no more insurrections, bridge-burnings, and hoisting of rebel flags. This enables me to rapidly increase my force in Tennessee. Nashville and Columbus must soon fall. I am, however, perfectly confident that if you had sent General Buell to the Cumberland to co-operate with me both would have been evacuated by this time.

I cannot possibly be mistaken in the strategy of the campaign. Threatened as I have continually been from Columbus, compelling me to keep a large force at Cairo and Paducah, I was too weak to act with promptness and efficiency on the Tennessee and Cumberland. The enemy made a terrible mistake in not falling back from Bowling Green on Clarksville, driving me out of Fort Henry, re-enforcing Fort Donelson, and connecting again with Columbus. It is true they would thus have exposed Nashville to Buell but with their river communication they could soon have reoccupied Nashville-much sooner I think, than Buell could have reached it on muddy roads. They have lost the golden opportunity, and I believe they will fall back from Nashville, without a battle, either on Decatur or Memphis. I certainly should if I were in Johnston’s place. If he should not, and General Buell should take the line of the Cumberland, so as to co-operate with me on the Tennessee, the enemy would be cut off and forced to surrender.

In your telegrams you complain of not getting returns from me of the numbers and positions of my troops. Certainly you do not expect to get information from me which I cannot obtain myself. I have worked hard for months, issuing order after order for returns, but the officers of this department are so negligent or ignorant of their duties in this respect that I find it impossible to obtain returns till long after they cease to be of any use, as everything in the mean time has changed. They became so negligent under the Frémont régime of all law, regulations, and orders that it will take time to bring about a reformation. I am doing everything in my power to effect it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 21, 1862-10 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

I find it utterly impossible to get returns of either of the regiments arriving or of those sent with prisoners. Moreover, telegraph lines have been defective and many of my messages not received. Have sent staff officers to obtain the information wanted. Have ordered a gunboat reconnaissance to-day of Columbus. Will send you results as soon as I get it.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

{p.648}

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SAINT LOUIS, February 21, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo:

Let me know result of reconnaissance as early as possible. Everything must remain in statu quo till to-morrow. I am awaiting messages from Kentucky and Washington. If possible, notify Grant, Phelps, and Commodore Foote to make no further moves till they receive orders.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 21, 1862.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Louisville:

Advices just received from Clarksville represent that General A. S. Johnston has fallen back on Columbia, and that there is very little preparation for a stand at Nashville. General Grant and Commodore Foote say the road is now open and are impatient. Can’t you come down to the Cumberland and divide the responsibility with me? If so, I will immediately prepare to go ahead. I am tired of waiting for action in Washington. They will not understand the case. It is as plain as daylight to me.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, February 21, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your plan of organization has been transmitted to me by Mr. Scott and strikes me very favorably, but on account of the domestic affliction of the President I have not yet been able to submit it to him.

The brilliant results of the energetic action in the West fills the Nation with joy.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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PADUCAH, February 21, 1862.

General CULLUM:

General Grant and myself consider this a good time to move on Nashville. Six mortar boats and two iron-clad steamers can precede the troops and shell the forts. We were about moving for this purpose when General Grant, to my astonishment, received a telegram from General Halleck not to let the gunboats go higher than Clarksville. No telegram. The Cumberland is in a good stage of water, and General Grant and I believe that we can take Nashville. Please ask General Halleck if we shall do it. We will talk per telegraph, Captain Phelps representing me in the office.

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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PADUCAH, February 21, 1862.

General CULLUM:

From information gleaned in Clarksville we believe the panic in Nashville is very great, and that the city will be surrendered without {p.649} a fight if a force proceeds at once against it. General Johnston is reported to be gathering his scattered forces at Columbia.

S. L. PHELPS.

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CAIRO, February 21, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Strength at Bird’s Point: Infantry, 4,181; cavalry, 1,284; twelve field guns.

Fort Holt: Infantry, 560; cavalry, 420; artillery, sixteen field guns.

Cairo: Infantry, 2,642; artillery, 6 guns; sappers and miners, 75 men, not counting forts.

E. A. PAINE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 21, 1862.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding Second Division:

You will proceed to Clarksville, Tenn., with so much of your command as transportation is now ready for, and occupy ground about the forts on the north bank of the river.

I have no special directions to give that will not naturally suggest themselves to you, such as keeping the men from going into private houses and annoying the citizens generally. There is said to be a large quantity of army stores at Clarksville, which by calling upon the mayor of the city will be given up to our use.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 21, 1862.

Troops in this military district will be brigaded and assigned to divisions in the following order, to wit:

First Division, Brig. Gen. J. A. McClernand, commanding:

First Brigade: Eighth, Twenty-ninth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois Infantry, Dresser’s battery, Dollins’, O’Harnett’s, and Carmichael’s cavalry.

Second Brigade: Eleventh, Eighteenth, Twentieth, and Forty-fifth Illinois Infantry, First Battalion of Fourth Illinois Cavalry, and Taylor’s battery.

Third Brigade: Seventeenth, Forty-third, Forty-ninth and Fifty-second Illinois Infantry, and McAllister’s and Schwartz’s batteries.

Second Division, Brig. Gen. C. F. Smith commanding:

First Brigade: Second, Seventh, Twelfth, and Fourteenth Iowa Infantry, and Second Battalion of Fourth Illinois Cavalry.

Second Brigade: Ninth and Twelfth Illinois and Thirteenth and Sixteenth Missouri Infantry, Willard’s battery, and detachment Regular Cavalry.

Third Brigade: Seventh, Fiftieth, Fifty-seventh, and Fifty-eighth Illinois Infantry, and two companies Second Illinois Cavalry.

The battalion of artillery commanded by Major Cavender will be attached to the Second Division at large.

{p.650}

Third Division, Brig. Gen. L. Wallace, commanding:

First Brigade: Eighth Missouri, Eleventh, Twenty-fourth, and Fifty-second Indiana Infantry, and Bulliss’ battery.

Second Brigade: First Nebraska and Fifty-eighth, Sixty-eighth, and Seventy-eighth Ohio Infantry, and four companies of Curtis’ Horse.

Third Brigade: Twentieth, Fifty-sixth, and Seventy-sixth Ohio and Twenty-third Indiana Infantry, and the remainder of Curtis’ Horse.

Fourth Division, Brig. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut, commanding:

First Brigade: Fifteenth Twenty-eighth, Thirty-second, and Forty-first Illinois Infantry, and Burrow’s battery of light artillery.

Second Brigade: Twenty-fifth Indiana, Fourteenth, Forty-sixth, and Forty-eighth Illinois Infantry, and Mann’s battery of light artillery.

Third Brigade: Thirty-first and Forty-fourth Indiana and Seventeenth and Twenty-fifth Kentucky Infantry, and Third Battalion Fourth Illinois Cavalry.

The senior colonels of brigades will command them in every instance. Brigade commanders will select from the regimental quartermasters of their commands one to act as brigade commissary.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 21, 1862.

Division and brigade commanders will take immediate steps to prevent soldiers of their command from passing beyond the limits of the field works of Fort Donelson.

All depredations committed upon citizens must be summarily punished.

Patrols will be sent out daily by division commanders, and all soldiers found outside the works without a pass approved by the division commanders will be brought into camp and punished by regimental commanders.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, February 21, 1862.

J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Louisville:

It will be better for all concerned if you will keep us fully advised about matters in Kentucky. The general is embarrassed all the time for want of definite information from both Generals Halleck and Buell.

Your dispatch of to-day was more definite than any yet received from either party since they left Washington. This is strictly private.

A. V. COLBURN.

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BOWLING GREEN, February 21, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I shall start from here to-morrow, and expect to be opposite or near Nashville to-morrow night. Move up the river with your gunboats, but without exposing them unnecessarily.

D. C. BUELL Brigadier-General.

{p.651}

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HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION ARMY OF THE OHIO, Paducah, February 21, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I arrived here to-day; reported to General Sherman, whom I found in command. Immediately four of my regiments were detached and sent to Cairo viz: Thirty-fourth, Forty-third, Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh Indiana volunteers, leaving me here with six regiments of my division, viz: Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-first Ohio Volunteers, Thirty-sixth Indiana, Colonel Ammen, and the Forty-first Ohio Volunteers, Sixth Ohio Volunteers, Sixth Kentucky, Colonel Hazen; also I have General Crittenden, with three regiments. One of the regiments sent to Cairo was his, viz, the Forty-third Indiana.

At this rate the Fourth Division of the Ohio will disappear, and I will be without a command.

I have directed the brigadiers to retain the regiments on their reports, remarking that they are detached at Cairo.

It does seem to me that as we were sent here from another department the organization of the brigades and division might have been left intact.

We debark to-morrow morning and go into camp.

There are nearly 1,000 men of Crittenden’s brigade yet at Calhoun that are fit for duty. Will you order them to join their regiments?

I sent an order the day before I left Camp Wickliffe to Colonel Wagner, who is on Green River, to return certain men of the Sixth Ohio Volunteers, who were employed repairing arms, to their regiments, in order that they might march with it. This Colonel Wagner failed to do. I inclose a copy of the order, and beg to request that the men whose names are inclosed be ordered to join their regiments.

Very respectfully,

WM. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

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BOWLING GREEN, February 21, 1862.

Captain FRY, Chief of Staff:

Order Thomas to Louisville by forced marches, to embark for the Cumberland. In the mean time get the transports ready, so that there shall be no delay. Send all the efficient batteries and Smith’s cavalry in the same way. Order my guard forward by railroad to-morrow. Come yourself, with all the officers of the staff that I have intended to accompany us, as soon as possible. Bring the operator employed to accompany me. I will order Wood and Boyle forward. Hurry Bruce forward, and direct him to report to General Wood. Send a boat to take the battery at Calhoun up the Cumberland, to report to General Nelson. I will send orders to Jackson to march across. Have the pontoon bridge sent forward by the first train after the track is laid. Send no more wagons beyond the mouth of Salt River until further orders. Don’t let these matters delay the railroad bridge. I send a dispatch for Halleck.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.652}

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, Camp near Bardstown, Ky.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Louisville:

I have sent back to hurry the regiments up, but the roads from Somerset to Lebanon are in such bad condition that I doubt if the last regiment can get up before Sunday.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General U. S. Volunteers.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, February 22, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your telegram of yesterday,* together with Mr. Scott’s reports, have this morning been submitted to the President, who, after full consideration of the subject, does not think any change in the organization of the Army or the military departments at present advisable. He desires and expects you and General Buell to co-operate fully and zealously with each other, and would be glad to know whether there has been any failure of co-operation in any particular.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

* See p. 655.

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LOUISVILLE, February 22, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

General Buell still at Bowling Green. Your messages have been forwarded by telegraph to Munfordville, thence by rail to Cave City, and thence by swift express to Bowling Green. Telegraph men promise to open through to Bowling Green to-morrow. McCook’s division is not yet at Bowling Green; has large working parties on the railroad. Railroad promises to send train to Barren River on Sunday, but McCook does not think they will succeed. General Thomas’ division-10,000 fighting men-is on the march from Somerset, and is moving by Bardstown to keep on the turnpike, dirt roads being impassable.

The division is scattered, and the head of the column is halted at Bardstown, to close up. I telegraphed him to-day that he must hasten his rear regiments. He will move south by Bardstown and New Haven turnpike. I will spur him again. Boyle’s brigade, about 2,800 fighting men, is at Glasgow, not assigned to a division.

Bruce’s brigade, about 2,000 fighting men, good ones, at Munfordville not assigned to a division. Mitchel reported yesterday that he would have a brigade at Franklin to-day; he has a small force at Russellville. He has repaired one locomotive and has it running with a few cars from Bowling Green towards Franklin and Russellville. I don’t know condition of railroad from Bowling Green down, except that it is but little, if any, injured as far down as our cavalry has been-about Franklin, and perhaps farther. Good to Russellville; have not heard beyond that point. Mitchel’s, McCook’s, Thomas’, and Wood’s divisions, and a new division to be formed of Brace’s and Boyle’s brigades, give about 50,000 fighting men for Nashville.

There is a turnpike from Bowling Green to Nashville; none from Bowling Green to Clarksville. Buell is so far beyond telegraph station (40 miles), that there is necessarily great delay in his answering your dispatches.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

{p.653}

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BOWLING GREEN, February 22, 1862.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER, United States Forces, Clarksville:

SIR: I am marching on Nashville. My advance will probable be within 9 miles of that place to-night. Your gunboats should move forward instantly. I believe they will meet no serious opposition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 22, 1862. (Received February 23, 1862.)

General THOMAS, Bardstown:

Move for Louisville with your whole division, including the First Ohio Cavalry, now at Bardstown, by forced marches. Transports will be ready for you to embark for the Cumberland. Lose no time.

By command:

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 22, 1862-1 p.m.

General BUELL, Bowling Green:

Nothing new. Thomas’ division will be at Bardstown to-morrow. Had he not better push on towards Green River? I have ordered Jackson’s cavalry and Behr’s battery to march from Calhoun to Bowling Green. Jackson knows the country and will get forage. General McClellan is impatient, as you will see by his messages. I have telegraphed him twice, giving such information as I thought pertinent. Hope you won’t go forward without letting me get down.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, February 22, 1862.

General THOMAS, Bardstown:

I am directed to urge you to use all possible dispatch in closing your division and preparing it for a rapid march.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Camp near Bardstown, Ky., February 22, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Louisville, Ky.:

I am using every exertion to concentrate my division at this point. It rained two days ago as I never saw it rain before. It has done the same to-day. Nevertheless I hope all the regiments will reach here to-morrow, except, perhaps, Colonel Fry’s Fourth Kentucky, which {p.654} was left at Somerset to guard the public property until the arrival of Landram’s regiment.

If forage is provided for me at New Haven by Monday, I can march my whole division to Munfordville close up by Wednesday afternoon.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO, Paducah, February 22, 1862.

General HALLECK, &c., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Under orders from General Buell I came to this point with my division to report to you. Finding General Sherman here, I reported to him.

My division consists of the Tenth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, Col. J. Ammen, commanding: Twenty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-first Ohio Volunteers, Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, Thirty-fourth In-diana Volunteers. Nineteenth Brigade, Colonel Hazen, commanding: Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, Sixth Kentucky Volunteers, Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, Forty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, and the Sixth Ohio Volunteers, attached to Hazen’s.

Two brigades of Brigadier-General Crittenden were also assigned to my command, and I was directed to ask they be reunited in my division.

General Crittenden is here, with one of his brigades, consisting of the Forty-second Indiana Volunteers, Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, Eleventh Kentucky Volunteers, Twenty-sixth Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Jones, commanding. His other brigade is at Fort Donelson.

Immediately upon my arrival here four of these regiments, viz, Thirty-fourth, Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh Indiana, and the Forty-third Indiana, the first three from my division and the last one from Crittenden’s, were ordered to Cairo.

I have the honor to request that these regiments be not taken from my division, but that, when the exigencies of the service will permit, they be sent back to me.

I have spent two months’ hard labor getting the three regiments of mine that are at Cairo into condition, and now that I am moving into the presence of the enemy it is not pleasant to have them taken from me.

Very respectfully,

WM. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

P. S.-There are also attached to my division and with me here three batteries of artillery, under Major Race: Battery F, First Ohio Volunteers; Battery 10, Second Indiana Artillery; Battery 8, Second Indiana Artillery; also two companies of Indiana cavalry, commanded by Captain Klein.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 22, 1862.

Col. M. D. Leggett, Seventy-eighth Ohio Volunteers, is appointed acting provost-marshal until a suitable person for the position can be designated, am’ will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

{p.655}

In all cases where it may be deemed necessary to refer to higher authority, Brig. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut, second in authority, will be appealed to.

Tennessee, by her rebellion, having ignored all laws of the United States, no courts will be allowed to sit under State authorities, but all cases coming within reach of the military arm will be adjudicated by the authorities the Government has established within the State.

Martial law is therefore declared to extend over West Tennessee. Whenever a sufficient number of the citizens of the State return to their allegiance to maintain law and order over this territory the military restriction here indicated will be removed.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 23 [21], 1862.

E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

One whole week has been lost already by hesitation and delay. There was, and I think there still is, a golden opportunity to strike a fatal blow, but I can’t do it unless I can control Buell’s army. I am perfectly willing to act as General McClellan dictates or to take any amount of responsibility. To succeed we must be prompt. I have explained everything to General McClellan and Assistant Secretary Scott. There is not a moment to be lost. Give me authority, and I will be responsible for results.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 23, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Paducah: Flag-Officer FOOTE, Cairo:

All available gunboats to be sent to Clarksville, prepared for a movement up the Cumberland. I think mortar boats will be of little use on this expedition. If Commodore Foote agrees with me, let them be sent down for defense of Cairo. I am waiting for telegraphic line to be opened to Fort Henry, to communicate with General Grant. In the mean time tell him that I wish to have about 20,000 men concentrated at Clarksville, including Smith’s and Nelson’s divisions. Proper garrisons should be detailed for Forts Henry and Donelson. All other forces should be encamped opposite Danville bridge, to await further orders. Cavalry and field artillery to be ready to move between the two rivers. One gunboat to be stationed near Danville bridge. All others not required for defense of Cairo to be at Clarksville, ready for service. Abundant ammunition to be taken along. See to this. There is a great and decisive contest awaiting us. Be ready for it. Answer, and give all you know of present state of affairs. Encouraging news continually coming in from the Southwest.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General

{p.656}

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THIRTY-SEVEN MILES FROM NASHVILLE, February 23, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

I have endeavored to keep you quite well informed of my plans and movements. Thomas’ division was, as I previously informed you, on its way to Nashville, via Bardstown, that being the only practicable route; but in order to expedite its arrival on Cumberland River and in consequence of subsequent developments I ordered it on the 21st instant to proceed by forced marches to Louisville and embark. I have also ordered some other troops by the same route that could reach Nashville sooner that way than by the land. I am moving with one division (Mitchel’s), without baggage by forced marches on Nashville. My pickets are now in front of the city, and but for the destruction of the railroad by the heavy rains I should have been there myself to-day with the advance. I expect to reach there to-morrow, and by Tuesday night or Wednesday expect to have the principal part of the division up. Two regiments here, unable to cross the river at Bowling Green in consequence of the flood.

My troops are moving forward everywhere as rapidly as possible. The arrival of a steamer at Bowling Green to-day will enable them to cross the river rapidly and come up to me soon. I would advise that positive instructions be given in regard to the disposition of General Halleck’s troops until the work nearest at hand is disposed of. It appears pretty well established that the enemy have mostly retired from Nashville, with the determination of making a stand at Murfreesborough. They have burned the bridge at Nashville.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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THIRTY-SIX MILES FROM NASHVILLE, February 23, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Nashville all right. Men wearied by excessive marching and toil.

Before Columbus or Memphis is struck the rebel army of over 40,000 men in Middle Tennessee should be crushed. To do this safely a little time must be given. Large detachments we believe, from rumors that reach us, have left Manassas; of the truth of which you of course know.

Generals Buell and Halleck can effect the capture or surrender of Columbus and Memphis as easily as they have secured the other important positions of the enemy. Give them help in the shape of good soldiers and you arc certain to achieve great results.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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LOUISVILLE, February 23, 1862-2 a.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

General Buell telegraphs General Halleck that he will be opposite or near Nashville to-morrow night, and asks General Halleck to move up the river with his gunboats, but without exposing them unnecessarily. I don’t know what force General Buell moves with, but presume it is Mitchel’s and McCook’s divisions. He has ordered forward Wood’s {p.657} division and Boyle’s and Bruce’s brigades. Thomas’ division from Bardstown comes to Louisville by forced marches. He should be here in two days, and will embark at once and proceed up the Cumberland. This puts the entire fighting force en route for Nashville. I will complete the arrangements and orders for Thomas’ division this morning, and with the staff and outfit for the field will join General Buell. He gives me no information with reference to the enemy.

The work on the railroad is not completed, and the general sent to Louisville to-day for material for Barren River bridge. I presume he intends to transfer his operations from the Louisville line to the line of the Cumberland, striking the latter near Nashville instead of at Clarksville.

Thomas should join by the river in six days, provided he moves more rapidly than heretofore.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 23, 1862-8 p.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

I have heard nothing from General Buell to-day.

The boats are coming in for Thomas’ division. He will not be here until Tuesday. Have ordered him to embark Tuesday night. The staff one company of cavalry, and two companies of Sixteenth United States Infantry move at 12 m. to-morrow on steamer Prioress; four companies of Eighteenth United States Infantry and two companies United States cavalry move at 8 a.m. to-morrow on steamer Fitzhugh. Three field and one rifle siege battery, being in addition to the batteries of divisions, go on board to-morrow. All these will precede Thomas’ division, and hope to join General Buell on the Cumberland near Nashville in forty hours.

Railroad repairs between Cave City and Bowling Green progress slowly. It was promised a train should go to Barren River to-day; it cannot be done before Wednesday. Telegraph through to Bowling Green.

One regiment here en route to General Halleck, and another coming down between here and Cincinnati.

Captain Greene, assistant adjutant-general, with department records, remains in Louisville.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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LOUISVILLE, February 23, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

General Buell wants boats to transport a large division up the Cumberland River. Send all the large Ohio River boats from Cairo, Paducah, and Smithland to Louisville, so that they will reach here to-morrow night. Our large boats are all down the river, and we can’t move till they come up.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.658}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 23, 1862.

J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Louisville, Ky.:

I cannot understand how you can want boats sent to Louisville to transport troops up the Cumberland. We have no transports to spare. On the contrary, I have asked Assistant Secretary Scott to send down all he can spare from the Ohio.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, February 23, 1862.

General BUELL:

Just returned from an armed reconnaissance of Columbus, which is not evacuated. Was within less than 2 miles of river batteries.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., February 23, 1862.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Division:

SIR: The general commanding the department directs that your division move to Louisville by forced marches and embark without delay for the Cumberland River. Colonel Swords, assistant quartermaster-general, is instructed to have boats in readiness for you.

The general directs that you embark your division and form a junction with him near Nashville with all possible dispatch. He is moving by forced marches from Bowling Green.

Major-General Halleck has been requested to send the gunboats up the Cumberland in advance of your arrival, so as to render the river secure. It would be well for you to inform yourself at Fort Donelson and Clarksville in relation to the whereabouts and movements of the gunboats. As the enemy has abandoned Clarksville, it is presumed he has gone to Nashville, and that the river is open to the vicinity of that city. Supplies have been ordered to be put on board your transports.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, February 23, 1862-10 o’clock.

General THOMAS, Bardstown:

Have you received my telegraph of 22d to move to Louisville by forced march? When will you be here? Answer. Let the First Ohio Cavalry come through at once and get aboard.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

{p.659}

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE OHIO, Camp near Bardstown, Ky., February 23, 1862-12 m.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Louisville, Ky.:

I have just received your telegram. I will send orders to the First Ohio Cavalry immediately. I will move to-morrow morning, and if the roads are in good order hope to be in Louisville Tuesday by noon, with the whole of my division except Colonel Fry’s regiment, which remained at Somerset as a guard, and has not yet got up. He will probably arrive on Wednesday.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, Commanding U. S. Volunteers.

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FEBRUARY 23-25.

Col. J. Ammen’s diary of movement from Paducah, Ky., to Nashville, Tenn.

[Extract.]

February 23.-Our fleet [at Paducah] has orders to raise steam to follow the Diana, the flag-boat and headquarters of General Nelson; destination not named. Eight a.m. the Diana starts up the Ohio; the other boats follow at intervals. Diana steams up the Cumberland; other boats follow; and now we conclude that this division is bound for Tennessee-Nashville, &c. Pass Fort Donelson in the night; do not stop.

Land at Clarksville, Tenn. about 8 a.m., 24th. Call on my old friend and brave soldier General C. F. Smith, who is in command at Clarksville. In 1837 we were stationed at the same post, lieutenants U. S. Artillery, and have not met since that time until this morning. We both forgot that we are growing old, and met as young lieutenants of the Regular Army.

February 24.-About noon the Diana steamed up the Cumberland, and the Woodward followed near; the other boats started in turn. The river is high, the night dark, and the rebels may have batteries on the banks as they had below. We proceed slowly and with caution.; one gunboat in advance, just before the Diana. The boats run against the trees in the dark; no serious injury. On we go, and would not be surprised to receive a shot from shore.

February 25.-Dawn; something like a battery on the bank a mile or more up the river is observed. The Woodward is signaled to come up to the Diana. General Nelson orders me to land with some companies and make a reconnaissance. When we reached the battery (Fort Zollicoffer, 5 miles below Nashville) the rebels had deserted the place. The fires had not yet completed their work of burning gun-carriages, &c. Twelve large cannon dismounted; four 6-pounders all spiked; cannonballs and shells in large quantities and railroad iron; fort leveled. After this examination we proceeded to the city and the Tenth Brigade took position on the public square. General Nelson crossed the river to meet General Buell, Mitchel, &c., and remained absent until towards evening. I was the senior officer in Nashville.

About noon the mayor, &c., called on me to furnish them a pass to General Buell, to enable them to ask for terms of surrender. The rebel forces retired as we entered Nashville. Some of our troops occupied {p.660} positions on the suburbs. During the day many persons called on me and professed that they always had been Union men; told who were rebels, &c.; mutually accused each other-and some informed me where Confederate provisions and clothing had been stored. The places were examined, and tons of salt pork were found, flour, forage, &c., but not much clothing. The manufactory for small-arms and the material in the building were taken possession of.

In the evening we marched to a large spring near the Fair Grounds, east side of the city. Troops are crossing the river and taking position on the different roads. There are some good Union men, but many more rebels; not a few that were pressed into the rebel service, as they claim. Hard to believe all they say.

...

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 24, 1862.

E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington:

If it is thought that the present arrangement is best for the public service, I have nothing to say. I have done my duty in making the suggestions, and leave it to my superiors to adopt or reject them.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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LOUISVILLE, February 24, 1862-9 a.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Barren and Green Rivers very high. Boats up to Bowling Green this morning. Telegrams from Bowling Green, from which I learn that General Buell has only General Mitchel’s division with him.

McCook finds difficulty in crossing Barren River on account of the high water. Have no reliable news whatever from the enemy.

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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WASHINGTON, February 24, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Louisville, Ky.:

I have requested Halleck to give you all the aid in his power in your operations on Nashville. When we have gained that, where will enemy make his next stand? The possession of railway junctions near Chattanooga would seem to be of next importance. Decatur can probably best be taken by moving up Tennessee River. After we have gained Nashville and can see our way to holding Chattanooga we must get possession of Columbus and Memphis. Cannot Garfield reach the Virginia and Tennessee Railway near Abingdon? We must not lose sight of Eastern Tennessee. Communicate frequently-

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

{p.661}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 24, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis:

General Cullum’s telegram in regard to reconnaissance of Columbus received. Buell will be in front of Nashville to-morrow evening. Best co-operate with him to the full extent of your power, to secure Nashville beyond a doubt; then by a combined movement of troops and gunboats seize Decatur. Buell will be directed to occupy and hold in force the railroad junctions in vicinity of Chattanooga and to re-establish the railroads from Nashville to Decatur and Stevenson. This will very nearly isolate A. S. Johnston from Richmond.

The next move should be either a direct march in force upon the rear of Memphis or else first upon the communications and rear of Columbus, depending entirely on the strength and movements of the rebels. In the mean time it would be well to amuse the garrison of Columbus with our mortar boats as soon as a sufficient number of them can be spared, with gunboats, from the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers.

The early possession of Humboldt in force is of importance, but should not be undertaken until Nashville is securely ours.

The possession of Grand Junction will complete the isolation of the rebels. It may be better to occupy Corinth instead of Decatur after Chattanooga is firmly in our possession. Please communicate fully and frequently.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 24, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

The reason that Cairo has no blanks is that no requisitions have been made. There is a screw loose in that command. It had better be fixed pretty soon, or the command will hear from me. Nashville has been abandoned. General Buell marches in this afternoon without opposition. This enables me to withdraw my column from the Cumberland. I was holding the Cumberland forces to await Buell’s movements. All O. K.; and now for a decisive movement. Tell Flag-Officer Foote not to move till I give him further orders. The sending of steamers to General Buell was all wrong. It disconcerted my plans. You should not have done it without my orders. If you can stop them by telegraph, do so, and order them to rendezvous at Paducah. You are too fast at Cairo. Consult me before you order any other movement. I have held everything in check till I could have positive information about the abandonment of Nashville. It is now certain.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION, Steamer Diana, February 24, 1862.

Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT, U. S. Volunteers:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose the consolidated morning report of Fourth Division, Army of the Department of the Ohio, for February 2, 1862.

{p.662}

Since this report was made the remaining three companies of the Thirty-fourth Indiana and the remaining three companies of the Forty-sixth Indiana have left the division for Cairo. Four regiments of this division have been detached for duty at Cairo.

The aggregate of infantry present with the division is now 5,947.

I have the honor to inclose a report of the ammunition, &c., with the division.

This report does not include the ammunition train which went to Cairo on boat with troops and has not yet been allowed to return. The circumstances are fully set forth in an accompanying letter.

I have the honor also to inclose lists of the officers under my command.*

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

* No inclosures found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 24, 1862.

General G. W. CULLUM, Chief of Staff, Department of the Missouri, Cairo, Ill.:

GENERAL: Inclosed I send you a dispatch from General Buell, sent through to Clarksville yesterday.* As requested, the gunboats have gone up to Nashville. The mortar boats I am sending back to Cairo, because it would be with great difficulty they could be got to Nashville and could be of no service there. Yesterday a steamer was down from Nashville with quite a delegation of the citizens. Their ostensible object was to bring surgeons to attend their wounded at Clarksville-real object, probably, to have some assurance that their property would be protected. Johnston, with his army, has fallen back to Murfreesborough, first destroying all bridges, commissary stores, and such artillery as could not be carried along. The troops wanted to destroy the city, but were restrained by the citizens and a speech from Pillow.

I have just returned from Clarksville, where I arrived last evening some hours after the departure of the Nashville delegation and gunboat Cairo. General Nelson reported to-day with his division. I forwarded them immediately to Nashville, with verbal instructions, to have the men under wholesome restraint, and written instructions, a copy of which is herewith accompanying.

I have only sent four small regiments to Clarksville, and do not propose sending more until I know the pleasure of General Halleck on the subject. A large garrison is not required.

General C. F. Smith is in command at Clarksville.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 24, 1862.

General NELSON, Commanding Division, Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: You will proceed with the division under your command to Nashville, Tenn., keeping in rear of the gunboat Carondelet with all your transports. {p.663}

From Nashville you will put yourself in immediate communication with General Buell, and if you find that his command is not within two days’ march of you, your command will not debark, but fall back down the river some miles on the transports, and remain to form a junction with General Buell when he does arrive.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE, Camp Brownlow, Piketon, Ky., February 24, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General:

DEAR SIR: I arrived here on the 22d instant, having already sent forward the Twenty-second Kentucky, the Fortieth Ohio, most of the Forty-second Ohio, and one company of McLaughlin’s squadron of cavalry. The other company of the squadron is water-bound at Prestonburg.

The river was already swollen by the recent rains, and on the morning of the 22d the rain began to fall in torrents and continued all day. Toward evening the river began to rise with great rapidity.

During the night we moved our stores to the highest point in the village. By daylight of the next morning the river had risen nearly 60 feet from its lowest water-mark. Two steamers were riding in the principal streets. The river was rushing with fearful current over the whole village. Our losses have been very serious. The tents and camp equipage of the Fortieth Ohio were nearly all submerged, and many were swept away. A very large quantity of commissary and quartermaster stores were lost and much that was saved was seriously damaged. The citizens here have suffered fearfully.

The steam saw-mill and flour-mill in this place the only one in the county, was carried away, and I am supplying from the Government stores the few families until they can fall back upon the charities of their neighbors. We have large quantities of stores at Paintville and Louisa, which I fear also have suffered injury. I greatly regret that the Government has suffered the loss of any property in my charge, but I am sure that no ordinary foresight could have provided against it in this instance.

Our stores were 10 feet above the highest floods of the season before we moved them.

Thirty-five years ago the water rose into the village, which was the highest rise ever known in this valley. This flood was several feet higher.

We are now saving all we can from the devastation as the water goes down and are endeavoring to ascertain the extent of our loss.

Colonel Marshall’s regiment has reached Ashland, and will move up the river as soon as the water will permit.

On the approach of the brigade to this point the remnant of Marshall’s force is reported to have evacuated Whitesburg and retreated through Sounding Gap. There is said to be a considerable force now there on the summit of the Cumberland, where they have fortified themselves.

As soon as I can retrieve our losses by the flood I shall send forward a corps of observation

{p.664}

Our scouts have already been forward 18 miles and find no enemy. I have left the Fourteenth Kentucky at Paintville to guard stores and protect our communication with the Ohio.

The acting brigade quartermaster is greatly in need of funds. His requisitions were sent to headquarters several weeks ago, but he has not yet received a remittance.

Very respectfully,

J. A. GARFIELD, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

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FEBRUARY 25, 1862-4 p.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville:

If it is true that the rebels have abandoned Nashville and have fallen back on Murfreesborough to make a stand, it will be necessary to make our next movement with great caution. Give me the number of troops you can concentrate on Murfreesborough, independently of Halleck’s troops. This is necessary, that I may be able to arrange that co-operation between Halleck’s troops and your own that is absolutely necessary to insure ultimate success. In this statement give number of guns and cavalry. By all means take steps to hold Nashville securely. What have you from the Knoxville column? I hope soon to hear that it has reached the railroad. Can Garfield also reach the railroad? How long will it take you to be in front of Murfreesborough with all your available force?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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FEBRUARY 25, 1862-4 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis:

If it is true that the rebels have evacuated Nashville and intend fighting at Murfreesborough, our next movement must be made cautiously. Give me the number of your troops available on that line independently of any of Buell’s troops, stating number of guns and cavalry. Until I receive this statement I cannot decide whether we should turn Murfreesborough by line of Tennessee River or whether we can undertake that simultaneously with a movement to turn Columbus and seize Memphis.

For how long can we count upon the use of the Tennessee River for our gunboats?

I think our mortar boats, well protected by gunboats, should begin to annoy Columbus just as soon as we are ready to advance again. What information have you about Randolph or any other fortified points between Columbus and Memphis?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., February 25-8 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I learn from telegraph of Commodore Foote to the Navy Department that you have ordered that no gunboats go above Nashville. I think {p.665} it may greatly facilitate Buell’s operations to send a couple, at least, of the lighter ones to Nashville. Captain Maynadier, Tenth Infantry, will be ordered to Commodore Foote, at his request, as his ordnance officer for mortar boats.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., February 25, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

If we send four gunboats up the rivers Tennessee and Cumberland, as you direct, and having two to repair, extensively, on the ways at Mound City, and the Benton not being ready before next week, superadded to the rebels planting guns to bear on the mortar boats, if we should shell them now, before the final attack, would seem to render it impracticable to do anything until next week. The new and bad men sent us from the East, with the crippled condition of the gunboats, also render an earlier attack or even demonstration on Columbus, in my judgment, injudicious,

A. H. FOOTE, Flag-Officer.

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PADUCAH, February 25, 1862.

General HALLECK:

Colonel Callender passed down without my seeing him. There are eight unarmed Ohio regiments here. Expect General Sherman back this evening. Have sent your telegraphs to General Grant by steamer Hastings an hour ago, and as well by Conestoga this moment. All fleeing from Weakley County, Tennessee, to escape impressment. Since Governor’s message 17 have arrived in Mayfield today, making their way to Paducah. They say there are 1,200 Union men in that county. The cavalry force burned everything at Camp Beauregard-private houses as well as their own huts. The trees are all felled across Blandville road, but the bridge is left for their own convenience. They are destroyed on all the other roads. The cars run down to the end of the road, but they blew up the locomotives.

D. STUART, Colonel, Commanding.

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CAIRO, February 25, 1862.

General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

SIR: Our telegraphic wires being down, and being possessed of Memphis papers of the 18th announcing in emphatic terms an intention to evacuate Columbus, I came down to see General Cullum, that the place should be so watched as to prevent the removal of their heavy ordnance.

I herewith send you these papers, which I had given to Colonel Thom, who was to have gone up this morning, but did not get off. I think these papers will convince you that the intention to evacuate Columbus has been made public. My scouting party went to Mayfield, Milburn, and some 5 miles towards Columbus. At Milburn they encountered a {p.666} scout of 15 cavalry, who fled towards Columbus. They heard that a cavalry force was between Milburn and Columbus about 2,000 strong. A man was employed to go into Columbus and to meet a messenger from Paducah to-morrow night. Lieutenant-Colonel Hogg, of the Second Illinois, who commanded the party, is certain that by to-morrow night he will have positive information from Columbus.

I send these papers, that you may adopt such measure as you may think proper to prevent the removal of the guns at Columbus. The road between Paducah and Columbus is very bad, the valley of Mayfield Creek being flooded and bridges destroyed. The Paducah Railroad is destroyed below Little Obion River.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, February 25, 1862.

General HALLECK:

I start for Paducah. I send important newspapers from Memphis by Colonel Thom. On consultation with General Cullum, I shall stop all troops coming down the Ohio at Paducah. Shall proceed to brigade the regiments. My opinion is that General Polk has ordered the evacuation of Columbus, but he is figuring to save his guns. Can anything be done to prevent the removal of the guns by threatening the railroad to his rear in force?

Can you order Captain Dodds, quartermaster at Benton Barracks, to Paducah?

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 25, 1862.

Brig. Gen. G. W. CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

I wrote you that General Nelson’s division had been sent to Nashville. Since that I have learned that the head of General Buell’s column arrived there on Monday evening. The rebels have fallen back to Chattanooga, instead of Murfreesborough, as stated in a former letter. I shall go to Nashville immediately after the arrival of the next mail, should there be no orders to prevent it.

The soldiers of the Eighth Missouri Volunteers who were disguised and sent to Memphis have just returned. They went by the way of Nashville and Decatur. Saw Beauregard at Decatur sick; he has since gone to Columbus. They were in Fort Donelson before the attack commenced, and say the force was estimated at 40,000.

Since the battle the people through the country are much disposed to return to their allegiance. Orders have been given for the evacuation of Columbus. This I learn not only from the men themselves, but from Memphis papers which they bring with them. I send two of these papers to General Halleck. I am growing anxious to know what the next move is going to be. The Southern papers advise the Columbus forces to fall back on Island No. 10 and to Fort Pillow. The force at Memphis is said to be about 12,000.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

{p.667}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 25, 1862.

General WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Commanding District of Cairo, Paducah, Ky.:

Your letter of the 23d,* asking what disposition I will have made of large re-enforcements now on their way, is just received. I do not know what work General Halleck intends me to do next, therefore cannot say where it is best to have them. Probably they had better remain at Paducah until further orders are received from headquarters of the department.

Our troops are now occupying Nashville. The rebels have fallen back to Chattanooga, only 3 miles from Georgia State line.

Two soldiers from the Eighth Missouri Regiment, who were sent as spies, have just returned from Memphis. They describe the feelings of the people as much inclined to return to their allegiance.

Orders have been given for the evacuation of Columbus. This I get not only from the men themselves, but from a Memphis paper of the 19th, which they bring with them.

There is a detachment of troops belonging to my command at Henderson, Ky., which there can be no further use of detaining there. If you have an opportunity of having them transported, I would like them to join their regiments.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 12.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 25, 1862.

Soldiers are positively forbid going beyond the line of sentinels outside the intrenchments.

The general commanding is again obliged to call the attention of division, brigade, and regimental commanders to orders restraining their men from committing depredations upon private property.

Such restrictions must be placed upon the actions of the men of this command as to prevent complaints in future of their killing stock or depredating in any manner.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, February 25, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, and Brig. Gen. WILLIAM T. SHERMAN, Commanding District of Cairo, Paducah, Ky.

The possession of Nashville by General Buell renders it necessary to countermand the order sent to Foote and Sherman yesterday morning, dated 23d. Grant will send no more troops to Clarksville. General Smith’s division will come to Fort Henry or a point higher up on the Tennessee River. Transports will also be collected at Paducah and above. All the mortar boats to be immediately brought back to Cairo.

{p.668}

Two gunboats to be left on the Cumberland, at Clarksville, to precede Nelson’s division up the river to Nashville. Having done this, they will return to Cairo. Two gunboats in Tennessee River with General Grant. The latter will immediately have small garrisons detailed for Forts Donelson and Henry and all other forces made ready for the field.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

(Copy to General Grant from General Sherman.)

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 26, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Send to Paducah transports sufficient to move Grant’s army up either the Cumberland or Tennessee. Accounts of Johnston’s movements are very conflicting, and we must be ready for any contingency. As soon as we know positively where he is a movement will be made. Extend the railroad to Bertrand and a wagon road to Sikesville [Sikeston]. General Pope was to occupy the latter place to-day.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 14.}

HDQRS. DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, February 26, 1862.

General Orders, No. 3, of the series of 1861, from headquarters Department of the Missouri, are still in force and must be observed.

The number of citizens who are applying for permission to pass through the camps to look for their fugitive slaves proves the necessity of the order and its faithful observance. Such permits cannot be granted; therefore the great necessity of keeping out fugitives. Such slaves as were within the lines at the time of the capture of Fort Donelson and such as have been used by the enemy in building the fortifications, or in any way hostile to the Government, will not be released or permitted to return to their masters, but will be employed in the quartermaster’s department, for the benefit of Government.

All officers and companies now keeping slaves so captured will immediately report them to the district quartermaster. Regimental commanders will be held accountable for all violations of this order within their respective commands.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, commanding:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., February 26, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I entered Nashville yesterday with a small force. It is insufficient, the enemy being only 30 miles distant, in greatly superior numbers; but I was compelled to it by the landing of a portion of the troops, contrary to my intentions. I have sent steamers to bring up the troops at {p.669} Clarksville, deeming it of vital importance that we should be re-enforced at an earlier day than my own troops can arrive. Steamers coming up should bring a full supply of fuel. None can be had on the river or here. Please let me know at once what your information is of the movements of the enemy. It is stated, on seemingly good authority, that the enemy has evacuated Columbus or is doing so.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 13a.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Nashville, Tenn., February 26, 1862.

The general commanding congratulates his troops that it has been their privilege to restore the national banner to the capital of Tennessee. He believes that thousands of hearts in every part of the State will swell with joy to see that honored flag reinstated in a position from which it was removed in the excitement and folly of an evil hour; that the voice of her own people will soon proclaim its welcome, and that their manhood and patriotism will protect and perpetuate it.

The general does not deem it necessary, though the occasion is a fit one to remind his troops of the rule of conduct they have hitherto observed and are still to pursue. We are in arms, not for the purpose of invading the rights of our fellow-countrymen anywhere, but to maintain the integrity of the Union and protect the Constitution under which its people have been prosperous and happy. We cannot, therefore, look with indifference on any conduct which is designed to give aid and comfort to those who are endeavoring to defeat these objects; but the action to be taken in such cases rests with certain authorized persons, and is not to be assumed by individual officers or soldiers. Peaceable citizens are not to be molested in their persons or property. Any wrongs to either are to be promptly corrected and the offenders brought to punishment. To this end all persons are desired to make complaint to the immediate commander of officers or soldiers so offending, and if justice be not done promptly, then to the next commander, and so on until the wrong is redressed. If the necessities of the public service should require the use of private property for public purposes, fair compensation is to be allowed. No such appropriation of private property is to be made except by the authority of the highest commander present, and any other officer or soldier who shall presume to exercise such privilege shall be brought to trial. Soldiers are forbidden to enter the residences or grounds of citizens on any plea without authority.

No arrests are to be made without the authority of the commanding general, except in case of actual offense against the authority of the government; and in all such cases the fact and circumstances will immediately be reported in writing to headquarters through the intermediate commanders.

The general reminds his officers that the most frequent depredations are those which are committed by worthless characters, who straggle from the ranks on the plea of being unable to march; and where the inability really exists, it will be found in most instances that the soldier has overloaded himself with useless and unauthorized articles. The orders already published on this subject must be enforced.

The condition and behavior of a corps are sure indications of the efficiency and fitness of its officers. If any regiment shall be found to disregard that propriety of conduct which belongs to soldiers as well as {p.670} citizens, they must not expect to occupy the posts of honor, but may rest assured that they will be placed in positions where they cannot bring shame on their comrades and the cause they are engaged in. The Government supplies with liberality all the wants of the soldier. The occasional deprivations and hardships incident to rapid marches must be borne with patience and fortitude. Any officer who neglects to provide properly for his troops or separates himself from them to seek his own comfort will be held to a rigid accountability.

By command of General Buell:

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 27, 1862.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Paducah:

I want transports enough in readiness to move General Grant’s available forces. I am only waiting to learn the positions of Buell and Johnston. Take forcibly, if necessary.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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PADUCAH, February 27, 1862.

General HALLECK:

There is no doubt Buell is at Nashville. It is reported that Sidney Johnston has moved towards Chattanooga. Columbus is still occupied by General Polk. Beauregard at Jackson, Tenn., sick. I have telegraphed to General Cullum for ten boats, and will stop those best adapted to the service till I have in all twenty boats. Ought they not be loaded in part with provisions and forage? I estimate Grant’s force at 25,000 men.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Nashville, February 27, 1862.

General D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

I have been in the city since an early hour this morning, anxious and expecting to see you. When I first arrived I understood that you were to be over to-day, but it is now growing too late for me to remain longer.

If I could see the necessity of more troops here I would be most happy to supply them. My own impression is, however, that the enemy are not far north of the Tennessee line. I was anxious to know what information you might have on the subject.

General Smith will be here this evening, with probably 2,000 men, as requested by you, and should still more be required, address me at Clarksville. To-night I shall return to Fort Donelson, but will take up my headquarters at Clarksville the next day.

Should you deem the command under General Smith unnecessary to your security, I request that they be ordered back.

{p.671}

I am in daily expectation of orders that will require all my available force.

U. S. GRANT, Major-General, Commanding.

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NASHVILLE, February 28, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

By means of the steamers which were got above the broken lock on Green River a bridge has been established at Bowling Green, which will enable the troops to pass without detention, and we shall soon be here in force. McCook’s division will begin to reach the Cumberland to-morrow. General Wood’s division will be up as fast as we can cross them. Thomas’ division, coming up the Cumberland, will, I think, begin to arrive to-night. Our transportation is coming partly by land and partly by water. It will not get up as soon as the troops. Our outposts are some 10 miles out on the Murfreesborough road.

I have a report to-day that the enemy is retreating toward the Tennessee. I shall advance as soon as we can move. In the mean time will determine the manner and direction. It is stated to me quite confidentially that Columbus is being evacuated and the enemy concentrating in the direction of Chattanooga, but I have no means of verifying it.

I have reason to hope that a great change will take place speedily in the attitude of the Tennesseeans, in both the manner of the military and political policy to be observed. As a matter of great importance and delicacy, I would advise you to use all the means you have to induce the President to pursue a lenient course, and as far as possible to reconstruct the machinery of the General Government out of material here, of which an abundance can be found that is truly loyal, though for some time overpowered and silenced. Deference to the recommendations of the most reliable Union people here would be advisable.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 28, 1862-9 a.m.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Nashville:

Nelson’s division and two gunboats were ordered up from Clarksville some days ago, and I think they must now be with you. I will immediately order another division. One gunboat should be sent back to escort it up the river. Columbus is not evacuated. It has been re-enforced. They are mounting more guns there and on Island No. 19. I am now turning it by New Madrid. Yours of the 26th just received.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, February 28, 1862-9.30 a.m.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

I have just received the first dispatch from General Buell for a whole week. It was dated the 26th, saying that he occupied Nashville on the {p.672} 25th. Two gunboats and Nelson’s division have probably reached him by this time. I will send Crittenden’s division as soon as a gunboat returns to escort it. Had I not better immediately move General Grant, with cavalry and light artillery, up the Tennessee, and endeavor to destroy the railroad connections at Corinth, Jackson and Humboldt? I require very little cavalry and light artillery for Pope’s expedition. They can be easily spared. I have transports all ready at Paducah.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

The enemy is mounting additional guns at Columbus and is fortifying Island No. 10.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Nashville, Tenn., February 28, 1862.

Mr. A. H. MARKLAND, Special Mail Agent:

SIR: I am directed by the general commanding to request that you will at once take charge of the post office in this city, and take such means as will open the mails at the earliest possible moment.

Very respectfully,

J. M. WRIGHT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington City, February 28, 1862.

To the PRESIDENT:

SIR: I have thought much lately upon the results of our experimental gunboats on the Western rivers. They have done even better than I had hoped, and it appears to me that the experience thus far gained may be made available for important operations.

I have a letter from Mr. Theodore Adams, builder of the Essex and of the mortar boats. I requested him at Cairo to examine the gunboats returned from Fort Donelson, and inquire particularly as to the effect of the fire of the batteries upon the iron plating.

From the newspaper reports and from a letter of Captain Wise, the quartermaster of the Flotilla, and from Mr. Adams’ letter, I reached the following conclusions:

The only guns used in these river attacks are the bow guns.

The broadside guns are serviceable as a reserve to replace a disabled bow gun, as in case of the bursting of a rifle on the Carondelet.

No shot heavier than a 32-pounder ball, except a 64-pounder rifle shell, struck the iron plating of the forward bulkhead, which is inclined at an angle of 45 degrees.

The only effect of the shots which did strike the iron plating was to dent it and glance off without injury.

The 64-pounder rifle shell which wounded Captain Foote and killed a pilot passed through the pilot-house, which it struck at a high angle, and which was sheathed with iron only 1 1/2 inches thick.

The Essex is sheathed on the broadside with 3/4-inch iron only, on heavy timber. Keeping bows on to the battery, the shot which struck {p.673} her sides struck of course obliquely and then glanced off without penetrating the 3/4-inch plate.

Should a vessel intended to work in a rapid river, stream, or tide-way be repulsed, she can back out, as the gunboats disabled at Fort Donelson did, still exposing only her bows.

I infer from these results that a boat constructed as sketched below would be very powerful, sufficiently protected, and, drawing little water, able taking advantage of the tides, to pass through the inland passages on the Southern coast from Fernandina to Charleston, and that three of them, mounting, say, four bow guns each, to be 11-inch, 10-inch shell guns or heavy rifles, old 32 or 42 pounder rifled, would give a battery of 12 guns, able to meet and destroy any hastily-erected battery on the low shores of the Southern inlets; drawing only 3 1/2 to 4 feet of water, able to visit every town on the coast intersected by an inlet not absolutely bare at half tide.

The 11-inch shells are a most powerful engine of destruction for close quarters, at which these vessels would terminate their fight, but the rifled 32 and 42 pounder shells have a penetrating power enabling them to pass through parapets of light earth of the thickness ordinarily used and an accuracy of fire enabling them to be thrown into the wide-mouthed embrasures of any earthen battery.

These boats are supposed to be sheathed on the bow, which can be struck only very obliquely, with 1 1/2-inch iron or with iron bars, while the bulkhead covering their batteries is of 2 1/2-inch iron, as used on the Western rivers. No other armor is necessary.

The weight borne at the widest part of the boats is not very great, and by being well braced the length can be made sufficient to give buoyancy and preserve a light draught.

There is if I read the Coast Survey map aright, a channel through which such boats could, removing obstructions, pass into Charleston Harbor above Fort Sumter, and a threat to lay Charleston in ashes would probably procure the evacuation of Sumter, certainly that of Charleston and the blockade of Sumter.

I have spoken with the Secretary of the Navy on this subject, and he authorized me to speak to you about it.

The Western rolling-mills have now practice in preparing this iron, its simple form enabling them to prepare it rapidly and cheaply.

The frames of the vessels could be made in New York and shipped thence. The engines for at least one of them can be bought ready-made, I understand, in Saint Louis, and with proper energy, from the day the plans are completed and the order given, I think that in forty days one at least of these vessels could be afloat at Port Royal.

They should be built at some convenient point in Port Royal Harbor, perhaps at Hilton Head or Beaufort. There is, I believe, inland navigation practicable for them from Charleston to Fernandina, and with favorable weather they could probably finish their cruise in the Saint John’s, having taken Fernandina and Jacksonville, Fla.

I respectfully advise the immediate construction of three or four such vessels at Port Royal.

The appropriation for gunboats under the Quartermaster’s Department is confined to the Western rivers.

I submit a very hasty sketch of the general plan proposed.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General, U. S. Army. {p.674}

SAINT LOUIS, March 1, 1862.

Maj. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Fort Henry:

Transports will be sent to you as soon as possible to move your column up the Tennessee River. The main object of this expedition will be to destroy the railroad bridge over Bear Creek, near Eastport, Miss., and also the connections at Corinth, Jackson, and Humboldt. It is thought best that these objects be attempted in the order named. Strong detachments of cavalry and light artillery, supported by infantry, may by rapid movements reach these points from the river without very serious opposition. Avoid any general engagement with strong forces. It will be better to retreat than to risk a general battle. This should be strongly impressed upon the officers sent with the expedition from the river. General C. F. Smith, or some very discreet officer, should be selected for such command.

Having accomplished these objects, or such of them as may be practicable, you will return to Danville and move on Paris. Perhaps the troops sent to Jackson and Humboldt can reach Paris as easily by land as to return to the transports. This must depend on the character of the roads and the position of the enemy. All telegraph lines which can be reached must be cut.

The gunboats will accompany the transports for their protection. Any loyal Tennesseeans who desire it may be enlisted and supplied with arms.

Competent officers should be left to command the garrisons of Forts Henry and Donelson in your absence. I have indicated in general terms the object of this.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 1, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo, Ill.:

Siege guns and mortars should be sent to Pope by best route. Who sent Smith’s division to Nashville? I ordered them across to the Tennessee, where they are wanted immediately. Order them back.

What is the reason that no one down there can obey my orders?

Send all spare transports to General Grant up the Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, March 1, 1862.

Capt. J. C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have informed the general commanding department (generally through the chief of staff) every day since leaving Cairo of my wants, what information was obtained of the movements of the enemy, &c. I will now recapitulate partly my wants. When I left Cairo, for the want of transportation it took two trips of the boats at hand to move the troops, leaving the cavalry to march, and leaving behind all the regimental train but four wagons to each regiment. A number of the regiments sent to re-enforce me came without wagons. Since getting into Fort Donelson I have written to have the wagons left forwarded. None of them have as yet come-I think none. As I have no quartermaster {p.675} to look out for these matters, I might be mistaken partly. My command is now suffering from camp dysentery, the result (according to report of surgeons) of being compelled to live on salt meat. I have had this country scoured for miles for beef cattle, but without being able to obtain them. The contractors for supplying fresh beef say that they have the cattle, but are unable to procure transportation. If I am compelled to move suddenly, it will be with a very weak force compared with what the major-general commanding probably expects. The loss in battle and the number who have sickened since reduces my force considerably. I will probably have to leave a garrison at Clarksville, Fort Henry, and at this place.

General Buell ordered General Smith, with the force at Clarksville (five regiments of infantry and some artillery), to join his column at Nashville. Two regiments that were sent as a guard to the prisoners have not yet been returned to me.

I most respectfully lay these matters before the general commanding the department, not to make suggestions, but that my true condition may be known.

There are now two or three cases of small-pox among the men. Every effort has been made to prevent the spread of the disease.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., March 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis:

I am now in sufficient force to feel secure, and this morning sent General Smith back to Clarksville. Thank you for your readiness to assist me. General Johnston is evidently preparing to go towards the Tennessee. Decatur and Chattanooga seem to be the points of rendezvous at present. As soon as I can see my way a little I will propose that we meet somewhere to consult, if agreeable to you.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, March 1, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Captain Phelps reports Columbus being evacuated now; guns, except from water battery, removed; quarters burned. Large force of cavalry but no infantry visible. Encampment seen Tuesday on bluff gone. Columbus on fire, and stores probably being destroyed. Polk did not send ladies, but proposes sending flag to some point to-morrow at 12 o’clock. Foote will make demonstration to-morrow or Monday.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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NASHVILLE, March 1, 1862.

General MITCHEL:

SIR: The general commanding has received your letter of this morning reporting that Captain Wilson, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, was shot while on outpost duty last night. The occurrence and the loss to your command are much regretted. The general suggests that your officers on outpost duty should be cautious and watchful and not expose themselves by becoming separated from their commands and thus render the {p.676} murdering of individuals, either by citizens or the enemy, impossible, or at least more difficult.

I am also directed to say that the general is not at this time prepared for a forward movement, and he does not wish you at present to commence it.

It is not deemed advisable at present to administer the oath of allegiance or to arrest persons whose loyalty is only doubtful. The general desires the protection of our forces to be extended with some liberality, and to reach a class of persons who are not hostile to us although not warmly our friends. This, of course, is not applicable to those in arms or who are known to give aid and comfort to the enemy.

The carbines for the Fourth Ohio Cavalry will be furnished as soon as practicable.

I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[JAMES B. FRY,] Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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SAINT LOUIS, March 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General BUELL, Nashville, Tenn.:

Columbus is nearly turned. The mortar boats will bombard it this afternoon, and General Pope will attack New Madrid to-morrow morning. A part of Jeff. Thompson’s force has been captured. Send to Paducah all spare transports; we are greatly in need of them; also one or two of the gunboats. Keep one gunboat in the Cumberland. I will make an appointment to meet you as soon as the Columbus movement is ended.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, March 2, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

Grant writes from Fort Donelson on 28th just returned from Nashville. Supposed him and army yet at Donelson. Buell ordered Smith’s division from Clarksville to Nashville. Sending steamers to report to Sherman to go farther.

Ought they not to go up Cumberland for Grant, and cannot the twenty-five steamers which went up Cumberland yesterday with Buell’s forces assist to bring back Grant and thence up Tennessee? Can be done in less time than marching across.

Island and head of promontory opposite New Madrid low and overflowed.

Will it then be necessary to send siege artillery, which will take, Lyford says, a week to get ready, with horses, harness, and ammunition wagons? Must have ten horses for each piece and move slow.

Can’t send it to Sikeston by railroad when ready. Sherman just telegraphs has sent ten steamers to Fort Henry.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 2, 1862.

Brigadier-General CULLUM, Cairo:

I think the bombardment should commence to-day, if possible. It will greatly assist Pope at New Madrid. If Columbus should be evacuated, {p.677} the fleet should follow to Hickman or Island No. 10. Send all transports you can spare up the Tennessee River.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., March 2, 1862.

General U. S. GRANT, Through General Sherman, Paducah:

General Halleck, February 25, telegraphed me:

Grant will send no more forces to Clarksville. General Smith’s division will come to Fort Henry or a point higher up the Tennessee River. Transports will also be collected at Paducah. Two gunboats in Tennessee River with General Grant. Grant will immediately have such garrisons detailed for Forts Donelson and Henry and all other forces made ready for the field.

From your letter of the 28th I learn you are at Fort Donelson and General Smith at Nashville, from which I infer you would not have received orders.

Halleck’s telegram of last night says:

Who sent Smith’s division to Nashville? I ordered it across to the Tennessee, where they are wanted immediately. Order them back. Send all spare transports up Tennessee to General Grant.

Evidently the general supposes you on the Tennessee. I am sending you all the transports I can find for you, reporting to General Sherman for orders to go up Cumberland for you, or if you march across to Fort Henry, then to send them up the Tennessee.

G. W. CULLUM, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Paducah, March 2, 1862-8 p.m.

General HALLECK:

I wrote you to-day, and since a gentleman named McCormick has come from Columbus. He says Columbus was evacuated yesterday. Some guns left, but the greater part carried off to Island No. 10, above New Madrid. I had a company yesterday at the Blandville bridge, and to-day have sent a cavalry force to enter Columbus, unless the troops from Cairo are already there. The Blandville bridge still stands, but all others are destroyed. The arms have not come for the Ohio regiment, but will be here to-morrow. I went to the town this afternoon and ordered the transfer of the sick and wounded prisoners of war from the Chauteau, which is a very large boat, to the January, which is smaller. The Chauteau will go up the Tennessee at and General Grant will be in possession of twenty good steamboats, capable of carrying 15,000 men and 3,000 horses. A violent thunderstorm has been prevailing all day, interrupting the use of the telegraph, so that I have been unable to report to you.

At Columbus yesterday Mr. McCormick says that they had full accounts of Pope’s intended advance from Commerce. It seems to me that the force on the island, if promptly followed, may be captured, or, what may be better, forced to abandon their guns, by General Grant’s advance towards Memphis.

I inclose you the Memphis Appeal of February 26, containing General {p.678} Pillow’s account of the battle at Fort Donelson. I write in haste, as the January is about to start for Cairo.

I, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., March 2, 1862-10 a.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Buell thinks the enemy intends uniting behind the Tennessee River, so as to be able to concentrate either on you or Buell. In this case it becomes doubly important, first, to hold Nashville; secondly, next to gain possession of Decatur and the line of road in that vicinity, in order to isolate Johnston from Memphis and Columbus. Having accomplished that, it would seem that Memphis and Columbus must soon fall. Chattanooga is also a point of great importance for us.

Arrange details with Buell.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., March 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Nashville, Tenn.:

I have telegraphed Halleck that it is important to seize Decatur and thus isolate Johnston from Memphis and Columbus. Of course you must hold Nashville firmly, and Chattanooga is a very important point to gain.

Arrange details with Halleck, co-operate fully together, and give him all the assistance you can. Push Carter forward as rapidly as possible. What is Garfield doing?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Cannonading.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 20.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, March 2, 1862.

The following changes in General Orders, No. 6 [February 21] ,brigading and assigning to division the troops of this command, are hereby made:

The Forty-eighth Illinois Volunteers is transferred from the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, to the Second Brigade, First Division; the Eighteenth Illinois Volunteers from the Second Brigade, First Division, to the First Brigade, First Division; and the Fifty-second Illinois Volunteers from the Third Brigade, First Division, to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division.

By command of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 14.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Fort Donelson, Tenn., March 2, 1862. ...

2. Two brigades of each the First and Fourth Division will proceed without delay to the Tennessee River by what is known as the Ridge {p.679} or Furnace road, and go into camp at the most accessible point for embarking on steamers. Three days’ rations will be taken and 40 rounds of ammunition, besides what is contained in cartridge boxes. All weak and disabled soldiers are to be left behind. Camp and garrison equipage is to be taken, but soldiers are to be limited as per General Orders, No. 17. No officer or soldier not entitled to forage will be permitted to ride on horseback or to have a horse with them.

Attention of division, brigade, and regimental commanders is particularly called to the execution of this order.

By order of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., March 3 [2], 1862-11.30 [9] p.m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

No material change in affairs since my dispatch of yesterday.

McCook’s division came up last night. Two brigades have crossed to-day. Thomas’ division has just arrived by water.

I am organizing depots, &c. We are finding every day large quantities of public provisions, principally bacon. The city is quiet and orderly. The enemy is leaving Murfreesborough and going towards Decatur and Chattanooga, and destroying all bridges as he goes. We will have to rebuild.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., March 3, 1862.

General MCCLELLAN:

Dispatch received. I have four divisions up; three and a half on this side of the river. Those coming by land have arrived without baggage.

The crossing is tedious. I can’t get exactly at what Halleck is doing, and therefore can’t see how to assist him at this moment if he should need it. I have proposed an interview with him and would like you to be present. He has to defer it a few days. I sent Garfield to chase Marshall entirely out of Kentucky. Have not heard from him recently. It will bring him down towards Cumberland Gap, and I will then unite him with Carter, who in the mean time will, I hope, have gained some advantage at the Gap. Use all your persuasion against the appointment of a military governor for Tennessee. It will do incalculable harm. Beg the President to wait.

D. C. BUELL

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., March 3, [received?] 1862.

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Washington, D. C.:

General Pope will attack New Madrid to-morrow. At the same time there will be a bombardment of Columbus.

I have had no communication with General Grant for more than a week. He left his command without my authority and went to Nashville. His army seems to be as much demoralized by the victory of Fort Donelson as was that of the Potomac by the defeat of Bull Run. It is hard to censure a successful general immediately after a victory, {p.680} but I think he richly deserves it. I can get no returns, no reports, no information of any kind from him. Satisfied with his victory, he sits down and enjoys it without any regard to the future. I am worn-out and tired with this neglect and inefficiency, C. F. Smith is almost the only officer equal to the emergency.

H. W. HALLECK.

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WASHINGTON, March 3, 1862-6 p.m.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis:

Your dispatch of last evening received. The future success of our cause demands that proceedings such as Grant’s should at once be checked. Generals must observe discipline as well as private soldiers. Do not hesitate to arrest him at once if the good of the service requires it, and place C. F. Smith in command. You are at liberty to regard this as a positive order if it will smooth your way.

I appreciate the difficulties you have to encounter, and will be glad to relieve you from trouble as far as possible.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army.

Approved:

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., March 3, 1862-12 p.m.

Hon. E. M. STANTON:

General Buell’s army is concentrating rapidly at this point, and will be ready for forward movements in a few days. Can General McClellan visit Louisville, and there meet, by appointment, General Halleck and General Buell, for consultation, to determine movements for Western forces.

I believe this to be important.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., March 3, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

What can I do to aid your operations against Columbus? Remember I am separated from you by the Tennessee. Johnston is moving towards Decatur and destroying the bridges as he goes. I have only one gunboat; all the others returned at once. I also sent Smith back Saturday last. Spare transports will be dispatched to Paducah.

D. C. BUELL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH BRIGADE, Camp Cumberland Ford, March 3, 1862.

Capt. J. B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff:

CAPTAIN: On the 1st instant I had succeeded in getting a supply of nearly five days’ rations for the command, and as a portion of the {p.681} ammunition shipped from Lebanon on the 4th of February last was received that day, I immediately issued orders for a forward movement to take place this morning. The Cumberland was not fordable, but boats had been prepared for crossing. Unfortunately rain commenced falling on the evening of the 2d instant and continued until this morning, causing such a rise in the river and streams between this and the Gap as to render the way impassable. The order for an advance, was duly countermanded when it was found that the bridge over Clear Creek was covered and after a portion of one regiment had crossed the river. The road is now impassable for wagons between this and Flat Lick, as a portion of it is under water. Ever since our arrival here we have had daily to encounter difficulties, in roads washed away, bridges destroyed, and almost incessant rains. Never before have I seen roads in such a condition, and unless there comes a favorable change soon in the weather, it will be impossible to transport supplies to our force.

By information received from different sources, and which seems to be reliable, the rebels at the Gap have been re-enforced by a North Carolina regiment, Colonel Vance, a Georgia regiment, and one or two Mississippi regiments. If I had men enough to divide the force and send one portion across the mountains, at, say, Big Creek Gap, to take the enemy in rear, I think that we could capture the whole force, but our effective strength, taking out the guards, &c., is about 3,300. I shall be prevented separating them so far as not to be within supporting distance. If I can do no more, I shall endeavor to protect this portion of the State from any further inroads on the part of the rebels. Much of the time since we have been here men have been on short rations. No ammunition for the Tennessee rifles has arrived.

Respectfully yours, &c.,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Commanding Twelfth Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS EIGHTEENTH BRIGADE, Camp Brownlow, March 3, 1862.

Col. C. A. MARSHALL, Commanding Sixteenth Kentucky Volunteers:

DEAR SIR: In view of the extraordinary fickleness of the Big Sandy, I presume it has been impossible for you to move up this way, as my last order directed. The Losses we have sustained require me to delay the forward movement for some time. You will therefore move a part or all of your command to Louisa, to guard that post from any depredations which may be threatened by marauding bands of rebels from the Virginia side, and hold yourself in readiness to move when the time is ripe. I send the paymaster on the first boat, and you will delay any movement till your troops are paid.

The acting assistant adjutant-general will communicate with you in person in reference to our movements. I have reason to hope that we may before very long be able to see a broader field of activity, and I hope I may be permitted to have your fine regiment with me.

Very respectfully,

J. A. GARFIELD, Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

{p.682}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 4, 1862.

General BUELL, Nashville, Tenn.:

If Johnston has destroyed the railroad and bridges in his rear he cannot return to attack you. Why not come to the Tennessee and operate with me to cut Johnston’s line with Memphis, Randolph, and New Madrid? Columbus has been evacuated and destroyed. Enemy is concentrating at New Madrid and Island No. 10. I am concentrating a force of 20,000 against him. Grant, with all available force, has gone up the Tennessee to destroy connections at Corinth, Jackson, and Humboldt. Estimated strength of enemy at New Madrid, Randolph, and Memphis is 50,000. It is of vital importance to separate them from Johnston’s army. Come over to Savannah or Florence and we can do it. We then can operate either on Decatur or Memphis or on both, as may appear best.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, March 4, 1862.

Major-General MCCLELLAN, Washington:

A rumor has just reached me that since the taking of Fort Donelson General Grant has resumed his former bad habits.* If so, it will account for his neglect of my often-repeated orders. I do not deem it advisable to arrest him at present, but have placed General Smith in command of the expedition up the Tennessee. I think Smith will restore order and discipline.

I hear unofficially, but from a reliable source, that our forces took possession of Columbus this morning, the enemy falling back to Island No. 10 and New Madrid. I am expecting official telegram hourly.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

* See Thomas to Halleck, March 10, and Halleck’s reply, March 15, p. 683.

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COLUMBUS, Ky., March 4, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The battalion of Second Illinois Cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Hogg, sent from Paducah day before yesterday, reached Columbus yesterday at 6 p.m. the enemy’s cavalry having just evacuated. Five gunboats, under Commodore Foote; General Cullum, on board the tugboat; and the Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Buford; Forty-second Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Northrop; and two battalions, composed of the Fifty-fifth Illinois, Major Sanger, Fifty-fourth and Seventy-first Ohio, under Major Andrews, dropped down this morning, and after some reconnoitering they discovered our flag and came ashore, finding Lieutenant-Colonel Hogg in possession. Have occupied the fort with the infantry. Fort very extensive, and large amount of guns, shot, shell, and stores abandoned by the enemy. Will dispatch for the Tennessee River instantly the Aleck Scott and T. L. McGill.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

{p.683}

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, March 4, 1862.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN:

Our cavalry from Paducah marched into Columbus yesterday at 6 p.m., driving before them the enemy’s rear guard. The flag of the Union is flying over the boasted “Gibraltar of the West.” Finding himself completely turned on both sides of the Mississippi, the enemy was obliged to evacuate or surrender. Large quantities of artillery and stores were captured.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, March 10, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A., Commanding Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis:

It has been reported that soon after the battle of Fort Donelson Brigadier-General Grant left his command without leave. By direction of the President the Secretary of War desires you to ascertain and report whether General Grant left his command at any time without proper authority, and, if so, for how long; whether he has made to you proper reports and returns of his force; whether he has committed any acts which were unauthorized or not in accordance with military subordination or propriety, and, if so, what.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Saint Louis, March 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington:

In accordance with your instructions of the 10th instant I report that General Grant and several officers of high rank in his command, immediately after the battle of Fort Donelson went to Nashville without my authority or knowledge. I am satisfied, however, from investigation, that General Grant did this from good intentions and from a desire to subserve the public interests.

Not being advised of General Buell’s movements, and learning that General Buell had ordered Smith’s division of his (Grant’s) command to Nashville he deemed it his duty to go there in person. During the absence of General Grant and a part of his general officers numerous irregularities are said to have occurred at Fort Donelson. These were in violation of the orders issued by General Grant before his departure, and probably, under the circumstances, were unavoidable.

General Grant has made the proper explanations, and has been directed to resume his command in the field. As he acted from a praiseworthy although mistaken zeal for the public service in going to Nashville and leaving his command, I respectfully recommend that no further notice be taken of it. There never has been any want of military subordination on the part of General Grant, and his failure to make returns of his forces has been explained as resulting partly from {p.684} the failure of colonels of regiments to report to him on their arrival and partly from an interruption of telegraphic communication. All these irregularities have now been remedied.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6