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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 6, Ch. XV–Confederate Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XV.
OPERATIONS ON THE COASTS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND MIDDLE AND EAST FLORIDA.
August 21, 1861-April 11, 1862.
(Fort Pulaski)
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CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.267}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 130.}

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, August 21, 1861.

...

XII. The undermentioned brigadier-generals of the Provisional Army of the Confederate States are assigned to duty as follows, viz:

...

2d. Brig. Gen. Roswell S. Ripley will assume command of the Department of South Carolina and the coast defenses of that State.

...

5th. Brig. Gen. John B. Grayson will proceed to Florida, and assume command of the Department of Middle and Eastern Florida, and the coast defenses of the same.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CHARLESTON, August 31, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Two transports with troops off bar yesterday; to-day off Bull Island. Probably enemy from Hatteras, after destroying batteries. Have re-enforced Stono heavily. Have ordered Orr’s regiment to Summerville to reserve. Have called on governor for another, besides holding Charleston volunteers in readiness to move until our batteries are in order. Must have force to prevent enemy’s landing, if possible. Hope, if uninterrupted, to dispense with extra force in fifteen days. If from one to four officers, having knowledge of ordnance or artillery duty, can be sent here, will assist greatly.

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

{p.268}

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTH CAROLINA, September 1, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: Colonel Gregg has two companies here, and desires that they may be received for the war into his regiment. As the law only admits of ten companies to a regiment, I refer the matter to you, and request an immediate decision, as I desire orders extended to these two companies. If agreeable to you I should most cordially assign these companies to his regiment, as he is a colonel of great experience and of the most distinguished standing. If there is any officer to whom twelve companies could be intrusted, then I should urge most respectfully the permission for Colonel Gregg. I shall not be able to arm them, as we have not a single arm to spare out of this State, and I am now remodeling the old arms picked up in the country, so as to try and be able to get arms for the forty-two companies now in camp under your requisition. You recollect you directed them to be formed into regiments and to elect their field officers. One of these regiments has done so, and the others will in a few days.

The President has telegraphed me to retain Colonel Orr’s regiment for our coast defense. The exposed coast of North Carolina will now be in possession of the enemy, and it endangers our whole defenses.

Under these circumstances I would respectfully urge that Colonel Gregg’s regiment be ordered to our coast, for the season is just approaching when an invasion may be anticipated, particularly after our recent disasters on the defenseless coast of North Carolina. If you were to order Colonel Gregg’s regiment into this State I presume his commission given by the President would be of older date than any volunteer regiment in the State, and, if so, it would make him the ranking colonel, and his experience would thus give confidence to the country.

I shall also place Colonel Dunovant and his regiment, recently organized under your requisition for the 3,000, under orders for our seacoast. I can arm and equip his regiment. Colonel Orr’s I have already armed and equipped, and I will go on to arm the others as fast as I can, and if you inform me immediately that Colonel Gregg’s regiment will he stationed in South Carolina, I will try and arm these two companies now here for his regiment, if you decide to receive them. Please inform me by telegram. With Orr’s, Dunovant’s, and Gregg’s regiments I would feel safe, as I have a stationary force organized in the city of Charleston of 3,000 well armed and trained men, ready to act, besides Colonel Heyward’s State regiment, now in actual service on the Beaufort coast and at the batteries recently erected.

I have also Colonel Manigault’s State regiment on the coast of Georgetown, above Charleston, and in the batteries. I have ordered another State regiment of well-trained men, under Colonel Hagood, into the forts at Cole’s Island, on the Stono, 25 miles from Charleston. These three colonels are thorough military men and of the highest standing and military education. 1 have also six companies of infantry (regulars) on Sullivan’s Island, and four of the battalion of regular artillery in Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie. I have ordered five months’ supplies into the former, to stand a siege, if necessary, and am raising two new artillery companies to put into it, but in the mean time will order other companies into it for the present. Besides Colonel Hagood’s regiment, now in the forts on Stono, I have there three regular companies of infantry and the battalion of regular dragoons, mustered in as infantry, under Major Lucas, so that I have in the forts and islands around

{p.269}

Charleston about 1,800 men, all well drilled, and a reserve in the city of about 3,000. This, with the State regiments under Colonels Heyward and Manigault, constitute about 7,500 men, and the additional regiments of Colonels Orr, Dunovant, and Gregg would make good 10,000 men. With this force, and ten cavalry companies I have on the coast and the reserves of about 3,000 men at the two camps of instruction, I think I could feel safe for the present. I am thus particular in details that you may understand our position and let the President know it All I beg is an answer as soon as possible, so that I may act as soon as possible.

I also earnestly beg, if possible, that you will order me, if you have it at Norfolk, 40,000 pounds of cannon powder. I loaned the governor of North Carolina 25,000 pounds, and also the governor of Florida, for Fernandina and Saint Augustine, 5,000 pounds, besides what I sent to Memphis, Tenn. If I could be sure of getting 40,000 pounds as a reserve for Charleston, I would immediately order a full supply of cannon powder for about 100 guns I have now on our coast below Charleston. As it is, I fear to drain Charleston entirely. I bought for the State last December and January about 300,000 pounds from Hazard’s Mills, in Connecticut, but I have distributed all of it but about 40,000 pounds, and used a great deal in our batteries in the harbor of Charleston. Please let me know immediately as to this point.

I now desire to get from you permission to raise for the war another regiment of rifles, and I think, if you give me the power, I can get it up with men who will arm themselves from our private rifles, and arms in their own hands. I think I could make a choice regiment, and with little or no expense as to arms, and selected from men who would incur the necessary expenses and, if you will give me the power to do so, and for me to appoint the field officers, and even the company officers, I could select men who were graduates of our State military institutions and of West Point, and I could select officers who are now in our regular State forces, and in the first volunteer regiments now in Virginia, to put in position. I would do so, because our regular forces and our forces in Virginia are only for one year, and most of their terms will expire in January and February next, and I desire to secure, in advance, the services of their officers “for the war,” as many of them have been in the late United States Army, and all of our regular forces have military education. I know them, and could make selections of officers for companies that would advance the public service greatly.

Please let me know on this point as soon as you can, and I will then proceed, in a quiet way, to raise a rifle regiment for the war, with officers all selected with an eye single to secure military education and qualifications. I would also desire to raise two full companies of cavalry, to be attached to it, of men who would arm themselves.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL FORCES, DEPT. OF S. C., Charleston, September 1, 1861.

GENERAL: I have the honor to request that authority may be given me to provide the force necessary for the defense of the batteries now being finished at different points of the coast. For this I think the following will be necessary.

1st. Authority to muster into service for the war, for special duty on the coast, a force not exceeding 1,500 men.

{p.270}

2d. Authority to establish a recruiting service for the enlisted troops now on duty, viz, the regiment of South Carolina infantry and the battalion of South Carolina artillery, that the former may be recruited and filled up to ten full companies, and the latter increased to a regiment, with its proper complement of field officers. This will, of course, require the co-operation of the governor of the State.

3d. Authority to procure, as speedily as may be, such means of transport, armed if necessary, as will insure a speedy communication and transport, by the inland routes, between the different points of the coast, as well as such facilities for guard service as may be necessary.

4th. To enable these things to be done as speedily as possible, and to provide such material as may be required by the chief engineer in charge of the coast defenses and by the ordnance officer on duty here, that means to the following amounts may be placed to the credit of the following officers, subject to draft for no other purpose than the defenses of the coast, unless by order of the Secretary of War: To the chief engineer, Major Trapier, $50,000; ordnance officer, Captain Childs, $25,000; quartermaster, Captain Lee, $100,000; total, $175,000.

The reasons for the above are as follows: For the first, that many men will be willing to muster into service for a particular locality who would not engage to go beyond the limits of the State or the coasts adjacent. It would also be bad policy to take too many men from the vicinity of these plantations, drawn from localities thickly settled with black population.

For the second, is the manifest importance of keeping up the strength of the small force enlisted in the department, being more reliable for the continued service of guarding the forts and batteries than men of a different class.

For the third, that our only means of communication are by the inland routes, which are tortuous and shallow, and only available for certain classes of vessels. If we have these vessels and speedy communication the inland navigation is a great element of strength, but without it it is one of weakness, enabling the enemy, by means of his barges, to overpower weak batteries, out the communication, and lay waste whole sections of country containing valuable property. The guard service is required to enable us to watch the enemy’s fleet, to assist vessels which may be endeavoring to run the blockade, and give timely notice of an attack in force. It is within my knowledge that one or two vessels at least have been warned off the harbor or captured which might have successfully run the blockade had there been a guard steamer to succor them. The brig West Indian, which ran the blockade this morning with 1,500 bags of coffee, came very near being lost by the wind failing when within 2 miles of the range of the forts and batteries. Had the calm lasted half an hour, chased as she was by the steam frigate and sloop of war now blockading here, she must have been captured by the boats of the squadron. A steam guard boat would have secured her from any hazard.

The reason for the fourth is, that while the War Department at Richmond is occupied with business of such gigantic importance as it now has in hand, many requisitions of vital importance lay by for their turn for consideration and action. Meantime master workmen and mechanics, many of them having their capital exhausted or in accounts against the Government, are in the present state of the money market often unable to pay their workmen, and delay ensues in important business. Funds provided for general service in the Quartermaster’s Department often are expended by requisition from abroad. Of the three requisitions {p.271} which have been made by the staff officers, attended to by my order, and which I have the honor to inclose, that most readily dispensed with is that of the Ordnance Department. Most of the material can be provided for by the guard service, but for various articles it would be well to have a fund for special purposes of coast defenses.

The estimate for the Quartermaster’s Department will be wanted especially to carry out the purposes mentioned in the third paragraph.

I have to request that the inclosed special requisitions be submitted with this communication for such action as may be deemed most proper by the Department.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

SEPTEMBER 5, 1861.

The original letter of General Ripley, of which this is a copy, has not yet been received at this office. The subject is, however, of such importance as to require immediate action, and hence this paper is respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, S. C., September 2, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: In my letter of yesterday I urged you to send back Colonel Gregg’s regiment to this State for the coast. Upon further reflection I withdraw any request of the kind, and leave it entirely to your own judgment as to the whole matter. You know the general plans and our resources, and I do not. I desire, therefore, now to leave the matter as to the disposition of Colonel Gregg’s regiment entirely to your own judgment, and hereby withdraw any request of mine on that point. If you will immediately authorize me I can raise many more companies for the war, and put them at the two camps of instruction, and perhaps it would be better for the President to appoint all field officers, or, if he will leave the appointments to me, I will make them from graduates of West Point or our own military academies, or from officers who have shown merit in the regiments now in Virginia whose terms of service will begin to expire in January and February next. I could also take officers from he regular forces now in this state whose terms will expire about February next, and thus save all our best officers by their appointment in forces for and during the war. If I can have discretion of this kind, I can then at these camps increase our forces greatly for the war, and as our twelve-months’ volunteers return from Virginia, I can catch nearly all of them immediately and save the best of their officers. Please give me an early answer on this point. The four regiments at the camps at present are electing, as you have, in yours of the 15th of July last, directed that they should do.

But all to be received after this, I desire field officers to be appointed either by the President or named by me and confirmed by the President or in any way the President thinks proper.

I have four very fine cavalry companies in camp and would be glad if you would allow me to name a major to command them.

I desire you to give permission for me to raise two full regiments of {p.272} cavalry besides, for and during the war, and if you can give me any assurance as to pistols and holsters, I think that I can do it. Let the President appoint their field officers, and let them elect their company officers, and when the number is full order them to the camp for Confederate service. If it is not your policy to raise two more regiments, then perhaps you might allow one.

The present four companies are by express telegraph from President Davis. I have three regiments and four companies of cavalry at one camp, and if you will permit I will appoint a very scientific officer, Major Stevens, the head of our military academy, to command them, and take charge of the camp for temporary purposes. Perhaps I could get Col. Thomas F. Drayton, who is a graduate of West Point, and a perfect and high-bred gentleman.

Very respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

P. S.-I most respectfully urge you will receive no more troops for any period except for and during the war, and let it be known.

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COLUMBIA, September 2, 1861.

Hon. Mr. WALKER, Secretary of War:

Will you allow me eight more companies for the war and formation of another regiment-the President to appoint, as he desires-Colonel Drayton to command? Please let me know.

F. W. PICKENS.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT, Savannah, September 3, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I beg to call your attention to the pressing necessity for additional troops on this coast at the earliest possible moment. I have received and mustered into service enough to replace the two regiments suddenly ordered to Virginia (Semmes’ and Williams’ regiments), and these are but enough to man the batteries on the coast, leaving us no protection on the main-land in case of trouble. Nearly all the companies I have at this moment are entirely raw and undisciplined.

The large calls upon the State of Georgia have taken away nearly every trained company and all the arms, except such as may be found in private hands. I am now endeavoring to organize all such as can furnish their own arms and muster them into service. In this way only can I secure a force that will give any protection to this coast May I ask the favor of you to say at once, by telegraph, that I may continue to organize new regiments and battalions on and near this coast? I wish to quiet the apprehensions of the people, by assuring them that I have full authority to organize and muster in until we have a sufficient force.

If the Department is willing to make appointments of colonels of these regiments, I recommend that Duncan L. Clinch (son of the late General Clinch) be forthwith appointed colonel, with authority to raise a regiment {p.273} for this coast. In any event please send me the telegraphic dispatch which I have above requested.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTH CAROLINA, Columbia, September 4, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 9th of August last to the governor of South Carolina, in relation to the First Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Glover, I have the honor to state that in consideration of the large number of State troops already in Virginia, and the recent requisitions of your Department for five additional regiments (which regiments are now nearly ready to take up the line of march), and in view of the anticipated invasion on our coast this coming winter, as evidenced by the Northern press and the Hatteras affair, the State authorities deem it inexpedient to permit the First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers (State troops) to leave the State for their unexpired term of service. The regiment is now guarding an exposed portion of our coast. His excellency the governor and the State authorities feel assured that you will not accept the services of any independent troops without they present the consent of the governor.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General of South Carolina.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT, Savannah, September 4, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: In addition to what I said in my letter of yesterday in reference to the urgent necessity for a large addition to the military force on this coast and a recommendation that Duncan L. Clinch, esq. be authorized to raise a regiment for local defense, I take leave respectfully to suggest that the elections for field officers of regiments within my observation have proved very disastrous to discipline and efficiency. If consistent with the views of the War Department I would be truly pleased to see all such appointments here made by the President, and I will suggest names, if desired.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, September 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General RIPLEY, Commanding Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: A copy of your letter of September 1 to Adjutant-General Cooper has been submitted to this Department. In view of its importance I take the earliest opportunity to reply. {p.274}

The authority for which you ask, “to muster into service for the war, for special duty on the coast, a force not exceeding 1,500 men,” is granted, but at the same time I take occasion to say that, as Governor Pickens is already organizing a force for home defense, it will be proper for you, so far as practicable, to act in concert with him, to avoid both unpleasant complications and unnecessary expenses.

2d. The authority asked for “to establish a recruiting service for the enlisted troops now on duty,” &c., as proposed, is also granted.

3d. With regard to the proposal “to provide means of transport, armed, if necessary,” &c., this Department must be, to a great extent, guided by your own view of the actual necessity of your position. The Department is, therefore, unwilling to refuse any means of defense which you recommend as necessary, and such armed transports as you propose will be allowed within the limits of as reasonable expenditure as may be rendered necessary. All requisitions made in consequence of this expenditure within the limit of necessary defense will be granted promptly, and the difficulties which you suggest as likely to arise in the execution of these plans, and in view of which you ask a departure from the usual rule, may, it is hoped, be without necessity of such departure, easily and satisfactorily obviated, without the necessity of such arrangements as you propose.

The requisitions inclosed by you have been sent to the proper bureaus, and will doubtless receive prompt attention.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, September 8, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

There is much alarm here about the coast. Stronger force and vigorous action absolutely necessary. Will you increase the force and quicken the energy, or will you furnish funds to support troops and approbate prompt State action for that purpose? I wish to avoid all conflict of authority, but prompt action is indispensable. Please answer immediately.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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RICHMOND, September 9, 1861.

Governor BROWN, Savannah, Ga.:

In a letter to General Lawton I have ordered him to increase his force as he may deem necessary. All legitimate expenditures for this purpose within the line of his approval will be paid by the Government.

L. P. WALKER.

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RICHMOND, September 9, 1861.

General A. B. LAWTON, Savannah, Ga.:

You are authorized to organize such military force as is in your opinion necessary for the defense of the coast of Georgia.

JOHN TYLER, JR., Acting Chief of Bureau of War.

{p.275}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, September 10, 1861.

His Excellency FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Governor of South Carolina:

SIR: It affords me very great pleasure to acknowledge your very interesting communication to this Department of the 1st and 2d of the present month, and to congratulate you upon the evidence they furnish of the ceaseless energies put forth by the governor of South Carolina during your administration. Where such faithful manifestations of public concern exist, guided and controlled by such admirable wisdom and policy, it is profoundly to be regretted that this Department is so circumscribed by law as not always to have it in its power to second your suggestions. Under the law a regiment is limited to ten companies, and therefore your proposition to incorporate two additional companies into Colonel Gregg’s regiment, although based on sound reasoning and solid facts, cannot be granted. Colonel Gregg has been informed more at large of the manner in which the action of this Department is circumscribed in the premises, and will doubtless communicate with you on the subject. Nor does there exist any authority by which I can authorize you to appoint company officers. They are invariably elected, according to the laws regulating the militia of the States respectively, and this is the case where vacancies occur after troops have been received and mustered into the Confederate service. To enable the Government even to appoint field officers troops must come to it direct, without State intervention, under the amended acts of Congress passed at the second session. Then they must come solely by companies, and be mustered into the service as such. Thus your excellency will perceive how utterly impossible it is for this Department to entertain your proposition in these respects. Neither can I gratify you by accepting the two unarmed cavalry regiments you generously offer. The service does not absolutely require them, and our present resources do not admit of their acceptance. But the two cavalry companies to which you allude will be received, if armed and equipped; and where there is necessarily so much negation of your wishes, I am happy to say that the rifle regiment you propose to raise for the war and to arm will be taken into service.

This Department, through an anxious desire to oblige you, will also receive ten companies, to be offered by companies, and to be organized by its authority into a regiment, thus reserving to itself the right to appoint the field officers; but if your excellency can possibly arm these companies, it is sincerely hoped you will arm them, though it be only with the flint musket, country rifle, or heavy shot-gun.

The cannon powder that you ask for cannot be spared by the Ordnance Office unless there be an absolute existing necessity for it, under the pressure of demand in other quarters, where it is indispensable. It is preferred that your excellency will retain your patience upon the subject for the present.

I entirely concur with your excellency in the policy of not accepting any more troops except for the war, and have endeavored ever since the Congress invested this Department with the discretionary power of thus receiving military tenders to limit its favor by this policy; but as our arms have not been abundant, it has been and still is a matter of pure necessity to accept tenders coming to us armed for a less period.

{p.276}

With renewed congratulations upon the martial force of your State and considerations of high personal regard, I remain, your excellency’s obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. MIL. DEPT. MIDDLE AND EAST FLORIDA, Fernandina, September 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, C. S., Richmond:

SIR: The whole population of Florida may well unite with me, as they do, in deploring the condition of the State. I have been in the State nine days and have been at this place for five days. I have pulled down much of the battery and magazine, and when completed (I hope in two weeks) the harbor will be guarded and protected. An alarm existed a few days since, and the governor promptly called out a large force of volunteers, and a strong resistance could have been made, but without aid from Fort Clinch and the battery it would have been useless to expect it. As sure as the sun rises, unless cannon, powder, &c., be sent to Florida in the next thirty days, she will fall into the hands of the North. Nothing human can prevent it. There are not 4,000 pounds of powder at every post combined. The batteries are incorrectly put up and not finished. The enemy can land where they please. Guns and chassis are lying on the beach, though that I have remedied. There is not an officer to put up the guns or an officer to superintend their instruction when put up. There is not an officer to receive the supplies when they arrive I have no assistant adjutant-general, nor an assistant commissary, nor an assistant quartermaster, nor an aide-de-camp. Mr. Wood, if appointed a lieutenant, was applied for as aide, Mr. I’Anson as assistant quartermaster. Captain Gott was applied for, and received orders, which were revoked; I applied for no one else, as I knew no one to apply for. I applied to General Cooper for Lieutenant Thomas, adjutant of Colonel Ward’s regiment Florida volunteers, who was dissatisfied with his position. Colonel Ward, Lieutenant Thomas informs me, will object to the transfer. I trust, Mr. Secretary, that you will take this communication under your immediate notice, and have the ordnance stores and the various officers sent at once. I send a list of guns and ammunition wanted forthwith. Florida will become a Yankee province unless measures for her relief are promptly made. I leave to-morrow for Tallahassee, and shall, with all dispatch, visit Saint Mark’s, Apalachicola, Cedar Keys, and Tampa. I will communicate my movements from time to time. I send a copy of my requisition for ordnance; also a circular found, with many others, posted about this city.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

JOHN B. GRAYSON, Brigadier-General, C. A., Comdg. Middle and East Florida.

[Inclosure.]

-Requisition for ordnance and ordnance stores required to be filled at the earliest moment for the Military Department of Middle and East Florida, and to be consigned to Capt. William Hickman, assistant quartermaster, Fernandina, East Florida:-

14 32-pounder cannon; six to be rifled, if possible.

4 42-pounders, if possible, and rifled, with chassis. The chassis for the 32-pounders are promised from Charleston.

{p.277}

23,000 pounds of cannon powder for 29 cannon.

12,000 musket cartridges; few or none on hand.

300 shells for three 12-pounder howitzers at Saint Augustine. The fixtures for the 32-pounders are promised from Charleston.

12 12-pounders, with chassis and fixtures complete; the 32-pounders to be the army pattern.

JOHN B. GRAYSON, Brigadier-General, C. A., Comdg. Middle and East Florida.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1861.

Notice.

All loyal citizens of the United States are hereby notified that the Federal troops will take possession of the island of Amelia in a few days, and if they desire to escape the vengeance of an outraged Government they must assemble on the south end of the island. All those found at that point, except the military, will be regarded as good citizens of the United States.

Assemble on the right.

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FORT PULASKI, September 15, 1861.

Capt. R. M. CUYLER, Chief of Ordnance, Military District of Savannah:

CAPTAIN: I am in receipt of yours of the 14th. In compliance with your request I inclose herewith a statement of the companies stationed at this post, with number of men, number and description of arms, and amount of ammunition, as given me by the captains of companies.* Seven thousand of the 8,000 cartridges sent here, subject to the order of Colonel Mercer, have been sent to Tybee. Out of the 1,000 left the guard are being supplied.

The 4,000 cartridges in the ordnance store-room, to which you refer, were made by the Irish Jasper Greens, and are ball, without buck-shot. They will answer, perhaps, for the Washington Volunteers, but Captain McMahon prefers the cartridges with buck-shot. There are no caps with them.

We have not made any fuses yet, having no fuse die that we can use. As soon as we can obtain fuse dies we will commence making fuses. We can easily work three or four dies if we have them. We have ours made at the Central Railroad workshops, which is imperfect. I send it up by this boat. If you will send it to Mr. Burns, at the Central Railroad, I have no doubt but that he will have the mistake corrected. If you will examine it you will see around that some of the forms for the fuses are very irregular; the taper does not extend to the small end, and if it did it would make the fuse too large at that end.

We want about a dozen small copper funnels (perhaps tin would answer) for filling shells; there are but two here. We also want a few fuse reamers.

Will you permit me to suggest the propriety of holding a survey upon the carriages of the barbette guns? I very much fear that they are not calculated to withstand the shock of repeated firing. Would it not be well to attend to this at once, and, if it is decided that the pine is not {p.278} suitable, have oak procured and carriages made without delay? I am informed that seasoned oak enough to replace all the barbette carriages can be had at Darien.

Permit me also to bring to your notice the small supply of cannon powder now in our magazines, it being but about 45,000 pounds. The Navy holds an order on the fort for 1,700 or 1,800, which, if delivered, will reduce the quantity of shot made.

Why cannot Captain Echols and yourself visit the fort some day this week and assist us with your advice?

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. S. CLAGHORN, Captain, Commanding Post.

* Not found

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., ENGINEER BUREAU, Richmond, Va., September 21, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: The project of auxiliary coast defense herewith, as submitted by Col. A. J. Gonzales, though not thought to be everywhere applicable, is believed to be of great value under special circumstances. In the example assumed at Edisto Island, where the movable batteries rest on defensive works and are themselves scarcely exposed to surprise and capture, a rifled 24-pounder, with two small guns, rallying and reconnoitering from each of the fixed batteries, would prove invaluable. A lighter gun than the 24-pounder, and quite as efficient, might be devised for such service, but this is probably the best now available. Colonel Gonzales’ proposed arrangements for re-enforcing certain exposed and threatened maritime Posts seem to be judicious and to merit attention.

Very respectfully,

D. LEADBETTER, Major, Engineer.

[Indorsement.]

SEPTEMBER 23, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Inclosure.]

RICHMOND, VA., September 14, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President C. S. A.:

SIR: I have the honor to place before you the outline of a system of coast defense which, if adopted, will, I believe, very much increase the security of our Atlantic and Gulf States, and render a lesser force than otherwise would be required sufficient for the protection of our coast. I have not been bold to submit it to you for adoption without having first had it before scientific officers of our Army and other gentlemen of military experience, who have highly commended it for practicability and efficiency. As acting inspector-general on Morris Island, and since up to this day as inspector of the troops and defenses on the coast of South Carolina by Governor Pickens, I have probably had opportunities for studying our coast and the way of protecting it not enjoyed by others. Taking the coast of South Carolina as a representation, with but few {p.279} exceptions, of our Southern coast, and taking the island of Edisto as a representation of the nature of its seaboard, we have as roughly marked in the sketch on opposite page:

We have one of our most valuable agricultural regions, with a population of about 5,000 negroes and one hundred and odd voters, with one sand open work (A) on North Edisto entrance, mounting six guns, and another (B) on South Edisto entrance, mounting two guns. On this island, as on the whole of our coast, there is a hard practicable sand beach, and immediately behind it a line of sand hills, forming almost a continuous fort of nature’s own making. The shallowness of the water opposite the coast, extending for several miles, would prevent any but the lightest vessels from approaching it. Hence the enemy’s large steam frigates, except through their tenders and barges, can inflict no injury upon us. By means of these barges, however, a force can be landed, if unresisted, anywhere upon the beach, and the works at the inlets taken in the rear. Through these inlets the batteries can be engaged by third-class steamers and by gunboats. Supposing the armament at these inlets to be so increased (which should be done) as to prevent ingress of ships, and consequently of heavy artillery (for the latter cannot be landed in boats upon the beach), in the absence of an overwhelming land force lining the whole extent of our coast we should have upon the {p.280} latter artillery of the greatest range, in order that it may engage small steamers lying off, sink approaching barges, and should the latter effect a landing with howitzers and men, crush them by the superiority of their metal and the advantages of range, and at the same time so portable that it can easily be used upon the coast, and even in emergencies upon the sandy roads on the island or the mainland. In the rifled 24-pounder on siege carriage we have the gun required.

Experience has shown that a rifled 24-pounder, not banded, can throw an elongated percussion shell, the most formidable to ships, much over 3 miles. The conditions necessary for the safety to the gun are, that the shell do not weigh more than one and a half the weight of the round solid shot of the same caliber, and that the charge for the 24-pounder do not exceed five pounds. This 24-pounder rifled cannon, outranging the largest Dahlgren guns of the enemy’s fleet, and, if provided with good shells, far more formidable than the former, can, on siege carriages, be drawn with the greatest ease up and down the beach at half and at low tide by 6 horses. I will assign, however, 10 horses to each gun and 10 to each ammunition wagon, and I would permanently attach to each gun and ammunition wagon, for protection and support, for assistance in drawing them at high water or on heavy roads on extraordinary occasions, and for co-operation in action against infantry, a body of cavalry, at the rate of 10 mounted men to each gun and ammunition wagon. For such guns, stationed on the coast, no more carriages and no forges, &c., would be required to be moved with the guns, for the reason that this artillery has for its object to link the batteries at the inlets, to close and watch the space which intervenes between them, and to prevent their being taken in reverse. At night they are expected to unite in some central post upon the coast, or to fall back upon the forts which constitute their base. These forts they would flank against a land attack, and re-enforce materially in a contest against ships. For this purpose, at each fort or battery there should be constructed a suitable work, with magazine and stored ammunition, ready to receive these guns whenever recalled. Thus, if there were stationed three 24-pounder rifled cannon on siege carriages on the natural fortress of sand hills (a most important feature of our coast) back of the beach on Edisto Island, at the points marked C, D, and E, they would cross their fire against barges or land forces, and would even advantageously engage, when united, any small steamers that might contrive to approach sufficiently near to protect the enemy’s landing.

To carry out beyond peradventure the operation of moving behind the sand hills, where the road is heavy, to move at high water in great emergencies along the beach, to cross with the seacoast flying artillery a belt of country in order to intercept the enemy or to take a strategic position, a strong rope, with ten straps permanently affixed to it along its length, is to be connected to the chain the draught horses are pulling by. Each of these straps is hooked on temporarily to the breast-band of the saddle of each cavalry soldier assigned to each gun and ammunition wagon, and thus 20 horses will be the draught to each gun in any difficult traveling. In an emergency, to place the guns in position at the shortest notice and in the most difficult localities, the horses and horsemen belonging to the ammunition wagon can be attached temporarily to the gun, and thus 40 horses are at once available to extricate it even from a morass. This duty performed they can return, and still more easily remove the ammunition wagon. In case of an attempt of the enemy to land, the infantry at the two forts, A and B, could, unseen behind the hills, come to the support of cavalry and artillery. I would {p.281} arm the cavalry with sabers and double-barreled guns. Behind sand hills, in defense of a battery from an enemy landing on the beach where the space to be traversed by him is very short and open, I would prefer the double-barreled gun to any other arm, especially as in landing from the boats the enemy must be crowded. Two volleys of large buck-shot and the saber, even on foot, would do quick work. Our men are all used to the double-barreled gun, and they would fire it promptly and confidently. Besides, that weapon can now be furnished to the troops when rifles could not be had. Moreover, if the enemy is in motion, or the horsemen, or if both, he is far more likely to be hit at short ranges with the double-barreled gun than with a rifle. To the uses of a support as infantry the cavalry could add the services peculiar to itself of charging a disorganized or surprised enemy, vedette and patrol duty, and the transmission of intelligence and of dispatches. On the shells for these guns I would have two fuses-the percussion at the apex, to be used against ships, and the Bormann fuse on the side, to be punched when fired upon infantry, barges, or at sharpshooters on the tops of ships while in close action.

Nothing that the enemy can bring can neutralize this system. The inlets being closed, he can land no heavy artillery. These guns would help to close the inlets, and would prevent even the landing of small guns. These, if landed, would be crushed by our artillery, and so would their small ships, if after passing the inlets they should venture into the narrow and tortuous creeks beyond. In connection with these guns nothing prevents the use of howitzers. The former would always remain guns of position, superior in range and accuracy to the Dahlgren, as well as in destructiveness to ships.

To fully complete this system, however, in addition to the above means of defense permanently and immediately upon the coast, I would have at each State center of operations-at Charleston, for instance, for the defense of South Carolina-a central battery of seacoast flying artillery of twelve rifled 24-pounders, organized on the same principle as those hereinbefore mentioned, with forges, sling-carts, extra ammunition-wagons, &c., superadded, as they would have to dart off much farther than the former from their magazines. For this central battery of rifled cannon the personnel of two companies of artillery and two squadrons of cavalry might be sufficient. Adding to these a regiment of rifles or light infantry, a compact, formidable flying column would be at hand-a fortress in itself on reaching any part of our coast where nature has provided suitable sandworks. Upon the receipt of intelligence of the proximate attack of any point upon the coast-North Edisto, for instance, in the above sketch-the whole of this armament, with provisions for a week, could be towed in two flats or lighters (such as Ferguson’s, in Charleston) in the space of six hours by one or two small steamers. At each of our forts upon the coast a temporary work should be constructed to receive these guns, as well as those upon the beach, as soon as they are called in.

Let us suppose North Edisto fort, when the enemy’s fleet appears off it, to have but the six guns it has at present. The three 24-pounders, rifled, on the beach, as soon as in battery, would increase its armament to 9. The arrival of the central battery would in six hours increase it to 21, of which at least 15 are rifled. Should the fleet move to attack another point upon the coast, the battery and its support would also move inland in the creeks on a line parallel to it, to meet it wherever its services are required, the fleet all the time unconscious that a fort is closely following it. Nothing but a few light-draught steamers and {p.282} large flats always at hand is required for this most important service. Let us roughly estimate the value of the succor brought in this way at the beginning or in the progress of an engagement at North Edisto:

Guns from the beach3
Guns from Charleston12
Total15
Artillerists from the beach, say50
Cavalry from the beach, say60
Artillerists from Charleston, say190
Cavalry from Charleston240
Regiment of rifles700
Total1,240

Fifteen pieces of formidable ordnance and 1,240 men, which, added to the force of even so small a post as it is at present, would give us 21 guns and 1,500 men.

Of course this infantry support from Charleston is what should at all times be ready to leave at a moment’s warning. Other regiments could immediately follow-at any rate, within twelve hours. With suitable bomb-proofs at the fort and proper discretion on the part of the commanding officer the enemy could be held in check until the arrival of re-enforcements sufficient to discomfit them. Depots for ammunition for these guns should be kept at each post expressly for them, and all ammunition for them should be uniform.

Supposing Georgia to have a similar provision made for her defense, and Savannah to possess, too, her central battery and flying column in the same time-in somewhat more time than it would take to dispatch the Charleston flying column if Edisto is the point attacked, but in much less time if it be the important port of Port Royal Harbor-24 rifled guns can at once be sent to the scene of action from both cities, and together with them over 2,000 men. In a few hours more 5,000 men from the two States, uniting at Savannah by means of the railroad, would at Hilton Head fort defy the power of any assailant. The first point is to prevent surprise. This the seashore guns will do. The second is to prevent the enemy from seizing any inlet in less than a day’s fight. This the flying column and central battery should do. The third is that he shall not move inland, and this the succors which can and should be sent in support of the flying column should be able to do. With more guns and of heavier metal at every inlet and strong garrisons at our isolated posts our coast would be secure, and the necessity of a large force up the country, where it can do no service except in re-enforcing Charleston, would not exist. Because the coast is weak, its support should not be more than a few hours removed; because Charleston is strong, its support might be at Aiken or Columbia. Much can be done in uniting the means of Georgia and South Carolina, and even of North Carolina, in defense of either of the three States against an invasion of the enemy.

At all the centers of operations, as, for instance, Wilmington, Charleston, and Savannah for our Atlantic coast, there should be one regiment assigned to the special duty of forming part of the flying column at a moment’s warning during the said week. Everything needful for the transportation and for the subsistence of this column for one week should be stored up and kept in readiness to be carried off at a moment’s warning. The quartermaster and the commissary of each regiment would upon their regiment entering on duty every week look into the quality and quantity of provisions, equipments, &c., designed for their regiment {p.283} when put in motion. The advantages are obvious of having one regiment assigned each week from the militia of Charleston and other cities for this special duty. The balance are at rest, and the one on duty when called out is not flurried in its arrangements. Should the enemy have forced an entrance into one of our inlets, the central battery at Charleston, as well as the one at Savannah, starling by the railroad, marked upon the sketch, would meet him upon any of the bluffs on the main-land, under which he must necessarily pass in his progress through narrow and tortuous creeks. From these bluffs and within pistol shot the almost vertical fire of rifled guns would be destructive even to ironclad boats, and if the enemy should effect a landing before the arrival of the battery, it is easy to perceive of what advantage it would be in enabling a flying column at the head of a bridge or in a debouch to arrest his progress, or even discomfiting him, before the arrival (necessarily more tardy) of an army. For carrying out such a plan sea-rangers in boats and small steamers on the lookout, telegraphs a good system of signals, facilities of transportation in lighters and steamers, prearranged railroad facilities, and the co-operation of our Navy are a matter of course.

We have in South Carolina very nearly the number of 24-pounders on siege carriages required for the establishment of this system. I understand that there are twelve guns of this description lying idle at the Pensacola navy-yard, which I would recommend our authorities to obtain. By working day and night all these guns can be rifled in two or three weeks. Should there be serious difficulty in procuring horses for these guns, the loan of all the mules required could be obtained, I should think, from our planters for the matter of their own defense. They could be furnished already harnessed by the planters, the Confederate Government reimbursing them their value should they be lost or injured in the service. Cavalry of the very best description exists throughout the seaboard, and is anxious for employment. There is no reason, then, why, in as little time as it will take the Lincoln Government to fit out a squadron, we should not contrive to have an omnipresent fort along the whole extent of our seaboard.

All of which I have the honor to submit, with assurances of my respect and regard.

AMBROSIO JOSÉ GONZALES.

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RICHMOND, September 25, 1861.

Brigadier-General LAWTON, Savannah, Ga.:

Intelligence that I believe reliable indicates that the enemy’s expedition is intended for Brunswick. Inform Governor Brown. Can I do anything to help you? Have ordered the Bartow Artillery company to Savannah.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, September 25, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I can do nothing, for want of arms, unless I hold those now landing from steamer Bermuda. I sent to-day a special agent to Richmond on {p.284} this subject. Georgia is stripped of arms. Men in abundance, if a few days are allowed.

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General.

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ATLANTA, GA., September 25, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Colonel Stovall, whose battalion is at Lynchburg, is here. Cannot send another gun out of the State. I ask that you order his battalion back to Brunswick on the coast, and I will fill it up to a regiment in the State. I also request that five other armed companies of Georgia troops be ordered back to the coast without delay, as an invasion of the coast is looked for daily, and you have nearly all the State guns in the Confederate service. Please answer both requests immediately. Colonel Stovall will wait here till I hear from you.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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RICHMOND, September 25, 1861.

Governor BROWN, Atlanta, Ga.:

Have sent orders to Major Shackleford, as requested. Have ordered Bartow Artillery Company to Savannah to report to General Lawton. Am reliably informed that the enemy will attack Brunswick. Be prepared.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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ATLANTA, GA., September 26, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Thank you for the order for the 1,000 guns to General Lawton. Let me beg of you to order Colonel Stovall’s battalion back from Lynchburg and let me fill it up to regiment for the coast.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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RICHMOND, September 26, 1861.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Atlanta, Ga.:

Your dispatch received. I cannot order back to Georgia any armed troops, for reasons which I will explain by letter. Instead of sending you a thousand men, I have ordered 1,000 of the rifles at Savannah, with the proper quantity of ammunition, to be turned over to General Lawton for arming that number of your men, as I understand you have plenty of men.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

{p.285}

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RICHMOND, September 27, 1861.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Atlanta, Ga.:

The thousand rifles were ordered to be given you instead of sending back the battalion from Lynchburg. Grave reasons of policy forbid sending back any troops from Virginia.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, September 30, 1861.

E. P. LAWTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah:

One thousand small-arms and one rifled 12-pounder were assigned by order issued to the proper ordnance officer for the service of Georgia.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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Abstract from report of the Provisional Forces, Department of South Carolina, Brig. Gen. R. S. Ripley, commanding, for September, 1861.

Stations.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
Sullivan’s Island (Colonel Orr)691,2441,5211,603
Stono forte (Colonel Hagood)549041,1151,274
North and South Edisto (Colonel Dunovant)15293367382
Near Georgetown (Colonel Manigault)26397538567
Near Aiken (Colonel Jones)38629739 898
Field’s Point473106 112
Port Royal Harbor4185227 289
Fort walker9195224256
Sam’s Point6566976
Braddock’s Point45357 69
Camp Lookout34875 96
Near Columbia (cavalry) 11162173 194
Lightwood Knot Spring (cavalry)35262 64
Charleston Arsenal (artillery)3456869
12th 13th and 15th Regiments S. C. Volunteers*2,372
Total2494,3365,3418,271

* Stations not given.

{p.286}

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Abstract from monthly return of the Military District of Savannah, Ga., commanded by Brig. Gen. A. R. Lawton, for September, 1861.

Stations.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Artillery.
Officers.Men.Heavy.Light.
Little Cumberland Island34863715
Sunbury, Ga.3545759
Sapello Island61772002085
Great Warsaw37075795
Isle of Hope24244606
Fort Pulaski1020425027336
Thunderbolt battery4941101154
Genesis Point25672764
Oglethorpe Barracks44979806
Fort Screven61591701818
Saint Catharine’s Island26772912
Camp Lawton, Savannah16242273305
Brunswick, Ga.3247757858725
Tybee Island408569731,0562
South end Big Cumberland Island25365744
Blackbird Island3901051125
Grand total1382,7383,1863,4278217

APALACHICOLA, October 1, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: The citizens of Apalachicola, under a deep sense of their present insecurity and anxiety for the safety and protection of their families and property, deem it their duty to address you on the subject of the defenses of their city. About the 1st June last, upon application, the executive of our State ordered two 32-pounders (old guns) to be delivered to us, and these, at the expense of the citizens, were brought here and placed in battery in the most eligible position to command the several approaches to the town. At a later period a messenger was dispatched to Richmond, who succeeded in obtaining an additional number of guns, and it was deemed advisable that these should be placed in battery at Saint Vincent’s Island, to command the entrance (West Pass) to our harbor, and the work was commenced and prosecuted with all the means and men that the city could command.

More recently a regiment in the Confederate service has been organized, five companies of which have been detailed to this point, and are now under command of Colonel Hopkins, who has established his headquarters at Saint Vincent’s Island, removed all the troops to that point, dismantled the battery here, and issued a peremptory order for two rifled cannon, daily expected, and ordered siege guns, mounted for the use of the city, to be sent to him on arrival, thus monopolizing for that station every available means of defense, leaving to our company of volunteer artillery and two companies of undrilled infantry, with less than 100 invalids and exempts, the entire and sole protection of the city, and 1,500 women and children, whose natural protectors are most of them enlisted in the service, and without the means to remove their families to places of greater security. The only means of communication is with boats, not only requiring a heavy expenditure in their employ, but they are subject to capture at any moment, as they may easily be intercepted in their trips to and from the city to the island through a {p.287} wide and deep channel across Saint George’s Island between the two points, and entirely beyond the reach of any guns that can be put in battery at Saint Vincent. The approaches to our town by land, as also from the East Pass, are entirely unguarded, and it would not require a large number of such boats as are now being constructed by the enemy to capture the city before any intelligence of an attack could reach Saint Vincent or assistance be rendered by the forces there. The capture of the city would invest Saint Vincent on the main-land side, their supplies would be cut off, and their entire force easily reduced to the alternatives of death or capture without even a show of defense, as no possible outlet of escape would be open to them. The armament at Saint Vincent consists of four ship-mounted and two long 32-pounders, and recent events at Hatteras have demonstrated the insufficiency of such ordnance against the heavy and long-range guns of the enemy. It is believed by military and scientific men that an abandonment of that position would not leave the city exposed to large vessels, and that by removal of the guns and troops, erecting batteries with long-range guns to command approaches by water, causing earthworks to be thrown up at assailable points around the city, with a battery of light artillery to furnish our present company, our town would be more secure than it could possibly be made in any other manner.

Lieutenant McLaughlin, of the Navy left here a few days since for Richmond, and to him, as an officer qualified by experience and examination of our position, we refer to present these matters more fully before you.

Insecurity and apprehension are predominant feelings now, yet these will in nowise lessen the determination of our people to perish beneath the ruins of their city rather than ignobly desert or suffer it to become the prey of the vandal hordes who threaten to assail it. We would speak modestly and respectfully of the officers who have been furnished by the Confederate Government to conduct military operations in our State, and the announcement of General Grayson’s appointment, from his long-tried and acknowledged capability, gave general satisfaction, but a recent visit from him has exhibited in him such an enfeebled state of health and constitution as almost to forbid hope of amendment, and we must necessarily be deprived, if not altogether, to a great extent, of his valuable aid and counsel in our necessity.

We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants,

H. R. TAYLOR et al.

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MARIANNA, October 2, 1861.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY:

DEAR SIR: I returned from Tallahassee on yesterday and received yours of the 15th ultimo. I expected to have received a letter from you at Tallahassee, but was disappointed. Having heard that Governor Perry had received one from you informing him that two rifled cannon, &c., had been ordered to Apalachicola, I inquired of him if it were true. He said it was, and read the part of the letter only which referred to the rifled cannon and powder being sent. I regret that Lieutenant McLaughlin was ordered back to Richmond by Colonel Hopkins and the consequent excitement among the citizens, but I know nothing of the particulars. The fact is, our State is in a most deplorable condition. The regiment at Fernandina is said to be demoralized by habitual intemperance of the colonel and lieutenant-colonel, and I am informed even the cannon have not been mounted, and dissipation and disorder {p.288} prevail. There are but eight companies, and never have been more in Hopkins’ regiment-three companies at Apalachicola, two near Saint Mark’s, one at Tampa, and two at Cedar Keys. You will perceive the useless expense of field officers by the arrangement. Would it not be advisable to concentrate the regiment-if, indeed, eight companies be a regiment-and transfer them to General Bragg’s command at Pensacola, and order the Magnolia Regiment, commanded by Colonel Anderson, at Pensacola, to the defense of Apalachicola? Under General Bragg’s command Hopkins’ regiment would be drilled and made useful, and Colonel Anderson’s regiment, with the aid of State troops convenient to Apalachicola, could successfully defend the place with the aid of Lieutenant McLaughlin and a few experienced artillerists.

Suggest the proposed change to the President and Secretary of War. Several companies are organized and ready to tender their services to the Confederate States for twelve months, and consequently there would be no difficulty in supplying the places of the companies of Hopkins’ regiment, now at Fort Williams, near Saint Mark’s, Tampa, and Cedar Keys, by more efficient companies under suitable commanders. The officers of the regiments mustered into the Confederate service in the State imagine that they are entirely independent of State authority, and if it is proper I wish you would request the Secretary of War to issue a suitable general order upon the subject, especially in this State. I anticipate no difficulty whatever with General Bragg or General Grayson, or any gentleman of military education. We can co-operate harmoniously. By the by, General Grayson and myself are old personal acquaintances and friends, though twenty years have elapsed since we parted, and met a day or two ago in Tallahassee. General Grayson’s health is very bad. He is nearly spent with consumption. I thought he would die last Wednesday night, and I fear will not have physical strength to discharge necessary duties in Florida.

I think there would have been no difficulty in forming the Fifth Regiment, but Governor Perry has organized five of the companies intended for the Fifth Regiment with an artillery battalion, and appointed D. P. Holland, esq., lieutenant-colonel to command it for Confederate service. The governor acted, if by any authority, by such as is unknown to me. In the present deranged state of affairs I shall be inaugurated and enter upon the duties of governor on next Monday with a heavy heart and a fearful apprehension of my inability to perform the duties of the office creditably and very usefully; but to the best of my judgment I will encounter surrounding difficulties, resolved to place the State upon the best war footing, and rely upon the Army Regulations and the laws of the State and the efficient aid of the officers sent here by the President to correct existing evils. From recent indications I think a scheme of systematic opposition to you is designed by some men in our State, and permit me to say to you that under all circumstances you may rely upon my friendship promptly to meet, and, if need be with personal responsibility, the most prominent assailants.

In haste, yours, &c.,

JOHN MILTON.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 176} ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, October 10, 1861.

...

X. Brig. Gen. E. K. Smith is assigned to the command of the Department of Middle and Eastern Florida, and will relieve Brig. Gen. J. B. {p.289} Grayson, whose state of health is such as to prevent him from discharging the active duties of that command.*

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Revoked October 22, and Brig. Gen. James H. Trapier assigned.

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HDQRS. THIRD REGIMENT FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS, Fort Clinch, Fernandina, Fla., October 14, 1861.

To the SECRETARY OF WAR, Confederate States of America, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to request that you order me to order one of my officers to muster in for twelve-months’ service Lieutenant Colonel Holland’s battalion of artillery. This battalion is absolutely necessary here. They are now in service under the order of the brigadier-general, and have been under my command and now are. The field officers, Lieutenant-Colonel Holland and Maj. Charles F. Hopkins, are fine officers. They are good artillerists, and thoroughly understand their profession. They were appointed by Governor Perry, and are the unanimous choice of the whole battalion. They are the most important aid that could be given me. I would respectfully request that the Department authorize me to have them mustered in without delay, and that they may muster with six companies. They are now erecting batteries, signal stations, establishing points for the ranges of the guns, and have been for some time. They are in the Confederate service, but not yet mustered in, and Captain Stockton has other companies to attend to, and cannot muster the troops as speedily as their efficiency requires. I have the honor to refer the Department to the accompanying copies of orders and letters for information as to the condition of this force and what it is doing.*

Owing to the illness of Brigadier-General Grayson, I cannot ascertain when the guns and ordnance stores for here will arrive. I have to specially request that the ordnance officer be required to send me without delay a supply of ammunition. I have only 2,000 caps and about fifteen rounds of musket cartridges, and the artillery battalion have four 6-pounders and only about five rounds of musket cartridges. I trust the Department will send me at once the necessary ammunition for musketry which can be spared for this point. I would urge the speedy forwarding of the guns and requisition made by Brigadier-General Grayson. His ill-health has caused me to make this statement and request. The general has done everything that man could. His command have perfect confidence in him, and I trust the officious meddling of scared politicians, who have never raised voice or hand for our independence, will receive that merited rebuke from headquarters it deserves for meddling with the acts of better men. Neither the troops nor the people have confidence in them. We are satisfied, and all we want is ammunition.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. S. DILWORTH, Colonel, Commanding.

* Not found. {p.290}

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, Fla., October 18, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President of the Confederate States:

SIR: I feel it my duty to present for your consideration the following facts:

First. That for the defense of Florida cavalry is, perhaps, less efficient than for the defense of any other State. At the most important points we should have batteries with guns of heavy caliber. To guard between important points, boats of light draught, with signals, at proper distances, and convenient to those guarding distant and exposed positions a few good horses, to be used by expressmen to give notice of any imposing approach of the enemy. Not many troops are required in the Confederate service, if those in service shall be commanded at important points by brave and skillful officers. There is much derangement of military affairs in this State, owing chiefly to the desire to enter the Confederate service for short periods and certain pay; but if the War and Navy Departments will respect my opinions I hope to establish such military organizations as will in the end be least expensive and most useful. Our chief reliance in connection with the coast defense should be infantry and light artillery, not in service, but ready to be at a moment’s warning, and to be concentrated where needed to support those in the Confederate service.

The recent authority to W. G. M. Davis, esq., to raise a cavalry regiment has excited a perfect furore upon the subject. The large majority of those who were willing to serve as soldiers of infantry are now in favor of riding into service, and I assure you, sir, a battle will never be fought in Florida by cavalry, unless the want of proper coast defenses, artillery, and infantry, shall induce an invasion, and will then be fought at great disadvantage. I entertain no feeling or thought personally unkind to Mr. Davis. He is a gentleman of the legal abilities. But I do regret that the material for the judicious defense of the State has been so much interfered with by the disposition excited in favor of cavalry service. Independent of the companies raised for Colonel Davis’ regiment I have refused commissions to ten associations for cavalry companies within the last two days. Almost every man that has a pony wishes to mount him at the expense of the Confederate Government, and I would most respectfully urge the necessity of the appointment of an honest, prudent, and experienced officer to visit Florida immediately, and inquire into and report the expenses being incurred. Let him first go to Apalachicola, and ascertain the nature and necessity of the expenditures there in the employment of boats, &c., and report immediately to the proper Departments; thence to other positions, and examine and report. It will afford me pleasure to aid in the investigation, and if the officer will come to Tallahassee I will to the best of my ability, direct the course of inquiry. I am fully persuaded that one-half the amount that will be expended, if there shall be no immediate check to expenditures, wisely appropriated, will secure the defense of Florida, and by means that will be useful in a future emergency. The unnecessary expense for cavalry would supply the means for the proper coast defenses; would enable me to equip companies of light artillery and infantry, which equipments might be preserved to protect the peace which we hope to obtain by the present war. But the hundreds of horses which are now being withdrawn from agricultural industry will be of little avail in war and leave the State without the means of agriculture, which will be difficult to supply.

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General Grayson is in a dying condition. General E. K. Smith, I am informed, has been appointed to succeed him, and permit me to suggest that his command shall extend west, so as to embrace Apalachicola and Saint Andrew’s Bay, and to express the hope that his staff will be composed of gentlemen of military education and experience. This suggestion is made because Colonel Hopkins entertains the opinion, if I am correctly informed, that General Grayson’s command does not embrace Apalachicola, and I regret to say that Colonel Hopkins’ military ability is much doubted by many worthy citizens, and unpleasant circumstances have consequently occurred, which I apprehend will result unhappily.

From a misapprehension of facts, the Fourth Regiment was tendered by my worthy predecessor without a full complement of companies. Colonel Hopkins has three of these companies at Apalachicola; there are two at Saint Mark’s, two at Cedar Keys, and one or two in the neighborhood of Tampa. Thus scattered, it is impossible for them to act as a regiment without previous instructions and competent officers.

I would respectfully suggest that Colonel Hopkins be ordered with his three companies to Saint Mark’s, to protect that place and the coast between the Ocella and Crooked Rivers, and if the Departments will furnish me with two good engineers and two good drill officers of artillery I will defend Apalachicola with State troops, and such troops as I may be able to raise and place in a camp of instruction for the army of reserve. If such an order should be deemed advisable, I would be pleased to be informed of it three or four days before Colonel Hopkins shall leave there, and I will visit the place and put the troops in proper positions of defense.

There is another matter to which I would respectfully invite attention. By letter from the War Department, dated June 30, 1861, the governor of this State was required to furnish 1,000 men as the quota of the State in the army of reserve, and to place them in a camp of instruction. For this purpose four companies were raised under special commission, and only four, and these were assembled at Fernandina, called a battalion of artillery, and put into the Confederate service, under command of Mr. D. P. Holland as lieutenant-colonel, with Mr. Charles F. Hopkins as major. I am not apprised that such a battalion, if any, was called for or authorized by the Secretary of War, and the appointment of the officers by the governor was, in my judgment, without authority, and contrary to the ordinances of the Convention, the Constitution, and the laws of the State, and that,if in the course of events, any court-martial shall be ordered, the matter will be inquired into by the civil authority, the commissions declared void, and the so-called battalion will be disorganized and demoralized.

I have felt it my duty thus candidly to submit to you my opinion, and invoke your judgment upon the matters submitted for your consideration. It has been said that perhaps General Smith would not accept the command in Florida, in which event I hope the regiments and companies which have been or may be accepted for service in this State by a general order of the War Department, not interfering with General Bragg’s command, may be made subject to my orders, and the defense of the State shall be successful, and at the least possible expense.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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OCTOBER 21, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

MY DEAR SIR: The following are the only points that occur to me to suggest:

1. That the special attention of General Trapier be directed to such points in his department as the governor may consider to be of chief military importance.

2. That he should be instructed to arrange with the governor for obtaining the ten companies in the speediest manner possible, and, in order to avoid delay in bringing the post at Fernandina under better command, he should be authorized to appoint a colonel to take command of the companies as they are mustered, unless the Department is prepared to designate one at once for the command.

3. That he should be authorized to make such alterations in the number and organization of the forces employed in Florida as may in his judgment be advisable; for which purpose he might be authorized to muster or discharge troops according to exigency, keeping the Department advised of his acts.

4. It would also be well to authorize him, if he deems it advisable, to arrange with the Cuban Telegraph Company for the surrender of the line between Savannah and Florida to the Confederate States during the war.

5. If it requires special authority to enable him to do so, he might be authorized to employ and attach to each post a capable drill officer.

Respectfully, yours,

D. L. YULEE.

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COLUMBIA, October 22, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I have been informed another large vessel has arrived at Saint Mary’s with arms, &c. From your last letter I am in hopes you will send 2,000 rifles for our flanking companies and 300 cavalry pistols for the men just mustered in. It is essential to our service, as I have put out 4,000 of arms in a few days past, which entirely exhausted our supply.

F. W. PICKENS.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, October 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRAPIER:

SIR: The President has, as you will perceive from the inclosed papers, accepted your tender of service, has appointed you brigadier-general, and assigned you to the Department of Eastern and Middle Florida. Your instructions are brief and simple. Do everything that your means and energies will permit to place the coast of Florida in a state of defense. You will first proceed to Fernandina, as the point most important and most likely to attract the attention of the enemy; but you are left to your own discretion as to the proper location of your headquarters.

{p.293}

Your staff will be appointed and commissioned in accordance with your recommendation, unless some special objection should exist. Upon one point you may require the aid of this Department. You will find, as I am informed, that troops have been mustered into the service of the Confederacy in such manner as to render their services almost valueless, either by reason of the incompetency and inefficiency of their officers, or because mustered for cavalry or artillery where such arms are not required or cannot be procured, or for other like reasons. In a word, I am informed that a radical reform on this subject is required in Florida. Under these circumstances you may be at a loss how to proceed, and I would therefore suggest that on your application the Department would not hesitate to muster out of service all such organizations as would come within the class above described, and then muster the men afresh by companies, so as to leave it in our power to organize the regiments and appoint the field officers, instead of leaving them to be elected by the men. We might thus hope to obtain efficient and competent officers; and for your guidance I inclose you a circular letter, prepared in answer to the constant inquiries addressed to this Department, and which will inform you of the policy on which we act in receiving tenders of troops. I send you likewise a set of the laws, so far as passed, which you will require for your guidance in many cases that must arise.

I am informed by Mr. Yulee that the Cuban Telegraph Company would place its line at the service of the Government at little or no cost, with the view of having it kept in order until the return of peace shall make it profitable. If this be so, you are authorized to make arrangements with them for that purpose, as the keeping up of your communications with Savannah cannot but be very useful in your operations.

You will be sustained by this Department as far as possible in your efforts to discharge the duties confided to you, but our resources in small-arms, in ordnance, and ammunition are very limited when compared with the enormous coast line we have to defend, and we cannot therefore supply, as we would wish, the several points where defenses are necessary. We must concentrate our means as promptly as possible at the different assailable points after the attack, not having enough to furnish any but the most important in advance.

Wishing you success and distinction in your new command, I am, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 186.}

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, October 22, 1861.

...

X. Special Orders, No 176, Adjutant and Inspector General’s Office, of October 10, 1861, is revoked.

Brig. Gen. James H. Trapier, Provisional Army, is assigned to the command of the Department of Eastern and Middle Florida, and will proceed at once to Fernandina, under such special instructions as may be given him by the Secretary of War.

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. MIL. DEP’T, MIDDLE AND EAST FLORIDA, Tallahassee, October 23, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose a copy of the report of Maj. W. L. L. Bowen, announcing the capture of two sloops and their crews. I have submitted a like copy to Col. W. S. Dilworth, Third Regiment Florida Volunteers, at Fernandina, who succeeded to the command upon General Grayson’s death.

The vessels you notice sail under the “American colors, with papers from Key West, with license to engage in the fishery on the Florida coast, and supply the Rey West market with the same.” There is a feature in this case that induces me to inform the Department, after a consultation with his excellency the governor of Florida. It seems the smacks belong to a firm in Key West, known as William H. Wall & Co., who I learn from a refugee here from the island are men good to the Southern cause. One of the firm, though a signer of the ordinance of secession, has taken the oath to the Federal side, but says it was done under duress. The refugee states he was a book-keeper for several years in the house of the Messrs. Wall & Co., the alleged owners of the smacks, and says, in addition, that he is sure the firm has not only wished for the success of our struggle, but that they have aided with money. It has not been made known to any one here that they (the vessels) are true to the Confederacy; so, in the absence of Colonel Dilworth at his post near Fernandina, I, acting as assistant adjutant-general during Lieutenant Wood’s absence, most respectfully write the Department, that a delay of several days may not occur in this case, where doubts exist as to whether the smacks are prizes or not, it being said they belong to friends, yet sail under our enemy’s flag. In the mean time I have written to Major Bowen, and said it would be well to keep his prisoners under guard until he can hear from higher authority. His excellency Governor Milton informs me that the crews are for the most part Spaniards, and may claim protection of that flag, and also that at Key West the Federal authorities force all persons, regardless of nationality, to take the oath of allegiance to the United States.

I respectfully inform you that in my letter to Colonel Dilworth I mentioned my intention of addressing you, to avoid delay.

I have the honor to be, sir, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE UPSHUR MAYO, First Lieutenant, C. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, FORT BROOKE, Tampa, Fla., October 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN B. GRAYSON, Commanding Middle and East Florida:

DEAR SIR: After my complimentary regards, permit me to report for your orders 13 prisoners of war, captured under my command on the 10th and 11th of this month, being the crew of the sloops William Batty and Lyman Dudley, sailing under the American colors (Stars and Stripes), with papers from Key West, with license to engage in the fishery on the Florida coast, and supply the Key West market with the same. The sloops are of the first class, well rigged, and in good order. One measures 65 16/95 tons, the other 56 80/95 tons.

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The sloops have been duly turned over to the prize commissioner as legal prizes to the Confederate States, and the prisoners are detained in safe custody for your disposal; and, in consequence of the inconvenience and difficulty of subsisting troops at this post, I hope you will order the prisoners to be sent to some other place, or disposed of in some other manner as soon as practicable.

With a deep regret for your ill-health, and with due regard to your orders, I am, sir, most respectfully, yours, &c.,

W. L. L. BOWEN, Major, Commanding Military Forces, Tampa Bay.

The sloops William Batty and Lyman Dudley are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the property of William H. Wall & Co., of Key West. They have been seized at Tampa Bay by the military for sailing under the Federal colors and with papers from Key West. Having been in the employment of Messrs. William H. Wall & Co. for several years, I know them to be true Southern men, and have largely aided the Confederate cause.

William Pinkney, one of the firm, has taken the United States oath under duress on the island, but signed the ordinance of secession. The permission for their vessels to sail under the Federal flag is only to keep him from seizure and imprisonment.

CHAS. ANTONIO.

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RICHMOND, October 23, 1861.

Gov. JOHN MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

General Kirby Smith has been assigned to duty with Army of the Potomac. General Trapier, of South Carolina, has been assigned to your State, and Mr. Yulee leaves to-morrow morning with his instructions.

General Trapier will go first to Fernandina, and you can address him there.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, October 24, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Well pleased that General Trapier has been assigned to the Military Department of Middle and East Florida. Would respectfully suggest that the Military Department of the State be so arranged as to embrace the State, distinguishing the departments to which General Bragg and General Trapier have been assigned. The reason of the suggestion is that Apalachicola and Saint Andrew’s, two important points, are not embraced in a general order. We have at Saint Mark’s howitzers and empty shells. No powder or fuse to prepare them. We need guns of large caliber and ammunition.

Respectfully,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 300.}

HDQRS. MIL. DIST., SAVANNAH, GA., October 25, 1861.

...

2. By direction of the Secretary of War all unarmed troops in camps of instruction, who have been mustered in for the war, will hold themselves in readiness to proceed forthwith to Richmond, Va. Commanding officers, quartermasters, and commissaries of such troops will make the necessary arrangements for an immediate move, and report, by letter, to these headquarters.

By order of Brig. Gen. A. R. Lawton:

THOS. J. BERRY, Aide-de-Camp, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, October 26, 1861.

Col. W. S. DILWORTH, Comdg. Third Regt. Fla. Vols., Hdqrs. Fort Clinch, Fla.:

SIR: I am in receipt of your letter of the 14th October, with its several inclosures, submitted to this Department by Capt. Thomas E. Buckman, who came to Richmond by your orders. Captain Buckman’s company having been accepted as a “company of infantry, armed with double barreled shot-guns, for twelve months,” I have directed Brigadier General Trapier to have the company mustered in on those terms whenever the required conditions are fulfilled.

With regard to your request that Lieutenant-Colonel Holland’s battalion of artillery be mustered in as organized, with six companies for twelve months, I have to say that this battalion has never been accepted by this Department, nor can we accept artillery companies in battalions, but only by independent companies or batteries, leaving the question of any further organization to rest with the proper authority. Neither do we furnish any batteries to companies of artillery offered for twelve months only. It appears, however, that this battalion possesses but a single battery, sufficient only, and barely sufficient, for a single company. I have therefore directed Brigadier-General Trapier to accept, and muster in a single company, if offered, furnished with this battery for twelve months, but not to accept any other company of artillery for twelve months not armed with batteries, except such as he may deem necessary for working heavy guns in battery, and those only by independent companies. Lieutenant-Colonel Holland has been informed that his battalion cannot be accepted as at present organized, and therefore that his commission cannot be confirmed. However able he may be as an officer, and however valuable his services may be to you as an artillerist, of which I have read with great pleasure your flattering testimonials, this course is dictated necessarily by a regard for the interests of the service and for the general policy of this Department, a brief view of which, so far as concerns the accepting and organization of troops, &c., you will find stated in the accompanying circular, which I respectfully inclose. It is now, of course, needless for me to add that the additional field pieces which you ask for on behalf of this battalion cannot be furnished.

An artillery company furnishing its own battery will be equipped for the field when mustered into service, but no person other than the proper officer of the Government can be authorized to purchase horses {p.297} or any other equipments or supplies for the battery or for the company, and such as may be furnished will be accepted only at a fair valuation.

The remaining topics of your letter shall receive due consideration, and your requisitions for ammunition, &c., are referred to the attention, of the Chief of Ordnance.

Very respectfully,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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NORFOLK, October 26, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

A Federal soldier’s hat was picked up to-day at Colonel Taylor’s farm, near Willoughby’s Point, 3 1/2 miles from Old Point. It contained two Boston papers, one of the 19th and one of the 21st. They contain important developments as to the destination of the great expedition. The gunboats are to concentrate in Hampton Roads, and the transports are to repair to Annapolis, and there embark a force of 25,000 men, under General Sherman. Several of the larger steamers are loaded with surf-boats. The papers state that the expedition is intended for Charleston and other places on our coast. At sundown the lookout reports over 100 sail of vessels in the Roads. They are arriving and departing continually. The main part of the expedition is still at the Roads, and great activity prevails in the fleet. Will send papers by Monday’s mail.

JAS. F. MILLIGAN, Captain, Signal Officer, Department of Norfolk.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 190.}

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, October 26, 1861.

...

XIII. The State of Georgia will hereafter constitute a separate department, to be designated the Department of Georgia, the command of which is assigned to Brigadier-General Lawton, headquarters Savannah, Ga.

XIV. The Department of Middle and Eastern Florida, announced in paragraph XII, Special Orders, No. 130, Adjutant and Inspector-General’s Office, of August 21, 1861, will extend west to Choctawhatchee River.

...

By command of Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, October 28, [861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: The special order by which the Chattahoochee River is established as the line between the two military departments of Florida excludes Apalachicola and Saint Andrew’s Bay from the department to which General Trapier has been assigned, both places being west of the river and therefore in West Florida. It may be best that these places should be in General Bragg’s department, for the following reasons. viz:

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First. For necessary supplies Apalachicola and Saint Andrew’s are more conveniently connected with Pensacola than with any important position in Middle or East Florida.

Second. The means of communication by telegraph and mail facilities are more speedy and less expensive; also for transportation of troops, guns, ammunition, &c.

Third. The military department east of the Chattahoochee River, in the present deranged state of affairs, is more than sufficient to command the utmost energies of any general to make a successful defense of the various important positions subject to and threatened with attack.

You may inquire, then, why I suggested by telegram that Apalachicola and Saint Andrew’s Bay should be embraced in General Trapier’s command. At the time the suggestion was made these places were not, by any general orders emanating from or authorized by the War Department known to me, embraced in any military department. From a misapprehension of the locality of Apalachicola General Grayson had assigned Colonel Hopkins to the command of the fort at Apalachicola, meaning, I suppose, the fort at Saint Vincent’s Island, 12 miles distant from Apalachicola. The public interest and the proper defense of the place required the immediate attention of an experienced and competent officer. Very heavy, and in my judgment, upon the information received, very unnecessary, expenses were being incurred. As to expense, one item of $130 per diem for a steamboat, for which there was neither urgent nor reasonable necessity. As to defenses, one item: a ditch was commenced, to be 3 feet deep, 3 feet wide, and about 3 miles long, to be depended upon to enable not exceeding 500 men to defend the city from an attack by land.

Moreover, unpleasant differences had arisen between Colonel Hopkins and Captain Dunham, of the State troops, which excited and alarmed the citizens and threatened most serious and disreputable consequences, the official orders relative to which by General Grayson and myself will be made known to you by certified copies inclosed by next mail. I did not suppose that General Bragg could give his immediate personal attention at Apalachicola, or that I could confer as promptly with him as with General Trapier, to remedy existing evils. Colonel Hopkins is a gentleman, but perhaps a little too excitable, and may not be possessed of, in an eminent degree, the knowledge of men and science of war requisite in a military commander.

In a letter bearing date 30th June the Secretary of War notifies the governor of this State that “the President deems it prudent, if not essential to the public safety, to form and organize a reserve army corps of 30,000 me and apportion to Florida the quota of 1,000 men. Your excellency will therefore receive for the war 1,000 men by independent companies,” &c.

When I came into office not a company had been raised, and the opinion, I think, was entertained by my worthy predecessor that the requisition could not be even partially complied with. I entertain a different opinion, and hope to be able in a few weeks to report to you 1,000 men in camps ready for instruction. For one battalion I shall establish a camp near Apalachicola, to be known as Camp Benjamin, in honor of the Acting Secretary of War, when, if necessary, the companies can be used in defense of the place. I have not yet decided where the other camp will be established, desiring, after an interview with General Trapier, to place it where it can be sustained at least expense and the companies that compose it made most useful; but permit me, with due deference, to protest against any authority in future to individuals to raise a company {p.299} or companies of any kind in this State. It brings their influence to accomplish the objects they have in view in conflict with State authority, and has prevented, and will continue to prevent, if not checked, the executive of the State from being able to comply with the requisitions of the President through the War Department.

Your attention, and through you that of the President, is respectfully invited to the following extract of a letter addressed to me officially by Col. J. P. Anderson, commanding near Pensacola the First Florida Regiment, viz:

You will have heard of the affair on Santa Rosa Island, on the morning of the 9th instant. The object of the expedition was fully and completely accomplished, though the loss of such men as Captain Bradford of Florida; Lieutenant Nelms, of Georgia; Sergeant Routh, of Tallahassee Private Tillinghast &c., would not be compensated for, in my opinion, by the total annihilation of Billy Wilson and his whole band of thieves and cut-throats. The Florida Regiment only had 100 men in the expedition out of 1,060, and lost 6 killed, 8 wounded, and 12 prisoners, as follows, viz: Killed, Captain Bradford, Sergeant Routh, Privates Tillinghast, Hale, Thompson of Apalachicola, and Smith. Wounded, Corporal Lanier, Privates Echols, McCorkle, Sims, William Denham, Hicks, Sharrit, and O’Neal (Peter, of Pensacola). These are doing well and will recover; some are only slightly wounded. Prisoners: R. Hale, Company A, and Bond, Company A; Mahoney, Company B, and Nichols, Company B; Bev. Parker and Finley, Company E; Holliman Godlie, John Jarvis, M. Mosely, and Patterson, of Company F; also Lieutenant Farley, Company E. I deeply regret that such men as Lieutenant Farley, Parker, and Finley should have fallen into the enemy’s hands. However, they write to us that they are well treated, but destiny unknown. By any civilized nation in the world most of these prisoners would be promptly delivered up, for they were taken while standing as a safeguard over the enemy’s hospital, to prevent it from sharing the fate of the balance of the camp. They protected it from flame and sword most scrupulously, but failing to hear the signal for us to retire, only remained too faithful to their trust, and have fallen into the hands of the enemy by so doing. Their names should illustrate one of the brightest pages of Florida’s history.

In a few days I will present to your consideration my views in regard to the defenses of Florida and the organization of a military department embracing parts of Georgia and Alabama adjacent to the Chattahoochee River, the importance and advantage of which will be readily understood.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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RICHMOND, October 29, 1861.

General LAWTON, Savannah:

Colonel Mercer was appointed brigadier-general to-day. The enemy’s fleet sailed South this morning; destination unknown.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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TALLAHASSEE, October 29, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

Florida wants arms. She has never received a musket from the Confederate States. The Gordon brings sabers and pistols. Can I get some?

Respectfully,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, Fla., October 29. 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President C. S. A.

SIR: On the 28th instant I addressed a letter to the Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of War, in which I invited his attention and requested him to call the attention of your excellency to the extract made from a letter of Col. J. Patton Anderson, First Florida Regiment, relative to members of his regiment being made prisoners “while standing as a safeguard over the enemy’s hospital to prevent it from sharing the fate of the balance of the camp.”

Permit me, sir, with all due respect, to invite such demand on the part of your excellency as the laws of nations will sustain for the honorable release of all the prisoners, and especially those from Florida, captured under these circumstances; but, should the enemy be insensible to such demand, then, that in any exchange of prisoners which may be made, the prisoners thus taken may be among the first exchanged.

October 30.-I had the honor to receive your highly-esteemed favor of the 25th,* and avail myself of the courteous invitation to a free correspondence.

The extent of our coast and its character are easily ascertained by maps and coast surveys, but a personal acquaintance with the localities, settled portions of the State, and mixed character of the population would be requisite to a just appreciation of our exposed position in the present war. My opinion has been and is yet, that if General Scott, as the Commander-in-Chief of the United States troops, with full powers to direct their movements, really desired the subjugation of the South, of which I have no doubt, and had possessed the distinguished qualities of a soldier which have been ascribed to him, with the least intelligence as a statesman as to causes and effects, the conquest of Florida would have been promptly made. Virginia would not have been disturbed. The conquest of Florida, as one of the seven States, would have had a powerful influence upon foreign nations, an inspiring effect upon the minds of his troops and of the citizens and Government of the United States, and formed a basis for future operations which would have checked Virginia and other States that have not seceded, and dispirited many in the seceded States who apprehended with fear and trembling the consequences of a change of government. The fate of the South would have been hair-hung. But, as if God in mercy permitted General Scott’s madness and folly, every movement he made but gave strength and vigor to our cause. As it is, unable to conquer any other State, may not Florida claim their attention? With our feebleness they are well acquainted through traitors, some of whom yet remain among us.

Independent of the force at and about Pensacola there are no troops by proper authority in Confederate service except the Third and what is termed the Fourth Regiments, and such companies of cavalry as have been received. The Third Regiment, commanded by (Col. W. S. Dilworth, a civilian, is scattered from Fernandina to the mouth of the Saint John’s River and Saint Augustine, and, if I am correctly informed, is in a deplorable condition. I presume there is not a field officer attached to it, unless it may be Major Church, at Saint Augustine, of {p.301} strict sobriety; but the colonel, W. S. Dilworth, is improving, and will. I think, make an efficient officer.

With regard to what is called the Fourth Regiment, commanded by Col. Edward Hopkins, there were but eight imperfect companies when he was elected, and I shall not consent that another may be added to it, for reasons you will appreciate. Of two companies ordered to vote, one was never attached to it, but was under the command of General Bragg, and did not vote. The other was in State service for six months, commanded by a nephew of Colonel Hopkins, voted for him for colonel, was in three weeks afterwards mustered out of service, and has never had a moment’s connection with the regiment. The time of election was only known a day or two before it occurred, and was intended to secure the command to D. P. Holland, who happened to be a pet of Governor Perry, and whose character was so odious that he was beaten by Hopkins-the only man, perhaps, in the State that, if the election had been properly advertised, Hopkins could have defeated; and the reason assigned by Governor Perry to the attorney-general of the State, to myself, and perhaps others, why he commissioned Hopkins, was that he apprehended that if he refused to do so he would be charged with having refused because he defeated Holland. For the character of Mr. Holland I refer you to Mr. Mallory, Judge Hawkins, or any other gentleman in West or Middle Florida, where he is known. In East Florida, where his true character is not yet ascertained, he is figuring in command of four companies, by the illegal appointment of Governor Perry as lieutenant-colonel of an artillery battalion, to which I have, in a previous letter, invited your attention.

Governor Perry is. I reckon, as you have perceived, a man of strong prejudices, without very extraordinary intellectual abilities.

The eight companies said to compose the Fourth Regiment are some of them in a deplorable condition, and scattered as follows: Three of the companies are on Saint Vincent’s Island, 12 miles from Apalachicola, relative to which you will find papers inclosed; one company at Saint Mark’s, commanded by Captain Dial, an efficient officer; one at the light-house, 12 miles off, commanded by Captain Law, a well disposed but ignorant man, and his men, that would have made fine soldiers if properly commanded, are much demoralized; one company is at Tampa, and an effort making there to get another, commanded by a major of no military education, and, if I am informed rightly, on an accidental visit to Florida; the other two companies at Cedar Keys, commanded by Lieut. Col. M. Whit. Smith, who is said to drink to great excess.

Hopkins, whom I now believe most honestly to be too irritable, involved himself in difficulties at Apalachicola, and was ordered by General Grayson to remain on Saint Vincent’s Island, with his three companies, but left without permission and came to Tallahassee. General Grayson was very sick and would not see him, but I have reason to believe if he had lived he would have had him dismissed from the service.

General Grayson requested me to direct all military movements. We were personal acquaintances thirty years ago. To discourage young officers from coming in conflict with officers claiming to be in Confederate service, I ordered Lieutenant-Colonel James, in command of State troops at Apalachicola, to report to and obey the orders of Colonel Hopkins, and for a few days intrusted the defense of the place to him; but his conduct has been so extraordinary that I have revoked the order, and thrown him back upon General Grayson’s order-to confine himself to Saint Vincent’s Island and its defenses.

{p.302}

As a matter of economy and public safety I would respectfully suggest that, inasmuch as the regiment has never been completed according to the terms upon which it was understood to have been accepted the field officers be retired from the service, and the companies be retained, for the present, under the command of their respective captains, subject to the orders of General Trapier or the governor of the State: that the pretended battalion of artillery be refused, and thrown back for the present upon the State. There was but one order relative to it obtained from General Grayson, a copy of which is inclosed, and under circumstances a knowledge of which you can obtain from Dr. Sabal, the medical director of General Grayson, now on his way to Richmond.

Then, sir, if you will accept of twenty companies for twelve months, and reserve to yourself the appointment of field officers, and appoint such as are known to you, or such as I may recommend, I can have the companies ready, I think, in a fortnight, embracing the eight companies now under Hopkins’ command. Freed of him, I will add two fine companies, and the regiment will be complete and equipped. Then, by adding six companies to the four now commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Holland, another regiment of infantry may be formed, with an artillery company attached, equipped with the guns, &c., now used by Holland’s battalion, the entire equipment being not more than sufficient for one company, allowing, meanwhile, Holland’s four companies to remain on duty where they now are until the regiment is completed.

The State troops at Apalachicola are under command of my aide-de-camp, Col. Richard F. Floyd-an accomplished gentleman and competent officer-and a copy of his orders is inclosed. By letter he is ordered to defend the place, if attacked, to the last extremity.

Now, permit me to say that Georgia and Alabama are as much, if not more, interested in the defense of Apalachicola, so far as commerce is concerned, as Florida; therefore, in view of our extended coast, and the almost insurmountable obstacles to its successful defense, I would recommend, most respectfully and earnestly, that a military department be composed of the counties contiguous on both sides of the Chattahoochee River, so as to embrace Columbus, Ga. Look at the map and the relative positions of the counties in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. Such a military department, under a brigadier-general of military education, experience, and sobriety, would contribute greatly to Southern defense.

The military department proposed, most respectfully, may be composed of the following-named counties in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, viz: In Georgia, the counties of Decatur, Thomas, Miller, Early, Baker, Clay, Calhoun, Randolph, Quitman, Stewart, Muscogee; in Alabama, the counties of Henry, Dale, Barbour, and Russell; in Florida, the counties of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Liberty, Washington, Calhoun, Jackson, and Franklin.

The proposed military department has been submitted to the consideration of the governors of Georgia and Alabama. The remaining counties of Middle, East, and South Florida will form a military department sufficient in itself to command the utmost vigilance of an experienced and able officer.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

MILTON.

* Not found.

{p.303}

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Tallahassee, Fla., October 30, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida:

SIR: In obedience to your instructions of the 16th instant, requiring me to visit Fernandina and report to you the condition of the defenses at that place, I have the honor to submit the following, viz:

The defenses consist of a sand and palmetto-log battery of eight guns, all mounted, to wit: Five 32-pounders, two 24-pounders (smooth bore), and one rifled 6-inch gun on a ship carriage. This battery I conceive to be very injudiciously arranged, having 24-pounders, 32-pounders, and rifled guns all in the same battery in barbette, except that two of the 32-pounders are partially masked by slight traverses on the parapet. These traverses confine the field of fire seaward to about 150. These guns are all placed on a straight line, except the rifled gun, which is placed just in rear of the left gun, and when fired its direction will be obliquely over the short-range guns, thereby endangering the men at these guns, and at the same time drawing the fire of the enemy on the whole battery long before they come within the reach of the 24-pounders and 32-pounders. There is also one 24-pounder and two 32-pounders unmounted at Fort Clinch, and one 8-inch columbiad landed at the wharf at Fernandina on the 27th instant.

The weather during my visit was so stormy as to render it impossible for me to visit Colonel Holland’s camp at the south end of the island, 18 miles distant; neither did I witness the drill of the troops in the immediate vicinity of Fernandina for the same reason; but the idea formed by seeing the men and officers about the streets was anything but favorable to their discipline, having seen several staggering through the streets on the Sabbath day. They are sadly in want of an efficient commander and a good drill-master for both artillery and infantry. I learned that Colonel Holland had not yet located his permanent camp at the south end of the island; neither had any breastworks been thrown up, he having but a few days before moved to that point. His command consists of four companies of artillery, with four brass 6-pounders, 500 6-pound balls, and 75 grape and canister, and 500 cannon friction tubes-his men are armed with muskets and carbines-4,000 caps, and a lot of balls. Of ammunition, as far as I could learn, there are 300 32-pounder caps, 500 cannon friction tubes, 770 32-pound balls, 80 32-pound shells, 100 rounds of shell and fixed ammunition for the 32-pounder rifled gun, 90 24-pound balls, 12,000 ball and buck-shot cartridges, 2,000 caps (the latter-balls and caps-delivered to the officer in command of the fort), 7,000 caps still in possession of General Finegan. The above constitutes, as far as I could learn, all the ammunition on the island.

There are at this time seven companies on the island, one of which is a cavalry company and the others are infantry. These are exclusive of the four companies belonging to Colonel Holland’s battalion of artillery. This battalion has never been mustered into either State or Confederate service, but an order for them to be furnished with the requisite arms and equipments issued by General Grayson has been forwarded to Richmond, showing the amount necessary to place this battalion in condition for active and efficient service.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. L. DANCY, Adjutant and Inspector General.

{p.304}

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TALLAHASSEE, October 31, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

Have not seen or heard from General Trapier. Full investigation satisfies me that troops, guns, &c., should be removed promptly from Saint Vincent’s Island to Apalachicola. Shall I order the movement? A messenger here waiting for the order.

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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RICHMOND, October 31, 1861.

Gov. JOHN MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

You are authorized to remove the guns and other munitions of war from Saint Vincent’s Island to Apalachicola. General Trapier will be in Fernandina in two or three days.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, Fla., October 31, 1861.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia:

SIR: I have this day recommended to the President and Secretary of War the establishment of a military department, to be composed of the following counties in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, lying on or near the Chattahoochee River, viz:

In Georgia: Decatur, Thomas, Miller, Early, Baker, Clay, Calhoun, Randolph, Quitman, Stewart, and Muscogee. In Alabama: Henry, Dale, Barbour, and Russell. In Florida: Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Liberty, Washington, Jackson, Calhoun, and Franklin.

I respectfully invite your consideration and approval of the measure proposed. Georgia and Alabama derive even more commercial advantages from Apalachicola than Florida herself, and both those States are deeply interested in its defense.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

MILTON.

Abstract from monthly return of the Department of Georgia, commanded by Brig. Gen. A. R. Lawton, for October, 1861.

Stations.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Artillery.
Officers.Men.Heavy.Light.
South end Big Cumberland Island61161421504
Fort Pulaski1729035237936
Brunswick, Ga.91291401545
Oglethorpe Barracks16887996
Genesis Point23970765
Great Warsaw battery61201401715 {p.305}
Thunderbolt battery31001091164
Saint Simon’s Island396978559193
Sapello Island112683213645
Isle of Hope25055706
Jekyl Island233594995636
Sunbury, Ga.3434971
South Newport4677373
Near Darien4687475
Carteret’s Point3535664
Camp Lawton (Savannah)21396421432
Camp Cumming (Savannah)66386101
Skidaway Island28498636658
Tybee Island548961,0861,1832
Camp Wayne, Waynesville71651751908
Other points4677174
Grand total2534,5525,4975,9628317

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA, Savannah, November 1, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose to you a communication received today from Col. T. J. Warthen, commanding a regiment at one of the camps of instruction recently placed under my authority, and by your directions ordered to Richmond. These camps having been established by the governor, under some sort of authority from the late Secretary of War, he (the governor) attempts such control over them as may delay their preparations for departure. Of course no attention will be paid by me to this notice of “protest,” and I only inclose the letter to explain the precise state of things at the time I assume command of these camps.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS CAMP STEPHENS, October 30, 1861.

General A. R. LAWTON:

But a few hours since I received a communication from his excellency the governor, stating that he had not been advised by the Secretary of War of the action of the Department in ordering this regiment to Virginia, and, moreover, stating that he had just written to the Department protesting, in the name of the State, against this and other regiments being removed from the State. I thought it due to you that you should be notified of the same.

Again signifying to you that I shall obey with pleasure any order emanating from you, I subscribe myself your obedient servant,

THOMAS J. WARTHEN, Colonel, Commanding Twentieth Regiment Georgia Volunteers.

{p.306}

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RICHMOND, November 1, 1861.

Gov. FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

I have just received information, which I consider entirely reliable that the enemy’s expedition is intended for Port Royal.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

(Same to Generals Drayton and Ripley.)

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COLUMBIA November 1 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN:

Telegraph received. Please telegraph General Anderson, at Wilmington, and General Lawton, Savannah, to send what forces they can spare, as the difficulty with us is as to arms. I have telegraphed them both.

F. W. PICKENS.

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CHARLESTON November 1, 1861.

To SECRETARY OF WAR:

Dispatch received. Will act at once. A fine strong southeast gale blowing, which will keep him off for a day or so. Will advise.

R. S. RIPLEY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA, Savannah, November 1, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: It is now generally understood that the governor of this State is preparing to call out a large force of State troops, to be thrown on the coast of Georgia. A brigade has already been organized and a brigadier-general appointed by the governor. This may not be at all embarrassing, but I am now informed that the governor proposes to organize a division forthwith, and to commission a major-general and send him to the coast, under an act passed at the last session of the legislature of Georgia. This may lead to serious embarrassment, and both General Mercer and myself see cause for uneasiness in the contemplated action of the governor. As all the arrangements for defense on this coast have been made without reference to State authority, I desire instructions from the Department as to the course which must be adopted, if an officer, commissioned by the governor of Georgia, of a higher grade than the Confederate general now on duty here, shall claim the command. I desire the views of the Department, that I may act with promptness and feel assured that my action will be approved.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, November 1, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

DEAR SIR: I have to-day written you an official letter in reference to the prospect of a major-general of the State of Georgia being ordered {p.307} by the governor to this coast. Pardon me for using the vehicle of a private note to convey some facts which I did not wish to communicate more formally. Governor Brown has suddenly shown a disposition to exercise a good deal of authority over, and claim much credit for, the coast defense, and his desire now is to make such appointments as will secure the control to him in case of an attack. He was anxious to appoint Colonel Mercer major-general, so as to secure it through him; but Colonel Mercer would not lend himself to the arrangement. Hence my urgent dispatch in reference to his appointment in the Confederate service, and I was much gratified to find by your reply that the appointment was made. It is now well understood that Governor Brown will at once appoint General W. H. T. Walker a major-general, and his commission will no doubt bear date before the time that this note will reach you. General Walker is an old friend of mine, and under other circumstances I could have no objections whatever to serving under him, as he is several years my senior, but I fear that the feelings with which he has now left the Confederate service, fomented by the temper which Governor Brown has (in the past at least) exhibited towards the War Department, might cause great embarrassment here, if he is permitted to assume command under State authority. Besides, after passing through the labor, the anxiety, the alarms, and complaints of the people on the coast, I would regret to see the results pass from my control, when we are comparatively in a condition to receive the enemy. If it must pass into other hands, I would gladly receive an order for service in some other department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON.

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CHARLESTON, November 1, 1861.

His Excellency Governor MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

SIR: You have, I presume, been officially informed from the War Department of my appointment to the command of the Military Department of East and Middle Florida. I accordingly write to put myself in correspondence with your excellency, and to advise the adoption of such preliminary measures for the defense of that portion of the State as may very well be commenced in anticipation of my arrival to take command in person. I am not accurately informed as to the number of troops now in the field in that portion of Florida. The force which, in my judgment, with the lights now before me, will be required cannot fall short of 7,000 men, of all arms, and I would respectfully suggest the propriety of at once calling for a sufficient number of regiments to make up that force.

Fernandina (or Amelia Island) is obviously the point most likely to become the object of the enemy’s first attack, and I have accordingly already taken steps for its better protection. An engineer officer of the corps of this State, a gentleman of skill and experience, kindly put at my service by Governor Pickens, is now under orders for that place and on his way there, with instructions from me for his guidance, and authority to make such alterations and additions to the batteries already erected there as may seem to be immediately called for for their greater strength and security.

I am organizing my staff, and hope to be able to proceed to Florida by the 10th of this month. Meanwhile I shall be glad to hear from {p.308} your excellency, and to receive any suggestions you may have to make at this city.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, Fla., November 5, 1861.

To the SECRETARY OF WAR:

Will the President receive two more infantry regiments in this State, for twelve months’ service, under command of General Trapier, the companies to be raised by me, and when reported ready the President to appoint the field officers? I do not think it possible to raise immediately more than two regiments in this State. If other forces are needed, therefore the necessity of the new military department recently suggested by me.

Very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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RICHMOND, November 2, 1861.

Governor PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

Will send dispatches and give you re-enforcements with speed as soon as I know that your coast is actually the point of attack.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, October 31 (via Columbus, November 2), 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

The steamer Salvor, owned and commanded by James McKay, of Tampa, has been captured by the enemy on the quicksand between Tortugas and Key West. Cargo, 21,000 stand of arms, 100 boxes of revolvers, 6 rifled cannon, and ammunition.

JOHN MILTON, Governor.

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WILMINGTON, November 2, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

I promised Governor Pickens if he would help me to return the favor in case South Carolina was attacked. He says the fleet will attack Port Royal. In that event will you justify me in sending one or two regiments and a field battery?

J. R. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.309}

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RICHMOND, November 4, 1861.

General JOSEPH B. ANDERSON

As soon as Governor Pickens informs you that South Carolina is attacked, you may send him all the aid that you can possibly spare.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, November 4, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War:

The enemy’s fleet concentrating between Savannah River and Port Royal. Point of attack still doubtful. More than twenty vessels in sight.

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General.

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CHARLESTON, November 4, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Enemy’s fleet concentrating between Tybee and Port Royal. Have started re-enforcements to General Drayton. Am occupying the country inland with cavalry, and concentrating the force here to re-enforce either Drayton or Lawton. Desire authority for General Anderson to re-enforce me. Not much fear of any landing north of Edisto.

R. S. RIPLEY.

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CHARLESTON, November 5, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

Forty-one vessels reported off Beaufort. Attack imminent. Have requested General Lawton to re-enforce Hilton Head with from 500 to 1,000 men and have requested General Anderson to send me two regiments and a field battery. Will you confirm the requests? Shall start in person as soon as reserve is organized, and attack as soon after they land as I can reach them.

R. S. RIPLEY.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 206.}

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, November 5, 1861.

...

XII. The coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and East Florida are constituted a military department, and General R. E. Lee, C. S. Army, is assigned to its command.

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.310}

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GOLDSBOROUGH, November 6, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

The following letter has just reached me, having been picked up near the wreck of the steamer Union, addressed by Louis H. Pelouze, acting assistant adjutant-general, to the captain of that steamer:

In the event of your transport being separated from the fleet, you will proceed to Port Royal, S. C., and report to the quartermaster of that port.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General.

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COLUMBIA, November 6, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

As I anticipated, they have passed the batteries, and will take Beaufort. My difficulty is in want of arms. I gave out the last to arm the 4,000 recently mustered in. I cannot rely on half armed men ordered out, except to defend the railroad. If I cannot get arms, can you not spare Gregg’s regiment from Suffolk, and order it immediately to Pocotaligo, or near there? See if any troops there at present. All to report to General Lee.

F. W. PICKENS.

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CHARLESTON, November 6, 1861.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

General Drayton telegraphs from Fort Walker at 11 p.m. yesterday: “No one wounded here; only 3 slightly at Bay Point. Enemy threatened another attack this afternoon, but withdrew on firing four or five shots at them. Now about fifty sail within 4 or 5 miles, several brigs, large transports.” De Saussure’s regiment I trust reached Drayton this morning, and hope that General Lawton has re-enforced him with 1,000 men from Savannah. One regiment from Wilmington expected to arrive momentarily here. Have arranged transportation by Savannah Railroad, and hope to have steamers to transport a large force to attack speedily, should he effect a landing.

R. S. RIPLEY.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Milledgeville, Ga., November 7, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I herewith transmit to your Department copy of letter received by me from his excellency the governor of Florida, informing me that he has “recommended to the President and Secretary of War the establishment of a military department, to be composed of” certain counties of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida.*

While I am not fully convinced of the necessity of establishing the new military department proposed by the able and patriotic executive of Florida, I have no objection to its establishment should the President {p.311} and War Department deem it advisable to carry out the recommendation of Governor Milton.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

* See Milton to Brown, October 31, p. 304.

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WILMINGTON, November 7, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I have sent one regiment and one field battery to Charleston, and await such certain information of attack as will justify me in sending more troops under your instructions.

J. S. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, November 8, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN:

The enemy has taken complete possession of Port Royal entrance and now controls the inland navigation at that point. I sent 1,000 men to re-enforce General Drayton on Hilton Head. They have returned to me with but few casualties, having been in the hottest of the fight.

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General.

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COLUMBIA, November 8, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I telegraphed you this morning to ask for Gregg’s regiment to report at Pocotaligo, but have no reply. Ripley is absent from Charleston. Telegraph me for Captain McCord’s company to report. It is ready. A fine company just received for Hampton’s Legion, but I armed it to-day to send to Beaufort. Do give me an order for Coit’s company also. All our regiments are safe from Hilton Head and Bay Point. We must defend Charleston, and I have no arms for any more men but have ordered out a large reserve to meet at Gillisonville or Pocotaligo.

Let me know if Lee is in command, so I may order troops to him.

F. W. PICKENS.

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COOSAWHATCHIE, November 8, 1861 (via Pocotaligo).

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Enemy attacked forts in Port Royal yesterday morning. After a hard cannonade silenced Fort Walker. General Drayton withdrew his troops last night to main line. No positive news from Bay Point, but the enemy have passed in and have possession of Port Royal. General Lee arrived.

R. S. RIPLEY.

{p.312}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., November 8, 1861.

I, In pursuance of instructions from the War Department, General R. E. Lee, C. S. Army, assumes command of the military department composed of the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and East Florida.

II. Capt. T. A. Washington, C. S. Army, is announced as adjutant-general of the department; Capt. Walter H. Taylor, Provisional Army, as assistant adjutant-general; Capt. Joseph C. Ives, C. S. Army, as chief engineer; Lieut. Col. William G. Gill, Provisional Army, as ordnance officer and Mr. Joseph Manigault as volunteer aide-de-camp to the commanding general.

...

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General C. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS, Hon. Coosawhatchie, November 9, 1861.

Secretary of War:

SIR: On the evening of the 7th, on my way to the entrance of Port Royal Harbor I met General Ripley, returning from the battery at the north end of Hilton Head, called Fort Walker. He reported that the enemy’s fleet had passed the batteries and entered the harbor. Nothing could then be done but to make arrangements to withdraw the troops from the batteries to prevent their capture and save the public property. The troops were got over during the night, but their tents, clothing, and provisions were mostly lost, and all the guns left in the batteries. General Drayton’s command was transferred from Fort Walker to Bluffton; Colonel Dunovant’s from Bay Point to Saint Helena Island and thence to Beaufort. There are neither batteries nor guns for the defense of Beaufort, and Colonel Dunovant crossed Port Royal Ferry yesterday, and was halted at Garden’s Corner. General Drayton reports he has but 955 men with him, and no field battery, the troops from Georgia that were on the island having returned to Savannah without orders. Colonel Dunovant’s regiment is in as destitute a condition as General Drayton’s command, as they were obliged to leave everything behind, and number between 600 and 700 men. I wrote to General Lawton to endeavor to withdraw the guns from the battery at the south end of Hilton Head. I have received as yet no report from him nor any official account from the commanders of the batteries. I fear every gun has been lost. At present I am endeavoring to collect troops to defend the line of the railroad and to push forward the defenses of Charleston and Savannah.

Colonel Clingman’s regiment of North Carolina volunteers, six companies of Colonel Edwards’ regiment of South Carolina volunteers, and Colonel Martin’s South Carolina cavalry compose the force now here. The enemy, having complete possession of the water and inland navigation, commands all the islands on this coast, and threatens both Savannah and Charleston, and can come in his boats within 4 miles of this place. His sloops of war and large steamers can come up Broad River to Mackay’s Point, the mouth of the Pocotaligo, and his gunboats can ascend some distance up the Coosawhatchie and Tulifiny. We have no guns that can resist their batteries, and have no resource but to {p.313} prepare to meet them in the field. They have landed on Hilton Head. Their fleet is in Port Royal Harbor. Four of their gunboats are reported to be approaching Beaufort. I fear there are but few State troops ready for the field. The garrisons of the forts at Charleston and Savannah and on the coast cannot be removed from the batteries while ignorant of the designs of the enemy. I am endeavoring to bring into the field such light batteries as can be prepared.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, November 9, 1861.

Governor PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

General Lee is in command of the department embracing South Carolina and Georgia, as well as Eastern Florida. This was done in order to enable him to concentrate all our forces at any point that might be attacked. It is not necessary to send you regiments from this distance, but we will order more troops to your aid from North Carolina. You may retain all armed troops in South Carolina and all unarmed troops that can be made useful in batteries. General Lee has full power to act, and it would be well to send him a copy of this dispatch, that he may not scruple in using all the means of the Government within his reach for your defense.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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CHARLESTON, November 10, 1861.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

Circumstances may soon arise to make it necessary that martial law should be proclaimed in this city. I ask for authority to take the step.

J. H. TRAPIER.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA, Savannah, November 10, 1861.

General R. E. Lee, Coosawhatchie, S. C.:

GENERAL: I had the honor to receive yesterday your letter of the 8th instant,* covering extract of Special Orders, No. 206, from headquarters of the Army [A. and I. G. O., November 5, 1861].

Permit me to express my extreme gratification at the contents of this extract, which assures me that I am to have the benefit of your military skill and experience in the present emergency; no one can appreciate the necessity for such assistance more than I do. I earnestly desire a personal interview with you at the earliest practicable moment, and trust that it may be in your power to visit Savannah, if only to remain here one night and return to Carolina the next morning. The present arrangements of the railway trains will make it very convenient for you to accomplish such a visit. It would afford me great pleasure to call on you at your present headquarters and there confer fully with you, but scarcely feel justified in absenting myself from my command at this {p.314} critical juncture, even for the space of twelve hours, unless you attach much importance to it, and cannot visit Savannah.

The number of troops recently received by me in a comparatively unorganized condition, and the changes now suddenly made in the posting and disposition of them to meet the movements of the enemy, together with the great pressure at this moment on each department of the staff, will necessarily cause delay in furnishing you with an accurate and forward statement of the troops, guns, ammunition, &c., under my command. In the mean time I have the pleasure to state, for your information, that my command consists of about 5,500 men, mustered into the service of the Confederate States, and distributed along the coast. About 2,000, under command of Brigadier-General Mercer, are stationed at and near Brunswick. The remainder, say 3,500 men, are on this side of the Altamaha River, and all but 500 of this number within 20 miles of Savannah.

Having to-day ordered up all the troops from Tybee Island (about 1,000), I will have about 2,800 men near the city that can move promptly, exclusive of 450 at Fort Pulaski and 200 at Green Island battery, on Vernon River, protecting an important landing about 12 miles in rear of Savannah.

Of the 5,500 troops under my command, about 500 are cavalry and the rest infantry, with the exception of three field batteries (two of these pieces were sent to Hilton, with the re-enforcements to General Drayton, and lost).

The cavalry are very well mounted and armed; the light batteries have a limited supply of horses, and but moderately well drilled. The infantry are made up chiefly of raw troops, though all substantially armed; about 2,000 of them are very well drilled and disciplined.

As all the volunteer corps in and about Savannah have been mustered into service, they are included in the 5,500; but there are about 3,000 men, armed after a fashion, under State organization, now in camp on the line of railway, and can be called to Savannah in a few hours. With the assistance of the naval officers we are now blocking up the channel in several places, and hope for good results.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. LAWTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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COOSAWHATCHIE, November 10, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

Dispatch from Governor Pickens received. Am I at liberty to employ troops in South Carolina and Georgia passing through the States to Virginia?

R. E. LEE.

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RICHMOND, November 11, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Coosawhatchie (via Pocotaligo):

You are authorized to use the entire resources of South Carolina and Georgia that are under control of the Confederate Government for your defense, whether troops, munitions of war, or supplies of every kind.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

{p.315}

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MILLEDGEVILLE, November 11, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

The city of Savannah is menaced by the enemy, and we are in great need of arms. You have nearly all our guns. I request that you send to Savannah immediately the brigade of State troops trained here under command of General W. Phillips, now known in the Confederate service as the Phillips Legion, Colonels Wofford and Boyd’s regiments, and Stovall’s battalion; also regiment of Georgia regulars. All these troops were trained at the State’s expense and thoroughly armed by her, and her safety now requires their services with their arms. Please answer immediately.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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COLUMBIA, November 11, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

There are 910 Enfield rifles in Charleston not paid for by Colonel Cunningham. If I can get them for troops mustered into the Confederate service can I do so? I would like to know the number of armed men I can rely on to be sent me. I have no arms; if I had I would ask for none. The great battle will be near Stono, but cannot take place until they are largely re-enforced, some weeks hence. I could raise 20,000 men if I only had the arms. Mr. Lee has been acting commissary here, but has no direct authority, and cannot act without constant permission. There is a necessity for an assistant commissary.

F. W. PICKENS.

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HDQRS. MIL. DEPT. MIDDLE AND EAST FLORIDA, Fort Clinch, Amelia Island, Fla., November 12, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War, C. S. A., Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I had the honor to receive yours of the 26th ultimo by the hands of Captain Buckman, and strictly adhered to the instructions therein contained until the present emergency arose, which has thrown on me a heavy responsibility, as unexpected as it has been onerous and disagreeable. A full report of my acts and doings I ask to submit to you, and which I trust, under the circumstances, you will indorse and sanction. Let me premise by stating that General Trapier has not yet assumed command of this department, and consequently I am in command of this department. I cannot now state when General Trapier will be here, as I cannot calculate how the disaster at Port Royal may influence the movements of our Government. But to the point. In my last communication I addressed you on the subject of the battalion of artillery, Lieutenant-Colonel Holland in command and Major Hopkins second in command. They were presented in this shape by Governor Perry, and received by Brigadier-General Grayson, deceased, then in command of this department.

On the 28th day of September, A. D. 1861 (see copy of order of Brigadier-General Grayson), Brigadier-General Grayson also ordered them supplied by the quartermaster and commissary departments at this place. Four companies were received in this way, and, stating that the mustering officers would soon muster them into the service formally, under {p.316} this order they have continued in service. Last week, however, an order arrived from Governor Milton to disband them, they-the battalion-regarding that they were not in the State service but in the Confederate service. In the mean time the Port Royal affair occurred on Thursday last. The United States war vessels are in sight every day, though not more than one at a time, evidently reconnoitering our coast and condition. This battalion of four companies on Saturday offered to go in the service in any shape I might name, but if not mustered at once they would leave the island or accept a proposition which had been made by an officer in Georgia to receive them there into service in Georgia. It is only one mile and a quarter from this (Amelia Island) to Cumberland, in Georgia. The four companies composing this battalion-Captain Buckman’s, Richards’, Brink’s, and Kendrick’s-are well drilled. They are armed with muskets, and I supplied them with five field pieces, and since have received from our Government two beautiful 6-pounders, rifled-bore field pieces, carrying some 12 or 14 pounds elongated shot and shell. Placed in this situation, in imminent peril, with only, in the aggregate of the Third Regiment at this post, 659 men, no soldiers that I could call from other posts, I have mustered these companies into the Confederate States service as light infantry, and will accept two companies more, making in all six companies in the battalion for twelve months from the 28th day of September last, the day on which four of the companies were received by General Grayson.

I have also notified proper parties that horses will be received on the same terms as in the cavalry service for the purpose of working the field artillery. I am fully aware that it is irregular to use infantry as field artillery; still, the regiments which I have the honor to command were mustered into the service as light infantry, and now they are converted into heavy artillery in part. I would ask that this battalion be increased into a regiment. We want them; we really need them. This island is 20 miles long on the seashore. I have, exclusive of the battalion, only 659 soldiers to defend it. When in surfboats a landing can be effected anywhere, and small gunboats can come in in the rear from Georgia or from the south end, there should be here at least 2,000 troops, stationed here permanently. Allow me also to state that I do not believe it possible to raise ten men in this State who will enlist for the term of three years or during the war. This was a strong reason why I ordered this battalion to be mustered into the service. I find, sir, that it will not do to rely on State troops to defend our country. There should be but one system of defense, and that should be originated and organized and systematized by the Confederate States Army. I hope, sir, that my course will receive the sanction of the Government which I have the honor to serve, and I assure you nothing was ever more painful to me in my life than this of being so situated when I felt compelled to act without having the proper authority; and I beg leave to refer you to Messrs. Ward, Morton, and Owens-our Delegates in Congress-who know my character, and that it is not my disposition or nature to assume unauthorized and undelegated power. Should the Government sustain my acts in this matter it will be a source of pleasure and gratification, but if condemned, then my mortification will be most acute. Still, I will have the consolation of knowing that I was actuated by the purest and most patriotic motives. Ex-Senator Yulee and every man with whom I have had any conversation say that my course was dictated by necessity; still I hope soon to have your approval.

My adjutant, Lieut. J. O. A. Gerry, will inform you particularly as to our defenses, ammunition, &c. We have at this point, the northeast {p.317} end of Amelia Island, at and near Fort Clinch, eight 32-pounders; two 24 and one 32 pounder rifle, mounted; one 10-inch rifle and three 8-inch columbiads, nearly mounted. We are hard at work placing these last in position, and we hope by the end of this week to have them in fighting trim. We have about 100 rounds for each gun. So soon as these guns are up I have little fear that the enemy can come in through the main channel; at least I shall not believe it until I have a practical demonstration of the fact. With proper batteries at the south end of the island-say one 8-inch columbiad and four 32 or 24 pounders, and infantry enough, say 2,000 in all-I do not think the enemy could even land, or if they did and, we could make them embark. We need particularly field artillery, which could be carried with great rapidity from point to point over the island or along the beach; and nature has done much in making breastworks all along the beach in the shape of sand hills, behind which not only field artillery could be maneuvered to great advantage, but also musketry, though in this respect our muskets are the old United States musket, and not an efficient weapon by any means.

For the port of Saint Augustine I need everything in the way of defense except the guns. However, I shall write you or the proper officer fully on this topic in the event General Trapier should not arrive soon. We heard distinctly the firing at Port Royal at this place on last Thursday for about five hours, and the news of its occupancy has saddened us, but at the same time determined us to stand more firmly at our post, as we regard an attack here as imminent. On Friday a war steamer appeared in the offing, three-masted. On Saturday another, and on Sunday and Monday a sloop of war. To-day none have come in sight. They come near the west end, run south, and usually go as near the shore as 3 miles at the south end, showing that they are reconnoitering and making a critical examination of our defenses, &c. They have now out off all water communication with Charleston, and their next object, I apprehend, will be to break up the inland navigation between this and Savannah, the benefits of which to us are incalculable. I hope our Government will adopt some more speedy means of raising troops for the Confederate States. I could raise all the troops necessary for our defense in one week from this time if they could go immediately into the Confederate States service for twelve months; but when raised by the State the whole military body has been attempted to be painted with the political hues of the poor politicians, and our citizens are very averse to going through the chrysalis condition of State service, and after being pulled, hauled, and packed, as a gambler would his cards, for two or three months, then turned over to the Confederacy, unarmed, undisciplined, and undrilled, their time wasted and their country unbenefited. There has been in Florida East too much politics mixed with the military in organizing the regiments.

Again expressing my most sincere and deep regret that circumstances have compelled me to act without the proper authority, and which necessity alone could or should justify, and hoping soon to have the sanction of my country to the course I have pursued, I leave the matter in your hands. I fear I have already tried your patience, but your name is so familiar, though not acquainted personally with you, I feel that I am addressing a friend to every man who is true to his country, and I ask you to mete out to me in this matter that same measure you would have meted to you under similar circumstances. God knows I have worked harder here than I ever did in my life, and that my only motive has been to serve my country. I volunteered and was a private in the ranks until this (the Third) regiment was formed, when I was elected a colonel, {p.318} and to-day would have been a private, had I not been elected to the colonelcy of the regiment.

Trusting that our country may soon be delivered from its present troubles, I subscribe myself; your obedient servant,

W. S. DILWORTH, Colonel, Commanding Department.

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RICHMOND, November 12, 1861.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Milledgeville, Ga.:

There are reasons of public policy which would make it suicidal to comply with your request to withdraw Georgia troops from the enemy’s front at this moment. This Government will co-operate with all its power for the defense of your State, but it must do so in the manner it deems most certain to produce the desired effect of repulsing the enemy at all points, and cannot scatter its armies into fragments at the request of each governor who may be alarmed for the safety of his people. Be assured that no effort will be spared to aid you, and be good enough to communicate your confidence in this assurance to your people, thus allaying all needless panic.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, November 12, 1861.

General J. H. TRAPIER, Charleston, S. C.

General Lee has now command of the whole coast of Carolina and Georgia. I cannot authorize you to proclaim martial law. Let the governor take that responsibility, if found necessary. If the enemy advance to attack the city, of course the city will then become a camp under military law, if the necessities of its defense so require.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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COLUMBIA, November 13, 1861.

President DAVIS:

Steel-clad steamer Fingal, cargo arms, &c., just run the blockade, and safe at Savannah. Now please send me an order for arms, as it is necessary. I am just off for Charleston. Arm us, and we are safe.

F. W. PICKENS.

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SAVANNAH, November 13, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Your dispatch refusing to send back any of Georgia’s guns with her troops is forwarded to me here. You said a few days since in your dispatch that you would send us armed troops if attacked. A kind Providence has enabled Major Anderson to land here to-day with over 10,000 Enfield rifles belonging to the Confederacy. I now ask, not for {p.319} men, but guns. Let us have 5,000 of these in place of 5,000 of the State’s guns now in your service. Please answer immediately.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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RICHMOND, November 13, 1861.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Savannah:

As soon as I know what arms I have received I will give to Georgia troops all that I can possibly spare for her defense. I beg you to remember that ten other governors are making just such demands as yourself, and that it is not reasonable to complain that other exposed points should also be provided for. I will do my best, if not prevented by exaggerated demands which I have no means of satisfying.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, November 13, 1861.

General LAWTON. Savannah:

Order to Savannah all the unarmed troops offered for the war that are or can be mustered into our service, so that I may arm them with rifles from the Fingal as far as I can possibly spare them. I cannot consent to put these arms into the hands of any troops mustered for a less term than the war.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, November 13, 1861.

Governor PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

Have you got the rifles from Fraser & Co.? As soon as I know what number of arms I have received by the Fingal, I will arm your troops with every musket or rifle that I can possibly spare.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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TALLAHASSEE, November 14, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

General Trapier has not arrived. The troops and munitions of war removed from Saint Vincent’s Island and works destroyed. An attack threatened at Apalachicola. We need arms and munitions of war. With them we can hold the place. A vessel has arrived at Savannah with arms, &c. Authorize me by telegraph to send an agent to get one or two good cannon and equipments and small-arms, and I will defend Apalachicola successfully. Please answer immediately.

JOHN MILTON.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, November 14, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Department of South Carolina, &c.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your report of the 9th instant, not very encouraging in its contents, but evidently written {p.320} before you had been enabled to gather in all the information necessary to enable you fully to judge of the condition of your department.

The arrival of the steamer Fingal at this critical moment is very opportune, and although the number of small-arms received is smaller than I had at first hoped, it is no contemptible addition to our means of defense.

Misled by a telegram which reported you to be at Savannah, I sent to you yesterday at that point the following dispatch, which I hope was forwarded to you:

Of the 9,000 Enfield rifles received by the Government on the Fingal, 4,500 are assigned to your command, to be placed by you in the hands of Georgia and South Carolina troops in our service for the war. Order 4,500 to be sent immediately to General Albert S. Johnston at Nashville, and a few hundred will remain, which please send here. Put none of these arms in the hands of troops not enlisted for the war. The governor of Georgia has received 1,100 rifles by the same steamer, so that you will have 5,600 for service within your department.

As soon as I hear what further supplies we have on the Fingal in the way of cannon, &c., I will appropriate to you as full a share as I possibly can of whatever you may desire to aid your defense. I ordered Col. A. R. Wright, by dispatch yesterday, to proceed at once to Savannah for aiding the coast defense, and, as this is a full regiment, for the war, I doubt not you will find it expedient to arm it with the new weapons. The 10,000 blankets on the Fingal have been ordered here, where our troops need them much more than in more southern latitudes. It is the President’s wish that you scruple not in employing every governmental resource within your reach, even troops in transit. You will, however, scarcely need this, for most of these troops are without arms, and have been ordered here to receive arms collected by the Potomac Army from various sources. I have a long letter from an inhabitant of Charleston, signing himself John H. Robertson, informing me that the forts in the harbor are in very incompetent hands. The writer speaks highly of Captain Rhett as a gentleman, but says he is totally without the experience necessary for so important a post. Of Captain Wagner he speaks in very different terms, representing him to be not only incompetent, but neglectful and dissipated, never spending the night in his fort, but coming to town to indulge in excesses with the common prostitutes. Of course this is for your private information, and the writer, who seems to be actuated by the best of motives, ought not to be exposed to the hostility of these officers. I know, however, your habitual vigilance, and this communication was perhaps needless.

Don’t fail to keep us constantly advised, especially of your wants, and rely on my very best efforts to support you with the whole means of the Government that can with prudence be diverted from other exposed points.

I am, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary, of War.

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SAVANNAH, November 14, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I trust you will let us have as many of the guns as possible. They landed here, and cannot be needed worse elsewhere. There are four rifled cannon. Do let us have two of them for fort, which lacks heavy guns. Answer at Milledgeville.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

{p.321}

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RICHMOND, November 14, 1861.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Milledgeville:

Out of about 9000 rifles, I have assigned half to General Lee’s command and the other half to General A. S. Johnston’s command. General Lee will therefore have 4,500, which, when added to the 1,100 brought in for Georgia, makes 5,600 arms for the defense of Charleston and Savannah. As soon as I get the account of the cannon on board I will appropriate to the same purpose every piece that I can fairly assign to your coast. I shall know in a day or two what is possible.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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CHARLESTON, November 14, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN:

I have just learned that the small-arms, &c., on the Fingal are the property of the Confederate Government. General Lee is nowhere, and has made requisition on me for five regiments. I have the men ready, but no arms. Will you send me an order for them? You know their situation, and will surely help us in ammunition.

F. W. PICKENS.

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RICHMOND, November 14, 1861.

Governor PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

I have assigned to General Lee 4,500 of the arms received by the Fingal, being half of all that are for us. The State of Georgia has also 1,100 on board, so that General Lee will have 5,600 for arming his department.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT, DEPT. OF S. C., Georgetown, November 15, 1861.

Maj. Gen. R. E. LEE:

GENERAL: There are two redoubts near the mouth of Winyaw Bay, on Cat and South Islands.

The first has mounted two 32-pounders, 50 rounds each; one rifled 12-pounder, 50 rounds, and two 24-pounders, 150 rounds each; three principal faces nearly completed; two bastions in rear, and curtain entirely unfinished; no bomb-proof. South Island redoubt, four 24-pounders, 125 rounds each; one rifle 6-pounder, 50 rounds; one 18-pounder, 125 rounds; three faces finished, still open in rear; bomb proof will be completed in ten days; garrisoned by 320 men of Tenth Regiment. There are near Georgetown, of Tenth Regiment, 565 men; three companies cavalry are on South Island, two near Georgetown, 135 men; one company rifles attached to Tenth Regiment for local duty near Georgetown, 50 men; one section light artillery on Waccamaw Neck, 40 men-1,110 men. I have called on General Harllee, local volunteers, for 800; 280 have reported for duty; 200 more to arrive to-morrow; 480-1,590; the remainder, {p.322} 320 cannot be here under a week. The 1,110 men are well armed, drilled, and equipped, and have about 100 rounds of ammunition to each man. The 480 are badly armed, mostly with shot-guns, are undrilled, fully supplied with ammunition, but are scarcely fit for service yet.

I will do the best I can, should the enemy appear.

There is also at the mouth of the North Santee River a redoubt mounting three guns, 12-pounders, not yet completed and not garrisoned; ammunition there sufficient. We have a full supply of powder and sufficient 24, 18, and 12 pounder round shot. You will perceive that the other guns are short of the proper number of balls.

Your obedient servant,

A. M. MANINGAULT, Colonel Tenth Regiment, &c.

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CHARLESTON, November 15, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I understand the Fingal has powder as well as arms. Be so kind as to set aside, if possible, 30,000 pounds of cannon powder as essential for a supply of our forts if we are to fight such a fight as at Hilton Head. I believe we can have musket and rifle powder, but I would be glad if some musket were allowed also. If they are re-enforced by 30,000 men, we will use at least 15,000 men on James Island. I am deeply obliged for the arms divided between us and Georgia. We only want more. Can we get another regiment from North Carolina? We only have two.

F. W. PICKENS.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HEADQUARTERS, Charleston, S. C., November 16, 1861.

I. Commodore Ingraham, C. S. Navy, is assigned to duty in Charleston Harbor. He will superintend the preparation and armament of the batteries for its defense; assign to duty the naval officers at his disposal as ordnance officers at the batteries, and execute such other orders relative to the naval operations in the harbor as he may receive from Flag-Officer Tatnall, Provisional Army.

II. Lieut. Col. John S. Preston, assistant adjutant-general, C. S. Army, is hereby ordered to inspect and muster into the service of the Confederate States for the war such troops of the State of South Carolina as may be transferred by the governor of the State. These regiments must be armed and equipped by the State, except three regiments, or 2,500 men, who will be armed by the Government with the Enfield rifle. Upon the assembling of these troops at such places of rendezvous as may be selected by the governor, the mustering and inspecting officer will make requisitions upon the proper Departments for arms, transportation, and such other munitions as may be necessary, and report his operations from time to time to the general commanding.

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Captain, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.328}

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RICHMOND, November 17, 1861.

Gov. FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

As soon as I can learn what ammunition is on board the Fingal you shall have your full share of everything. Be assured my solicitude for your defense is as great as your own, and nothing shall be refused that we can possibly give.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., November 17, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. R. S. Ripley, Provisional Army, will proceed to Charleston, S. C., and relieve Brig. Gen. J. H. Trapier in his command at that place. The latter, on being relieved, will proceed to Fernandina, Fla., and take command, pursuant to existing orders from the War Department. General Ripley will prosecute vigorously the completion of the water and land defenses of Charleston, and General Trapier will make use of all means in his power for the defense of Cumberland Sound.

II. The following disposition of troops will be carried into effect as soon as practicable, viz: Heyward’s and De Saussure’s regiments, South Carolina volunteers, under the immediate command of General Drayton; Clingman’s and Radcliffe’s North Carolina volunteers will continue near Grahamville, and Dunovant’s and Edwards’ South Carolina volunteers at their present positions.

...

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Coosawhatchie, November 18, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Being about to repair to Charleston, in obedience to the orders of the general commanding, I have the honor to submit the following information concerning the troops in this vicinity:

Bluffton is held by Lieutenant-Colonel Colcock’s cavalry, in observation only. It has been reported to me that there are two companies of infantry of Heyward’s Ninth (Eleventh] regiment remaining there, but I have nothing definite. This section of country is under charge of General Drayton’s command, which it is intended to move forward as soon as possible to occupy positions to cover Bluffton and the roads to Hardeeville. General Drayton’s command is composed of Heyward’s and De Saussure’s regiments, Ninth [Eleventh] and Fifteenth South Carolina Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Colcock’s cavalry. Colonel Clingman’s regiment of North Carolina volunteers (Twenty-fifth), occupies a point on the Honeywood road in advance of Grahamville, intended to be a guard for that town and to cover the roads leading from Tenny’s or Boyd’s Landing. His quartermaster and commissary are directed to {p.324} establish depots and obtain supplies of subsistence at Grahamville, as far as possible; whether they will be successful remains to be seen, and the regiment will have to be looked after in the general depots.

Captain Trezevant’s company of cavalry is in advance of Colonel Clingman, in observation of Boyd’s and Tenny’s Landings. General Drayton’s command is supplied from his own depots at Hardeeville.

At the estate’s landing, near Huguenin’s plantation, are stationed the 8-inch howitzer battery, under General Gonzales, as volunteer aide-decamp to myself. The howitzer battery is manned by the Palmetto Guard (State troops), and has attached to the command the Charleston Light Dragoons and Rutledge Mounted Rifles; the last are, however, in observation near Pocotaligo and Port Royal Ferries.

Colonel Radcliffe’s Eighth North Carolina Volunteers is on the right of Gonzales’ command, in position to support the battery or to defend the roads from Eutaw Church or to move forward to support Clingman. He is supplied partly by purchase and partly from the depot here.

A force of negroes, under the supervision of General Gonzales, is engaged in obstructing the Coosawhatchie below the landing; and, this being done, the steamer John A. Moore and several flats, sent from Charleston, are available for transportation from the railroad to the landing by water. Mr. Gregory is engaged with his negroes in obstructing the Tulifiny.

At Coosawhatchie is Colonel Edwards’ full regiment and Captain Moore’s light artillery, both waiting orders, &c.

Six companies of Dunovant’s Twelfth South Carolina Volunteers are at Pocotaligo Corners, the remaining four being at Hardeeville. It is supposed that it was intended to order them to rejoin their regiment, but the order may be delayed until the arrival of the general.

Colonel Jones’ Fourteenth South Carolina Volunteers holds Garden’s Corner, and is stretched in observation towards Combahee Ferry, in advance towards Port Royal Ferry. This is guarded by Fripp’s cavalry. Another force of Colonel Martin’s regiment, which has its headquarters at Pocotaligo (it may be well to add that Lieutenant-Colonel Colcock’s regiment is a portion of Colonel Martin’s regiment, with one or two [companies] under Major Farr, a force of Martin’s regiment), is also guarding the district of country about Combahee, Ashepoo, and Paw Paw.

Capt. Leo. D. Walker, assistant adjutant-general, with Messrs. Walter Blake, Rawlins Lowndes, and Paul, volunteer aides-de-camp, are now engaged in endeavoring to block the rivers at some point below the railroad bridges. They are to be assisted by Mr. Nolan, who has been sent out by the superintendent of the railroad for the purpose.

The general idea of the disposition of the troops has been to cover the railroad bridges in the direction of Savannah and have them not too far from the railroad, that they might move in either direction, in case of an attack on the road or on Savannah or Charleston.

If everything were in order, and the troops well disciplined, there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the ends of the disposition, but General Drayton’s command has not moved from Hardeeville, and our troops are very raw; they require severe discipline and constant watching; it will take some time of this to make them efficient.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

{p.325}

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, Fla., November 19, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President of the Confederate States of America:

DEAR SIR: The presence of General Grayson, although unable to render service, the expectation of General Smith for two weeks, and of General Trapier for the last three weeks, have prevented me from adopting and enforcing with energy measures necessary to the defense of the State. At all important points we are threatened with attack; nowhere prepared to meet the enemy; and when, as governor of the State, I have applied for arms and munitions of war, I have been answered a requisition should be made by the officer in command of the military department, yet none is in command. It would have been almost as reasonable under the circumstances to have referred me to the Emperor of China. We need troops and munitions of war, and officers of military education, experience, and ability, and, if not promptly aided, Florida may be lost to the Southern Confederacy. Her citizens have almost despaired of protection from the Confederate Government-will lose confidence in it; but being one of the first States to withdraw from the United States, and to resolve to maintain her independence, her gallant sons and daughters would rather perish bravely, sword in hand, vindicating their rights, than yield submissively to or entertain a moment’s thought of ever living under the same Government with the people of the North. If General Trapier will not accept the command (and I presume he will not while the enemy holds or threatens an inch of South Carolina), let us have arms and munitions of war, and have an order issued immediately, placing the troops in this State which have been mustered into the Confederate service, not embracing any in General Bragg’s department, under my command, and subject to my orders as governor and commander-in-chief of Florida, and if I cannot hold positions exposed to the naval armament of the enemy, I will prevent the enemy from holding the positions and defend the State against invasion. From every portion of the State I have been appealed to by the citizens to assume the command in person, and have been prevented by a desire to avoid coming in conflict with the authority and policy of the Confederate Government. Since the death of General Grayson I have corrected the evils arising from intemperance among the Confederate as well as the State troops. It is highly important that some one should be in command having the experience and common sense necessary to avoid useless expenditures and to enforce discipline among the troops, and make them available for the defense of the State.

These views are respectfully suggested for your consideration, with the sincere avowal that I would rather co-operate with General Trapier in this military department, if he will accept the command and repair here immediately.*

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, sir,

JOHN MILTON.

P. S.-I am informed that upon the steamer which has just arrived at Savannah rifled cannon and Enfield rifles have been received, and respectfully ask your excellency to place at my disposal 1,000 Enfield rifles and two rifled cannon, with equipments complete, and send them by Captain Noyes, the bearer, and I will successfully defend Apalachicola and Saint Mark’s. Also, let Florida have 1,000 sabers, 1,000 pistols {p.326} for cavalry, and equipments, and a few hundred bags of buck-shot. If General Trapier should decline the command here, and your excellency would prefer to have the military department under the command of an officer appointed by yourself rather than the governor of Florida, then I respectfully recommend Col. Richard F. Floyd, a citizen of this State, a native of Georgia, and now in command at Apalachicola by my appointment. He is about fifty years old; a soldier and a gentleman of strict sobriety and integrity; a good disciplinarian, and a gentleman of excellent sense and unquestionable courage.

Respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

* Some personal matters here omitted

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, November A, 1861.

General LEE, Commanding:

SIR: As you have recently arrived to take command, I think, perhaps, it may be useful to you to have a general and authentic statement of the forces now in actual service from Georgetown to Hardeeville. I therefore inclose the within statement, that you may know what troops you can use for any immediate emergency.

I am not yet prepared to state exactly what regiments can be raised immediately or mustered in. I suppose you will have about 2,500 of the arms recently arrived to put in their hands and I think I can have 1,000; that is, in all 3,500. If the regiments are mustered in and get those arms, which no doubt will be the case, it will give about 20,000 men, who can be relied on, with arms. As to what you can get in an emergency from General Lawton and General Anderson, I can know nothing certain.

With very great respect, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS.

[Inclosure.]

Commands.Stations.Strength.
Boyce’s artillery124
Citadel Cadets 126
Claremont troops 65
Clingman’s regimentGrahamville1,100
Coit’s artillery132
College Cadets 60
De Saussure’s brigadeCharleston2,750
De Saussure’s regimentHardeeville 800
Dunovant’s regimentPocotaligo and Hardeeville 800
Edwards’ regimentCoosawhatchie 600
Gonzales’ siege train (four guns)Huguenin’s Neck 80
Hagood’s regimentCole’s Island 750
Hatch’s battalionJames Island and Bull’s Bay 500
Heyward’s regimentHardeeville1,000
Jones’ regimentGarden’s Corner 800
Lafayette ArtilleryPort Pickens (Stono) 60
Lamar’s artilleryPort Johnson 131
Lucas’ battalionPort Pickens (Stono) 70
Martin’s regiment (mounted) 650
McCord’s Zouaves 92
Moore’s artillery (6 guns)Grahamville 110
Radcliffe’s regimentHuguenin’s Neck1,000
Regular artilleryFort Sumter 560
Regular infantryTo be kept in Port Moultrie 420
Vigilant RiflesFort Palmetto (Stono) 50
White’s battalion240
Total13,100
{p.327}

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RICHMOND, November 19, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Charleston:

I desire the cartridges for Enfield rifles divided between you and General Johnston in proper proportion, reserving for me such portion of the cartridges as is proper for the rifles that remain after dividing 9,000 between you and General Johnston. Divide the accouterments equally between yourself and General Johnston. Send to him the 500 sabers that are aboard. Keep the 10,000 pounds of the cannon powder, and send me the remaining 7,000 pounds belonging to the War Department. Send me all the rifle powder, as you have plenty at Augusta Arsenal.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, November 21, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report, for the information of the Secretary of War, that I have just returned to this city after having inspected the batteries and posts along the coast from Charleston to Fernandina, Fla.

The guns from the less important points have been removed, and are employed in strengthening those considered of greater consequence. The entrance to Cumberland Sound and Brunswick and the water approaches to Savannah and Charleston are the only points which it is proposed to defend. At all of these places there is much yet to be done, but every effort is being made to render them as strong as the nature of the positions and the means at hand will permit. They ought, after their completion, to make a good defense against any batteries that are likely to be brought against them. More guns could be usefully employed if available for this service; those at hand have been placed in the best positions and the troops distributed so as to work them to advantage. The batteries are tolerably supplied with ammunition, having about 50 rounds to the gun. This amount it would be well to have increased to 100 rounds.

The greatest difficulty to be contended with is the want of artillerists and proper officers as instructors. The naval officers directed to report to me have been assigned to duty at the batteries in Charleston Harbor as ordnance and artillery officers, with the exception of Captains Buchanan and Sinclair, whom I have directed to return, having, while uncertain as to any attack being in contemplation, no appropriate duties for them to perform, and believing their services were important at their former stations.

I have been able to learn nothing of any movements of the enemy’s fleet along the coast of Georgia or Florida, and am inclined to believe that they have not yet made any further demonstrations of attack.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., November 21, 1861.

I. In consequence of the general scarcity of ammunition, the general commanding desires to impress upon the commanders of regiments and {p.328} corps the absolute necessity of economizing the supplies they have on hand to the utmost extent. To this end the guards will not be allowed to load their pieces unless in the actual presence of the enemy or in danger of surprise, and all hunting parties will be strictly forbidden to use the public ammunition. Each soldier will be held strictly accountable for the number of rounds issued to him, and company officers are directed to make constant inspections of the cartridge-boxes and their magazines, in order to assure themselves that there is no improper wastage.

II. The commanding general has also learned that the arms issued to some of the regiments are not of uniform caliber, and, consequently, there has been some disproportion in the corresponding ammunition. As this might not improbably prove a fatal error, it is strictly enjoined upon all commanders to give a careful personal examination of all requisitions for ammunition, and also to superintend the distribution of the same to the men.

III. The attention of the troops in this department is called to the evil practice of tearing down fences and other private property for firewood and other purposes. All interference with the rights of citizens is highly injurious in its tendency, and is strictly forbidden. The general hopes that it will only be necessary to remind the troops that they are citizens as well as soldiers, and that, as they take up arms to repel the enemy from our soil, they should still be more careful to preserve it sacred from their own depredations. Prompt and severe punishment will follow all irregularities of this nature in future, and it is strictly enjoined upon all officers to see to the literal execution of this order.

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, November 22, 1861.

Governor MILTON, Tallahassee:

We shall not recognize any action of Colonel Dilworth in contravention of instructions sent to him. General Trapier has gone to Fernandina and will assume command at once, and thus bring matters into proper order. His command extends to the Choctawhatchee, and not to the Chattahoochee, as you supposed.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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COLUMBIA, November 26, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

You telegraphed me that instead of sending me Gregg’s regiment or others you would send some North Carolina regiments to us. If you could send another it would be of great service, particularly if armed. You must judge if an attack on Charleston is intended, for if it is we will want at least six more armed regiments there, the line is so long.

F. W. PICKENS.

{p.329}

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, November 26, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Coosawhatchie:

CAPTAIN: I have received a dispatch from Lieutenant-Colonel Black that he has received reliable information that the enemy has landed at Otter Island and Fenwick’s Island. The abandonment of the ports of course leaves the streams Ashepoo and Paw Paw open, as, from what I learn from Captain Walker, they cannot be immediately obstructed. Forces are required for each river. I have none at my disposal. I shall, however, in addition to the movement of the Rifle Regiment, South Carolina Militia send two companies of Orr’s regiment, to act with Lieutenant-Colonel Black on the main, and annoy, if not stop, the enemy if he attempts to pass through Dobson Creek.

Meantime the work of fortifying and arming progresses slowly, but, as there is but little more powder to be had, the number of our guns will not assist us very materially. I beg to represent the want to the general commanding, that it may be supplied, if possible.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, November 26, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY, P. A., Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The commanding general directs me to say that the enemy can land on all the islands he can approach with his armed vessels, but he will hardly find it to his advantage to hold them after they have been pillaged. Urge forward, therefore, the obstructions to the Ashepoo and Edisto, and see if laborers cannot be obtained on the line of rivers to be obstructed.

The deficiency in powder is a serious calamity, and the general desires you to furnish these headquarters with a statement of what is at your disposal on account of the Confederate States. The State has in addition 14,175 pounds of cannon powder, which it will no doubt distribute for the defense of Charleston.

Col. William V. Mallard is reported to be at Jacksonborough, on the Edisto, with two companies of infantry. As he is not mentioned in your report of troops furnished this office on your departure, you will please inform these headquarters in what service he belongs.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Captain, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, Hardeeville, November 26, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Coosawhatchie, S. C.:

SIR: I inclose you a copy of a communication from Lieutenant-Colonel Colcock, and although I have indorsed my approval of his application {p.330} for howitzers, I nevertheless need some guns at Red Bluff and New River Bridge at once, if in your reach.

The enemy are evidently sounding and examining our rivers with reference to Savannah, and to retard their approach towards it via New River would be only secondary to doing so via Tybee and Pulaski. I am desirous of taking the offensive, but, without artillery, any display with my small infantry and cavalry force would prove of little avail against any expedition of respectable numbers.

I feel assured of an onward movement towards Red Bluff whenever our enemy gets a hint of its strategic importance.

It is not only difficult to get the pile-driver, as proposed at our last interview, but mechanics also. I am now endeavoring to procure chains and anchors from Savannah, and, by the aid of the rafts as supports to the chain cables, present a very strong resistance to any advancing boats. When I get the pile-driver I will sink piles and flats likewise.

I have an expedition out to-night, and hope to produce such an impression upon the marauders as will make them less venturesome, for some few days at least, and afford me better opportunity of carrying on my defenses on New River.

Respectfully,

THOS. F. DRAYTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. LOWER SQUADRON MOUNTED REGIMENT, Bluffton, November 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General DRAYTON, Hardeeville:

GENERAL: I sent out a guard boat last night, under command of Sergeant Mikell; he returned this morning with a boat load of negroes and plunder, whom he captured while making their way to Bull Island. About three nights ago Baynard’s man Cyrus sent two negroes (William and Paddy, supposed to be trustworthy) to Bull Island to reconnoiter, with instructions to return the same night. They remained on the island two days, and then returned stealthily during Cyrus’ absence and enticed off portions of their families. Last night William attempted to repeat the operation, but was caught and brought over to me. I have had him tied, and, together with the negroes captured by Mikler, placed under a guard and sent off to Hardeeville, with instructions to report to you. Some of them belong to the Baynards, who I believe are at Hardeeville, to whom they can be delivered there. Most of them belong to Mr. James Pope, who I am told is at Robertsville. You will please communicate to him the fact of their arrest. Mr. Farr will inform you what disposition he wishes made of his boy. I thought it necessary, both for the example to the other negroes and to save so much property, that these negroes should be placed inside of our lines and in a place of safety.

Our vedettes who have come in so far report all quiet this morning. I have omitted to mention that a barge of considerable size, and filled with men, approached Hunting Island Landing yesterday morning. On the reception of the intelligence I ordered out a detachment of infantry and one of cavalry and hurried down in person to reconnoiter, but the enemy was in full retreat, having probably heard our drum and retired without attempting to land. These boats are getting rather impertinent, {p.331} and we want one or two howitzers down here. I wish you would telegraph to General Lee, requesting him to send me down two howitzers in addition to the cavalry which he wrote me this morning he was trying to get to me.

I inclose a list of the names of the negroes sent, with the names of their owners.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. J. COLCOCK, Lieutenant-Colonel Mounted Regiment.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP MARION, November 27, 1861-7 a.m.

[Brig. Gen. THOMAS F. DRAYTON :]

GENERAL: The expedition to Bull Island, about which I wrote you, left here last night about 10.30 o’clock, consisting of a detail of about 40 men from Major Smith’s command, under command of Capt. Manning J. Kirk. It was conducted by him with great prudence and ability and proved a complete success, resulting in the capture of 38 negroes, most of them belonging to Joseph Baynard. By my directions, after the party were embarked, fire was applied to the fodder and corn houses, which were completely destroyed. From what I can learn from the negroes there were no Yankees on the island last night. My impression is that they only come over in the day-time for foraging purposes and leave at night. As some of our wagons are going to Hardeeville for stores, I have ordered the prisoners sent up to Hardeeville, under a proper guard. Please have them delivered to their owner, Mr. Baynard, who, not being in the village, I suppose must have returned last night to Hardeeville.

Please telegraph this information to General Lee, from whom I received a letter yesterday, saying he was making an effort to send me down a re-enforcement of cavalry, and request him to hasten them forward, as I have but little doubt that the enemy will attack us soon in retaliation for our Bull Island expedition. I wish you would send down a regiment of infantry as soon as possible.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. J. COLCOCK, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Lower Squadron Mounted Infantry.

P. S.-I neglected to inform you that Baynard’s fellow (Pompey) had to be killed to prevent his escape. Captain Young and his party arrived late last night and shall have every assistance I can render.

[Indorsement.]

General Drayton takes pleasure in forwarding the inclosed letter to General Lee and trusts the next one may result in the capture of some of the Lincolnites. Cavalry, artillery, and transportation are our great wants.

THOS. F. DRAYTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.332}

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SAVANNAH, GA., November 27, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: As directed in Special Orders, No. 2, Headquarters, Coosawhatchie, November 17, 1861, I proceeded to Fernandina and to the batteries along the coast to examine the condition of their armament, and have the honor to make the following report:

1st. The batteries on Amelia Island are not yet completed; some of the guns are to be changed, and others have yet to be mounted. These are, one 10-inch rifle gun; one 32-pounder rifle gun; three 8-inch columbiads; four army and four navy pattern 32-pounder guns; two 24-pounder guns; and of field guns, two 3-inch rifle guns; four 6-pounder bronze guns; one 6-pounder iron gun.

The guns in position (barbette) are well mounted, except an 8-inch columbiad which has an unequal bearing on the platform. It is being remedied by letting the pintle bolster deeper into the pintle cross. In the columbiad carriages yellow pine is substituted for oak, and I directed an additional iron strap, to secure the braces, to be added to each brace. I may add that all the columbiad carriages on the coast are made of yellow pine, and are additionally strengthened in the same way.

The guns are all supplied with the necessary equipments; have all the implements for firing hot shot and for preparing and firing shells, and are provided with shot, shells, fuses, and ammunition for 70 rounds each.

I have directed a few articles to be sent to Colonel Dilworth. He asked for 45 sabers and 1,000 Enfield rifles.

2d. The battery on the south end of Cumberland has four 32-pounder naval guns en barbette. The carriages, platforms, and guns are in excellent order, but the battery is almost deficient in implements. There are no shells; 50 rounds of powder and shot for each gun. Orders have been given for its supply at once, and until furnished spare implements and shells have been sent from Amelia Island.

3d. The battery on Jekyl Island has one 42-pounder gun en barbette; four 32-pounder navy guns en barbette. They appear to work well, and have each about 60 rounds shot and shell; not a sufficient number of the latter. This battery is scantily furnished with implements. I have arranged to send them, through Lieutenant Harden, acting ordnance officer at Brunswick, all that will be required.

4th. Saint Simon’s batteries have one 10-inch columbiad; one 8-inch columbiad (in process of mounting); two 42-pounder guns; five 32-pounder guns. The guns and carriages work well, except the 10-inch columbiad, which bears too heavily on the pintle bolster. This was directed to be remedied by cutting away a small part of the chassis. The battery is supplied with implements; each gun has about 75 rounds of shot and shell, with the ammunition. But as the guns are to be distributed in several batteries, I conceived it proper to order additional stores. (See requisition for depot at Brunswick.)

5th. Fort Pulaski has five 10-inch columbiads en barbette; six 8-inch columbiads en barbette; two 10-inch mortars en barbette; three 8-inch columbiads in casemate; two 42-pounder guns in casemate; twenty 32-pounder guns in casemate; one 24-pounder gun, plank casemate. The guns and carriages are in excellent condition; have an abundance of all kinds of implements, fuses, &c. Each gun has about 120 rounds of shot and shell. Some of the fuses are imperfect; these I am renewing with new ones from the Augusta Arsenal.

{p.333}

The fuses in a number of instances are imperfect in several batteries; as fast as they can be made others are supplied. The two mortars have but 70 shells between them. I have ordered an additional supply to the fort, and have recommended two 12-pounder field howitzers to be placed so as to flank the ditch.

6th. Fort Jackson [Ga.] has one 32-pounder navy gun (rifled); five 32-pounder navy guns; three 18-pounder guns. They are in good order, and are supplied, or being supplied, with the necessary implements, &c. Each gun has about 60 rounds.

7th. Battery on Green Island has one 10-inch rifled gun (caliber 6.4); one 10-inch columbiad; two 8-inch columbiads; two 42-pounder guns; four 32-pounder guns. The rifle gun has just been mounted. I fired from it, and with 9 1/2° elevation attained a range of about 1 3/4 miles. The guns and carriages work extremely well; they have everything to make their fire effective. The battery is supplied with about 60 rounds to a gun; has a portable shot-furnace, which I think too small for this point.

8th. Thunderbolt battery has one 8-inch gun (columbiad); three 18-pounder guns. The battery is in good order, and has about 50 rounds to a gun.

The batteries in the neighborhood of Savannah are well served, and with the allowance of ammunition will do very effective service.

I have advised in every case the adoption of ricochet firing. This, if the guns are not fired too rapidly, will, in my opinion, enable all the batteries to make a good defense against shipping. To make the men more deliberate, particularly in the commencement of an action, the gunners should not be permitted to fire but a certain number of rounds in an hour, and the loading be by “detail.”

There has been some trouble in firing shell from several of the batteries; the fuses in some instances were imperfect, and the fuse plugs improperly driven in others. I have made arrangements for a new supply of fuses as rapidly as they can be supplied at the Augusta Arsenal, and have given instructions so as to insure the proper loading of shells, &c.

Some of the regiments on the coast are armed with shot-guns and sporting rifles. They have little or no ammunition. I propose to put up for the shot-guns a blank cartridge, to fire a small linen bag containing twelve buck-shot.

I requested the State Ordnance Officer to give me the calibers of the rifles, to make fixed ammunition for them. I will furnish each regiment with a caliber gauge, and it will enable them to furnish me with the kind and quantity of cartridges required.

Fire and light balls, rockets, fuses, port-fires, fixed ammunition and cannon powder, implements and gun carriages, are required most at present. These I have been engaged on at the Augusta Arsenal, and I will repair thither and push the force employed there as much as possible in supplying the above deficiency. I find it necessary to be there to superintend the works in construction, as there is no one there of sufficient experience in artillery or ordnance duties to direct matters.

In an order from the Ordnance Officer, received in October, I was directed to obtain reports from all the batteries along the coast of Georgia and Florida as far as Apalachicola, with the view of furnishing those batteries with ordnance and ordnance stores. Some of these reports have been received, and I will prepare the arsenal to supply their wants.

In conclusion, I will state that the powder mills at the arsenal have been delayed in their work. On my return there I will work them at {p.334} once night and day, and expect to turn out from 300 to 500 pounds of cannon per day. If possible, this amount Shall be increased.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. G. GILL, Lieutenant-Colonel, Ordnance Officer.

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RICHMOND, VA., November 29, 1861.

His Excellency FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

MY DEAR SIR: I have received your letter of the 24th instant,* and thank you for writing so freely.

Generals Evans and Pemberton will be sent to General Lee immediately.

The deficiencies of which you speak in the character of your brigadier-generals will, I hope, be compensated for by the presence of General Lee and the addition of General Pemberton.

More than half the amount of powder received was ordered to be furnished to General Lee. The whole amount was less than that asked for by you.

In regard to arms, I wish indeed that I had more to give you. Governor Letcher has now 500 for you in addition to the 500 previously furnished. This is but a small supply, but will be increased as fast as our means will admit.

Very respectfully and truly,

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

* Not found.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, November 29, 1861.

His Excellency Governor MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

SIR: The President has received your letter of the 19th instant in regard to the condition of things in Florida, &c., and has referred it to me for reply.

Since the date of your letter the arrival of General Trapier and the organization of the military district under his command have doubtless put an end to the apprehensions you suggest, and render it, therefore, unnecessary for the President to avail himself of your proffered services. We rely, nevertheless, with confidence upon your vigilant and zealous co-operation in all our efforts for the defense of Florida against the common enemy. Your excellency may rest assured, and you may assure the patriotic people of your State, that you shall not be overlooked in our efforts for the common defense. Of this the arrival, I hope by this time, of the munitions, &c., requested by Judge Baker and the measures of preparation organized by General Trapier have already given you some assurance. No effort shall be intermitted by the Confederate Government to insure the safety of your State, either now or hereafter.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

{p.335}

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 3, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR In a letter received to-day from Col. John S. Preston, whom I had assigned to the duty of mustering into the service of the Confederate States such troops as might offer themselves for the war from the State of South Carolina or be transferred by the governor, it is stated that the only transfers made up to this time are four companies for twelve-months’ service. Even for twelve months the recruiting is very languid; for the war not one company has yet offered, and not one new regiment will be organized in three months. The entire levy will be for terms less than the war, and generally for twelve months, for local defense and special service. I fear that there will be great delay in organizing even such a force as can be armed, unless some measures can be resorted to to procure men.

I have received an application from J. C. B. Mitchell, Montgomery, Ala., to furnish arms to a regiment of that State on my own terms and have also been informed that Col. Charles C. Lee, Thirty-seventh Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, has written to Governor Clark to know if his regiment could not be transferred to this State and armed. I consider that the arms at my disposal are for the troops of Georgia and South Carolina.

I yesterday visited Port Royal Sound, with the view of organizing a light force to cut off, if possible, the enemy’s marauding parties on the islands. No attempts have yet been made on the main-land, nor could I discover any indication of any movement. The fleet in large force lay extended across the sound from Hilton Head to Bay Point, perfectly quiescent, and no troops were visible except a picket at Hilton Head Ferry.

General Lawton reports that the enemy has evacuated Tybee Island.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 4, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: Will you please inform me whether the Marion Artillery mentioned in your letter of the 4th,* now preparing for field service, is the battery referred to in General Gist’s communication, of which you were notified, and whether the Washington Artillery is intended by the governor to be attached permanently to Stevens’ Legion, or for general service in the field?

Your plan of occupying the country between the Edisto and Combahee and occupying Edisto Island would be advantageous, if you had sufficient troops and guns to retain such an extent of country; but unless you can make the line sufficiently strong, or at least have the means of withdrawing the troops, it will, I fear, expose them to be taken in detail. If all the force was concentrated at advantageous points I think the defense of the approaches would be more effective. I do not know {p.336} whether you intend the forts at Tar Bluff, Rhett’s Bluff, Edisto Inlet, &c., to be temporary and for the protection of the property in their vicinity, or permanent.

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, December 5, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Coosawhatchie:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from the commanding general of the 4th, and one from yourself of the same date. I telegraphed to General Gist to ask him what battery was intended by him, and received the answer as follows:

De Saussure said the Marion Light Artillery and the Germans would be ready by today. Call upon the commanding officer Fourth Brigade South Carolina Militia.

From information here neither the Marion nor the German sections will be ready for two or three days, nor do I believe they will be ready for a week. The Washington Artillery commenced its preparation some time ago by my direction, and was called out. Meantime, while absent, it was intended to attach it to the Stevens Legion, and the governor had an idea of also attaching Boyce’s company of so-called light artillery. The Washington Artillery, however, have not mustered into Confederate service and I doubt whether they will, and they stand now as a company of State troops temporarily in Confederate service, with State guns (six pieces, three caissons, battery wagon, and forge), and horsed partly by State and partly by Confederate horses. Their preference is to a regiment of militia artillery of South Carolina; but I should have no hesitation in making them perform any duty they are capable of.

With regard to the intention, if more troops can be got, to hold in advance and reoccupy Edisto, it seems to me as far forward as we can go with safety from Charleston the better we are for its defense. Now, occupying positions to defend the rivers Ashepoo, Paw Paw, and Combahee involves taking position on the main only. The rivers will be obstructed above the batteries. Paw Paw will be defended by two 24-pounders recovered by Lieutenant-Colonel Black, and two light 4-pounders. The other rivers I had intended to defend with two 12s each, and to let a section of light artillery be with each battery, and to have such a supporting force of infantry and cavalry to support them as it may be possible to give or the necessity demands, the defense to be made either permanent or temporary, as circumstances might dictate, and to have for its object the protection of that section of country from which most of our subsistence must be drawn. As it stands now, the enemy can run up to the railroad at any moment and cut our communication at once in his barges, ravage the plantations on either side, and return. The obstructions will detain his vessels, it is true, but, unguarded, will be removed speedily, and his barges can come at any time. There is not even the show of a force to render him cautious, and it has been reported to me by Lieutenant-Colonel Black that the enemy’s officers have made several pertinent inquiries from negroes with whom they have had intercourse with regard to our armament on the rivers. Each of the positions being on the main, retreat to the railroad is easy, over a low, flat country, impracticable in many places except by the roads, {p.337} and these tolerably secure so long as the defenders have a force of light artillery. The infantry force, unless a large quantity [is] at our disposal, need be no larger than to support the artillery against a sudden attack and give confidence to the population. Moreover, with a small force in position, the enemy, it appears to me, will be obliged to take time if he wishes to cut our communication and land in strength.

With regard to Edisto, with the three rivers held as proposed, our inland navigation south of Jehossee being gone, we can block Dawho on both sides of the Edisto Ferry, or one to be established at Pineberry or vicinity. The obstructions there can be defended by riflemen, assisted by light guns from Willstown Bluff, the place of obstruction on Paw Paw. If it be possible to place another battery on Edisto or Seabrook’s Island, if an enemy passes he cannot cut off the troops on Edisto, who can gain the main before he can remove the obstructions. Not many are wanted there, if they can, under a proper officer, be made moveable and vigilant to protect property and to retire.

The troops on John’s Island, should the enemy attempt to run by and force Church Flats battery, can fall back through Wadmalaw to a church, which is a fine position for a battle on a small scale, and where the main fight should be on John’s Island. If Church Flats are forced, they can cross the Stono by Legareville, between Stono and Battery Island; or, should the enemy land on the main south of Church Flats, the communication is direct to the lines on James Island or the city. As a defense for Charleston it seems to me that the farther out our posts are, so long as our force is not too small here, the longer the enemy will take to make his attack.

I have written at length, as I shall not probably have an opportunity of seeing the commanding general on the subject soon. But we want two or four more regiments to fulfill these objects, and I regret to state that under present arrangements they are coming slowly.

My commission as brigadier-general dates August 15.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST., DEP’T OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Georgetown, December 6, 1861.

Maj. T. A. WASHINGTON, Department Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: Yours of the 3d received* this morning. The additional 150 32 round shot was received yesterday.

Not having had any authority over the engineers in charge of works here until within the past week, although for two months in charge of the district, I have been unable, until authorized as above, to carry out any of my own views in regard to the defenses of coast in this district. I had already directed the abandonment of the work at North Santee and ordered the guns there removed. They will be temporarily placed on the work at Cat Island. Should I make any other disposition of the guns, I will inform you of it. I would place them higher up the river, but there is no position for them without incurring heavy expense in piling, &c., the land being all swamp or rice land and below the level of {p.338} the daily tides. The first point would be 10 miles above the present position, leaving many plantations below it entirely exposed.

I can use these guns to greater advantage on the main than at any point on the banks of the Santee. At present my entire available force is employed in the completion of the south and Cat Island redoubt.

I desire to call the attention of the general commanding to a matter, and in the absence of any instructions on the subject it is proper, I believe, that I should inform him that I have directed the officers under me commanding at the different posts in this district immediately on the coast that, should it be apparent that the enemy intend to make an effort in force to occupy any portion of this coast and it be evident that they will succeed in establishing themselves or actually succeed in doing so, they direct the rice planters to destroy all the rice and provision crops on their plantations; and, in the event of their failing so to do, to cause it to be destroyed themselves as a military necessity; the negroes to be removed also by force, if necessary.

With a view to this, I sent to each rice planter on the adjacent rivers some three weeks since a circular recommending that provision be made with as little delay as possible for the probable removal of their negroes, with subsistence for one year, to different points inland, not less than 15 or 20 miles from the coast, the plantation flats and boats with which each planter is supplied readily furnishing the transportation by the rivers, beyond the reach of their gunboats and vessels; also informing them that I would endeavor to make such arrangements that, on their requiring it, a military force would be furnished them to insist on obedience on the part of the slaves to their masters’ orders.

In many instances these suggestions have been complied with, and such arrangements are being generally made. Over two-thirds of the rice crop of the State is made in this neighborhood, and as the entire crops are in the different barn-yards, it would be disastrous in many ways should our enemies ever succeed in possessing themselves of so large an amount of provisions, particularly valuable to them for reasons too numerous to mention here.

So satisfied am I that our true policy is to destroy all we cannot remove or hold, that unless otherwise directed I shall carry out the instructions that I previously mention having given. I do not, however, intend that they shall take possession quietly or without a struggle while I have the means of opposing them.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. MANIGAULT, Colonel Tenth Regiment, Commanding First Military District.

* Not found.

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RICHMOND, December 7, 1861.

Governor PICKENS, Columbia:

I have ordered three regiments-two of Tennesseeans and one of Virginians-to your State. Several more will follow. Two batteries of flying artillery have been sent and one more will follow, and one regiment of Mississippians have been ordered to Savannah. You are kept in constant remembrance.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

{p.339}

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 7, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston:

GENERAL: I have read with attention your letter of the 5th instant. I regret to learn that the Marion Light Artillery is not yet prepared for the field. When it is ready please inform me whether it will be required in the vicinity of Charleston.

Unless more field artillery can be obtained, it will be almost impossible to make head against the enemy, should he land in any force. I understand from your letter that the Washington Artillery is only temporarily in Confederate States service, and suppose, therefore, cannot be calculated upon for general service. Being partly equipped by the State and partly by the Confederate States causes embarrassment in supplying it with necessary articles. It is very desirable that the battery should enter the Confederate service so soon as to be rendered as efficient as possible.

The defense of the rivers Ashepoo, Paw Paw, and Combahee, for the protection of the railroad, is of the greatest importance, and I trust may be speedily accomplished.

As the positions occupied will be on the main, the withdrawal of the troops, in case of necessity, can be easily effected. Moreover, the protection of that section of the country, upon [which] you rely for subsistence, is very desirable. The only difficulty I see to the measure is the want of troops to insure successful resistance should the enemy land in force. The three rivers being defended as proposed, the passage through Dawho and at Church Flats being obstructed, preclude the enemy’s approach to the railroad. It would be also desirable to prevent his occupation of Edisto, but whether fixed batteries can now be erected of sufficient strength I think is doubtful. It will also, I fear, be impossible to obtain the regiments which you think necessary for the purpose. I can learn of no regiments in South Carolina entering the service. Several have been offered to me from other States, but they are all unarmed, and I have none for them.

Very respectfully,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 7, 1861.

I. The recent inspection by the medical director of the department discloses the existence of much sickness among the troops. No special means can be devised for banishing measles, but catarrhal affections, pneumonia, and rheumatic complaints are produced, in many instances, by bad selection of sites for camps. They should always be located on high and dry ground, exposed to the healthful influences of the sun. It is believed that typhoid disease is developed by the close air of tents, the want of personal cleanliness, the neglect of proper police, and the prolonged occupation of the same ground of encampment. Commanding officers are particularly desired to establish proper sinks, remote from the tents, and to cause the daily removal of all garbage and offal. The tents must be frequently emptied and ventilated and the bedding thoroughly aired and cleansed. A proper attention to these measures on the part of commanding and medical officers will do much to mitigate disease and promote the health and efficiency of the men.

II. The commanding general finds it necessary to urge upon the officers {p.340} in every department the practice of strict economy in all purchases and expenditures. Commanding officers will see that the regulations in this respect are rigidly observed, and that the supplies for the Army are properly cared for and used. The good of the service and the comfort of the troops demand strict attention to this subject.

By order of General Lee:

W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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COLUMBIA, December 8, 1861.

Hon. Mr. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I am greatly obliged to you for the regiments promised and the flying artillery companies. I began to fear you had forgotten us. I start twenty companies with our State arms in the morning and more coming in. The fleet at Saint Helena cannot be counted. Please push on your troops, for by Thursday we will begin to feel the enemy.

F. W. PICKENS.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, December 8, 1861.

Maj. Gen. R. E. LEE, Coosawhatchie, S. C.:

SIR: Your letter of 3d instant was received on the 7th. Since its reception I have telegraphed, announcing that measures had been taken to re-enforce you with three batteries of field artillery and three regiments of infantry, and that several other regiments would be sent. The three on the way to you are Donelson’s brigade, of two Tennessee regiments, and Starke’s regiment. They were all ordered to re-enforce General Floyd, but did not reach him in time to prevent his retreat. His whole force has now been withdrawn from Western Virginia, and I expect further to send you Russell’s Mississippi regiment, Phillips’ Georgia regiment, Waddill’s Louisiana battalion, and perhaps some others. Floyd’s army is now on railroad near Wytheville, and as soon as it has been inspected and furnished with its necessary supplies of tents, camp equipage, &c., say in about five or six days, the additional troops just mentioned will be sent you, unless some unforeseen exigency shall render it impossible. I am firm in my purpose not to give a musket to a man enlisted for less than the war (or three years, which is the same thing), and therefore I beg that you will inform Governors Pickens and Brown that if they have no “war” troops ready to receive the arms you still retain in your hands you will at once arm the other regiments mentioned in your letter, and if they are unable to promise the troops immediately, you will please write Colonel Mitchell that you are authorized by this Department to arm his regiment, and to order it to Savannah or Charleston for that purpose. I had nearly forgotten to say Colonel Dowd’s regiment of Mississippians, unarmed, has been ordered to Savannah to receive arms from you if Georgia has no “war” troops to receive them, and must therefore be armed before Colonel Mitchell’s regiment. Keep me advised of your wants, that I may send you everything our means will permit.

Your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

{p.341}

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GARDEN’S CORNER, December 8, 1861-11.30 p.m.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Coosawhatchie, S. C.:

CAPTAIN: Half an hour ago I received information from Captain Maffit that a small force of the enemy were landing at Cunningham Point; that with my company from Page’s Point he would attack them. Just now I have by a courier further information from Captain Maffit that the enemy are landing in force at Cunningham Point, landing continuously from boats and flats. Upon conference with Colonel Dunovant, who is now in my quarters, he will take his command to the junction of the road from Cunningham Point with the main road from Pocotaligo to this point. We will await further orders. Shall we move on to the attack provided the enemy does not advance to the road occupied by Colonel Dunovant I Colonel Dunovant is senior colonel.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES JONES, Colonel Fourteenth Regiment Routh Carolina Volunteers.

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RICHMOND, December 9, 1861.

Col. GEORGE DEAS, Dublin Station, Va.:

Hasten forward Donelson’s Tennessee brigade and Starke’s regiment to Charleston, S. C., as already ordered. Answer by telegraph.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, December 9, 1861.

Hon. JEFFERSON DAVIS, President of the Confederate states of America:

SIR: For some time before his death General Grayson was rendered non compos mentis by disease, and acted upon suggestions. Satisfied of this fact, and with the view so far as was possible of protecting him from imposition, I requested his attendants to invite my attention whenever he should be called upon to discharge any official duty. This, however, was not at all times practicable, nor perhaps possible. As an illustration, upon one occasion I was called upon at night by one William J. Turner, of the vicinity of Tampa Bay, and requested to commission him and others as officers of a cavalry company. I refused to do so. This was about 10 o’clock at night. In half an hour after a dispatch came, addressed to General Grayson and myself, bringing information that the enemy were landing near Saint Mark’s. General Grayson was confined to his bed (which he never left alive), and before 2 o’clock I left the capital by railroad, with a company of light artillery and one of infantry, with the aid of other troops near the place, to repel the invasion. The enemy, however, not landing, I returned to the capital, and learned that Turner had departed with orders from General Grayson under which his company has since been mustered into the Confederate service. I am now informed, by men of high respectability and undoubted veracity and standing in the country, that Turner has 116 men mustered into the service, and many of them upon horses which could {p.342} not stand a day’s march. This company is in the vicinity of Tampa Bay, a region of country where cavalry cannot possibly be of any use. That point (and indeed all others in Florida), if it can be defended from invasion, will be by artillery and infantry. Also that the quartermaster (McKay), in the purchase of supplies for said company, is paying from $1.50 to $2 per bushel for corn, and is hauling it from 20 to 60 miles, in wagons (with the teams) hired at $7 per day. One of the gentlemen who gave me this information also informed me that his own wagon and team are hired at that price. This company is not one of those recently raised by W. G. M. Davis, but is an additional company, authorized by the order of General Grayson, obtained at a time when he could not have been responsible for any act that he might have done.

This is but one fact in relation to the abuse which cannot but grow out of the presence in this State of such troops in the Confederate service. Doubtless the same facts, though perhaps not to the same extent, exist in the supply of every other company of cavalry recently raised for the Confederate service, and every reflecting man in the country is becoming alarmed at the uncalled-for waste of the substance of the land at the very time when it should be husbanded; and throughout the State the people are becoming indignant that such bodies of unarmed men and idle horses should be reared up among them, with no prospect but to consume the means of support for the women and children, cripple the usefulness of the armed troops for defense against the enemy, and bring ruin upon the people and disgrace upon the Confederate Government.

These troops have been raised by authority of the War Department in disrespect to State authority and in disregard of State rights; and, in addition to the fact of vital ruin they are bringing upon the country, against which it is my duty to and I do most solemnly protest, the tendency of the assumption and exercise of such power by the Confederate Government is to sap the very foundation of the rights of the States and is to consolidation. The worst feature of Black Republicanism was that which threatened to ignore State boundaries and the rights of States as free, sovereign, and independent parties to the compact known as the Constitution of the United States of America. The sinuosities of the policy of that party were not seen or comprehended, and the great body of the people, in their devotion to the Union, were blind to the fact that inroads were constantly but quietly being made upon the guarantees secured by the Constitution. Had the effort been made by act of Congress to elect the President, Representatives in Congress, and Federal officers generally by the people, regardless of State political organization the attempt would have been so open and glaring, that every man of intelligence and patriotism throughout the country would have declared it a usurpation of power and a violation of constitutional authority. That would have been so palpable as not to have escaped any intelligent mind. Yet the effect would not have been half so ruinous as is the policy pursued by the War Department in assuming to raise up armed bodies of men within the limits of a State in disregard of the constituted authorities of the State. And why? The answer is, that the first, being seen and comprehended as a flagrant invasion and usurpation, would have roused the people in resistance throughout the length and breadth of the land; the last is so insinuating as not to have alarmed any one, and hence good and true men are found advocating it, without thought, as a right. Well, admit and exercise it as a right, and let it be continued, and before the lapse of a century such bodies of men will be {p.343} reared up within the limits of the States by some able and ambitious Executive of the Confederate Government as to enable him to override the constituted authority of the States and destroy the last vestige of human liberty. Is this an unreasonable conclusion? Is it half so unreasonable as the facts which now exist in the United States? “When we see a President making war without the assent of Congress; when we behold judges threatened because they maintain the writ of habeas corpus, so sacred to freemen; when we see justice and law trampled under the armed heel of military authority, and upright men and innocent women dragged to distant dungeons upon the mere edict of a despot; when we find all this tolerated and applauded by a people who had been in the full enjoyment of freedom but a few months ago,” we may be admonished that there may, in time, be danger to us, unless we meet with our opposition at the very threshold every invasion of the rights of the States, whether that invasion be intentional or not. I have no thought that a man could be found who would say that the course pursued by the War Department is intended as a usurpation or in derogation of the rights of the States. But we must forget the teachings of history to suppose that men will not be what men have been. Look again at the people of the United States. Once, who more firm in the maintenance of chartered guarantees than they? Who more watchful of their rights or more quick to resist aggression than they? So devoted were they to the sacred cause of freedom, that a temple in one of their chief cities has been denominated the “Cradle of Liberty.” And yet where are they now? Their Constitution openly violated; their laws trampled under foot; their press muzzled; the freedom of speech a thing of the past and they applauding. Would they have believed this if they had been told it fifty years ago? Had they been as watchful in this as in former ages, and had checked aggression at its incipiency, they would not now have been as they are; and unless we shall be watchful of our rights, we may in an age to come be as they are. What has been may again be, if we neglect that maxim of patriotism, “Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty.”

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 9, 1861.

Col. R. G. M. DUNOVANT, Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: The Thirteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, Col. O. E. Edwards, has been ordered to take the road towards Garden’s Corner and to halt at the first convenient spot beyond Pocotaligo. This is intended as a precautionary movement, and should you need support, you will call upon Colonel Edwards to join you. In the event of not being required, Colonel Edwards is ordered to return to his camp this evening. You are desired to use all the force under your command in driving the enemy from the main whenever he may land within your reach.

I have the honor to be,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

{p.344}

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 9, 1861.

Colonel [R. G. M.] DUNOVANT, Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: A dispatch has just been received from Colonel Jones stating that the enemy was landing at Cunningham Point, and asking whether you should move to the attack, provided the enemy does not advance to the road now occupied by you.

The general commanding directs me to say that if the enemy attempts to effect a landing on this side you will attack him and drive him back.

W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 10, 1861.

General J. C. PEMBERTON, Commanding Fourth Military District, South Carolina:

GENERAL: Captain Ives reports that the obstruction placed in the Combahee River, even should it stop the advance of an enemy, would arrest him within 2 1/2 miles of the railroad, and unless prevented by a strong force he could easily reach it by land. There is no defense of this corner projected, nor could one be advantageously arranged. The work, however, is partially completed, and is therefore of some benefit. Two 12-pounders are placed at Tar Bluff, with a view of opposing the ascent of the river. They can make but slight resistance, especially as they are unprotected by defensive works, and being within 1 1/2 miles of Field’s Point, a good landing place for the enemy, they can easily be captured.

If an obstruction can be placed in the Combahee below the bluff it would give more stability to the battery, and perhaps prevent the enemy from attempting the ascent of the river. The width is about 200 yards and the depth at least 40 feet. It would therefore require great labor to obstruct it. I understand, however, that the planters interested in the project are wiling to furnish labor and material, and the matter is left to your discretion.

Very respectfully,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 10, 1861.

I. The coast of South Carolina will be divided into five military districts:

The First, or Eastern District, will extend from Little River Inlet to the South Santee River, under the command of Col. A. M. Manigault, headquarters at Georgetown.

The Second, beginning at the South Santee, will extend to the Stono River and up Rantowles Creek, under the command of Brig. Gen. R. S. Ripley, headquarters at Charleston.

The Third will comprise the country between the Stono and Ashepoo Rivers, under the command of -, headquarters at Adams Run.

The Fourth will extend from the Ashepoo to the Port Royal entrance, thence through the Colleton River and Ocella Creek to Ferebeeville, {p.345} under the command of Brig. Gen. J. C. Pemberton, headquarters at Coosawhatchie.

The Fifth will embrace the country between the last-named boundary and the Savannah River, under the command of Brig. Gen. T. F. Drayton, headquarters at Hardeeville.

...

V. The Third Military District, as organized in Paragraph I, is for the present attached to the Second.

By order of General Lee:

W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, A. AND I. G. O., Columbia, S. C., December 12, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Commanding Southern Department, Coosawhatchie:

GENERAL: Having understood from unofficial sources that you feel somewhat embarrassed as to the control and disposition of the State troops in service, in consequence of conflict of orders, I have the honor to state that no orders have been issued at any time from this office which can in the slightest degree conflict with your implied or expressed wishes. In fact, I know of no orders but those requiring troops of the State to report to you or your subalterns for duty upon requisitions made. The troops of the State are entirely without any reservation under your control, and the only irregularity attending the matter, as far as this office is concerned, is that requisitions for troops are often made by subalterns instead of coming through the department office.

I would assure you again of the most hearty and sincere co-operation of the State authorities in all possible matters-of their earnest desire to carry out your designs and wishes when made known to them, and their readiness to respond to any call you may make upon them to the utmost extent of their ability. Permit me to add that they do this the more cheerfully, as you possess their entire confidence.

I have just read this letter to the governor, and he approves and indorses my expressions of confidence and support.

I have the honor to inclose a copy of my orders* under act of the general assembly of the State, and as soon as the militia organizations can be relieved and their places supplied by volunteer troops I shall no longer have any distinct State troops in the field, but all will have taken Confederate service.

Allow me to say that the troops now being sent forward are sent in accordance with the instructions of Lieutenant-Colonel Preston, assistant adjutant-general. I have given orders for the fitting up of two additional batteries of light artillery, making five State batteries in all, and have written to ask for the guns of our battery in Virginia, as the term of service of the men who are with it expires in January next.

Let me ask of you to inform me at once of any irregularity that can be remedied by State authority, and it will be promptly attended to.

With great respect, I am, your obedient servant,

S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General of South Carolina.

* Not found

{p.346}

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HEADQUARTERS, Charleston, S. C., December 13, 1861.

General D. S. DONELSON, Commanding Third Brigade Tenn. Vols., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs that you should proceed with your brigade to Coosawhatchie, S. C., as soon as the quartermaster at this place (Maj. H. Lee) can furnish you with the necessary transportation. Directions have already been given to him to that effect.

Very respectfully,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., December 16, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Your letter of the 8th instant, forwarded from Coosawhatchie, has just been received. Two of the batteries (Thornton’s and Leake’s) and two of the regiments (Fulton’s and Savage’s) mentioned in your letter have arrived. I hope the others named will be dispatched without delay.

I have notified Governors Pickens and Brown that unless they had troops from their States “for the war” ready to receive the arms at my disposal, I should issue them to regiments from other States that have offered themselves for service in this department. On being informed by General Lawton that he had been advised by Governor Brown that he had none from Georgia, I directed him to arm the Mississippi regiment (Colonel Dowd). On the application of General Trapier for re-enforcements, having no other regiment available, I have directed General Lawton to send the Mississippi regiment to Fernandina, where they have only 1,300 men.

The Mississippi regiment, with some Georgia companies that have been mustered into the Confederate States service for the war, will absorb all the arms intended for Georgia troops. There are several companies in this State organized for the war, recently raised, and unarmed, attached to Colonels Orr’s and Dunovant’s regiments, that will require so many arms, as not to leave more than sufficient for one regiment. Ha regiment is not furnished by South Carolina, I will receive either Colonel Mitchell’s or Col. C. C. Lee’s regiment from North Carolina. The latter officer is a graduate of the West Point Academy, and I believe before his recent resignation was in the Ordnance Corps. He served in Virginia as lieutenant-colonel of Colonel Hill’s regiment, North Carolina Volunteers.

Could more arms be had for the troops for the war, as I believe, there would be no difficulty in procuring men. There is great need of more heavy guns, but knowing the constant demand in every section of the country for arms and ammunition, hesitate to make requisitions. If, however, twenty could be spared for this department they would be of great benefit-8 or 10 inch guns, 42 and 32 pounders, for water defense, and 8-inch howitzers, 24-pounders or less, for land defense.

The land defenses around the city, commencing on the coast side of James Island, extending to Wappoo Creek, thence to Ashley River, across the neck between Ashley and Cooper, and from the branch through Christ Church Parish to the sound, are in good state of progress, and {p.347} will now give steadiness and security to our troops in any advance of the enemy from any of those quarters, and afford time to move troops to meet them. The works have been mostly constructed by labor furnished by the planters. I hope they will be completed this week. The batteries in the harbor are in good condition, and if properly served should arrest the approach by the channel. Wappoo Creek is also provided with batteries in addition to those previously constructed at the mouth of the Stono, which should stop vessels by that direction. They form part of the lines of land defense and points of support where they touch the creek.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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CHARLESTON, December 16, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

Tennessee regiments arrived. Want what can be spared from other points. Require heavy guns, if available. Land defenses around Charleston progressing. If batteries are well fought, enemy ought not to succeed by water approaches. Eighty vessels of enemy counted at Port Royal on the 12th.

R. E. LEE.

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RICHMOND, December 16, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Charleston:

I send you six 32-pounders, with barbette carriages. They will leave here on Wednesday. Have sent you Waddill’s Louisiana battalion and Ector’s Georgia regiment. Will send you Russell’s Mississippi regiment and Phillips’ Georgia Legion in a day or two. Will you want any more heavy guns?

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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COOSAWHATCHIE, December 17, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

In addition to the six 32-pounders, require guns and howitzers on traveling carriages for land defense. Understand they can be had at Norfolk. Have written on the subject.

R. E. LEE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 22.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 18, 1861.

Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans, C. S. Provisional Army, having reported at these headquarters, pursuant to instructions from the Secretary of War, is hereby assigned to the command of the Third Military District of South Carolina, as set forth in Paragraph I, Special Orders, No. 17, current series, from these headquarters.

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army.

{p.348}

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 20, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I am much in need of guns for land defense and the protection of the rivers extending into the country. I have understood that there are carronades at the Norfolk navy-yard unemployed. Please, if practicable, send me eight 42-pounder carronades on chassis carriages, with a supply of shot, grape, shell, and primers, implements, &c., complete, with as little delay as possible.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

Lieutenant-Colonel Gorgas, for immediate attention.

J. P. B.

On the 17th December three 32-pounder heavy guns. On the 21st December two 8-inch columbiads were sent to General Lee, and to-morrow one 8-inch columbiad and one 24-pounder siege gun will be sent.

Very respectfully,

L. GIBBON, Captain.

DECEMBER 30, 1861.

Eight 42-pounder carronades were sent from Norfolk navy-yard to General Lee December 27, as per invoice received from Commodore Fairfax. The ammunition will be sent from here to-day.

J. GORGAS, Lieutenant-Colonel, Chief of Ordnance.

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RICHMOND, December 20, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Charleston:

I have no objections to your giving arms to any companies mustered for the war, as requested by Governor Pickens. It is not necessary to reserve them for an organized regiment unless you prefer to do so.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 23.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 20, 1861.

...

III. The following regiments and battalion of South Carolina volunteers, recently mustered into the service of the Confederate States, are assigned to the command of Brig. Gen. N. G. Evans, and will immediately proceed to such destinations as that officer may designate, viz:

Sixteenth South Carolina Volunteers, Col. C. J. Elford; Seventeenth South Carolina Volunteers, Col. J. H. Means; Laurens battalion, Maj. G. S. James.

...

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.349}

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COOSAWHATCHIE, December 21, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

Have already stated, after arming organized corps would arm companies for the war if arms remained.

R. E. LEE.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 23, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I am gratified to learn by your letter of the 21st instant that the battery at Church Flats is ready for action and the obstruction prepared for closing the channel. The troops that you have advanced from Charleston into the Third Military District must remain for the present under the command of General Evans. I hope by this time that the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Regiments and Laurens battalion of South Carolina Volunteers have reached him. As soon as he can be properly re-enforced, the regiments that it may be desirable to have around Charleston can be recalled into your district. In the mean time I request that you will furnish the necessary supplies to the troops, upon proper requisitions, and aid General Evans in every way in your power in the organization of his district and by furnishing him all needful information and facilities that he may require.

I wish as soon as possible that you would inform me of the number, &c., of troops present in the Third Military District, as it may be some time before General Evans can furnish me with an official return.

I agree with you as to the importance of holding John’s Island and the post at Church Flats, and beg that you will re-enforce General Evans, if necessary, to enable him to do so.

I have the honor, &c.,

R. E. LEE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 24.}

HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., December 23, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. Maxcy Gregg, C. S. Provisional Army, having reported at these headquarters, in compliance with instructions from the War Department, will report to Brig. Gen. J. C. Pemberton for duty with the South Carolina troops serving in the Fourth Military District.

II. Brig. Gen. D. S. Donelson, commanding Tennessee Brigade and Col. W. E. Starke, commanding Sixtieth Virginia Volunteers, will report their commands to Brigadier-General Pemberton for duty in the Fourth Military District of South Carolina.

...

By order of General Lee:

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army.

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COOSAWHATCHIE, December 24, 1861.

[MAGRATH]:

MY DEAR SIR: I have just received your note announcing the meeting of the Convention about to take place at Columbia. The exposed condition of the State and the presence of a powerful enemy on her shores {p.350} will naturally occupy the earnest consideration of that enlightened body. I do not think that any suggestion from me will be necessary or even useful, as I feel certain that every measure requisite for the protection of the State or her citizens will be adopted. In compliance, therefore, with your kind request to make to you any suggestions that may seem to me required by present circumstances, I think it only necessary to repeat more emphatically than perhaps I have been able to do in person the urgent necessity of bringing out the military strength of the State and putting it under the best and most permanent organization. The troops, in my opinion, should be organized for the war. We cannot stop short of its termination, be it long or short. No one, I presume, would desire to do so; no one, therefore, will continue in service longer than the war requires. The disbanding and reorganization of troops in time of peace is attended with loss and expense; what must it be in time of war, when it may occur at periods that might otherwise prove highly disastrous?

I tremble to think of the consequences that may befall us next spring when all our twelve-months’ men may claim their discharge. At the opening of the campaign, when our enemies will take the field fresh and vigorous, after a year’s preparation and winter’s repose, we shall be in all the anxiety, excitement, and organization of new armies. In what different condition will be the opposing armies on the plains of Manassas at the resumption of active operations! I have thought that General McClellan was waiting to seize the advantage he would then possess.

I beg you will put a stop to this lamentable state of affairs. The Confederate States have now but one great object in view, the successful issue of their war of independence. Everything worth their possessing depends on that. Everything should yield to its accomplishment.

There is another point to which I would invite your attention. The best troops are ineffectual without good officers. Our volunteers, more than any others, require officers whom they can respect and trust. The best men for that position should be selected, and it is important to consider how it can be effected. It would be safe to trust men of the intelligence and character of our volunteers to elect their officers, could they at the time of election realize their dependent condition in the day of battle. But this they cannot do, and I have known them in the hour of danger repudiate and disown officers of their choice and beg for others. Is it fight, then, for a State to throw upon its citizens a responsibility which they do not feel and cannot properly exercise? The colonel of a regiment has an important trust, and is a guardian of the honor of the State as well as of the lives of the citizens. I think it better for the field officers of the regiment in the State service to be appointed by the governor, with the advice and consent of its legislature, and those in the Confederate service by the President and Congress. It would also, in my opinion, add to the simplicity and economy of our military establishment to conform to the same principle of organization. That adopted by Congress is formed by the united wisdom of the State representatives, and is followed in its army. It would be well for the State governments to adopt it, as far as circumstances will permit. Special corps and separate commands are frequent causes of embarrassment.

It is useless for me to suggest that measures be taken to develop the military resources of the State; to advance the fabrication of powder, arms, and all the necessaries of war, as well as the production of bountiful supplies for her troops and citizens. The strictest economy should {p.351} be enforced in every department and the most rigid accountability required of its officers. I have not been able to get an accurate report of the troops under my command in the State. I hope it may be as large as you state, but I am sure those for duty fall far short of it. For instance, De Saussure’s brigade is put down at 3,420 men. When last in Charleston (the day inquired) I was informed that in one regiment there were 110 men for duty in camp on the Race-Course and in the other about 200. Colonel Branch, I am told, had only about 200 men with him at Rockville, though I have had no official report of his retreat from there.

The companies of mounted men in the service are very much reduced. The Charleston Light Dragoons and the Rutledge Mounted Rifles have about 45 men each. The companies of Colonel Martin’s regiment are very small. One of them-Captain Fripp’s-reports 4 commissioned officers, 9 non-commissioned officers, and 19 privates. It is very expensive to retain in service companies of such strength, and I think all had better be reorganized.

I have only on this line for field operations Heyward’s, De Saussure’s, Dunovant’s, Jones’ and Edwards’ regiments from South Carolina and Martin’s cavalry. General Ripley writes that Elford’s and Means’ regiments are poorly armed and equipped and at present ineffective, and that the organization of the troops thrown forward on James Island is so brittle that he fears it will break. The garrisons at Moultrie, Sumter, Johnson, and the fixed batteries-the best and most stable of our forces-cannot be removed from them; neither can those at Georgetown, and should not be counted among those for operations in the field.

You must not understand that this is written in a complaining spirit. I know the difficulties in the way, and wish you to understand them, explain them to the governor, and, if possible, remove them. Our enemy increases in strength faster than we do and is more enormous. Where he will strike I do not know, but the blow when it does fall will be hard.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 24, 1861.

General A. R. LAWTON, Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: Your communication of 23d instant* has been received. The general commanding is glad to learn that instructions have been given to officers commanding batteries to withhold their fire till the enemy’s vessels are within effective range of the guns, and trusts that this practice will in all cases be strictly adhered to. The general hopes that the threatening approach of the enemy’s boats will stimulate the officers and the troops of your district to press forward the projected earthworks and defenses to a speedy completion. As no further re-enforcements can be spared to send to you, it will be necessary, should your command require strengthening, to call upon the governor of the State of Georgia.

The general has been informed that three 32-pounders are on their way from New Orleans, and as they will probably be sent by Augusta, he is desirous that you should make arrangements to have them forwarded from that place to Savannah. Two of them will be sent to General {p.352} Trapier at Fernandina, and the third placed at such point as may be, in your judgment, most necessary. Should the guns be unprovided with carriages, Colonel Gill has been directed to supply them.

The guns for General Trapier the latter has made a requisition for, and desires to have forwarded to him without delay.

Very respectfully,

W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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RICHMOND, December 25, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Coosawhatchie:

Yours of 20th received. On the 17th sent you three 32-pounders from here, and ordered three more sent to you from New Orleans. On the 21st sent you two 8-inch columbiads. Will send you to-morrow one more 8-inch columbiad and one 24-pounder siege gun.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. FIRST MILITARY DISTRICT, DEPT. OF S. C., Georgetown, December 25, 1861.

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: The schooner Prince of Wales, from Nassau, loaded with salt, fruit, &c., having been chased by a steamer and bark of the Federal Navy, ran into North Inlet, one of the harbors of this district, the enemy’s vessels not being able to follow her and she getting aground when inside, and having been hulled several times by their shot, boats were sent in to take her, when the captain fired the vessel and escaped with his crew. The enemy proceeded to tow her out, when a mounted detachment of Captain Tucker’s company arrived, opened fire from the north side of the inlet upon the boats, and forced them to abandon their prize and return to their ships.

About 4 o’clock in the afternoon five boats filled with men put off again from the vessel, to come in either to land on North Island or again take possession. Lieutenant Harllee with 6 men (picket guard), Company D, Tenth Regiment, as soon as they came within reach, fired upon them and continued to do so, eventually driving them back to their vessels. The boats’ crews in both instances returned the fire of our men. No one hurt on our side. Detachments sent to support the picket guards did not arrive in time to take any part in the affair. I regret to state that the vessel has since burned to the water’s line, and is, with her cargo, a total loss. She was owned, I believe, by the house of John Fraser & Co., Charleston.

I remain, respectfully,

A. M. MANIGAULT, Colonel, Commanding First Military District.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DISTRICT SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, December 25, 1861.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from General Lee, of the 23d instant, and inclose herewith a memorandum {p.353} of the troops in General Evans’ district. I shall do everything in my power to furnish his troops and give him every information and facility. The Laurens battalion moved yesterday, but I fear that the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Regiments will not be ready for service for some days.

Referring to a letter of former date from General Lee, in which I am directed to give my attention to extended operations to meet the predatory excursions of the enemy (supposing the Stono fleet to have demonstrated his abandonment of an attack on Charleston), I beg to say that I shall do so to the utmost of my ability. The enemy will hardly attempt any such incursions between Charleston and Stono the limit of my command, and, if he does, the locality is pretty well guarded. Northward there is but little to attract for plunder until he gets to Bull’s Bay; thence to the limits north, the Santee country, it is very difficult of approach on account of the intricate navigation; it is rich, however, and invites attack on that account. I have there only the newly-raised command of Maj. Edward Manigault. I intend to re-enforce it by Lieutenant-Colonel Moore’s battalion (made up of the extra companies of Orr’s regiment) as soon as it is armed completely; Lieutenant-Colonel Moore is endeavoring to raise his battalion to a regiment, in which I hope he will succeed.

I also inclose a memorandum of the troops in the Second Military District.* The force is nominally large, and would allow re-enforcement of other points, but from the peculiar position, and the character of the country, which does not admit of celerity of movement without an almost unprecedented amount of land and water transportation. These facilities I shall of course endeavor to improve, but with the crippled mechanical resources of this city it may take some time. Brigadier-General Evans wrote to me day before yesterday requesting that I would place a steamer at his disposal for the ferry at John’s Island; I have done so. Meantime I have been informed that there is a steam-flat nearly completed, which will cost about $4,500. I have ordered her inspected, and were John’s Island in my command should have her employed as a ferry-boat. The ferry is in bad order, and it will be difficult to make a rope ferry of it on account of the diagonal position of the landings.

The State Troops Rifle and Seventeenth Regiment South Carolina we will probably break up as soon as they are called in, and we shall probably get one respectable well-armed regiment from them. It would facilitate its formation if those troops could be relieved as soon as possible after the Sixteenth and Seventeenth South Carolina Volunteers take the field.

The lines on James Island, were the troops in readiness to occupy them, might be considered finished. As they are not, 50 or 100 hands for three or four days will be necessary to put the works in a little permanency. The lines on Christ Church will be done in the course of three days, and will be quite strong; Lieutenant Blake has carried them quite down to the inland navigation, covering the landing. One company of Hatch’s regiment has been ordered to take post as a lookout on the islands to the northward of the city, to give notice of the approach of an enemy and protect, as far as possible thereby, the rice-boats coming from Santee. It seems to me important to get as much of rice to market as may be, should our communication be in danger of being interrupted.

The lines on the Neck are progressing but slowly, for want of the {p.354} hands. I trust, however, as a law has been passed authorizing impressment of negro labor, that as soon as Christmas is over we shall have a considerable force, without the necessity of making use of the law.

It seems that there will be a good deal of difficulty in arming and equipping the companies of light artillery in Major White’s battalion and of Captain Boyce. Major White is still garrisoning the batteries at Wappoo, which I shall endeavor to increase in armament with the two 12-pounder ship guns from the Theodora. The 24-pounder I think of placing on Castle Pinckney. The one-gun battery on the right of the James Island line is constructed, and will be armed and garrisoned with one of White’s companies speedily; but for guns, caissons, or harness for them I am utterly at a loss.

From such observation as has been lately made the sunken fleet is gradually disappearing.

I have omitted to mention that the Marion Artillery will be ready for the field, with four pieces within a day or so; they are State troops.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, Adams Run, December 26, 1861.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report, for your information, that my express has just arrived, with the intelligence that the enemy, with a force of ten vessels, are advancing up Wadmalaw Sound, firing, as they advance, both upon Edisto Ferry and White Point. These points, it is understood, are being occupied by the enemy. Please send me re-enforcements; my force is only 250 strong.

Truly, yours,

N. G. EVANS, Brigadier-General, C. S. A.

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MARIANNA, December 26, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: Inclosed is a report from General Floyd, who is in command at Apalachicola; also a copy of a report made by Lieut. B. Mickle, who, at my request, was sent by General Bragg upon an application for a skillful engineer and artillerist.

Much has been accomplished by the forces in service by State authority since Colonel Hopkins was ordered from and left there, who is in Confederate service; and immense expense has been saved, which was being, to say the least, uselessly incurred.

If the Confederate Government will become definitely responsible for the defense of Apalachicola by State authority, the expense will be less and its defense more certain. The forces in State service at Apalachicola have been well equipped and well drilled, and are generally substantial men and men of intelligence, and this body of gallant men cannot enter the Confederate service without breaking up the most efficient organization of State troops unless they will be received in their present organizations. It is extremely difficult to associate forces {p.355} in the service of the Confederate Government and those serving by State authority harmoniously. If it can be done, no officer is better qualified to accomplish it than General Floyd. Thrice the expense has been incurred and thrice the force assembled for the defense of Fernandina, and yet Apalachicola is decidedly the most important commercial city, and, in a strategic point of view, in the hands of the enemy would afford greater facilities for injury to the South. Both places are worthy of the means necessary to a successful defense.

These matters are respectfully submitted to the consideration of the Secretary of War and President, provided the proposition submitted to establish a military department in parts of Georgia, Florida, and Alabama shall not meet with a favorable consideration. I am now engaged in raising a regiment of infantry in West Florida for service twelve months-Confederate service-to be armed and equipped by the State and for the defense of Apalachicola. There should be at least one artillery company at Saint Andrew’s Bay, the entrance to which can be successfully defended by two cannon, 42-pounders, with equipments.

The cavalry companies in State service at Apalachicola I propose to retire from the service. By an order issued by General Grayson, if I was informed correctly, the State troops have been supplied.

I shall return to the capital to-morrow, when I shall be pleased to hear from you.

Very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

[Inclosure.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Apalachicola, December 18, 1861.

His Excellency Governor MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

SIR: I have the honor to state to you that there are under my immediate command at this post but 612 men, rank and file, including the two dragoon companies. The additional troops to be sent here, as mentioned by your excellency, have not arrived, nor do I know where they are. If these troops are to come, I would respectfully suggest that it should be at an early day, in order that they may have the all-important advantages of drill to prepare them for battle when it should come. The troops here are improving rapidly under regular drill and discipline and are already quite efficient.

From reports I received I deemed it prudent to remove from Saint Vincent’s Island to this place and detain them one white man and two negroes who had been kept there to butcher for this market. From certain indications since I am convinced that the measure was correct, and precludes any possibility of intercourse between them and the United States blockaders. There is no proof that such intercourse had existed, but some strong suspicions.

I think it important to request your excellency to appoint a chaplain to this regiment. There will then be no excuse for any of the men leaving camp on the Sabbath to attend church in the city. The restrictions I have necessarily placed upon them in this respect and in the absence of a regular chaplain produce dissatisfaction, although no disobedience.

I am informed by Second Lieutenant Mickle, who was sent to me by General Bragg recently as an engineer, that there are two 42-pounders at Pensacola not in use, and that it is probable they might be, by {p.356} proper application, easily procured for this place. He also informed me that they can be readily rifled at Mobile. My largest guns here are 32s. If your excellency sanctions it, will it not be advisable to procure these guns at once, have them rifled at Mobile, and forwarded to this post, with about 100 rounds (or less) of balls for each? We could then hold the enemy in check at long range.

I beg to call the above particularly to the notice of your excellency, and trust my suggestion will meet your approval.

The batteries here are all so forward towards completion and their construction approved by Lieutenant Mickle (whose report upon them I have the honor to transmit herewith), that I send him back to Pensacola, having no further occasion for his services. He is not acquainted with artillery drill, else I would have retained him here.

I have the honor to be, your excellency’s very obedient servant,

R. F. FLOYD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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APALACHICOLA, FLA., December 14, 1861.

General RICHARD F. FLOYD, Commanding Troops at Apalachicola:

GENERAL: In company with Mr. Benezet, who has the supervision of the works, and to whom, by the way, I am indebted for his kindness in showing me the batteries and their bearings on the approaches to the city, I to-day visited the defenses of Apalachicola.

Presuming that I have but little experience in military engineering, I proceed without further apology to give you, in compliance with your request, a brief report as to the efficiency of your batteries.

To my astonishment I found that, though built by men of little or no experience, they differ but little from those around the harbor of Pensacola, and that, too, on points involving mere convenience, or which from surrounding circumstances require a difference. Your magazines are built farther from the guns than those in the batteries at Pensacola, and are therefore not so convenient; and the parapets are not so high in your batteries as in those at Pensacola, but from the nature of the approaches that is to a great extent necessary.

Except a suggestion to young gunners to practice at a target placed where the attacking force would probably be stationed, I know of no other that I can make which would be practicable.

From my limited knowledge of your harbor and the enemy’s fleet, I am unable to form an opinion as to the armament he may bring against you, but think I hazard nothing in saying it must be sufficiently heavy to destroy your city at the distance of 2 miles or he must adopt another plan of attack.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. MICKLE, Second Lieutenant, G. S. A.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 27, 1861.

His Excellency FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Governor of South Carolina, Columbia:

GOVERNOR: I had the honor to receive your letter of the 20th inst.* In a previous [letter] I endeavored to express to your excellency my {p.357} entire willingness to arm certain companies of regiments already in the service named by you, provided any arms remained after arming the regiments being organized for the war, but I cannot issue the arms before the arming of the regiments is completed.

If the companies of Captain Blair, McCord, and Rives, which I understand are for the war, and attached by you to Stevens’ Legion, were assigned to the battalion commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Moore, which embraces the six companies attached to Orr’s regiment, this battalion would only require one more company for the formation of a regiment, and might then be armed with Enfield rifles. My object is to make the arms available for the defense of the state as soon as possible, and I hope your excellency will aid me in this.

Major James’ battalion has been ordered to report to General Evans, who is in great need of troops. General Ripley informs me that Colonels Elford’s and Means’ regiments will not be able to take the field for some days. In the mean time he has sent forward Colonel Stevens’ Legion to re-enforce General Evans.

The enemy is making demonstrations against Wadmalaw Island, and our force there is not strong enough to resist him. Since your letter authorizing me to take command of the State troops in the field, I have felt no hesitation in doing so. Previously, although aware that certain forces were called into service and placed under the command of General Ripley, I did not know when or how it was designed to use them. According to the last returns received the number of troops mustered in Confederate service from South Carolina within the department present for duty is 10,036, including officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates. The strength of the Fourth Brigade South Carolina Militia (De Saussure’s), present for duty, including officers, non-commissioned officers, and privates, is reported to be 1,531. Its total strength present and absent is 2,021, and differs from the number stated in your excellency’s letter, which is 3,420.

The strength of Colonel Martin’s regiment in the field, by the last returns, is 628; the number reported for duty, including officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates, is 567. The number of troops in Confederate States service, as stated above, 10,036, does not include the regiments of Colonels Elford and Means, the Laurens battalion, and the other companies mentioned in your letter, which have arrived since the returns were made. In addition to this force there are two regiments from North Carolina, two from Tennessee, and one from Virginia, and four field batteries.

My object is to inform your excellency of the amount of the force for actual service in the State. You must, however, bear in mind that the garrisons for the forts at Georgetown, of Fort Moultrie, Forts Sumter, Johnson, Castle Pinckney, and the field works for the defense of the approaches through Stono, Wappoo, &c., which embrace the best and steadiest of our troops, cannot be removed from their posts, and must not therefore be included in the force for operations in the field.

The strength of the enemy, as far as I am able to judge, exceeds the whole force that we have in the State. It can be thrown with great celerity against any point, and far outnumbers any force we can bring against it in the field.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

{p.358}

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 27, 1861.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston:

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 25th instant, inclosing a memorandum of the troops under General Evans, and desire to express my gratification at the steps taken to re-enforce and support that officer.

Should you find that the enemy intends a movement against Charleston through the Stono approaches, I desire that you will resist him with all your available force and support General Evans should he be compelled to retire upon you. In the event of the two commands uniting on duty, as the senior officer of course you will direct the operations of the whole. General Evans has been directed in case of necessity to close the avenue through Church Flats; I request you to afford him every facility in completely obstructing it at the proper time.

Please inform me whether Maj. Edward Manigault’s battalion has entered the Confederate service for twelve months or for the war. If for the latter period, it might be united to Lieutenant-Colonel Moore’s battalion, and, by the addition of the two companies reported by Colonel Preston to have been mustered in for the war by him, would form a regiment for the war. In that event I should apply to the President for the appointment of a colonel for the regiment. Should Manigault’s battalion be not enlisted for the war, could you not attach companies raised for the war, which I learn from the governor have been sent to Stevens’ Legion, so as to form a regiment? All the companies could then be armed with the Enfield rifles by Colonel Preston, and placed under the command of Col. Carter L. Stevenson (formerly of the old service), or such other officer as the President might think proper. Should detached companies be sent to you by Colonel Preston, mustered into the Confederate service either for twelve months or for the war, I desire you to collect them into battalions and regiments according to their period of service, and place them under the command of such field officers as are at your disposal until their regular field officers are appointed. According to my understanding of the act of the legislature of South Carolina of December 7, 1861, the First Regiment Rifles South Carolina Militia, Colonel Branch, and the Seventeenth Regiment South Carolina Militia, Colonel De Treville, being part of the Fourth Brigade, will not be disbanded on being relieved from service. I do not see, therefore, how the formation of a regiment can be facilitated by relieving them, as you propose, after the Sixteenth and Seventeenth South Carolina Volunteers take the field. As the aggregate strength of the two regiments as reported by you will only make one regiment, namely, 854, should you be able to unite them you are authorized to relieve them from duty for that purpose when their services can be spared.

The measures taken by you to secure the delivery of the rice crops are judicious, and I hope you will do the same to insure supplies of other provisions, corn, provender, &c.

I beg you to use every exertion to complete the line of defenses around the city, and hope you will get a sufficiency of hands as soon as the Christmas holidays are over, and desire that you will take the necessary steps for this purpose.

I will write to the Ordnance Department to see if nothing can be done in supplying Major White’s battalion with artillery. As soon as the {p.359} Marion Artillery can be got ready for the field, assign it to such station as you think fit.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, Adams Run, December 27, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Coosawhatchie, S. C.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that the enemy commenced firing on my pickets at White Point yesterday at about 12 o’clock. He then proceeded up the Wadmalaw Sound as far as the mouth of the Tugaloo Creek, and shelled the house of Mr. James King for four hours, throwing 10-inch shells, but without effect.

The enemy at the same time made a demonstration at Edisto Ferry on land, though but few were seen. Their drums were distinctly heard by my vedettes at the ferry.

The gunboat that proceeded up the sound was accompanied by a number of row-boats and a barge. From an elevated point I could distinguish the troops aboard. They seemed about 500 on the gunboat to White Point. The enemy sent a few men ashore, and burnt the summer house of Col. James Lezau, which was situated immediately on the water.

As soon as I learned the enemy would attempt to land I ordered Major James’ battalion, of 250 strong, and a cavalry force of 30 men to take a concealed position on Slann’s Island. I also ordered Captain Walter to bring his battery to these headquarters as soon as possible, whence I detached a section to the support of Major James. They arrived in their position about 4 o’clock. The enemy retired about sundown towards their large vessels now in Edisto Inlet. As it was now probable he would land, and my only available force being the above-mentioned troops, I wrote to Brigadier-General Ripley for re-enforcements, which he readily granted.

I will here report that, having heard the enemy was seen some two or three days since near Rockville, I ordered Colonel De Treville to cross over to John’s Island with his battalion and a cavalry force and reconnoiter the enemy, and attack him should he find himself able to make a successful stand. I have made arrangements for the return of this force at Church Flats by a bridge of boats.

Colonels Means and Elford have reported in person, and report their regiments as not yet armed or equipped They are now encamped near Charleston.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. G. EVANS, Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Military District.

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HDQRS. FIRST MILITARY DIST., DEPT. OF S. C., Georgetown, December 27, 1861.

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Coosawhatchie:

MAJOR: I have never seen or received General Order, No. 1, from General Lee’s headquarters, although I have written for said missing {p.360} number. I have since heard, however, that my reports, returns, &c., are to be made to yourself. This will account for my seeming negligence, as I have been reporting regularly to the headquarters of General Ripley, in Charleston. It is proper (not having [been] informed of any general officer having been appointed to the command of this district), being responsible for this section of country, that I should inform you that a great portion of my force here, consisting of 650 men of Harllee’s Legion, will, under the late act of the legislature, be disbanded within a week. Also that Captain Walker’s company of horse, Black’s battalion, under orders from General Lee’s headquarters, has been ordered to report to Colonel Black, and is now on the road to join him. This will leave me with but my own regiment (the Tenth) not more than 800 strong, as the measles and mumps have broken out amongst them; two small companies of State cavalry (volunteers), together numbering 70 men; one section of artillery, 30 men, badly horsed, and 20 mounted riflemen.

With the long line of coast to be watched and guarded, the force that will be left me on the 1st January will scarcely be adequate. I am aware that there are other more exposed and more important districts, requiring all the available force for its defense, and it may not be possible to re-enforce me. I do, however, desire it known of what my means of defense consist, so that more may not be expected of me than my force would warrant. It would be well if I could get another company of cavalry; a battery of artillery also. There is a State battery here, four iron 6-pounders, old carriages, but in good order, with harness and ammunition. Were I furnished with horses I could make good use of them.

Effective force of First Military District after the disbandment of Harllee’s Legion.

10th Regiment500
Two companies cavalry70
One section artillery35
Detachment Mounted Rifles20
925

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. M. MANIGAULT, Colonel, Commanding First Military Dist., Dept. of S. C.

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HDQRS. SECOND DISTRICT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, December 27, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Coosawhatchie:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter from General Lee of the date of December 24*. In answer to the inquiries concerning Elford’s and Means’ regiments, I have the honor to inclose letters from both of those colonels, showing the state of those regiments. Other information respecting them, as well as any knowledge of their or other troops reporting here, I generally get from inquiry after their arrival.

I duly received the dispatch from General Lee concerning General Evans. Previously General Evans had sent to me, and I ordered the Holcombe Legion, about 650 strong, and the best of the new troops, to {p.361} move at once. It is at Adams Run before this. I also directed Elford’s to be in readiness to move this morning, but received the report inclosed. This and Colonel Means’ letter show it to be impossible to depend on either for any support to General Evans for a week at least.

By a reference to the memorandum inclosed yesterday it will be seen that the only disposable troops would be the remainder of Orr’s regiment, and that would leave Sullivan’s Island with only Dunovant’s regiment, acting as artillery, for the defense of that point. It would, I think, be manifestly improper to take a man from Stono, as the enemy are in front of it sounding and making other demonstrations; I do not think with a view to attack, unless they should find the point undefended. I shall, however, do the best I can, and if General Evans calls upon me, shall support him with as efficient a force as I can muster, even at the hazard of weakening the garrisons in the harbor. It appears to me that the importance of defeating our enemy once well on this coast is worth a great deal of risk.

I have directed a telegraph station to be put in operation at Adams Run, which will save General Evans’ cavalry and afford information on both points.

Upon Colonel Preston’s requisition I have ordered Mr. Lowndes, volunteer aide-decamp, to proceed to Mars Bluff, and muster in the Pedee Legion. Authority to employ volunteer aides-de-camp on this service was given by General Cooper, and thus far has not been revoked. Mr. Lowndes has already mustered in several corps.

At Stono yesterday a gunboat, reconnoitering, threw a shell at the light-draught steamer supplying the post. The batteries returned it, contrary to instructions, at long range, and the two continued to waste shots for half an hour. I have sent to forbid any more practice of that kind.

It would materially assist in the continuance of our works if Captain Ives could be spared for a few days, as his office is, I learn, now in funds.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

[Inclosures.]

CAMP MOORE, Charleston, S. C., December 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, C. S. A.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that my regiment is not in a position to move with efficiency immediately. One of our companies is unarmed. Of the remaining arms about 100 have proved defective and are in the hands of the armorer for repair. We have not a bayonet-belt, or scabbard, or cartridge-box in the regiment. Major Eason, the ordnance officer, informed me to-day that these could be procured in eight or ten days. We have about three rounds of cartridges and caps, but I understand that ammunition can be obtained. I have been pressing our requisition for accouterments continually since we have been here, but hitherto without success. So soon as we can procure these we are ready and anxious to march to the point of duty.

Respectfully,

C. J. ELFORD, Colonel Sixteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers.

{p.362}

CAMP LEE, December 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General RIPLEY:

GENERAL: In obedience to verbal orders received through your aide, I have the honor to report my regiment as organized but not full. Seven companies are here encamped, comprising in the aggregate 547 officers and men. I have 75 good muskets (percussion) and 415 flint-and-steel muskets utterly unfit for service; no transportation, but have been authorized by the quartermaster to purchase it, and will send agents to-morrow to do so. No knapsacks; 75 cartridge-boxes and bayonet scabbards; no ammunition. I hope to have my regiment full in the course of a week or ten days. I am under orders for General Evans to march as soon as ready to Adams Run.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. MEANS, Colonel Seventeenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS OF STATE FORCES, Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1861.

General R. E. LEE, Commander-in-Chief:

GENERAL: I have assumed command of a division of State troops actually in the field. This, for reasons personal to myself, I had refrained from doing until a question as to their willingness to be transferred to the Confederate service, submitted to them by act of the legislature, had been decided. It is hardly necessary to say that, although in the immediate service of the State for State defense, I hold myself subject to your directions in all military operations looking to that end, and will make such reports, at such times, and to such quarters as you may be pleased to designate.

From conversations with my friend General Lawton I learn that the necessity of this auxiliary force, in the character of a reserve, is fully recognized. I shall labor to render it efficient.

I am happy to add that my personal relations with General Lawton are of such a character as to insure between us the most cordial of feelings and a perfect harmony of action.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. R. JACKSON, Major-General, Commanding State Forces.

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DEPARTMENT OF GEORGIA, C. S. A., Ordnance Office, Sec’d Mil. Dist., Brunswick, Dec. 30, 1861.

Capt. R. M. CUYLER, Ordnance Office, Savannah:

DEAR SIR: By General Mercer’s direction I write to urge upon you the necessity of sending us more powder. It is his belief, in which all who have seen the batteries concur, that we can whip off the fleet upon the first attack; but that if it is renewed the next day, as in all probability it would be, our powder would be exhausted, and they could pass us without our being able to fire a gun. Officers and men are all confident of success and anxious to redeem the Port Royal disgrace, for so they all consider it, and I think they will if the powder does not give {p.363} out. You must be able to afford us some by this time, and we will put it to good use and see that none is wasted. I want 20 barrels large grain and 30 barrels fine grain, in all 5,000 pounds, cannon powder. I know you will do all you can.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. D. HARDEN, Ordnance Officer.

General Mercer requests me to add that Fernandina is vastly better supplied with guns and ammunition than we are.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, December 31, 1861.

General LEE, Commanding:

SIR: I have received yours of the 27th and 29th instant.* In the former you make the number of troops mustered into Confederate service from this State under your command 10,036. I inclose with this a correct copy** of the exact number mustered in whose rolls are in the adjutant-general’s office, which is correct from the record. You say in yours you do not include the regiments of Colonels Means and Elford nor the companies mentioned in mine. From your remark in relation to the garrisons at Cole’s Island and Sumter and Moultrie not being considered troops for field service, I suppose you exclude them also, and perhaps the troops at or near Georgetown. If I am right in this construction of your letter, then the estimates, according to the rolls in the adjutant-general’s office, making 17,000, vary but little from yours of 10,036, but if these are added it would make about the same. If this is not the case, and I do not understand you right, then the officers in command of your different districts have not sent you in a full report of the troops mustered in.

As to the suggestion you make in relation to a cavalry regiment, I will cordially unite with you to raise the other four companies, and we have a company now which General Gist is trying to get in for the war unconditionally. There are many offering, and we will try to get enough for the regiment and report to you, so that the President may send an officer to command them.

I regret to hear and to know of the unpleasant feeling amongst the officers under General Ripley, particularly of the junior officer in the artillery. Appointments cannot be made to please all, and none have been made but with an eye single to the strength of the service. Ferguson and Beauregard were appointed supposing they had a company ready to bring right into the battalion of artillery, and their commissions are not to be presented unless this is done first. There is great difficulty in enlisting regulars now, and as a large portion of a company was already enlisted for young Beauregard in New Orleans, I thought it was well to secure a company for our service, and besides I thought it would be very agreeable to all to appoint a son of General Beauregard. The appointment of Kemper as second lieutenant was because he was a brother of the gallant commander of the battery from Alexandria, who was with one of our regiments in service, and because this Mr. Kemper whom I appointed had settled in Beaufort and was ruined by the invasion {p.364} there. Why these appointments should create such excitement among the junior officers in Fort Sumter I am at a loss to understand.

With great respect and esteem, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS.

* Of 29th not found.

** Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, December 31, 1861.

General S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General South Carolina:

GENERAL: General Ripley, commanding in Charleston reports that the line of intrenchments for the defense of that city may be considered as completed except those between the Cooper and Ashley Rivers. He also reports that he is entirely without troops to defend them those not required at the forts and batteries being advanced on James Island and beyond the Stono to check the approach and marauding parties of the enemy.

The Sixteenth and Seventeenth Regiments South Carolina Volunteers, as soon as equipped for the field, will be sent to General Evans for similar service. Will you be kind enough to inform me when you can place in the field the other regiments of the State you have called into service?

It will give me pleasure to meet you in Charleston, as proposed in your dispatch of yesterday, after my return from Savannah, where I shall go to-day.

R. E. LEE.

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Abstract from monthly report of the Department of Middle and East Florida, commanded by Brig. Gen. James H. Trapier, for December, 1861.

Stations.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
1st Florida Special Battalion Infantry23386455511
3rd Regiment Florida volunteers44800889950
4th Regiment Florida volunteers;39664823881
24th Regiment Mississippi volunteers40409614932
Coast-guard on board steamer General Grayson4545
Battalion of cavalry28628674701
Hopkins’ Independent troop4616880
Owens’ Independent troop399105116
Pickett’s Independent troop3707374
Turner’s independent troop4909595
Baya’s company of artillery4626666
Martin’s light battery3606576
Grand total1953,3233,9724,527

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., January 2, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding, &c., Fernandina:

GENERAL: I have not yet been informed whether you have determined to remove the guns from the south end of Cumberland Island. The battery at that point, in conjunction with the fire of Fort Clinch, {p.365} would add greatly in my opinion to the defense of the harbor. Its fire would reach a ship after it had passed beyond the range of the guns of the fort, and the position, if not occupied, might be used by the enemy. I hope, therefore, you will be able to make arrangements to get sufficient troops from the State of Florida to support the battery; and, if I recollect aright, works could be easily thrown up to defend its rear.

Respectfully, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., January 2, 1862.

His Excellency FRANCIS W. PICKENS, Governor of South Carolina, Columbia:

GOVERNOR: I have had the honor to receive your communication of the 29th ultimo,* inclosing a copy of the resolution adopted by the general assembly at its recent meeting relative to the employment of slaves on works for military defense. I have given instructions to General Ripley to make with your excellency the necessary arrangements and to urge forward the works around Charleston as rapidly as possible. I hope that your excellency will see that his wants in the matter of laborers are complied with.

I beg leave again to submit to your excellency the great need of troops to defend this line, and would respectfully ask that you urge forward their organization with all possible dispatch.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, January 3, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. R. JACKSON, Commanding First Division Georgia Troops, Savannah:

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letters of the 28th ultimo and 2d instant.* I am much gratified to learn that the division under your command is ready for the defense of the State of Georgia and is placed at my disposal for that purpose. The troops in the Confederate service under General Lawton have already been distributed with a view to the protection of the most exposed points, and particularly to guard the approaches to Savannah. There is no point at which re-enforcements may not be required. I will direct General Lawton to indicate to you where your troops can be of most service, and to designate such points as you may take under your exclusive charge. At present, or until called upon by General Lawton, I beg that you will see that the preparation of your command for service in the field be perfected as far as possible. The camp and garrison equipage and baggage of every sort should be curtailed to the regulation allowance. Transportation ought to be provided and a supply of ammunition for field service. I need not suggest to you the necessity for instituting discipline and a regular and thorough course of instruction for officers and men; your own experience will show you its propriety and benefit.

{p.366}

I shall be glad to receive from you a return of the strength of your troops and a report of the condition of their arms, equipments, &c.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Of 2d instant not found.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, Columbia, January 7, 1862.

President DAVIS:

MY DEAR SIR: I have been informed from pretty high authority that the telegraph operator at Wilmington, N. C., and perhaps at Petersburg, Va., were not true to us, and perhaps they use their position to suppress or delay matters of importance. I mention this, and would most respectfully suggest that a secret detective be appointed to ascertain the facts, not only there, but anywhere else that there may be suspicion about.

I do not know if it prevails elsewhere in the Army, but I take the liberty to inform you that I fear the feeling of General Ripley towards General Lee may do injury to the public service. His habit is to say extreme things even before junior officers, and this is well calculated to do great injury to General Lee’s command. I do not think General Ripley means half what he says in his energetic way, but others construe it differently.

From a copy of the report of forces sent to General Lee by General Ripley, up to December 1, I find many very important omissions. I suppose it must be from inadvertence, for I do not think Ripley at all exact in relation to infantry. I have sent General Lee a correct return. General Lee is a perfect head, quiet and retiring. His reserve is construed disadvantageously. I find him all that a gentleman should be, and all that ought be expected of a thorough and scientific officer. The two are in contrast.

I have sent forward lately from this camp five new regiments, not yet reported to Lee by Ripley.

The enemy are only feeling the different points at present. It will be difficult to approach Charleston with less than 50,000 men; and that will be through North Edisto, over John’s Island or Stono and over James’ Island. They will endeavor to reach the Ashley about 1 mile above Fort Johnson.

If the strength of the forces under General Pemberton were nearer Adams Run it would be safer for Charleston, for if they should happen to cut off the railroad at Pocotaligo, it would cut off 10,000 of our most efficient forces so they could not approach to defend the city. My private opinion is that they will hardly attack Charleston, at least until towards spring. Savannah may be attacked sooner, but they will have to increase their forces first before any serious move can be made against either place.

It will be more difficult to re-enforce with the feeling rising in the North as to the danger of collision with Great Britain. If I could be certain of 3,000 arms from any quarter, I could send forward 3,000 more troops. I have given out State arms in the last two weeks to 4,900 men. These arms I got from disbanded companies in the State, with 1,000 sent from Virginia.

With great respect, and very truly, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS.

{p.367}

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SAVANNAH, January 8, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: From a paragraph in the Charleston and Savannah journals, to which my attention has been called, I fear I may have inadvertently misled the Department as to my opinion of the strength of the defenses of those cities and of my ability to prevent the enemy from penetrating into the interior of the country. In my letters describing the works and batteries in progress of construction, to which I cannot now refer, I intended to express the hope rather than the confident assurance that when completed, armed, and manned, if properly fought, the enemy’s approach ought to be successfully resisted. I am aware that we must fight against great odds, and I always trust that the spirit of our soldiers will be an overmatch to the numbers of our opponents.

Our works are not yet finished; their progress is slow; guns are required for their armament and I have not received as many troops from South Carolina and Georgia as I at first expected. The forces of the enemy are accumulating, and apparently increase faster than ours. I have feared, if handled with proportionate ability with his means of speedy transportation and concentration, it would be impossible to gather troops necessarily posted over a long line in sufficient strength to oppose sudden movements.

Wherever his fleet can be brought no opposition to his landing can be made except within range of our fixed batteries. We have nothing to oppose to its heavy guns, which sweep over the low banks of this country with irresistible force. The farther he can be withdrawn from his floating batteries the weaker he will become, and lines of defense, covering objects of attack, have been selected with this view.

I have thought his purpose would be to seize upon the Charleston and Savannah Railroad near the head of Broad River, sever the line of communication between those cities with one of his columns of land troops, and with his other two and his fleet by water envelop alternately each of those cities. This would be a difficult combination for us successfully to resist. I have been preparing to meet it with all the means in my power, and shall continue to the end. Any troops or guns that can be withdrawn from other points will greatly aid in this result.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., January 15, 1862.

Lieut. Col. J. GORGAS, Chief of Ordnance, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: During my recent visit to Fernandina I learned from Captain McBlair, C. S. Navy, that two 8-inch columbiads were en route for that place in addition to the two that reached there on the 11th. Captain Cuyler, ordnance officer at this place, informs me by a dispatch from your office he is informed that four 8-inch columbiads are on the way to Fernandina, for which he is preparing carriages.

I am glad to find that you can supply these guns, for they will aid materially in the defense of Cumberland Harbor, and I hope that you may be able to furnish others for this point. If you could send one or two columbiads to Savannah and give me six guns, 24-pounders, 32-pounders, or heavier, for Brunswick, I should feel much better satisfied {p.368} of the strength of this coast. I also request that you will inform me when you send guns or munitions upon the requisitions of others within this department, that I may know their destination and application. I had not been informed of your intention to send the six columbiads to Fernandina.

I have the honor, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

P. S.-There is a want of cannon powder at Fernandina. Captain Cuyler will send 2,000 pounds, received from Augusta, for immediate use.

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SAVANNAH, GA., January 15, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fernandina, Fla.:

SIR: In reference to the deficiency of accouterments for the troops on Amelia Island, to which my attention was called during my recent visit, I find that, in compliance with my previous orders, 500 sets, on the 21st ultimo, were sent by Captain Cuyler, of the ordnance, to Maj. John G. Barnwell, Fernandina; 500 sets Enfield accouterments, on the 28th ultimo, by Lieutenant Harden, from Brunswick, to Major Barnwell; that on the 31st ultimo Lieutenant-Colonel Gill wrote from Augusta that he would send “300 infantry accouterments to Major Barnwell, Fernandina, in charge of a special messenger.”

If these accouterments have been received there is no reason for the deficiency complained of, and I request you will report the fact to my headquarters.

I have directed 300 pairs of shoes to be sent from this place to the brigade quartermaster at Fernandina and some clothing from Columbus, which I understand is at that place. Captain Cuyler will send some cannon powder from here to Captain McBlair (2,000 pounds), which will increase his supply for the 8-inch guns. I also directed when at Brunswick 500 pounds of lead to be sent to Fernandina, to enable the colonel of the Mississippi regiment to make additional cartridges for his regiment. I understood he had powder.

By a dispatch from Richmond I learn that four 8-inch guns are on their way to Fernandina. Carriages have been ordered for them here, but only one is now completed. I understand that these are in addition to the two which reached Fernandina on the 11th instant. Should this be the case, I think one or two of them had better be mounted on the south end of Cumberland Island.

I request this letter to be forwarded to General Trapier.

I have the honor, &c.

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, January 17, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: By a communication from the commandant of Saint Simon’s Island I am informed that the port of Brunswick is continually blockaded by a heavy side-wheel steamer, and that the enemy’s gunboats have been cruising inside of Sapello and the adjacent inlets.

{p.369}

I apprise you of the fact in view of the shipments expected over from Nassau, some of which may perhaps have been ordered to seek access into the ports named.

My letter to the Department of the 15th December reported the coast clear at those points; since then the Federals seem to be on the alert.

The entrance to Warsaw is effectually sealed; a vessel is permanently anchored inside.

Very respectfully,

ED. C. ANDERSON, Major, Artillery.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, January 17, 1862.

Hon. C. M. FURMAN, Commissioner, &c., City of Charleston:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 16th instant in reference to an ordinance of the State Convention to provide for the removal of property from portions of the State which may be invaded by the enemy and to certain resolutions intended to carry its provisions into effect. Copies of the ordinance and resolutions have been furnished me, and I shall take great pleasure in doing all in my power to aid the commissioners in the performance of the duties required of them.

As regards the probability of the occurrence of the contingencies in which you will be called to act, and of which you ask my opinion, I can only say that, seeing no reason now for apprehension, I think it an act of prudence to make provision in time of security for what would be required in time of danger, and that steps should be taken for the formation of depots, &c. Every arrangement made in anticipation of events which, should they happen, would mitigate their evil consequences.

As regards the information which you may require from time to time to govern your action in relation to the city of Charleston, I suggest that you apply to the Confederate officer commanding in the city, should it not be convenient to refer to the commanding general of the department, as by so doing valuable time may be saved. I shall certainly apprise you of any danger I can foresee.

With great respect,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Coosawhatchie, S. C., January 17, 1862.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Second Military District S. C., Charleston:

GENERAL: In reply to your letter of this date,* relative to the proposed operations against the enemy at North Edisto, I wish to state that when my approval to Captain Ives was given to make the attempt, I did not sufficiently understand the plan to be able to form an opinion as to the practicability of its accomplishing the object. Of this you must judge and of the means to effect it.

General Evans has been apprised of the projected expedition, and {p.370} wishes to be informed of the time, place, &c., so as to prevent any collision of our troops.

In a conversation had with General Evans to-day he fears from demonstrations of the enemy that he may be preparing to land on Bohicket Creek, near West Seabrook’s, and push forward to the Stono, east of Rantowles Creek, or to Legareville. His troops only extend to Dr. Whitridge’s, on the west bank of Bohicket Creek. In the former case they would turn left, and your right. In the latter, with the assistance of his floating batteries, he would endeavor to silence your batteries on Cole’s and Battery Islands, and thus ascend the Stono. The paucity of troops in General Evans’ district prevents his guarding this route. Can you not forward from the regiments ordered to him, or others that may have reported since, a sufficient detachment for this purpose? Should this not be practicable, I suggest that you hold Orr’s regiment in readiness, or advance it to some convenient point, to move at a moment’s notice.

I have the honor, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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COOSAWHATCHIE, S. C., January 17, 1862.

General J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding in Florida:

GENERAL: Arrangements have been made for running into Mosquito Inlet, on the east coast of Florida, arms and ammunition, by means of small fast steamers. The department considers it necessary that at least two moderate sized guns be placed at New Smyrna, to protect the landing in the event of our steamers being chased by the enemy’s gunboats. You are therefore desired to send temporarily to New Smyrna some defense of this kind as soon as possible. The cargoes of the steamers are so valuable and so vitally important, that no precaution should be omitted. It will also be necessary to act very promptly, as it is hoped the steamers (two) will arrive within ten or fifteen days.

There are two Parrott guns at Fernandina, if nothing better and more available are at hand, that could be sent to the waters of the Saint John’s, and thence as near the desired point as practicable, with ammunition, &c., under an active officer, with their complement of men, &c. But the guns, way, and means are left to your better knowledge and judgment.

I have the honor, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Charleston, January 22, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Second Military District, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to inform you that he has just received a dispatch containing an extract from a letter dated the 19th instant, stating that an officer of the Confederate service, who had been a prisoner at Boston, had reached Norfolk and said that it was {p.371} understood at the North that two persons, prompted by heavy bribes, had left there to burn the principal bridges on the Wilmington and Charleston Railroad; that the Burnside expedition is to take that road, and that the other fleet, acting in concert, will take the road from Charleston to Savannah, thus isolating Charleston.

The general is of opinion that this may be reliable, and desires that you take such precautionary measures as may be in your power to insure the safety of the railroad from any incendiary attempts within the limits of your district.

Respectfully,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, January 30, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah:

I send you to-morrow three heavy guns, two of them 10-inch and one 8-inch, equipped complete. Will send three more in three or four days. They are all we can give you. We have no iron carriages, and send wooden carriages.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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Abstract from monthly report of the Department of Middle and East Florida, commanded by Brig. Gen. J. H. Trapier, for January, 1862.

Troops.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.
Officers.Men.Officers.Men.Officers.Men.
4th Regiment Florida volunteers37474721777
3d Regiment Georgia volunteers28551655823
24th Regiment Mississippi volunteers39443787898
Bailey’s company of infantry4747878
Evans’ company of infantry3808384
Simmons’ coast-guard4414545
1st Florida Special Battalion18331502577
1st Florida Cavalry35761827867
Hopkins’ independent troop3768182
Owens’ independent troop27599120
Pickett’s independent troop2687474
Turner’s independent troop4100115115
Baya’s company of artillery3293467
Martin’s light battery3606576
Grand total1331,994481,0806894,1664,680

[FEBRUARY 2, 1862.-Requisitions made by the Confederate Government for two and a half war regiments from Florida, twelve from Georgia, and five from South Carolina.*]

* Requisition will be found in Series IV, Vol. I.

{p.372}

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, February 3, 1862.

President DAVIS:

MY DEAR SIR: My aide, Colonel Duryea, has just returned, and I regret that you should have thought anything of my sending on to claim the arms that belonged to our regiments, if out of use. I said that they belonged to the State, with the equipments, for I sent on all our regiments without charging for them.

I had been informed by the Ordnance Officer of North Carolina that that State had a claim of $2,000,000 for what she had sent on and inquired of me what course I intended to pursue. I wrote back I had made no such charges at all. Of course I calculated, when the regiments had served their time out and were discharged, they would bring back their arms, for their field officers have all given bonds to the State for their return or to be accounted for. If the war were to end, of course I take it for granted the arms would be ours. The arms received from the old United States arsenal were accounted for by General Jamison at Montgomery, and settled in the transfer he then made of everything taken by us as a State before any other State had acted and before any Confederate Union had been formed at all.

I did not mean to make any unusual claim as long as the arms were in actual service, but only if they were not in use, and I only wanted to state the general principle upon which our claims to the arms rest.

When Colonel Gregg’s regiment was discharged his arms were, under my orders, brought to Richmond, to be brought home, and he asked the privilege to reorganize his regiment in Virginia, and asked to retain his arms there and to receive companies commissioned by you, &c. I refused, because I could not do so in good faith to the State. We had companies of our own citizens who were eager to go into service, and as the arms were public property, I had no right to assign them to companies from other States, and if I did so, it would produce great excitement and discouragement amongst our own people.

Mr. Memminger then interceded, and also the then Secretary of War, and joined in an urgent appeal to me to allow Gregg to retain the arms in Virginia, and then Gregg pledged himself to give them alone to companies from our own State. Upon this I agreed to their wishes, but a claim that the arms did not belong to the State I never heard of or imagined at that time.

So, too, with our six pieces of flying artillery, sent on with Company A, under Calhoun, with the harness, caissons, &c. I wrote the Secretary of War to send them back, if possible to spare them, as we needed them much on our own coast, and as the company had not been re-enlisted. He declined, because it would produce a bad effect for South Carolina troops to be sent back at that time from the Potomac line. I acquiesced in it, because, upon reflection, I thought the reason was sound and wise, but I never heard of any claim made that the guns, &c., were not ours. I hope now that I am mistaken in the impression that any claim of that kind is to be set up. But I am informed by Colonel Duryea that the Secretary of War told him that my true way was to charge the Confederate Government for the arms and equipments sent on with our troops, and that this would be the proper course, and that it would be recognized, and the arms, &c., would then be considered as belonging to the Confederate Government and not to the States.

I was not aware that the States had taken this course, but I would be very glad to be informed if Colonel Duryea has understood the Secretary {p.373} aright, and if so, I will be most happy to try and conform to what has been done by other States and to what is most agreeable to the Confederate Government in the general policy you may direct.

I have no object but to do justice to the State, and surely should never have made any demand at all for the arms until the war was closed if our own State had not been invaded and our arms absolutely needed to put into the hands of regiments now actually mustered into Confederate service. Having been informed that we had arms out of use now, I thought it nothing but right to send for them.

Be so good as to let me know if I am right as to the general information I have received through Colonel Duryea.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, yours, truly,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HEADQUARTERS FIFTH MILITARY DISTRICT, Hardeeville, February 3, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters, Savannah, Ga.:

SIR: I have the honor of acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 31st ultimo, asking the cause of the “withdrawal of the guns and forces from Red Bluff.”

I evacuated Red Bluff, as already communicated to headquarters at Coosawhatchie, on the 1st instant, because I regarded it as indefensible against gunboats armed with heavy pieces.

With the two 24-pounders and the two short howitzers, aided by the obstructions I had placed 1,000 feet below the fort, any attack from open boats could probably have been repulsed.

As long as I was in expectation of receiving a large gun for the single gun battery marked D on sketch*, I felt disposed to risk keeping the troops at Red Bluff; but when the general of the department told me in the cars the other day that the cannon he had intended for me must under the threatened attack upon Savannah be sent there, I concluded to fall back with the whole command to such a point about 4 miles distant as would not only permit a prompt resumption of the post whenever an 8-inch howitzer or columbiad could be obtained, but at the same time occupy a position near Savannah [and] adjacent plantations as would overcome the negroes, who had just given some evidence of insubordination.

By reference to the sketch accompanying this, the commanding general will observe a sector of fire, A, B, 1,000 yards off from the fort, from whence the gunboats might fire into the embrasures without receiving a single shot in return. The two batteries are connected by a covered way. While I now write, four steamers and gunboats are close up to the chain obstruction below the fort, throwing shells into it. The guns, ammunition, and public property of all kinds have been removed to a place of safety and are now with Captain Elliott’s command at Hardee’s, in which direction I am now going.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. F. DRAYTON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

{p.374}

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HARDEEVILLE, February 3, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The enemy have shelled and burnt Box’s and Lawton’s houses on New River. The obstruction near Red Bluff removed, and the sailors are sounding above it. No soldiers on board gunboats. One company cavalry and three of infantry close by, watching them, ready to attack in case they leave edge of water. The shells from guns of steamers picked up 3 miles off.

THOS. F. DRAYTON, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, February 4, 1862.

General THOMAS F. DRAYTON, Commanding, &c., Hardeeville, S. C.:

GENERAL: Mr. T. A. Reynolds, overseer of Capt. John Screven reports that on last Saturday night a party of Federal troops visited Captain Screven’s Proctor plantation, and that on Sunday they made their appearance with negroes. After taking a view of Fort Jackson, &c., they retired, without disturbing anything on the plantation. They reached Proctor’s by the way of Wright’s Cut, which leads through the marsh from Savannah River to Wright River. This information is derived from the watchman (negro) on the plantation, and is believed by Mr. Reynolds.

You are desired to advance a company, mounted or on foot, convenient to throw out pickets to observe the approaches to the Savannah River, and to endeavor to catch or intercept reconnoitering parties of the enemy. I would suggest that they keep themselves concealed by day and take positions by night to accomplish their object effectually. Select a bold and intelligent officer for the service.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 4, 1862.

Brig. Gen. THOMAS F. DRAYTON, Commanding, &c., Hardeeville, S. C.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 3d instant has been received, and your withdrawal of the guns from Red Bluff is approved. It will be necessary for you to take a line removed from New River, so as to prevent the advance of a land force of the enemy, should one be attempted from New River to Savannah River, sufficiently distant from the former not to be affected by the enemy’s gunboats.

You will strengthen this line by artificial defenses, breastworks, abattis, &c., as you best can, and have a sufficient force at hand to attack and drive back an advancing foe. Should this be impracticable, you will hang upon his flank and rear to retard his progress until re-enforcements can reach you. Should a force be landed with which you may consider yourself unable to cope, you will notify General Pemberton who is ordered to march to your relief. Should you require additional {p.375} artillery, I can send you two 42-pounder carronades on siege carriages, but have neither harness nor horses for them. These you must endeavor to procure, if wanted.

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 4, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Commanding, &c., Pocotaligo, S. C.:

GENERAL: It has been reported to me by General Drayton that two of the enemy’s gunboats, accompanied by two steamers, ascended New River yesterday, and burnt the houses of Mr. Box and Mr. Lawton. The obstruction near Red [Bluff?] was removed, and I have learned that one of the enemy’s steamers has passed above it. The guns had been previously removed from the battery at that place. I have also heard that a party of the enemy visited Captain Screven’s Proctor plantation, on the Savannah River, and that three appeared there on Sunday, accompanied by negroes, who, after viewing Fort Jackson, &c., retired. The party of the enemy came by Wright’s Cut, which leads through the marshes from Savannah River to Wright River.

It seems probable that the enemy is meditating an advance from New River to the banks of the Savannah, and General Drayton has been directed to take up a line removed beyond the reach [of] the gunboats on New River to intercept him; should the enemy land too large a force for him to cope with, he has been directed to notify you. In that event you are desired to send to his support such of your available force as may be necessary, and to march with it, should you deem it requisite, and to take command of the whole operation. With this view it is suggested that you repair to Hardeeville, visit the field of operation, and concert with him a plan of operations. Should you not be able to drive him back under cover of his boats, you will attack him in his flank and rear, so as to prevent his approach to the Savannah River.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 5, 1862.

Lieut. Col. J. GORGAS, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: I have just received your letter of the 30th ultimo, advising me that two 10-inch and one 8-inch columbiads would be forwarded to me the next day. I hope that the others required are also on their way, and if it would be any relief to the department, as it will avoid the cost of transportation, the shot and shell can be procured here. I therefore desire to be informed of the caliber of the guns, that I may provide them. Please send an agent with the guns to hasten their transportation, and it has occurred to me that this might be expedited by sending them through Charlotte to Augusta, as the connection of the roads at Augusta is better than at Charleston, and much time will therefore be saved. I require nine heavy guns in addition to the three sent.

Captain Cuyler, ordnance officer at this post, has just stated to me {p.376} that O. G. Parsley & Co., of Wilmington, N. C., have bought the whole stock of iron of Weed, Connell & Co., the principal importers and holders of iron in this city, at the market price at which it has been sold to the Government. He has left the iron here, with directions that it be sold at double the former price, 12 and 16 cents per pound. I have directed that all iron required by the Government should be taken and paid for at the original price. This seemed to be such a palpable act of speculation, that it ought to be stopped.

I report the facts, that you may bring the matter to the notice of the Secretary of War, as the practice may be extended to other points.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 6, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond:

SIR: The replacing the troops in the Confederate service in this State is a matter of serious consideration. The period of service of several companies serving the batteries for the defense of the city of Savannah is about to expire. One that was mustered out of service a few days since at Fort Pulaski declines to re-enter the service, and it is supposed that others will be equally averse. The loss of these companies at this time will be a serious injury to the defense of the city, as artillerists cannot be made on the eve of a battle. But the prospective injury to the service, I fear, will be equally great, as neither the sentiment of the people nor the policy of the State seems to favor the organization of troops for Confederate service. I have thought it probable that the influence of the Department might be able to avert the evil I apprehend.

I have been very anxious to assign another general officer to duty with the troops in the State of Georgia. At the time the officers of that grade reported to me an attack on the Carolina coast seemed so imminent and it was so unprovided that all re-enforcements were assigned to its defense and every effort made to prepare the troops for their duty. The movements of the enemy for the last week indicate Savannah as the threatened point of attack, but I do not think it safe to withdraw troops from Carolina. I have no one to place in charge of the body of troops guarding the approaches from the Ogeechee to Savannah. The troops are fresh, officers new in the service, and all require instruction. If some instructed officer could be spared me I should be greatly relieved. I have already mentioned General Heth and Colonel Stevenson, but have been informed they were wanted elsewhere, and I can name no one not disposed of. I therefore leave the matter to the Department.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, February 7, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG, Pensacola:

General Lee says he understands there are twenty heavy guns at Pensacola that could be spared. If this is true, send him any you can spare to Savannah.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

{p.377}

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MOBILE, ALA., February 8, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Not a gun to spare here or at Pensacola, and we need eight or ten heavy shell guns here now. See my requisition on Ordnance Office.

BRAXTON BRAGG.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Milledgeville, February 8, 1862.

General R. E. LEE:

GENERAL: I have learned from General Wayne the substance of the conversation in your interview with him relative to the removal of the troops from Brunswick to Savannah. I have a great desire to see Brunswick remain in the possession of our troops, and should be very reluctant to see it abandoned to the enemy. If, however, it is not reasonably certain that you can with the force at your command, including the State troops, hold both Brunswick and Savannah, I do not hesitate to say that it is important that the whole force be at once concentrated at Savannah. It is the key to the State, and if it falls into the hands of the enemy Brunswick and the balance of the coast must of course be under their control.

All the indications are that Savannah is to be the point of attack, and we must repel the attack at any cost and at every hazard. If my home were in the city I would fight for it as long as possible, and if driven from it by overpowering force, I would never permit its roof to shelter the enemy, but would leave it in smoking ruins when driven from it.

The troops at Brunswick are under your command, and you are the best judge of the military necessities by which we are surrounded. Exercise your own judgment, in which I have the highest confidence, and I shall be content with and shall do all in my power to sustain your action, as I have no doubt you will so act as will best promote the highest interest of the people of the whole State.

Should you determine to withdraw the troops from Brunswick, I wish all the assistance afforded the inhabitants which is in your power for the removal of such property as they wish to carry into the interior; to this end you are at liberty to use the Brunswick Railroad, now in the military possession of the State. When all is removed that can be, let the engines and cars be brought to the junction of that road with the Savannah, Albany and Gulf road. I have directed General Jackson to call out such of the militia force of Savannah as he can arm for immediate service in addition to the State troops now in the field, and hope the order will meet your approval.

Very respectfully,

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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RICHMOND, February 9, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah:

General Bragg says he has not a gun to spare. I will send you this week five 8-inch columbiads and one 24-pounder howitzer. I have ordered 1,000 Enfield rifles sent to you and 20,000 pounds of cannon powder, besides the fixed ammunition for the rifles.

J. F. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

{p.378}

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RICHMOND, February 9, 1862.

General LEE, Savannah:

Send 10,000 pounds cannon powder to Norfolk immediately, and you will receive 20,000 pounds of the powder just received by the Kate. Send it from Charleston, if possible. Urgent.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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APALACHICOLA, FLA., February 10, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: The foregoing [following] copy of a letter addressed to me by General Floyd, commanding post, is respectfully commended to your consideration.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN MILTON, Governor of FLORIDA.

[Inclosure.]

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS, Apalachicola, February 9, 1862.

His Excellency Governor MILTON, Commander-in-Chief, at Apalachicola, Fla.:

SIR: Your suggestion this morning, that I should freely express my views to you respecting the future action to be taken for the defense of this place, I beg here respectfully to submit them.

If; in accordance with a decree of the late Convention, the State troops here are to be disbanded by the 10th of March ensuing, unless in the mean time they should enlist in the Confederate service, the defense of this place seems at present to rest entirely upon that contingency.

My opinion is that the companies will not enlist in the Confederate service until they shall have been discharged in March, and even if they will then do so, an entirely new organization will have to be effected. This, in my opinion, will not be done until they have enjoyed the privilege of going home, which seems to have been accorded; and even though they should enlist before doing so, they will still consider a thirty-days’ furlough as their right. Unless in the mean time other troops are sent here to fill their place, the absence of even half of the present force would leave the place comparatively defenseless.

Supposing that the 10th of March arrives, and that other troops are not sent here to supply the place of those who will be mustered out of service on that day, it would be highly improper to leave the cannon and ordnance stores here at the disposal of any gunboat and crew which the enemy might send here to capture them.

If such a state of things as I have supposed should occur, in the absence of orders relating to them I should feel it incumbent upon me to dismantle the batteries and remove the guns and ordnance stores to a place of security up the river before the men were disbanded or by that time, as I think it questionable, under the circumstances, whether I could detain them after that date.

Taking the above view of this matter, I would respectfully suggest to your excellency, that every effort be made to get a force here for the defense of the place before the 10th of March, and not to depend upon a reorganization of the force now here until after that time.

{p.379}

It would seem that General Trapier, upon an application to him, would send a regiment of Confederate troops perhaps from Fernandina; or the Secretary of War might be induced to do so in case General Trapier does not possess the authority; that at least the property of the Confederate Government might be protected, obviating the necessity of removing it from this post.

From all I can discover, it is my firm impression that but comparatively few of the troops now here will enlist in the service of the Confederacy; and even though the majority of them were disposed to do so, I fear there would be much confusion in their reorganization into companies, owing to the ambition of officers to get higher rank than they now enjoy.

I know of nothing more that I could now say on this subject, and have the honor to remain, your very obedient servant,

R. F. FLOYD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 10, 1862.

Hon. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Ga.:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 8th instant in reference to the withdrawal of the batteries from Saint Simon’s and Jekyl Islands. No one can regret the apparent necessity of such a measure more than I do, and so great is my repugnance to yield any point of our territory to our enemies, that I have endeavored from the time of my arrival to give strength to the defenses of Brunswick. I find it impossible to obtain guns to secure it as I desire, and now everything is required to fortify this city. I have therefore given General Mercer discretionary authority to withdraw the troops and guns from the islands to the main [land], should he, upon a reconsideration of the subject, hold to his opinion as to the inability of the batteries to contend with the enemy’s fleet.

I have sent Maj. Edward C. Anderson to assist in removing the guns, &c., and as soon as I know his determination will inform you. With the exception of the fact of opening another harbor on the coast to the enemy and receding from a point we have occupied, I do not know that any material interest is sacrificed. As the inhabitants of the islands and of Brunswick have removed their families and property, there is no trade or commerce with Brunswick, and no immediate back country to be injuriously affected.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 10, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: From the reports of General Mercer as to the inability of the batteries on Saint Simon’s and Jekyl Islands to withstand the attack of the enemy’s fleet, the isolated condition of those islands, and the impossibility of my re-enforcing him with guns or men, I have given him authority, should he retain that opinion upon a calm review of the whole {p.380} subject, to act according to his discretion; and, if deemed advisable by him, to withdraw to the main-land, and take there a defensible position for the protection of the country. Should he adopt this course, the heavy guns at those batteries will be sent here for the defense of Savannah River, where they are much needed and cannot otherwise be obtained. The channel between Saint Simon’s and Jekyl Islands leads into Brunswick Harbor.

Brunswick is a summer resort for certain planters, and is the terminus of a railroad extending about 60 miles into the interior, where it intersects the Savannah, Albany and Gulf Railroad. There are no inhabitants now in Brunswick, and the planters on the islands have removed their property to the interior; nor is there any population in the vicinity of Brunswick that would seem to warrant jeopardizing the men and guns necessary elsewhere. I would not, therefore, originally have occupied Saint Simon’s or Jekyl, but the batteries, though small, are well placed, and the guns well distributed, and I think would defend the channel against ordinary attacks, and I exceedingly dislike to yield an inch of territory to our enemies. They are, however, able to bring such large and powerful batteries to whatever point they please, that it becomes necessary for us to concentrate our strength. As this point may be selected by some of our forward-bound vessels to run the blockade, I think proper to give you the earliest information of its probable relinquishment.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, Va., February 13, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah:

The order of Colonel Myers was only meant to hurry on the cannon powder without waiting for anything else. Twenty thousand pounds of it are to be retained by you, and remainder sent here as quickly as possible.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRIFLER, Commanding, &c., Tallahassee, Fla.:

GENERAL: In reply to your letter of the 5th instant, in relation to the defenses of Saint John’s River, I am directed by the commanding general to say that he has directed four 32-pounders to be sent to you at Fernandina, if practicable, to strengthen that point, unless you think it more advisable to place them elsewhere. He has been obliged to withdraw the troops from Saint Simon’s and Jekyl Islands to obtain means for defense of this city, and he deems it advisable to strengthen Fernandina as far as in his power. He also desires you to relieve as soon as possible Captain Blain’s company at Cumberland Island, and to order it to rejoin its regiment.

As regards the defense of the Saint John’s he suggests to you, if possible, to place the guns that may be available for that purpose at one point rather than at two, distant or out of support of each other, {p.381} as united they might withstand the attack of the enemy, which, [while?] if distant, each might be suppressed separately. Not knowing the ground, he leaves the matter to your better judgment.

I am, &c.,

[W. H. TAYLOR,] A. A. G.

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STATE OF GEORGIA, ADJT. AND INSP. GEN.’S OFFICE, Milledgeville, Ga., February 14, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, C. S. A., Commanding Southern Military District, Savannah:

GENERAL: By direction of the governor I send you herewith two communications relative to the defenseless condition of the city of Augusta, in this State-one written by the mayor of that city, the other by a highly respectable citizen of it, and holding the commission of colonel in the militia of the State. These letters express fully the weakness of the city and the interests there to be protected, and entering heartily into the views of the writers, the governor directs me to commend them to your earnest consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY C. WAYNE, Adjutant and Inspector General.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

MAYOR’S OFFICE, Augusta, February 11, 1862.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor, &c.:

DEAR SIR: I desire to call your attention to the fact that there now exists among a portion of our citizens considerable apprehension that an attempt may be made before long by the Federal forces near Savannah to ascend the Savannah River to Augusta. Whether this apprehension is well grounded or not, there can be no doubt that if the enemy are placed in a position to enable them to do so, great exertion will be made to reach Augusta, as it must be generally known that we have a large quantity of cotton stored and that manufactories of arms and powder are being erected near our city. It is suggested that it may become necessary to obstruct the Savannah River. I address your excellency for the purpose of bringing the matter to your notice, and thus enabling you to give such directions as you may think required by the circumstances. Should it be deemed important to obstruct the river, and you have no engineer whom you can direct to the duty, I will cheerfully undertake any service connected with the matter which you may think proper to designate.

With sentiments of highest esteem, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. H. MAY, Mayor of City of Augusta.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

AUGUSTA, February 11, 1862.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor State of Georgia:

SIR: Some apprehension is felt in this city that the enemy will endeavor to take it, provided they succeed at Savannah. In the event of {p.382} their success there (which Heaven forbid), and they make the attempt, we are entirely at their mercy, for we have neither artillery nor arms for infantry; in fact, the city is for effective service totally defenseless, and no matter how willing we all might be to fight to the last, we could do no good unless we have arms.

It has been suggested to me to write to you on this subject. There is now 82,000 bales of cotton here, besides the powder-mills, factories, &c., which should be protected. I would respectfully suggest that an efficient battery of twelve or fifteen guns of suitable caliber should be at once placed at Silver Bluff, on the Carolina side, about 2 to 5 miles below the city, and also that rafts or old boats and other material suitable for the purpose should be used to barricade the river, which could be effectually done at Matthew’s Bluff, about 90 miles below the city. It is the opinion of well-informed men as well as myself that this should be done immediately.

I hope your excellency will excuse me for mentioning this important matter to you, and I hope it will meet with a favorable consideration. And, further, let me assure you that any service I can do you and my State in this war [illegible] or any other business will be cheerfully done to the best of my ability, without fear or reward.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. GRIFFIN, Colonel, Commanding Tenth Regiment Georgia Militia.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 14, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to say that General Evans has reported that the enemy have landed in considerable force on Edisto and driven his pickets from Jehossee, and has requested that his force be increased as soon as possible. He therefore desires you to send as soon as possible the four companies intended for the battalion under Messrs. Nelson and Aiken, and to request General Gist to hasten the organization of the two regiments lately withdrawn from the Third Military District South Carolina. In the mean time, should there be one of the new regiments ready to take the field, he desires you to order it to report to General Evans and to notify him accordingly.

I am, &c.,

[W. H. TAYLOR,] A. A. G.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT, Adams Run, February 15, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah, Ga.:

CAPTAIN: Inclosed please find charges and specifications against Capt. J. H. Rion, Lieutenants Harrison, Kennedy, and Isbell, of the Lyles Rifles. These officers have positively refused to obey my order. I have arrested them, and placed an officer of another company in command of the Lyles Rifles.

{p.383}

I would respectfully request that a court-martial be ordered as soon as possible for their trial, and that the court consist of as many officers of experience as the good of the service will admit.

I beg leave to report, for the information of the general commanding, that I have now but 1,305 men for duty on the main-land, at least half of whom are raw militia, composed of the new companies joining battalions and men returned from sick furloughs. The troops I have distributed as follows:

The Holcombe Legion, Colonel Stevens, 492 strong, between Togodo and Willstown, opposite Jehossee Island; Laurens battalion, Major James, 281 strong, in rear of the intrenchments at Slann’s Island Causeway; a section of light artillery is also stationed here; Colonel Elford, Sixteenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers is stationed at a central position on the Willstown road, between this place and Church Flats, guarding the approach of the enemy up the Wadmalaw. The enemy have occupied Edisto Island in considerable force and have thrown pickets as far out as Jehossee Island, and from observation I am convinced are making preparation for an early attack.

With my present forces I find myself entirely unable to strengthen my position in front of Jehossee Island as the forces on John’s and Wadmalaw Islands, now not adequate to their positions, could not be withdrawn without exposing an open way to the railroad for the enemy. With reference to the disposition of the troops on the islands, please see letter inclosed from Colonel De Treville, commanding. It will then be readily perceived by the general commanding that should the enemy occupy Jehossee Island (which he can whenever he pleases) and erect batteries on the island out of range of our guns (24-pounders), he could, with the assistance of his gunboats, take our batteries, overpower my small force, and make his way to the railroad. I would therefore request, if possible, an additional force be sent to this district.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. G. EVANS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

WADMALAW ISLAND, February 6, 1862.

Brigadier-General EVANS, Adams Run:

DEAR GENERAL: In accordance with your orders we will leave today for Charleston.

Colonel Moore’s battalion, with the exception of three detached companies, moved to Bear’s Bluff yesterday. Colonel Means’ regiment will move to our camping ground as soon as we move. The two pieces of light artillery from Bear’s Bluff I have stationed near Rockville.

Though this ends my connection with the military, perhaps forever, I cannot but remark again upon the undefended condition of these islands. There is now no guard at Church Bridge and nothing on the road from the Haulover to Legareville but two companies from Colonel Moore’s battalion and Nesbitt’s cavalry. If the enemy intend, as the Herald says they intend to do and as I think very probable, to make North Edisto their base of operations against Charleston, they can with perfect impunity land any number of troops on that island and at any moment transport them to Hanover, Rockville, and Bear’s Bluff, and advance in these directions to the ferry or to Legareville. We are totally unprepared to meet them, but of this your own personal observation has made you fully {p.384} aware. With less than three more good regiments, well drilled, if the duty of defending these islands is still on you, you ought not to be content.

I forgot to mention that General Ripley has relieved Captain Pinckney’s company at the ferry by one of the regulars of Colonel Dunovant’s regiment-so there is now no picket on the John’s island side of the ferry. The ship went reconnoitering on Tuesday morning towards Bear’s Bluff, and approached, as we thought, within the range of your guns at White Point. We expected you to fire on the enemy before they fired on our pickets and damaged some of the houses at Rockville.

Wishing you a prosperous and brilliant campaign and that you may add to your Leesburg laurels, I remain, dear general, yours, truly,

RICHARD DE TREVILLE.

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HDQRS. SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, February 15, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah, Ga.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of order concerning mechanics, &c. I have taken the necessary steps for obtaining the reports required.

General Evans telegraphs, date of 15th:

Enemy landed one regiment on Edisto yesterday. A spy taken this morning says he will ascend the Wadmalaw and land at Simon’s Landing. Please send me two heavy guns; if none other, 8-inch howitzers.

I have not a gun to send him, the number of guns here belonging to the State being held for our lines. Am preparing to support him with infantry, but regret to add that the regiments are not what I could wish. Moragné’s and Gadberry’s are still down with measles, and Keitt’s not armed yet.

Although I think the movement here is rather demonstrative than positive, so long as the enemy threatens Savannah so seriously there is no doubt that Simon’s Landing is a very important point, and if possible would like to arm and hold it. I do not see how I can assist General Evans, except by infantry such as I have.

The store of powder in Fort Sumter has been very much diminished, and I should like much to have it replaced as soon as possible. The further supplies for the lines, I suppose, will have to come from that fort, and it would be well to keep it in full condition.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, February 15, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel GILL, Commanding Arsenal at Augusta:

COLONEL: I wrote yesterday to Major Rains in reference to the advisability of obstructing the navigation of the Savannah River below Augusta, for which he had suggested a plan. As he informed me he should be absent on official business for some time, I find it necessary to apply to you for information. I desire to know whether any examination {p.385} of the river has been made with a view to the selection of the most eligible point, and whether any guns can be had to arm a battery for the protection of the river obstructions. In that event the point selected, besides being favorable to the work, should be contiguous to a position where a battery could be placed to prevent its removal. If no guns can be procured, then rifle-pits should be dug, where good marksmen could drive off working parties of the enemy. The position of the obstruction should be below the bluff, from which it could be protected. If no examination has been made and you are not able to do so yourself, could you select a person for the service and make arrangements for the conduct of the work, should Major Rains not return in time? The navigation of the river should be retained until it becomes necessary to close it, and for this purpose an outlet for the boats should be left.

The work, in my opinion, should be undertaken at once as a purely prudential measure, and as soon as the plan is matured should be pushed forward with vigor.

From the tenor of Major Rains’ letter, I inferred that the citizens of Augusta would provide the necessary labor, &c., and that Col. Henry Cummings would superintend the work.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 15, 1862.

General HENRY C. WAYNE, Adjutant and Inspector General State of Georgia:

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 14th instant, inclosing communications from the mayor of Augusta and Colonel Griffin to his excellency Governor Brown, in reference to the propriety of obstructing the navigation of the Savannah River.

This subject had already attracted my attention, and, in addition to measures contemplated for closing the river above this city, I have authorized the adoption of a plan, suggested by Major Rains, for arresting its navigation below Augusta. To prevent the removal of obstacles, however, placed in the bed of the stream, there should be a battery contiguous. For this I have no guns, and cannot possibly obtain more than necessary for the defenses of Savannah. I was, therefore, on the point of requesting the Governor to permit me to apply any belonging to the State to the defense of the upper river, and am glad that the subject has been brought to his notice. May I ask you to inform me whether there are any State guns available for this purpose, whether they can be procured, their caliber, &c.?

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah Ga., February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston:

GENERAL: There are abundant indications of the presence of the enemy in force, both on land and water, in this vicinity; but as far as I {p.386} can judge from the character of the vessels and the position of their troops, I see no indications of an immediate attack. They may be waiting for re-enforcements, or intend to deceive by demonstrations here while preparing for an attack on the coast elsewhere. I desire to know whether you can detect any indication of a movement against Charleston, and whether, should the attack be made against this city, you could detach two or more good artillery companies, skilled in the management of heavy guns, for service in the open batteries on Savannah River. These companies of course are only intended for temporary service and to provide against the impracticability of obtaining good artillerists from the new troops in this State.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 15, 1862.

Brig. Gen. N. G. EVANS, Commanding, &c., Adams Run:

GENERAL: I have had the honor to receive your letter of this day’s date, and have directed that a court-martial be convened at Adams Run for the trial of the officers of the Lyles Rifles.

As regards the re-enforcements that you request, I wrote you yesterday on the subject, which is all, under the circumstances, that can be done. It will be impossible to find sufficient troops to garrison the whole line of the coast, and all that can be done is to ascertain the points of attack, concentrate the troops in the district to meet the advance of the enemy, and, if unable to drive him, to hold him in check until re-enforcements can be forwarded from other districts.

I am, &c.,

E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. MILITARY DISTRICT, DEPT. OF GEORGIA, Brunswick, February 16, 1862.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of General Lee, that the guns have all been removed from the islands and brought to this place, with the exception of one 32-pounder, which I expect up in the course of the day. One 42-pounder and eight 32-pounders have been shipped to Savannah by rail, and I hope to get off to-day and tomorrow the columbiads and the remaining 32s, reserving four 32s to be sent to Fernandina. Lieutenant-Colonel Lamar’s battalion is now encamped at this place, and Colonel Styles’ command, it is hoped, will all be withdrawn before to-morrow night, though the weather is now very unfavorable, especially for the removal of his horse company and light artillery.

Before finally evacuating this position I beg to bring to the consideration of the general the question of burning the town of Brunswick. For the moral effect it would produce upon the enemy, as evidencing our determination to continue the present contest with unconquerable determination and at every sacrifice, and for other obvious reasons, which {p.387} you will think it needless for me to recite, I would respectfully urge that I be furnished with precise orders to destroy all the buildings that can afford shelter and comfort to the enemy. I desire also again to request of the general that I may be allowed to bring back Blain’s company from Cumberland. The captain and colonel are both anxious that this company should not be withdrawn from my command, and its anomalous position will be fruitful of embarrassments, without, as it appears to me, any corresponding benefit. In this connection I would respectfully submit that General Trapier is much better able to supply a garrison for Cumberland than I am to spare a good company from this military district.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. MERCER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, February 16, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah, Ga.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 14th, relating to the re-enforcement of General Evans. I have taken steps to re-enforce him with all I can muster on short notice. Nelson’s battalion will be sent out as soon as possible, but I regret to state that Captain De Russ’ or De Pass’ company has not yet filled, and that the rest are suffering from disease.

On the other hand, Gadberry’s and Moragné’s and Keitt’s people are rapidly recovering. Keitt received arms yesterday. Clement Stevens’ regiment is filling up, and General Gist is using every exertion to reorganize the troops of the city. He has three companies of cavalry here, which I shall endeavor to have equipped and make use of. Two companies of Black’s cavalry have also reported lately, which will join the headquarters of the regiment as soon as they can be equipped.

I have respectfully to request that Captain Childs may be authorized to issue or purchase arms for the troops for the war upon my requisition. There may be one or two more cavalry corps offering for the war, and there are a good quantity of Colt’s pistols and rifles still for sale in different hands. Capt. Ap C. Jones, of Black’s regiment, has found about 20 army revolvers and some 10 Enfield rifles, which have been in the hands of merchants and gun-dealers for some time. He has purchased them, trusting to have his purchase authorized.

I yesterday sent Captain Walker, assistant adjutant-general, to confer with General Evans. He brought back with him the man reported as a spy. I inclose his statement, and although by no means a man of unimpeachable veracity, I think he told nearly all he knew. As he is not entirely reliable, however, and it has occurred to General Evans that he may have been set at liberty in order to act as a spy and gain information for the enemy, I have to request instructions as to whether I shall hold him confined or release him. The works on the lines are nearly completed, but require dressing.

I am employing a force on the inundation in Saint Andrew’s, which will be done in a few days. Have also started to place a fixed battery on the middle ground between Castle Pinckney and Fort Johnson. The water is but about 8 feet deep, and the timber caissons can be ballasted with the rubbish of the late fire. The idea was suggested by the necessity {p.388} of putting more traverses in Fort Moultrie if that place is to be bombarded. Not wishing to lose the fire of the guns and having no place for them on the forts, it seemed to me that if it can be done in time it will be a strong additional defense to the city. Before removing the guns, however, will see that it is not going to take too long.

I inclose copy of the pass given by Captain Ammen, of the Seneca gunboat, to Black, the party alluded to in a former paragraph.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

Statement of Thomas Black.

Black left Charleston on the 16th December, with a flat and two hands, for Edisto Island, to obtain his own and Major Whaley’s furniture, having first obtained a pass from the mayor. Arrived on Edisto on the 19th. On the night of his arrival his flat was stolen by negroes. Whilst hunting for his flat the next day he was taken by negroes, who were armed with guns and pistols and bayonets on sticks; there were between 30 and 50 negroes; drew their weapons and threatened to shoot him if he offered resistance. Black was carried on board gunboat Penguin, where he was kept two weeks, and then transferred to the Seneca, and sent to Hilton Head, and then transferred to the Wabash.

He was kept on board for a week, and sent back by the Seneca to North Edisto. Flag-Officer DuPont, upon reading the letter of the captain of the Penguin, said he did not consider Black a prisoner of war, as he was taken by negroes, and was sorry the captain gave him the trouble of being sent to Hilton Head. Whilst on Hilton Head he heard that there were about 8,000 troops on the island. Heard them speak of attacking Savannah and Charleston, but most of attacking Charleston. From what he heard, thought they were going to attack Charleston by way of Wadmalaw Island and Simon’s Bluff. They spoke of burning Rockville yesterday.

He heard the steward of the Ben DeFord say that he had heard the officers say that a portion of the Burnside fleet would be in North Edisto soon. Heard the provost-marshal of Hilton Head say that he had been in Savannah about two weeks since.

Was sent back, after first having been returned to North Edisto by Flag-Officer DuPont to Hilton Head, and at the instance of Mr. Boutelle was sent back again to North Edisto in the Ben DeFord.

One regiment of troops, about 600 strong, landed at Edisto; they had two transportation wagons and mules; had commenced to remove everything that was valuable in the way of furniture from the island.

Heard Boutelle say that he had received a Charleston paper of the 10th on the 11th. Was landed at White Point by Mr. Boutelle, under a flag of truce. The flag was not received by any one, and Black walked on until he met the pickets.

The negroes go up from Edisto to White Point continually, and Black thinks they get information by communicating with the negroes on the main.

Thinks they have given up the attack on Savannah, as we have too many troops there. They have a machine for cutting off pile obstructions close to the bottom, &c.

P. S.-Captain Rogers, of General Evans’ staff, saw the boat with the flag when it was coming ashore.

{p.389}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Savannah, Ga., February 17, 1862.

Col. C. H. OLMSTEAD, Commanding, &c., Fort Pulaski:

COLONEL: From the position the enemy has taken in the Savannah River, it becomes necessary that you look to your defense in that direction. I therefore recommend that, if necessary for that purpose, you shift some of your barbette guns to the gorge of the work, and the casemates in the northwest angle, which bear up the river, be provided with guns. I would also recommend that the parapets of the mortar batteries be carried all around, so that the mortars can be protected from the fire up the river as well as from Tybee Island, and that everything be done to strengthen the defenses of your work in the rear. As far as it is possible your safety will be anxiously cared for, and for the present your communication with the city will have to be by light boats over the marsh and through Wilmington Narrows to Causton’s Bluff, or by any other mode by which you can better accomplish it.

I am, sir,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT, Charleston, February 17, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah, Ga.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of General Lee of the 15th.

The only indications of an attack on Charleston are those reported by General Evans and such information as was derived from Mr. Black, the prisoner who was at Hilton Head. I consider these vague, and were it not for the bitter animosity against this city by the enemy should not be much alarmed. As for the artillery companies, General Lee will agree with me that properly they cannot be spared, but I think a certain number might be sent with a comparatively small risk. I should send them from Lamar’s and White’s battalions, which, although not by any means perfect, have had some little practice.

Fort Sumter has now but four well-instructed companies in garrison, the others being recruits. Castle Pinckney is garrisoned by one company, which relieved the State volunteer company under Captain Chichester. Colonel Hagood requires an additional force of artillery-men at Stono, and General Evans calls on me for guns and men, which I have been unable to furnish.

The troops are holding themselves in readiness to march at a moment’s notice but are suffering from disease, as I have informed you.

If the general thinks the necessity absolute, I will endeavor to send the troops required with as little risk as possible. Meanwhile the people here are under a little excitement and fear an attack. I am not going to allay it, hoping they may volunteer at once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.390}

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RICHMOND, VA., February 18, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah:

Order the cavalry regiment of Colonel Davis from Florida to Chattanooga immediately to report to General A. S. Johnston. Withdraw all forces from the islands in your department to the main-land, taking proper measures to save the artillery and munitions of war.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 18, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and inspector-General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report, for the information of the honorable Secretary of War, that the guns have been withdrawn from the batteries on Saint Simon’s and Jekyl’s Islands and the troops removed to Brunswick. The former are now in progress of transportation to this place, to be used in the defense of the city of Savannah and the latter directed to occupy a position, to command the railroad and protect the back country. The nature of the ground prevents the possibility of holding the town of Brunswick, as the gunboats of the enemy can unmolested ascend the river within 4 miles of the railroad at Waynesville and about 25 miles in the rear of Brunswick. Brunswick would prove a convenient and healthy position, if occupied by the enemy, affording shelter and comfortable quarters for the troops and hospitals for the sick. It is used as a summer resort, and at this time mostly uninhabited. Should it fall into the possession of the enemy, its convenient harbor, salubrious climate, and comfortable buildings might tempt him to hold it for the continuance of the war, and, rather than it should fall into his hands, I propose to destroy it.

Before issuing orders to this effect, I desire that my views be known to the Secretary, so that if not approved by him I may be informed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, February 18, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, Charleston:

GENERAL: I am directed by the commanding general [Lee] to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant to-day; that he hopes you will use every effort to organize the Carolina troops and to get them into the field. The three cavalry companies that you are equipping can be retained for service in your district if you desire it. Captain Childs will be authorized to issue arms to the cavalry companies mustered into the Confederate service for the war upon your requisition, but the Enfield rifles must be reserved for the infantry. As regards Thomas Black, who has been released by the enemy, you must judge from his character and antecedents whether he can be trusted at large; if you feel satisfied, you can release him and keep him under surveillance. If not, he had better be sent to Colonel Preston, at Columbia, to be retained in close custody or within prescribed limits on parole.

In reference to the fixed battery you propose on the middle ground, {p.391} if adopted he would recommend that it be casemated, using heavy timber and railroad iron for the purpose. Similar protection should be given to our other water batteries, where practicable, if time permits, and, indeed, every preparation made to shelter the men from the bombardment of the enemy’s fleet.

I am, &c.,

- -.

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SAVANNAH, February 18, 1862.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville:

GOVERNOR: I have the honor to report for the information of your excellency that the guns have been removed from the islands of Saint Simon’s and Jekyl, and the troops withdrawn to the main-land; the former are in process of transportation to this city, and the latter ordered to take a position to command the railroad and to protect the back country.

In giving final orders for the defense of that portion of the State, I wish to give directions in reference to the town of Brunswick, provided the enemy attempt to possess. Besides the moral effect of showing our determination to defend the country at any sacrifice, its destruction would deprive the enemy of comfortable quarters in a healthy position, which they might otherwise be tempted to occupy during the continuance of the war, the present buildings saving them much labor and expense, and the hotel serving as a hospital for their sick. As there are other considerations besides those, purely military, involved in this question, I am unwilling to order the destruction of the town without the knowledge and approbation of your excellency.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. SECOND MILITARY DISTRICT SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, February 18, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Savannah, Ga.:

CAPTAIN: In view of the reported recent successes of the enemy at Fort Donelson, which, although not entirely reliable, will probably lead to renewed activity on the part of the enemy, I beg leave respectfully to suggest the following for the consideration of the commanding general. We may, I opine, consider it as certain that the enemy will soon attack Savannah or Charleston, directly or by the shortest land approach, especially if their generals have a proper appreciation of a moral effect of a victory.

With this letter I have the honor to inclose a copy of the weekly return of the troops in this district. It will be seen that the aggregate “present and absent” is 7,754, while the number of effectives, sabers and bayonets and artillery-men, is but 4,569, including sergeants and corporals.

General Evans has nominally from 2,800 to 3,000, probably 1,500, effectives.

The commands to the south and west are, I doubt not, proportionally weak, according to the extent of their lines.

{p.392}

I do not know the force in Savannah, but, with over 200 miles from the North Carolina to the Georgia line, it seems to me that we have not more than 20,000 effectives, and probably that estimate is too large. The greater portion of this force is between this point and Savannah, guarding our line of communications between the two cities, and from circumstances of topography it is weak and liable to be cut.

Free communication between the cities is of great importance, and so long as there were any hopes of a speedy termination of the war the defense of the rich plantations on Paw Paw, Ashepoo, and Combahee of little less. But if the news of our disaster in Tennessee be correct, the war may last long indeed. The Santee, Pedee, and Waccamaw countries are comparatively undefended, except by nature, which has provided a strong defense in the shoals and bars at the months of the rivers. Nevertheless, should the enemy be successful in an attack upon either of our cities, we must expect to be attacked there. If, however, we hold the cities and the Santee and Georgetown districts, the Ashley and Cooper being within the limits of Charleston, with the resources of the interior at command, we shall have the principal part of the grain country within our hands. I take it for granted that it will be out of the question to get a crop from either Combahee, Ashepoo, or Paw Paw.

Our weakest points between this city and Savannah are this side Paw Paw, and near Charleston. North Edisto affords a safe harbor for vessels of from 14 to 16 feet of water, and thence they can come to White Point or Simon’s Landing in force. They are from 5 to 8 miles of the railroad, a short half day’s march.

General Evans’ force, it must be remembered, is divided, a considerable portion being on John’s Island. I shall certainly support him with all the means at my disposal, but out of my effectives it would be hard to get 1,500 movable troops. This would hardly suffice to make a successful stand.

Now, if a disposition is made which would strengthen the points near to Charleston by drawing troops from the vicinity of Pocotaligo, this side of Paw Paw, strong guards being at or in advance of the railroad bridges on Ashepoo and Combahee, while the obstructions in the Coosawhatchie is held as a strong advanced post by the troops defending the Carolina shore of the Savannah, General Evans’ force closing in on the landings on the Wadmalaw and Stono, the approach to Charleston from that vicinity would be comparatively secure. Troops here and to be raised could be thrown in readiness to support the advance as soon as they convalesced, and any surplus we may have can be placed northward to defend the country in that direction.

This it may be said would leave a very rich section of the country undefended. But no crop comes from that country this year if the war continues, and it is well-nigh exhausted now of those necessaries which, in my opinion, first rendered it advisable to hold it in force. Our weak point on the Charleston and Savannah road would be about Ashepoo and Combahee. The weak point now is close to Charleston. Should the forces of the enemy make a dash, they have comparatively no distance to march to cut the rail.

In the case supposed, they would at any point have twice or thrice the distance to march, or take a narrow and tortuous route of from 30 to 50 miles up tidal rivers; moreover, neither we nor the enemy can hold the line of the railroad about Coosawhatchie or Pocotaligo or at Salkehatchie or Ashepoo Ferry more than six or seven weeks longer. We shall have to take the healthy regions about Adams Run, and the sandy sea islands {p.393} in the vicinity of Charleston and to the north of Grahamville would be one good location for the troops south of Broad River.

In the vicinity of Charleston we have Long, Sullivan, and Morris Islands, besides Folly, and perhaps Kiawah and Summerville, 20 miles up the South Carolina road, for a reserve.

Communication with Savannah could be kept up by the rail until it was cut, and if it should so happen, the rolling stock could be transferred to the South Carolina and Georgia Central for transportation by way of Augusta.

The various arguments on the subject it would be hard to embody in a single letter, but the general idea is that in the present state of affairs, while a considerable portion of our troops are guarding a long line of railroad through a country which we must soon leave and now nearly exhausted, our weakest point is close to, perhaps, our most important city, and that city has not men enough to defend it in case of attack.

If the enemy dashes at General Evans, and the rail is cut, the danger would be imminent, and should either or both Charleston or Savannah fall, we shall be forced to hold unhealthy positions in an exhausted country, or to retire into the interior and give up the seaboard, with its advantages of grain crops and communications. My opinion upon these matters has not been asked, but, charged as I am with the defense of this military district, I have felt it my duty to submit the considerations to the commanding general. I regret that I could not state them more forcibly and in fewer words.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 19, 1862.

His Excellency JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida, Tallahassee:

GOVERNOR: I have had the honor to receive the letter of the 9th instant, from Brig. Gen. R. F. Floyd to your excellency, referred to me. From his statement, the necessity for additional troops at that point is apparent, and as I have none under my command to send, I have to request that your excellency will transfer into the service of the Confederate States a regiment for the war, if possible, and order it to report to Brigadier-General Trapier. I have already written to General Trapier on the subject. Unless troops can be organized in Florida for its defense, I know not whose they can obtain.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 19, 1862.

General J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding District Florida, Tallahassee:

GENERAL: In looking at the whole defense of Florida, it becomes important to ascertain what points can probably be held and what points had better be relinquished. The force that the enemy can bring against any position where he can concentrate his floating batteries renders it prudent and proper to withdraw from the islands to the main-land and to prepare to contest his advance into the interior. Where an island offers the best point of defense, and is so connected with the main that {p.394} its communication cannot be cut off, it may be retained. Otherwise it should be abandoned.

A dispatch was sent to you this morning on this subject, and I now wish you, in reviewing the defensive positions in your district, to see what changes and improvements can be made in the number and strength of the points occupied. I fear but little aid can be offered you from without the State of Florida. You must therefore use every exertion to make available the resources in it, and apply the means at your disposal to the best advantage. Whatever can be given from the means under my control will be cheerfully accorded. You must, however, prepare to concentrate your forces at the point liable to be attacked, and make every arrangement to secure the troops, guns, and munitions of war at such points as you may deem proper to relinquish.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 19, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding, &c., Charleston:

GENERAL: From the progress of the war, it seems plain that the enemy, when ready to move against Charleston, should he select it as a point of attack, will advance in great force. We should therefore be prepared to concentrate rapidly in his front, on the lines that can be best defended, so as to be able to contend to the utmost of our strength. Beyond these lines every preparation should be made to withdraw guns and munitions of war when it becomes necessary or when the route of the enemy renders them valueless in the positions occupied. My object is to ascertain your opinion, whether, without weakening the plan of defense, our lines could be contracted, and exposed or distant points abandoned.

The batteries at Cole’s Island, for instance, would not be available, provided the enemy should advance by the Edisto, and, unless arrangements are made to withdraw them, would be lost. If they can be reached in great force by the enemy’s gunboats they might be suppressed, and the Stono seized as an avenue of approach. If it is necessary to maintain these batteries, they should be made as strong as possible and their communications rendered practicable in case of a reverse. So at other exposed points.

I am in favor of abandoning all exposed points as far as possible within reach of the enemy’s fleet of gunboats and of taking interior positions, where we can meet on more equal terms. All our resources should be applied to those positions. I wish you therefore to review the whole subject, and see what changes or improvements can be made, both as to the importance and strength of the positions retained.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 20, 1862.

Brig. Gen. N. G. EVANS, Commanding, &c., Adams Run:

GENERAL: If I have correctly gathered your opinion, you seem to think it probable that the enemy, in his advance upon the railroad or in {p.395} attack upon Charleston, would ascend the North Edisto Island either at White Point or Simon’s Landing. I hope you have this point well watched, and your forces prepared to throw them in advance of the enemy to cut them off from the railroad, and if forced to retire to place your troops so as to defend the route to Charleston. Should you discover a movement of the enemy in this direction, I desire you to notify General Pemberton as well as General Ripley, the former of whom can by a flank movement press upon the rear of the enemy, while the latter can move directly to your support. In this connection I deem it proper that you should hold your troops as concentrated as possible, and watch your exposed points by strong guards. If necessary to retain troops on Wadmalaw and John’s Islands, they should be light, not encumbered with baggage, with communications free to retire to the main and join your main body. I take it for granted that everything that can be removed from these islands, and indeed from your front, has already been brought off by the inhabitants, and that no crops can be raised there the ensuing year. The country therefore does not require troops for protection, but merely to watch the enemy and guard the avenues of approach.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH GA., February 20, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Commanding, &c., Pocotaligo, S. C.:

GENERAL: The observations of Generals Ripley and Evans lead them to believe that the enemy in his attack upon Charleston will ascend the North Edisto as high as White Point and Simon’s Landing, and make a dash at the railroad, of which he will be within 7 miles, so as to cut our communications. It will be apparent to you that this is one of our weak points, and is as likely to be seized upon by the enemy as any other. General Evans has been requested to give it careful attention, and in the event of the movement apprehended to give you notice. I wish you to be prepared, therefore, by a flank movement to intercept him, and, if possible, place yourself in his front, so if he is not driven back that we can fall upon him with our whole force in his movement against Charleston. I have always thought it probable that preparatory to an attack upon Charleston or Savannah the enemy would attempt to seize the line of the railroad both east and west of the waters of the Broad River, so as to isolate your force, the strength of which is probably known to them, as well as the cities themselves.

I wish you to be prepared against such a movement, and have your forces well in hand to move to any threatened point and take direction of the operations. I take it for granted that all property of value has been removed from your front, and that no crops can be raised in the country of the Broad, Combahee, and Ashepoo Rivers, and that the resources in this vicinity are nigh exhausted. The disposition of the troops, therefore, should look rather to their concentration to resist the enemy than to hold the country.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

{p.396}

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Milledgeville, February 21, 1862.

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding:

GENERAL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 18th instant. I am happy to learn that you have removed the troops from the islands and that you now have the guns at Savannah. God grant that they may enable you to drive the enemy’s gunboats from the river when the attack comes.

In reference to the other point in your letter, I have to say that if my own house were in Brunswick I would certainly set fire to it, when driven from it by the enemy, rather than see it used by them as a shelter. We should destroy whatever the military necessities require. I am therefore prepared to sustain any order which in your opinion it is necessary to have executed. Private property and private rights must yield to the great public interests now at stake. The question of compensation will be one which will address itself to the State. When the war is over, justice to sufferers will no doubt be done.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

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AUGUSTA, GA., February 22, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, C. S. A., Commanding:

GENERAL: I have sent the bearer, Mr. N. B. Grant, a civil engineer in my employment, to ascertain if a small steamboat can be procured in Savannah for aiding in placing obstructions in the river.

I made a reconnaissance for about 70 miles down the river yesterday and the day before, and decided to place the proposed obstructions at that part of its course called Shell Bluff, about 45 miles from this city by water and 6 miles to the nearest point of the railroad. The stream at this place is 300 feet in width, impinging against the shell formation, which is surmounted by a ridge some 100 feet in height parallel to the course of the river, with a spur, affording direct fire at the point selected, at right angles to the stream and 100 yards distant.

There is also a small plateau about 30 feet perpendicular above the river at its highest stage, affording room for a battery or intrenchment of limited dimensions immediately on the river and at the foot of the ridge. This is the point I have selected to place the proposed obstructions, and offers excellent advantages for such purpose. The depth of the channel is about 30 feet at high water.

The river has many sudden and sharp turns in the part examined, with side currents of much force passing over the intervening inundated lands, thus rendering the navigation slow and difficult for a screw steamer at a high stage of the water, and I understand the shallowness of the bars and numerous projecting stumps of trees render its navigation dangerous for boats drawing 6 feet or over of water at a medium stage of the river, and impracticable at low water to this place.

Thus a high stage of the water is probably the only period at which gunboats would make the attempt, and from the numerous high bluffs bordering the right bank of the river and commanding its channel at more than 200 yards distant, I think its navigation could be, in the general case, rendered dangerous to the enemy, if not absolutely stopped, by small-arms alone.

{p.397}

We would want a steamboat about two weeks probably. One could be procured here, but of larger size than is necessary or desirable, and at a corresponding increased rate of charter; hence I have thought it proper to send Mr. Grant to obtain one of the small boats which I understand is now at Savannah in Government employ, if practicable. The work of procuring the timber, iron, &c., has already commenced, and matters will be pushed forward with all the celerity possible.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. RAINS, Major, Artillery and Ordnance, &c.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 22, 1862.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville:

GOVERNOR: In the present condition of affairs the connection between the cities of Charleston and Savannah by the Charleston and Savannah Railroad is very precarious. Should the force now on this coast be re-enforced, an attempt will be made in all probability to cut the road between the two cities, and, in view of this contingency, I have the honor to call your attention to the importance to the defense of the cities of Charleston, Augusta, and Savannah, as well as to the States of Georgia and South Carolina, of connecting the Augusta and Savannah Railroad with the Georgia or South Carolina Railroad at Augusta. I am informed that the Augusta and Savannah Railroad Company is willing to build the connection at its own expense, provided they be allowed to take the route which they would prefer, and which the president of the road (Dr. Willis) informs, me is but one-fourth of a mile in distance, and if permission were given at once, the connection could be completed in one week. I am moreover informed by Dr. Willis that the railroad company will make the connection, taking the route selected by the city council of Augusta-more than twice the distance, however-if the State of Georgia will direct it and assume the expense. In the latter case, no doubt the State would be reimbursed by the Confederate Government but all considerations of time and expense would seem to recommend that the former plan be adopted, and I earnestly request that, if there is no insurmountable objection to its being carried out, your excellency lend your aid and influence to have it done immediately.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &O., February 23, 1862.

Maj. GEORGE W. RAINS, Augusta, Ga.:

MAJOR: I am glad to learn by your letter of the 22d instant that your examination of the Savannah River has been successful, and that you have selected a point suitable for obstructing its navigation. I request that you will commence immediately the construction of the work, push it forward with vigor, and at the same time erect such batteries, intrenchments, and rifle pits as in your judgment will best defend it, and which we may have the means of arming and manning.

{p.398}

The position you have selected seems to possess excellent advantages for this purpose, and I trust by your skill and energy will be made impregnable. It should be provided with bomb-proofs to shelter the men from shells, &c., provided the guns cannot themselves be protected from these missiles. I have written to the governor, who has no guns which can be applied to your position, and I cannot say now whether any can be sent from here. Please inform me of your progress, and whether I can give any aid to the work.

Mr. Grant has gone to inquire about a suitable boat. The two most convenient for your purpose, Talemino and Habersham, are in constant use, and I do not suppose can be spared. In that event you must impress a boat and pay the rates given here.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, Va., February 24, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah, Ga.:

SIR. The recent disaster to our arms in Tennessee forces the Government to the stern necessity of withdrawing its lines within more defensible limits, so as to enable us to meet with some equality the overpowering numbers of the enemy. The railroad line from Memphis to Richmond must be defended at all hazards. We can only do this by withdrawing troops from the seaboard. You are therefore requested to withdraw all such forces as are now employed in the defense of the seaboard of Florida, taking proper steps to secure the guns and munitions of war, and to send forward the troops to Tennessee, to report to General A. S. Johnston, by the most expeditious route.

The only troops to be retained in Florida are such as may be necessary to defend the Apalachicola River, as the enemy could by that river at high water send his gunboats into the very middle of the State of Georgia. Let General Trapier put that river and harbor in a satisfactory state of defense, and then further orders can be given to him; but I beg that there be no delay that you can possibly avoid in forwarding to Tennessee the troops now at Fernandina and on the eastern coast.

I am, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 24, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding, &c., Tallahassee:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of February -, from Fernandina, relative to the indefensibility of the position on Amelia Island. The withdrawal of the troops from Saint Simon’s and Jekyl Islands can only affect the inland communication between Brunswick and Cumberland Sound, rendering it less secure and certain. The batteries commanding the principal entrance into Cumberland Sound can be as easily turned through Saint Andrew’s Sound as Saint Simon’s, which is nearer and as accessible as the {p.399} latter. I had hoped that guns could be obtained in time to defend these rear approaches, but as I now see no possibility of doing so, and as the means on the island are incompetent in your opinion for its defense, you are authorized to retire both from Cumberland and Amelia Islands to the main-land, taking such positions as will best defend the interests of the State, and using the guns and troops for that Purpose. Captain Blain’s company must be sent as soon as possible to this city, to report to General Lawton.

The withdrawal of the troops and guns will have to be done with extreme caution, and your arrangements for that purpose must be done so quietly and executed so speedily as not to attract the attention of the enemy.

The guns from Cumberland should first be removed and transported across at night; logs in imitation of guns should be mounted in their place as the guns are removed. The same precaution should be taken in dismantling the batteries at Amelia Island; the platforms, ammunition, and munitions of all sorts secured. It is hoped that the guns and ammunition derived from these points will enable you to secure other important points in the State of Florida, for supplying which I see no other means.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 24, 1862.

Col. J. GORGAS, Chief of Ordnance, &c., Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: I am in receipt to-day of a letter from Brigadier-General Trapier, commanding, &c., Florida, requesting most earnestly to be at least supplied with 1,000 muskets for the arming of the new troops under his command. One company, which was mustered in the service on 11th December last for the war, has not as yet, he informs me, received a single arm. I have not any at my disposal to give him, those allotted to my department having already been devoted to the arming of troops mustered into service from Georgia and South Carolina. I see by the disposition that has been made of the arms that 900 are to be sent to Richmond; if those are not wanted there I would recommend that they be applied to the arming of the troops now mustering for the war in this department. General Trapier also applies for some blankets and powder, if they can be spared. Similar applications have been made to me by the governor of Florida.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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SAVANNAH, GA., February 24, 1862.

His Excellency JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida, Tallahassee:

GOVERNOR: I have bad the honor to receive your letter of the 21st instant,* handed to me by Col. J. J. Williams, of Florida.

I regret very much to learn that the means for the defense of the capital of the State are so deficient. Not finding it possible to defend {p.400} all the important points in the State, or to obtain guns to place Cumberland Harbor out of the reach of capture, I had previously authorized General Trapier to withdraw the troops and guns from that point, and to apply them to other vital portions of the State. This is the only course now left to supply means for defending it. I have also authorized him to withdraw generally from the islands to the main; the only way, in my opinion, successfully to resist the large force that can be brought against us by the enemy, and to deprive him of the benefit derived from his fleet and heavy floating batteries.

In reference to the cargo landing from the steamer Carolina, its disposition has been made by the War Department at Richmond, which will go but a little way in supplying the urgent demands of the service. It is now impossible to arm troops entering the service for the war. I consider it therefore useless for troops entering the service for a less period to expect arms from the Government. If regiments can be raised in Florida for the war (the only period, in my opinion, for which they ought to be accepted), I will endeavor to procure arms for them.

It will be necessary for the citizens of Florida to turn out to a man to defend their homes, and the sooner your excellency can impress upon them this fact, the easier will be its accomplishment. Troops cannot now be drawn from other States for this purpose. Every State is looking to the protection of her own borders and providing the regiments called for by the Secretary of War. The governor of Georgia has been obliged to refuse my recent application to him for two regiments, to be placed under the command of General Trapier, for the purpose of preventing an advance of the enemy through Florida into the southwest portion of Georgia.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Savannah, Ga., March 1, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 24th February, in reference to withdrawing the forces from the seacoast of Florida, and have directed General Trapier accordingly. By telegraph he has been directed to send Colonel Dowd’s Twenty-third Mississippi Regiment immediately to Tennessee, to report to General A. S. Johnston. On the 19th ultimo he was directed by telegraph to send Colonel Davis’ regiment of cavalry from Florida to Chattanooga, to report to General A. S. Johnston. As soon as Amelia Island has been evacuated, the public property secured from there and other points along the seaboard, troops not necessary to prevent the enemy from penetrating into the interior will be forwarded to General Johnston.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, VA., March 2, 1862.

General R. E. LEE, Savannah:

If circumstances will, in your judgement, warrant your leaving, I wish to see you here with the least delay.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

{p.401}

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., March 3, 1862.

General A. R. LAWTON, Commanding District of Georgia:

GENERAL: I shall be compelled to leave Savannah this evening on duty. Major Long, Captain Ives, and Captain Tatnall, members of my staff, will remain here for the present on the duties on which they are now engaged, the former in preparing and arming the new batteries in the vicinity of Fort Jackson; the second in superintending the batteries and obstructions on and near Saint Augustine Creek, and the latter in getting up certain boats for operations on the water. I need not press upon you the necessity of urging forward all these operations with the utmost expedition. It is my wish that as soon as the batteries are in fighting condition the work of protecting the guns from the enemy’s missiles be vigorously pushed on, a commencement of which has been made at Thunderbolt and the battery at Fort Jackson under Captain Ives and Captain Echols. As it is a subject attended with difficulty, I beg you will give attention to it and adopt the plan that promises the best success.

The three-gun battery located on the right bank of the river to unite with the battery on Hutchinson Island should be commenced at once, and the bomb-proof arrangement be carried on with its construction. The raft must be put in position below Fort Jackson, and strengthened as far as time and opportunity allow. I have proposed a casemated battery of one or two guns, if they could be obtained, situated on the right bank of the Savannah, with embrasures and loop-holes for riflemen, looking across the river, to fire on boats reaching the raft. The battery will be located at the end of the raft, and have no opening down the river by which the raft or guns could be harmed by the shot of the enemy from that direction. If no better arrangement can be made, the 18-pounders from Fort Jackson, replaced by the 32-pounders, could be used for this battery. The batteries now under construction are so far advanced that a portion of the hands could be diverted to these last-named batteries.

I beg now to refer to a matter that must claim your earnest and close attention-the probable route of the approach of the enemy. It looks now as if he would take the Savannah River. In that event, the batteries of Skidaway and Green Island would be out of the line of approach and if the guns can be applied to the defense of the Savannah, should be so used. They can be removed from these batteries in any event, should you determine it best to withdraw to the main. Thunderbolt battery must then be re-enforced and some 32-pounders mounted at the battery at Beulah, reserving the heavy guns for the Savannah. You are aware that arrangements are made for obstructing the navigation of the river at Shell Bluff, 35 miles below Augusta. This matter has been intrusted to Lieutenant-Colonel Gill and Major Rains, C. S. Army, and any aid they may require and you can give I desire you to afford.

Examinations have also been made with a view of obstructing the river above Savannah. Captain Walker, of my staff, has been on this duty, and will continue for the present. He recommends a battery at Mulberry Grove, and that the main and minor channels be obstructed. I wish these subjects attended to. No precise instructions can now be given, but they are left to your judgment. An obstruction on the Ogeechee has been proposed, and the planters on the river have offered to furnish the necessary labor. You are referred to Captain Hartridge’s {p.402} letter on the subject, and requested to forward the matter as much as possible.

Every effort must be made to retard, if not prevent, the further progress of the enemy up the river. If he attempts to advance by batteries on the marshes or islands, he must be driven back, if possible. Bold scouts must be established on Elba, and the right and left banks of the river closely watched, so as to discover his first lodgment, when they can be broken up. With this view I invite your attention to the propriety of establishing a battery at Mackay’s Point, to drive him from Elba. There are three 32-pounders that could be used for that purpose, if a battery there is deemed advisable. It could not be maintained against his gunboats should they enter the river in force, but might with the aid of boat attacks, prevent the establishment of batteries on Elba.

It is of the utmost importance that the work at every point should be pushed forward with the utmost vigor and the closest attention given to the whole subject of the defense of the city.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Pocotaligo, S. C., March 4, 1862.

During the absence of General R. E. Lee, and in compliance with his instructions,* the undersigned assumes command of the Department of South Carolina, &c.

The headquarters of the department will be for the present at Pocotaligo Station, S. C., and all official communications intended for department headquarters will be addressed to Maj. T. A. Washington, assistant adjutant-general.

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

* Special Orders, No. 34, of March 3.

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STATE OF FLORIDA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, March 5, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: Permit me to present to your acquaintance the Hon. David S. Walker, who visits you with a copy of an order recently issued by General R. E. Lee to General J. H. Trapier.

The effect of the order is to abandon Middle, East, and South Florida to the mercy or abuse of the Lincoln Government. It cannot be possible that the order was intended to have such an effect. If strictly obeyed, the forces at Saint Augustine, on the Saint John’s River, at Tampa, and at this place, have to be ordered to the defenses of the Chattahoochee River or to Tennessee. I cannot and will not believe that an order to have that effect would have been issued without previous notice to the executive of the State, that proper measures might have been advised for the protection of the lives, liberty, and property of the citizens of Middle, East, and South Florida. Moreover, the order, if executed, would not, with the forces now in Florida, secure the defenses upon the Chattahoochee, for, if the enemy were in possession of {p.403} Tallahassee and Saint Andrew’s or Saint Joseph’s Bays, they can attack in the rear all batteries which may be constructed on either side of the river.

But, sir, if the sacrifice of Florida is necessary to secure the sacred rights claimed by the people of the Confederate States, there is not a man, woman, or child, true to the cause of liberty in Florida, but what will say amen, and in the midst of desolation, however fearful, advocate and cheer the progress of freedom to the South.

But, sir, we do not wish to give up our personal rights without striking a blow in their defense, and we are destitute of arms and the munitions of war, while in the State is a large quantity of arms and ammunition belonging to the Confederate Government not only liable but in danger of being captured by the enemy. I allude to the arms and ammunition at Smyrna. Moreover, when brought from Smyrna to Madison (the railroad depot), for the want of ready and sufficient means of transportation, they are subject to be seized and used by slaves against the lives of our citizens. I propose to order these arms and munitions of war to be sent to this place for safe-keeping, and, if necessary, for use by the forces now being mustered in for Confederate service during the war. To get them from Smyrna, I shall probably order some companies to that place to take the arms and march with them to protect the wagons of transportation. If here, they will be subject to your order or forwarded without it as soon as possible. If the enemy should get command of the Saint John’s River, it will not be possible to get the arms from Smyrna without a long and tedious march, where subsistence for the forces cannot be easily obtained. Say to me to arm and equip 2,500 men in Florida for Confederate service for the year, or for the war, if it is to the end of time, and the 2,500, upon the terms, will be armed and equipped, and the balance of the arms and equipments will be protected from the enemy and slaves, and forwarded in one-third of the time which will be otherwise consumed in their transportation, even if not interrupted.

In conclusion permit me to invite your attention to the inclosed copy of a resolution of the so-styled executive council. My views with regard to this regiment have been too freely avowed to justify my saying more on the subject.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

SAVANNAH, GA., March 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding, at Tallahassee:

GENERAL: In pursuance of instructions from the War Department you are directed to send the Mississippi regiment, Colonel Dowd commanding, to Tennessee, by the most expeditious route, to report to General A. S. Johnston. He is reported to be at Murfreesborough, and it is presumed that the route by Chattanooga will be the most direct. I desire that no delay that you can possibly avoid will take place in forwarding these troops, as there is an immediate necessity for defending the road from Memphis to Richmond. The recent disasters to our arms in Tennessee forces the Government to withdraw forces employed in the defense of the seaboard. The only troops to be retained in Florida are such as may be necessary to defend Apalachicola River, by which the enemy’s gunboats may penetrate far into the State of Georgia. You are therefore desired to put that river and harbor in a satisfactory state of defense, and forward all troops not necessary for that purpose to report {p.404} to General A. S. Johnston. All the guns and munitions of war must be secured. Let me know what arrangements you can make, and whether all of the guns will be needed for local defense.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

STATE OF FLORIDA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, March 5, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

RESPECTED SIR: The following is a copy of resolutions of the executive council of the State, passed the 3d instant, in regard to the cavalry regiment commanded by Col. W. G. M. Davis, in this State:

Resolved, That the governor be requested to correspond with his excellency Jefferson Davis, the Secretary of War, General R. E. Lee, and the officers of Colonel Davis’ regiment, as to the necessity of the regiment being converted into an Infantry regiment and remain in the State for its defense.

Adopted.

True Copy.

E. BERNARD, Private Secretary to his Excellency.

JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, DEPARTMENT OF THE MILITARY, Columbia, S. C., March 7, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose, for your information, a statement from the adjutant and inspector general’s office of the State, showing number of troops sent by this State into Confederate service. It embraces a period up to 20th February last. Since that time 2,000 men have been added.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

JAS. CHESNUT, JR. Chief, &c.

[Inclosure 1.]

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, A. AND I. GEN.’S OFFICE, Columbia, February 20, 1862.

Hon. JAMES CHESNUT Jr., Chief of Military Department of Executive Council of South Carolina:

SIR: In accordance with your request and instructions, received from Brig. Gen. S. R. Gist, adjutant and inspector general of South Carolina, I have the honor herewith to submit a statement of the number of South Carolina volunteer troops now in Confederate service. I would respectfully state that the report shows the original strength (except in the case of the regular force, where enlistments are still progressing) will reach 1,500, the troops passing entirely out of the State departments after their muster into Confederate service, except as to simple matters of organization.

The statement is classified as follows:

First. Those in service beyond the State.

Second. Those in service within the State.

{p.405}

Third. Those for and during the present war.

Fourth. Those for shorter terms of service.

With much respect, your most obedient servant,

G. A. FOLLEN, Clerk Adjutant-General’s Department.

[Inclosure. 2.]

Recapitulation.

1. Those in service beyond the State9,636
2. Those in service within the State21,271
30,907
3. Those for and during the war8,153
4. Those for shorter terms of service22,754
30,907

---

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, A. AND I. GEN.’S OFFICE, Columbia, March , 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: In compliance with the requisition of your Department for five regiments of infantry to serve for and during the present war, I have the honor to inform you that a proclamation and orders for the rendezvousing said regiments have been issued by the State authorities and that the troops will soon begin to report in camp. The present camp of rendezvous selected will be at the Lightwood Knot Springs, near Columbia, on the Columbia and Charlotte Railroad.

You say “these troops will be clothed, supplied and armed on Confederate expense,” and “each soldier will receive a bounty of $50,” &c. I have to request that you will at once cause the necessary arrangements to be made for the reception of the troops at the camp of rendezvous and for the compliance with the above-quoted stipulations, and to tender you the assistance of this office in the premises.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General of South Carolina.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, March 9, 1862.

Hon. ISAAC W. HAYNE, Chief Police and Justice:

SIR: After an examination of the land defenses on James Island, I desired Brigadier-General Ripley commanding Second Military District, to strengthen them in part, and to construct certain other works on the island and also in the direction of Rantowles Bridge. General Ripley, though appreciating the importance of the work to be done, informs me that it is impossible with the hands now at his disposal to undertake it, and that the difficulty of obtaining a sufficient number will delay it indefinitely.

Regarding the proposed addition as essential to the safety of the city, should the enemy attack in large force, I deem it my duty to ask your {p.406} co-operation, or, if necessary, that of the executive and council, to enforce the supply of labor which General Ripley may require.

I am, &c.,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

RICHMOND, VA., March 13, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. H. TRAPIER, Commanding, &c., Tallahassee:

GENERAL: In my letter to you of the 1st instant, from Savannah, it was my purpose, under the instructions that I had received from the Secretary of War, to indicate to you the measures that would necessarily be adopted under the emergency of the occasion. Colonel Dowd’s Mississippi regiment was to be sent with the least practical delay to report to General A. S. Johnston. Colonel Davis’ regiment had been previously directed to do so. Both orders, I hope, have been executed. The Secretary, in his instructions, directed that the only troops to be retained in Florida were those employed in the defense of the Apalachicola, and I wished you to understand that our necessities might limit us to the defense of that avenue through Florida into Georgia. But I did not intend that you should send from your department immediately any troops but Dowd’s and Davis’ regiments, retaining the rest to secure the public property, guns, &c. until you saw what arrangements you could make for the defense of the State generally, after withdrawing from those points of the seaboard which in your judgment could not be maintained. It was with this view that I asked to be informed what arrangements you could make for local defense. It was then to be determined, under the instructions from the War Department, what other forces could be spared to reinstate our operations in the West. My own opinion and desire is to hold the interior of the State, if your force will be adequate, the Saint John’s River, as well as the Apalachicola. I do not think you will be able to hold Tampa Bay, and the small force posted at Saint Augustine serves only as an invitation to attack; but on these points you must judge, and I desire your opinion.

I am, &c.,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

–––

RICHMOND, VA., March 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Commanding, &c., Pocotaligo, S. C.:

GENERAL: You will receive from the Adjutant and Inspector General’s Office an order placing you in command of the military department composed of the States of South Carolina and Georgia. General Trapier will command the Department of Florida.

Being assigned to duty at the seat of government, I shall require certain members of my staff left at my headquarters at Coosawhatchie. I desire you to send to me at once Maj. T. A. Washington, assistant adjutant-general, with such official books and papers not appertaining to the Department of South Carolina, &c. Captain Memminger may continue on duty with you, as you will require additional assistance in your office. Major Long and Captain Ives, having in charge certain operations in the vicinity of Savannah at the time of my leaving the department, I am {p.407} unwilling to withdraw them until I learn that their services can be dispensed with; they will therefore continue with you for the present. I take pleasure in commending to you my volunteer aide-de-camp, Capt. J. Manigault, who, from his local knowledge and other considerations, I presume would prefer serving in South Carolina, and hope that you may give him some position in which his services may be secured to his native State. I also left in Savannah Capt. J. R. F. Tattnall, C. S. Marine Corps, volunteer aide-de-camp, in charge of certain operations, in which it may be desirable for you to continue him. He is also commended to your attention, as I believe that you will require the aid of every good citizen of your department to contribute to its defense.

I am, &c.,

B. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 59.}

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, March 14, 1862.

...

XXII. Maj. Gen. John C. Pemberton is assigned to the command of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia.

XXIII. Brig. Gen. J. H. Trapier is assigned to the command of the Department of Middle and Eastern Florida. The western boundary of this department will be the Choctawhatchee River.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

- -, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 18, 1862.

Hon. ISAAC W. HAYNE, Of Executive Council:

DEAR SIR: I have just returned from an official visit to Florida, which I hope will excuse the tardy acknowledgment of your favor of the 9th instant. I have to express my thanks for the prompt attention given by the executive council to my application in reference to negro labor. The resolution of the council will no doubt be sufficient to accomplish all that is desired. It is, in my opinion, a matter of great public interest that the connection between the South Carolina Railroad and Charleston and Savannah Railroad be made as soon as practicable. Any assistance in my power will be most cheerfully given. The connection is emphatically a military necessity. Be pleased to inform me in what manner I can best aid in the work.

Very respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Pocotaligo, March 18, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report my return from an official visit, via Chattahoochee River, to the cities of Apalachicola and Tallahassee, {p.408} Fla. On my arrival at Apalachicola, I found the batteries dismantled and the guns, carriages, ammunition, &c., already on board the steamboat Marianna and about leaving for Ricco’s Bluff, a point on the river which would no doubt admit of a good defense, but which after a personal examination of its advantages, seemed to me to be interior in that respect to a position some miles lower, and known as Fort Gadsden. In a personal interview with Brigadier-General Trapier it was decided to establish the batteries at the latter place, against which an attack by land ought easily to be repulsed, by reason of the almost impassable country through which an enemy must necessarily advance.

I ascertained during my brief stay in Apalachicola that very many of the citizens-probably a majority-prefer to remain there. A large class of the population is compelled to do so, having no means of subsistence elsewhere. Many, however, are abandoning everything and going into the interior. All public property had been removed before my departure. All river pilots were required to leave the city with the troops. The telegraph office was closed, and the instruments for the present transferred to Chattahoochee.

It is proposed to occupy Fort Gadsden with from 600 to 800 infantry, a battery of six field pieces (not yet equipped), and, in connection with the position, two or three companies of cavalry, to be used as advanced pickets for courier service. Under present instructions from the War Department these are the only troops to be retained in Florida (being considered sufficient for the defense of the Apalachicola River), unless it is deemed advisable to continue a competent guard in the direction of New Smyrna and the Saint John’s River, for such arms ammunition, and other public stores as may be hereafter landed at New Smyrna. This guard I have directed to be retained for the present. It is the more necessary in view of the fact that the enemy, being in possession of Jacksonville, may intercept the stores sent to Baldwin, only 20 miles distant, for transportation by rail. Their safety, therefore, may require a further wagoning to Lake City.

I regret to report a very unsatisfactory condition of affairs in East and Middle Florida. The Mississippi regiment, some time under orders to repair to Tennessee, has not yet moved, for the want of the necessary transportation, as stated by General Trapier. Davis’ regiment, also under orders for General A. S. Johnston’s army, is in a state of mutiny, positively refusing, as I am informed, to move until the arrearages of pay due are received and until satisfied that a sufficient army is left in Florida for the protection of their families. A paper to this effect was shown me by General Trapier a few moments before my leaving Tallahassee, which was signed by several captains, lieutenants, and apparently by some of the rank and file of the regiment. General Trapier desiring to consult with me on the subject, I gave him my views, which will be carried out, i.e., to arrest and bring to trial the captains whose signatures were attached; that the articles of war (7 and 8) bearing upon mutiny be read before the regiment, and the order for the movement immediately reiterated. A personal interview of a few moments with Colonel Davis, commanding this regiment, whom I met with yesterday, on his way to rejoin his command, leads me to hope that this mutinous spirit may be quelled without resorting to stronger measures, and the orders of the Department be carried into execution without further delay.

I find the citizens of Tallahassee much excited on the subject of the withdrawal of the troops, and am informed by Governor Milton and others that the feeling in many cases amounts almost to disaffection.

{p.409}

I observe also a disposition to plant cotton the coming season. Several thousand bales are still in the vicinity, which I have directed General Trapier to notify the people must be destroyed rather than permitted to fall into the hands of the enemy. The four pieces of siege artillery now at Saint Mark’s I have directed to be withdrawn, as no troops are to be retained there. They will be forwarded to Fort Gadsden.

I respectfully renew the request that General Trapier be authorized to retain a sufficient number of arms from those landed at New Smyrna to equip the unarmed troops mustered into the Confederate service for the war. It is represented to me by Governor Milton that if arms could be issued to troops called out by the State, there would be no desire to retain Confederate forces, and that a feeling of security would be engendered which does not now exist.

In bringing this subject to the consideration of the Department I would add, that it a system of guerrilla warfare should be instituted in a country so sparsely settled as is Florida, it would probably result in great suffering to many unprotected families. Unless, therefore, the district of country liable to incursions of the enemy be entirely abandoned by the people, I have advised the governor to discountenance such mode of warfare.

I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a communication addressed to myself by General Trapier, showing the regiments and separate corps to be transferred, as also those to remain in the State, under the present instructions of the War Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. PROV. FORCES, DEPT. EAST AND MIDDLE FLA., Tallahassee, March 16, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, P. A. C. S., Comdg. Dept. of S. C., Ga., and Middle and East Fla.:

GENERAL: I have the honor very respectfully to inform you that, in obedience to instructions from General R. E. Lee, the Twenty-fourth Mississippi Regiment, Colonel Dowd, and the First Regiment Florida Cavalry, Colonel Davis, are now under orders to proceed to Tennessee, and will leave as soon as transportation can be furnished.

The remaining troops in this district to proceed hereafter to Tennessee under the same instructions will be-

(Twelve-months:) Third Regiment Florida Volunteers, Colonel Dilworth, now at Baldwin.

(Twelve-months:) Fourth Regiment Florida Volunteers, Colonel Hopkins, now at Sanderson.

Fifth Regiment Florida Volunteers (for the war), in camp of instructions; not yet fully organized.

Martin’s light battery, six pieces.

Gamble’s battery, three pieces, not equipped.

The troops to remain [in] Florida, by your direction, for service on the Apalachicola River, and for scouts, couriers, &c., are the First Florida Special Battalion, six companies, Major Hopkins.

Baya’s company of artillery (independent).

Dunham’s light battery.

Owens’ troop.

Brokaw’s troop.

{p.410}

Capt. C. Smith’s company of cavalry.

Captain Partridge’s company of cavalry.

Captain Thigpen’s company of cavalry.

Captain Smith’s company of cavalry.

Captain Turner’s company of cavalry (to be disbanded).

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Pocotaligo, March 18, 1862.

General J. H. TRAPIER, Comdg. Dept. of East and Middle Fla., Tallahassee, Fla.:

GENERAL: The general commanding the department directs me to in form you that he considers it of great moment that all the cotton that has been accumulated at Tallahassee and vicinity should be removed as speedily as possible to some secure place or places in the interior, where there would be no chances of capture by the enemy in case of their getting possession of the city. To this end you will give the necessary notice to the citizens and owners, and in case such an emergency as the probable loss of it should ensue, you should be prepared to burn or otherwise destroy it rather than that it should fall into the enemy’s hands.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, &C., Pocotaligo, March 18, 1862.

General HENRY C. WAYNE, Adjutant and Inspector General Georgia:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of March 8, 1862,* and in answer am instructed to state that he [General Pemberton] approves of your idea of ordering out the militia in that part of your State invaded by the enemy; but before inaugurating a system of guerrilla warfare he would recommend that all women and children be removed before such operations are commenced on our part.

I am, &c.,

[T. A. WASHINGTON.]

* Not found.

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HDQRS. PROV. FORCES DIST. MIDDLE AND EAST FLA., Tallahassee, March 19, 1862.

Maj. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to forward herewith a copy of a letter received yesterday from General Lee* for the information of the major-general commanding. Under these instructions it becomes my duty to suspend the movement of all troops except that of Dowd’s and Davis’ regiments and the battalion which is to garrison the works on the Apalachicola River. Want of transportation on the Apalachicola River {p.411} has prevented my visiting and deciding upon the proper position for a defense of that river up to this time. I leave here to-morrow morning for that purpose. I learn, however, from General Floyd that all the guns were landed at Ricco’s Bluff, and that they were being put in battery. Unless, therefore, I find the advantages of the lower position (old Fort Gadsden) greatly superior to those of Ricco’s Bluff. I shall decide to allow the guns to remain at the latter place.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See Lee to Trapier, March 13, p. 406.

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HDQRS. PROV. FORCES, DEPT. EAST AND MIDDLE FLA., Tallahassee, March 19, 1862.

Capt. W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General, Richmond, Va.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of the commanding general, dated Richmond, March 13, 1862.

The regiments of Colonels Dowd and Davis were put under orders for Tennessee immediately upon the receipt of the general’s instructions to that effect. I regret to say that owing to the limited means of transportation in this military district neither of them has as yet left the State. Their arrangements, however, are now nearly complete, and Colonel Dowd will take up the line of march to-morrow from Madison, on the Tallahassee Railroad, for Quitman, on the Savannah road. Colonel Davis will follow by another route in a couple of days, I hope.

I regret very much my misapprehension of the spirit and intention of the general’s letter of instructions of the 1st March. The language used was explicit, and did not seem to leave any discretion with me. I was told “the only troops to be retained in Florida are such as may be necessary to defend the Apalachicola River,” and, further, to “send forward all troops not necessary for that purpose, to report to General A. S. Johnston.”

With the purpose of carrying out this order, I was assembling the troops in the interior of the State, where it was my intention to have held them till “all the guns and munitions of war” had been secured, if possible; sending forward, however, to the Apalachicola River the forces intended for its defense.

Major-General Pemberton visited this military district a few days since, and had ordered immediate preparations made for the movement of the troops to Tennessee, excepting the guard for the protection of the arms that had been landed at Smyrna, a regiment which was to remain temporarily in observation before Jacksonville, and the independent companies of cavalry, all of which he directed should be retained in the State.

Carrying out my instructions, I had withdrawn from the Saint John’s River, which river is now in the possession of the enemy.

I concur entirely in opinion with the general that we should “hold the interior of the State,” if practicable, and to this end I recommend the raising and thoroughly arming and equipping bands of guerrillas. The forces at my command are utterly inadequate to the defense of the State generally by heavy bodies of troops, except it be the capital of the State. In front of this place masses of troops may operate, and I strongly advise the concentration here of an army of at least 3,000 men.

I have ordered the troops to withdraw from Saint Augustine, and {p.412} shall not countermand the order, for I agree with the general that the place is not tenable. Tampa I think we may hold, and I shall countermand the order for its evacuation, since the general leaves it discretionary with me to do so.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, March 19, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary, of war:

SIR: The inclosed copy of [letter of] General Richard F. Floyd is respectfully submitted to your consideration.

I am informed that General Trapier desires to be relieved from service in this military department, and respectfully recommend General Floyd to be appointed brigadier-general and assigned to duty here.

Nearly all our guns have been lost at Fernandina and on the Saint John’s River, and an immediate and rigid inquiry into the causes is alike due to the public interests and the character of officers.

The prejudices excited against General Trapier, whether just or unjust, prevent his being an efficient officer in this department. I regret it very much, and entertain for him the kindest regard, but an immediate change, in my opinion, is necessary to the defenses of the State. If agreeable to you, submit this letter to the consideration of his excellency President Davis, and moreover whether it will be agreeable to him and the War Department for me, as the governor and commander-in-chief of the State, to command the Confederate forces a few weeks for the defense of the State.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

[Inclosure.]

BRIGADIER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Tallahassee, Fla., March 17, 1862.

His Excellency Governor MILTON, Tallahassee, Fla.:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you that as the State troops were to go out of service on the 10th instant, and as others were not forthcoming to replace them at Apalachicola, I deemed it proper to remove the guns, ordnance stores, and other public property from that post to one of greater security. I therefore commenced to take the cannon from the batteries on the 10th. The State troops were held for this purpose by their own voluntary action. After many days and nights of constant labor I got the cannon, with all their appliances, ammunition for small-arms also, on board steamers, and removed them to Ricco’s Bluff, on the east side of the Apalachicola River. At this point the cannon (thirteen in number, being all I had at Apalachicola) were being placed in position for immediate use, if necessary, and orders have been issued to Lieutenant-Colonel James, in command there for the present, to erect batteries with all dispatch. The brass field pieces of the Milton Artillery, together with all things pertaining to them, I brought to Chattahoochie Arsenal, at which place they are now, in charge of Second Lieutenant Bull, of the Milton Artillery.

{p.413}

Your instructions that Lieutenant-Colonel James and Major Richardson should continue for the present in their respective commands have been made known to those officers, and they have cheerfully complied with your wishes. Lieutenant-Colonel James has been very efficient and energetic in his duties, almost everything having devolved upon him in the absence of Major Richardson upon recruiting service.

The companies of Captains Grace and Attaway, for Confederate service, now full, and Captain Gregory’s, not yet full, constitute the force now at Ricco’s Bluff. All other troops have returned to their homes. Subsistence for the troops at Ricco’s Bluff has been sent from Apalachicola to that point.

The balance of Captain Dunham’s company, the Milton Artillery, have orders to be at Chattahoochie to-day. I deemed it prudent to leave him with the remainder of his company at Apalachicola for a few days, to keep order there and prevent communications being sent to the enemy’s vessels and to protect the balance of the women and children desiring to leave that place immediately. Captain Thigpen’s company of dragoons was not reorganized in full.

I had the telegraph office at Apalachicola closed, and apparatus removed on the day of my departure. Some river pilots have been arrested and brought to Chattahoochie. This was done as a measure of prudence, and not because their loyalty was suspected.

In descending the river I examined all the available positions with a view to the erection of batteries on the east bank. I beg to submit to you my opinion of these. Fort Gadsden is too much exposed; a long and wide reach of the river would enable the enemy to take distant positions, and with their heavy guns play upon batteries erected there. The only advantage this place has is that there is a thick swamp below it. Ricco’s Bluff also possesses this advantage, besides many others. The sharp bend of the river compels vessels to approach within very short range of our guns in coming up and they must come immediately under them in turning the point, and again be in short range if they succeed in passing the point. Fort Gadsden is also represented by old settlers to be extremely unhealthy, while Ricco’s Bluff is reported to be a healthy location.

I examined other points, and regard them all as possessing but few advantages by comparison with Ricco’s Bluff, Re-enforcements are much required to expedite the works now progressing at that point, and I earnestly recommend that they should be sent there as early as practicable.

I have the honor to be, your excellency’s very obedient servant,

R. F. FLOYD, Brigadier-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 63.}

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, March 19, 1862.

...

XXIX. Brig. Gen. J. H. Trapier is relieved from the command of the Department of Florida, and will proceed without delay to Decatur, Ala., and report for duty to General A. S. Johnston, commanding. Col. W. S. Dilworth is assigned to the temporary command of the Department of Florida.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.414}

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT S. C. AND GA., Pocotaligo, S. C., March 19, 1862.

I. By direction of the War Department the undersigned assumes command of the Departments of South Carolina and Georgia.

II. The following-named officers are announced as composing the department staff, viz:

Capt. J. R. Waddy, adjutant-general of the department.

Capt. B. W. Memminger, assistant adjutant-general.

Col. W. S. Walker, acting inspector-general.

Maj. A. L. Long, chief of ordnance.

Capt. W. W. McCreery, assistant to chief of ordnance.

Capt. J. C. Ives, chief engineer.

First Lieut. J. H. Morrison, P. A. C. S., aide-de-camp.

III. The headquarters of the department are for the present established at Pocotaligo, S. C.

[J. C. PEMBERTON.]

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 44.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF S. C., &c., Pocotaligo, S. C., March 19, 1862.

...

IV. Special Orders, No. 17, dated Headquarters Department South Carolina, &c., December 10, 1861, are so far amended as to cause the Fourth Military District to embrace that part of the coast between the Ashepoo and east bank of the Pocotaligo River, to be commanded by Brig. Gen. Maxcy Gregg, P. A. C. S.

The Fifth Military District will embrace that part of the coast of South Carolina between the west bank of the Pocotaligo River and Ocella Creek to Ferebeeville, under the command of Brigadier-General Donelson, P. A. C. S.

V. The district heretofore known as the Fifth Military District will hereafter be known as the Sixth Military District, the limits of said district remaining the same, and commanded by Brigadier-General Drayton, P. A. C. S.

VI. The brigadier-generals commanding the Fourth and Fifth Military Districts will have control of the quartermaster and commissary departments within the limits of their respective districts.

...

By order of Major-General Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

HDQRS. PROV. FORCES, DEPT. EAST AND MIDDLE FLA., Tallahassee, Fla., March 20, 1862.

Maj. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

MAJOR: Through inadvertency I have neglected, until the present time, to report, for the information of the commanding general, that by my order eight steam sawmills, near Jacksonville, in this State, had been burned, to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy, together with a large quantity of sawed lumber lying near them. I caused also to be burned an iron foundery and work-shops, the property of a Mr. {p.415} Mooney, in the same place; also the gunboat which was building near Jacksonville for the Government.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

RICHMOND, VA., March 21, 1862.

General HENRY C. WAYNE, Milledgeville:

I have ordered 2,400 Enfield rifles, with a like number of infantry accouterments and a proper supply of cartridges, sent to Pocotaligo for your three regiments. Send to us at Goldsborough, N. C., three or four of your new regiments as promptly as possible, and they will be armed in like manner. The necessity for troops is most urgent, and not an hour should be lost. Advise me when you send them.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 21, 1862.

General R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Second Military District South Carolina:

GENERAL: I have received your communication of to-day’s date, marked “confidential.” General Evans writes, March 21:

Yesterday the enemy were seen making preparations to cross Watt’s Cut and are evidently making arrangements either to make a feint from Jehossee or land on the mainland, &c.

Of course you keep in communication with General Evans. You are aware that three regiments have been removed from what was the Fourth Military District out of the State. No other troops have as yet arrived to replace them. I look for them,however,on Monday or Tuesday next. You will of course keep securely the prisoners sent by General Evans. I shall write immediately for instructions with reference to them to War Department.

I wish you to assist in any way you can to provide transportation for rice to points where it will be available.

How do your fortifications progress? I shall endeavor to see you in a few days.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General. Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 22, 1862.

Hon. ISAAC W. HAYNE, Chief Justice and Police:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 21st* is just received, and I regret to learn that in your opinion the governor and council have in terms conferred {p.416} greater powers upon me than they intended in the matter of the impressment of slaves for labor on fortifications. No new fortifications have been directed by me since the receipt of the resolution, nor do I at present contemplate any. Up to this date all my requisitions for labor have been for work previously under way. Lines of defense which I consider important had been suspended in their progress to completion for want of hands; the engineer in charge in this military district informing me that all but nine negroes had been withdrawn by their owners. As to voluntary labor being furnished, experience has taught me that it is not to be relied on at all, each owner of slaves judging apparently of the value of the work by what amount of protection his individual interest may seem to derive from it.

Where emergencies do not exist, I am of opinion that in a country where slave labor ought to be so abundant the soldiers can be more appropriately and profitably employed in attaining proficiency in drill, &c. You may rest assured, sir, that I will not call for labor under the authority of the resolution which in my opinion can be safely dispensed with.

Very respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, S. C., March 23, 1862.

Col. W. S. WALKER, Provisional Army, Adjutant and Inspector General:

COLONEL: The following telegraphic dispatch was received last night, and its tenor telegraphed to you at Camp McDonald. You are directed to proceed to Columbus, Ga., and impress the powder referred to. Take immediate measures to have it tested under your own supervision; report its quality to me, also to the Secretary of War direct, stating likewise the proportion of cannon powder. Report as promptly as possible:

RICHMOND, March 22, 1862.

To Major-General PEMBERTON:

The steamer Florida brought 64,000 pounds of powder, which the parties want to buy [sell] at 2 per pound, deliverable at Marianna, Fla., and the Government to take the risk of forwarding it to Columbus. This I have refused.

I have answered that I would pay the price for it when delivered at Columbus, if found to be of good quality. You are required to impress the powder, and have it tested by a competent officer, and report as promptly as possible of its quality. Let me know also what proportion of it is cannon powder. The arms on board are for the State of Louisiana, and cannot be impressed.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

Very respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, S. C., March 24, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I have taken the necessary steps to impress the 64,000 pounds of powder brought by the steamer {p.417} Florida immediately upon its arrival in Columbus, Ga. It will be thoroughly tested, under the supervision of Maj. A. L. Long, chief of ordnance and artillery in this department, and if of good quality 20,000 pounds will be at once forwarded to Maj. Gen. Sam. Jones, at Mobile, and the remainder to Major-General Lovell, at New Orleans. I have sent an agent-Mr. J. Manigault-to Marianna, Fla., to keep an eye upon the powder, which is there and in transit.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROV. FORCES DEPT. EAST AND MIDDLE FLA., Tallahassee, March 25, 1862.

Maj. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report, for information of the commanding general, that having received intelligence which leads me to doubt the accuracy of the report as to the enemy’s forces in Jacksonville, which came to me yesterday, and having at the same time received orders relieving me from the command in this district, I am making my preparations for an early departure for the headquarters of General A. S. Johnston.

The forces in East Florida are reported so much weakened by sickness, that I have taken the responsibility of keeping Davis’ regiment in that part of the State till the arms from Smyrna are in a place of safety. The colonel of the regiment has reported that it would not be prepared to march for some days, at any rate.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. TRAPIER, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, S. C., April 2, 1862.

Having no control over Florida, this communication is respectfully forwarded for the information of the War Department.

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Charleston, March 25, 1862.

Col. A. M. MANIGAULT, Commanding First Military District South Carolina:

COLONEL: Having maturely considered the subject, I have determined to withdraw the forces from Georgetown, and therefore abandon the position.

You will accordingly take immediate measures to have the guns dismounted, taking care to have at hand heavy logs to place in position as each gun shall be dismounted. Do not allow more guns to be displaced at a time than you can immediately remove.

The heavy metal should be removed first, and the work should be done {p.418} as far as practicable by night and as rapidly as the means at your disposal will admit of. You will use the light-draught steamers for transportation to the railroad, and forward the guns and all munitions to Charleston. I earnestly impress upon you the necessity of promptness and caution in this movement.

You will, so soon as the batteries are dismantled and the material secured to a certainty against capture by the enemy, proceed with all the infantry force under your command (except troops for local defense) to this city and report to Brigadier-General Ripley.

The cavalry, field artillery, and local troops will for the present be continued as guard, and you will make such disposition of them for that purpose as your judgment and experience shall dictate.

If the field artillery is not equipped, it may be well also to remove it. You are requested to make immediate report on this point and upon any other connected with this movement which you may deem of interest.

Respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 118.}

DEP’T EAST AND MIDDLE FLORIDA, Tallahassee, March 25, 1862.

...

Col. William G. M. Davis, First Florida Cavalry, will proceed to Camp Langford, with his whole command, and relieve Colonel Dilworth, Third Regiment Florida Volunteers, in command of all the forces in that portion of the State, provided Colonel Hopkins’ Fourth Regiment Florida Volunteers is not present.

As soon as the arms now en route for Lake City shall have arrived at that point Colonel Davis will, with his regiment, proceed immediately to Tennessee, and report for duty to General A. S. Johnston, C. S. Army.

...

By order of General Trapier:

R. H. ANDERSON, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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POCOTALIGO, S. C., March 26, 1862.

General A. R. LAWTON, Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: I have just received the following telegraph. Answer me at once by telegraph, and report facts in full by letter:

RICHMOND, March 26, 1862.

Major-General PEMBERTON:

The governor of Georgia complains that arms imported in the Gladiator and landed at Savannah have been seized by the Confederate officers. If this be so, have them released.

GEO. W. RANDOLPH.

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.419}

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 26, 1862.

Brig. Gen. THOMAS F. DRAYTON, Commanding Sixth Military District South Carolina:

GENERAL: It is impossible at this time to send you permanent re-enforcements. The three Georgia regiments which have just reported are without arms or instruction. I expect, however, to have them armed immediately. One of these regiments is at Grahamville, and will, with the rest of General Donelson’s brigade between Broad and New Rivers, be the principal assistance upon which you must depend for a movement against the enemy should he land east of New River. You have sufficient force now west of that stream, together with such aid as may be sent you from General Lawton’s command, to effectually resist its passage or to meet the enemy should he approach from Red Bluff. The rest of your troops can be made disposable for any emergency in the south and west of New River.

I do not expect you to protect any possible landing place. Generally cavalry advanced guards are sufficient; the great object being to have information communicated rapidly, and to this end I desire you to keep your cavalry scouts in constant communication and in close proximity with General Donelson’s, who will also be directed to establish them for that purpose at the head of Fording Island road. The only reason why the powder for torpedoes was not sent was because I found when in Charleston that the amount in hand was not sufficient to admit of it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 27, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram from the Secretary of War, dated March 26, 1862, in relation to a complaint from the governor of Georgia that certain arms imported in the Gladiator and landed at Savannah had been seized by the Confederate officers. The Secretary directs, if this be so, the arms shall be released.

I have replied by telegraph of this date, on report from Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding at Savannah, this moment received, that-

The arms were not seized, but came into the hands of the ordnance officer with Confederate arms and without any notice of the State’s claim until they were shipped. Those arms cannot be recovered for the State, as they were shipped to Tennessee, Richmond, and other places, but they may be replaced by others to arrive from Florida.

Having had no notification of the disposition to be made of arms, &c., from the cargo of the Gladiator, I am not prepared to say at present how the arms were diverted from their proper destination. General Lawton will report in full by mail to-morrow. I respectfully request to be instructed by the Department as to the course to be pursued in replacing these arms from any future arrival.

I telegraphed to the Secretary of War this morning that certain parties in Atlanta, Ga., offered to dispose of about a ton of pig lead to the Government at 30 cents per pound. The highest price paid heretofore, as I am informed by Captain Cuyler, ordinance officer at Savannah, has been {p.420} 16 cents. The lead is very necessary and becoming very scarce. I would suggest that general instructions be given me to impress for the use of the Confederate States in all cases where such gross extortion is attempted.

The 64,000 pounds of powder which I was directed to impress on its reaching Columbus, Ga., has not yet arrived there. Officers are in attendance to carry out the instructions of the Secretary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 27, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that Brigadier-General Ripley has been directed to withdraw the guns from the batteries on Cole’s Island, and to confine the defenses of the city of Charleston by that approach to James Island and the Stono River.

Col. A. M. Manigault, commanding at Georgetown, S. C., has also been instructed to remove the guns from the works at that place to Charleston, and to withdraw all troops except those raised for “local defense.” These last, amounting in the aggregate, present and absent, to about 1,200 infantry and 400 cavalry, I propose to continue for the present as a sufficient guard against raids by the enemy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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POCOTALIGO, March 27, 1862.

Hon. GEORGE W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

General Lawton reports-

The arms were not seized, but came into the hands of ordnance officer with Confederate arms, and without notice of State’s claim until they were shipped. Those arms cannot be recovered as they were shipped to Tennessee, Richmond, and other places, but can be replaced by others to arrive from Florida.

Shall they be so replaced?

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, VA., March 28, 1862.

General PEMBERTON, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

Replace the arms belonging to Georgia when you receive others.

GEO. W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War.

{p.421}

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RICHMOND, VA., March 28, 1862.

Governor BROWN, Milledgeville, Ga.:

Your arms were taken by mistake and distributed to various points. They cannot be recovered, but I have ordered General Pemberton to replace them from others expected from Florida.

GEO. W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 28, 1862.

Brig. Gen. MAXCY GREGG, Commanding Fourth Military District:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding wishes me to say to you that it would be well for you to notify the planters in the vicinity of Ashepoo River (Chapman’s fort) that as spring approaches the troops in that section will be compelled to fall back to a more healthy region of the country, and the guns at Chapman’s fort will be removed to some other point, as necessity may require.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, March 30, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit the two accompanying papers,* received through Brigadier-General Lawton, in relation to certain arms represented by his excellency the governor of Georgia to have been seized by Confederate officers in Savannah, the arms being the property of the State of Georgia.

The Secretary of War directs that if the arms were taken, as charged, that they be restored. It will be seen by General Lawton’s letter, that, having been shipped to various and distant points, it is impracticable to recover them. I request further instructions on the subject.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Savannah, March 31, 1862.

His Excellency JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia:

SIR: It has recently been brought to my notice that there is at present a large amount of cotton stored in and near Augusta, and it has been suggested to me that an expression of the intention of the commander of the military department to have this cotton destroyed rather than allow it to fall into the hands of the enemy might have a beneficial effect {p.422} in inducing its removal, Should the enemy be successful in his attempt upon Savannah, Augusta will be seriously threatened, and if rapid in his movements it is probable that, in the confusion and panic which would be likely to ensue, much of the cotton would not be removed. I therefore refer to your excellency’s serious consideration the propriety of the State authorities notifying the people of the intention of the military commander in order that such preliminary arrangements may be made for the removal of the cotton should the unfortunate emergency arise, which would otherwise involve serious loss of property.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

Extract from return of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, Maj. Gem. John C. Pemberton commanding, for March, 1862.

Troops.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
Infantry1,34728,14629,04334,505
Artillery1002,0562,6093,167
Cavalry1312,2492,7743,220
Total1,57827,45134,42640,892

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HDQRS. DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 1, 1862.

Brig. Gen. MAXCY GREGG, Commanding Fourth Military District:

GENERAL: The general commanding wishes Colonel Dunovant’s regiment advanced as skirmishers until they engage the enemy. You will make such disposition of Leake’s battery as circumstances may require. He has ordered two 42-pounder carronades to the work at Stony Creek. The general wishes you to keep him constantly advised of the enemy’s movements.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. R. WADDY.

P. S.-Move the two Georgia regiments down as far as the work on Stony Creek.

By order Major-General Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Occupy the several causeways (intrenched)) and all important positions from Stony Creek to Benton Causeway with one of the Georgia regiments. Keep Leake’s battery in hand to occupy any work which may be threatened. Let the mounted troops keep the enemy always in view. If compelled to fall back from Hosper’s Creek, burn the boats.

Respectfully,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.423}

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH MILITARY DISTRICT S. C., Jericho, April 1, 1862-11 a.m.

Capt. J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Pocotaligo:

CAPTAIN: I learn that the enemy have retired to the other side at Port Royal Ferry. I send you a copy of a slip of paper left by them.*

The enemy landed this morning at Page’s Point at a later hour than at Port Royal Ferry. They were burning some houses when last heard from. I have not yet been informed of any advance by them. Our advanced guards of infantry, at Garden’s Corner and Camp Pemberton have not been approached. I am about proceeding down the road to ascertain the precise situation of affairs, taking the Twelfth Regiment South Carolina with me.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAXCY GREGG, Brigadier-General, Commanding Fourth Military District.

P. S.-While writing the above I have received your two notes, with General Pemberton’s postscript tome.

In my dispositions to receive the enemy, made early this morning, I ordered Major Huger, with the artillery, from near Fishburn’s Causeway to the east end of the Combahee Ferry Causeway, there to await further orders, supported by four companies of the Thirteenth South Carolina Volunteers (two more of which are on this side of the ferry). I had not intended to move the two Georgia regiments farther than Old Pocotaligo before being assured of the enemy’s advance. In obedience to General Pemberton’s instructions, I will now move them forward to the intrenchments.

MAXCY GREGG.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 2, 1862.

Hon. GEORGE W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War:

Information just received by telegraph from Colonel Dilworth, commanding Department of East and Middle Florida, shows it necessary that immediate instructions be given him as to disposition of arms en route from Smyrna, Fla.*

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Comdg. Dept. South Carolina and Georgia.

* See report of affair March 23, at Smyrna, p. 111.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., April 2, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Comdg. Dept. South Carolina and Georgia, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

GENERAL: By direction of General Lee, commanding, &c., I have the honor to state that he has just received a telegram from Governor Pickens, who states that the abandonment of Cole’s Island before the inner lines are prepared opens the approach to the city by Stono to the enemy, and requests that the guns may be retained there for the present. Lie further states that the sickly season is approaching, and that there is no place on James Island where troops can live.

{p.424}

Governor Pickens has already been informed by telegraph that movements of this character can only be decided by the officer in command of the Department, although the matter is respectfully referred for your further consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., April 3, 1862.

Brig. Gen. A. B. LAWTON, Commanding, &c., Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: I am directed by General Lee to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant, and to say in reply that the State troops should by all means be retained in the service for the war by the Confederate Government, if possible, and, if not, by the State government. He agrees with you that, “if the entire State forces with their arms could at once be received into the Confederate service, it would add materially to our security.” But at all events the troops should be retained, and for the war, and he has advised Governor Brown to this effect.

As regards the matter of the State’s undertaking its own defense, he thinks the Confederate Government should do all in its power to protect the State and defend her interests; and if for any reasons it should appear advisable that the State alone and unaided undertake her defense, the proposition should come from her and not from him.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. TAYLOR, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 4, 1862.

Colonel DILWORTH, Tallahassee, Fla.:

By direction of the Secretary of War, you will send at once 1,500 muskets or rifles to Col. T. M. Jones, at Pensacola, Fla., and report to the War Department by telegraph the number on hand.

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., April 4, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Comdg. Dept. South Carolina and Georgia, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

GENERAL: General R. E. Lee commanding, directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th ultimo, in which you report that you have directed the withdrawal of the guns and troops from the batteries at Georgetown and on Cole’s Island. Since the receipt of your letter a communication has been written by Governor Pickens, representing {p.425} the exposed condition to which the inhabitants and much property must be subjected in the country about Georgetown, and also that the enemy’s gunboats easily ascend the river to the railroad unless there be interposed sufficient guns and troops to prevent them.

In view of these facts, the general commanding suggests the propriety of complying with the governor’s suggestions at least until such a time as would enable the planters, &c., to remove their property, and also to allow time to those who desire it to move away themselves.

In conclusion, it is respectfully submitted to your judgment whether, in order to preserve harmony between the State and Confederate authorities, it would not be better to notify the governor whenever you determine to abandon any position of your line of defenses, in order that he may give due notice to the inhabitants to look out for their security.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, VA., April 5, 1862.

Governor BROWN, Savannah:

SIR: I regret extremely the interference with your arms, will use every exertion to recover and restore them, or to return others of equal value. The arms sent to Richmond were many of them stopped at Raleigh and turned aside to Goldsborough, for the purpose of arming three Georgia regiments called for by General Lee. It may be that those were your arms.

I have instructed General Pemberton to call on you for an invoice or other description of the arms, and to return them out of the first parcel received. If they cannot be replaced, they can be paid for. I have cautioned Colonel Dilworth, at Tallahassee against using any State arms, and will cause any officer to be punished who knowingly takes them.

GEO. W. RANDOLPH, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. TENTH REGT. S. C. V., C. S. P. A. Second Military District, Mount Pleasant, April 5, 1862.

Capt. J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters, Pocotaligo:

CAPTAIN: By permission of General Ripley, to whom I reported on my arrival here from Georgetown with my command, the Tenth Regiment, I have the honor to report that the instructions received from the general commanding have been executed. The redoubts in the First Military District have been abandoned; the guns, 20 in number, dismounted, and are now on their way by railroad to Charleston, with ammunition, ordnance stores, &c. Logs of wood resembling pieces of ordnance have been mounted in the place of each gun that has been removed, and three companies of cavalry and three of infantry are encamped near them; the positions have the appearance of being still occupied. The troops cannot be cut off by any but a land attack, against which only ordinary precaution will be necessary.

{p.426}

The works are uninjured, having received no orders to destroy them, and deeming it inexpedient to do so.

The command of the district I have turned over to Col. R. F. Graham, commanding Twenty-first Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, with the following-named force under him:

State defense: Twenty-first Regiment, R. F. Graham, commandant, ten companies, 700 men; battalion, R. Nesbit, commandant, seven companies, 500 men. Fourth Battalion Cavalry, Maj. J. C. Wilson, four companies, 240 men; Tucker’s cavalry, one company, 115 men.

For the war unconditionally: Ward’s light battery, six pieces, one company, 112 men.

The district in its present defenseless condition requires a considerable cavalry force as a coast guard and police force. The five companies left there are, I think, sufficient for that purpose. The infantry can be of but little use, and I think it would be better to place them on the line of railroad (Kingstree), from which point they could be easily moved in any direction in the State where their services may be needed. At Georgetown where they now are, it would be a three days’ march to reach any point on the railroad, and requires by the ordinary mail route two days nearly to convey information to them. I arrived here on the 3d instant with Tenth Regiment, 903 strong, having left behind, sick and convalescents, 123 men, the greater portion of whom will rejoin me on Tuesday next, also 77 men on furlough at that time, 30 of whom are on thirty days’ furlough. Aggregate strength, 1,103.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

A. M. MANIGAULT, Colonel Tenth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers.

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STATE OF FLORIDA, EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Tallahassee, April 7, 1862.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS:

SIR: The retiring of forces from Fernandina and the Saint John’s River was attended with the loss of nearly all our guns, &c. The transportation of the arms and munitions of war from Smyrna has also been so mismanaged as to cause heavy losses. The causes should be promptly and rigidly inquired into.

The troops have become demoralized, and the faith of many citizens in the integrity and ability of the Government impaired.

The enemy is in possession of all of Florida east of the Saint John’s River, and doubtless intend to take this place and hold Saint Mark’s and Apalachicola.

The forces which were in Fernandina and are now here, if properly commanded, are enough to drive the enemy from the State.

The militia have not yet been ordered into the field, first because of the difficulty of procuring subsistence and arms, secondly because, from the prejudices excited, it would be difficult to preserve harmony between them and those in Confederate service.

I have recommended General Richard F. Floyd to be appointed brigadier-general and assigned to this military department. He is brave and yet prudent, and commands the confidence not only of the citizens (militia), but of those in Confederate service. He was in command at Apalachicola until the troops were retired from that place, and if we {p.427} could have gotten a regiment there in addition to the 500 men he had, would, with the preparation he had made, have defended the place. As it was, in the presence of the enemy he retired in order without the loss of a gun or any ammunition or military stores.

There is much confusion and disorder among those in Confederate service, and simply because a competent officer in command is necessary. When General Trapier was relieved of the command, I expressed to the Secretary of War a willingness to direct the military movements in the State a few weeks, until a suitable officer could be assigned to the duty, if he would order the officers in command of regiments to report to me, but he replied there was no law to authorize it.

As soon as an officer shall be assigned to the command, competent to the discharge of the duties, I shall proclaim martial law throughout the Military Department, because of the disposition manifested in several places to submit to the enemy, and in fact upon the first opportunity to rally to their standard. I would much rather be in the field than discharging the duties of civil life, and would like to be appointed to the command of a brigade, where active service will be required and the enemy can be met.

Agreeably to a requisition of General Lee, four cavalry companies have been mustered into Confederate service and are upon duty, to supply the place of the cavalry regiment commanded by Col. Wm. G. M. Davis, who was ordered to report to General Johnston. Col. Davis’ regiment is still here, and your attention is respectfully invited to the inclosed correspondence.*

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN MILTON.

* Not found.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 7, 1862.

Brig. Gen. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Second Military District S. C.:

GENERAL: The remaining Charleston companies, referred to in our conversation of the 5th instant, can be mustered in for one year, to complete the organization of corps. I trust, however, that every effort will be made to bring all these troops in for the war. I believe it can be done, and such I heard is also the opinion of Adjutant-General Gist.

If the accounts we have just received from the West of the success of our Army be true, it seems to me very probable that, to counterbalance his defeat there, the enemy may make a prompt and serious attack upon some important point on this seaboard. I am very anxious, therefore, that every exertion should be made to get the works at Elliott’s Cut into condition to receive the guns from Cole’s Island. If you cannot obtain labor otherwise, you should impress it at once. You are so confident of being able to hold Cole’s Island, that I will not insist on the removal of the guns from there until they can be fought at Elliott’s Cut. Let me know by telegraph whether the work there is under way; if not, when it will be.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.428}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 79.}

ADJT. AND INSP.. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., April 7, 1862.

...

X. Major General Pemberton’s command is extended so as to include Eastern and Middle Florida as far west as the Choctawhatchie River.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS.. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 8, 1862.

Brig. Gen. THOMAS F. DRAYTON, Commanding Sixth Military District South Carolina:

GENERAL: I desire you to proceed with as little delay as possible to the city of Augusta, Ga., and confer with the mayor, R. H. May, esq., in relation to the immediate connection through Augusta of the Waynesborough and Augusta and South Carolina railroads. You will explain to the city authorities and to the presidents and directors of the railroad companies that this measure is a military necessity, which I trust those interested will acknowledge. It is only necessary to revert to the important fact that, should the enemy cut the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, there will be no direct communication between the cities of Charleston and Savannah by railroad unless this connection is made. I am informed by his excellency Gov. J. E. Brown, of Georgia, that the route through Augusta proposed by Dr. Willis, president of the Waynesborough and Augusta road, and which he is willing to construct at the expense of the company, is the shortest; and being, for military necessities, the proper route, you will therefore require the said connection to be made by this route, and as expeditiously as possible.

I am, very respectfully, &c.,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Savannah, Ga., April 8, 1862.

Capt. N. C. TILTON, Assistant Quartermaster, P. A. C. S.:

CAPTAIN: The major-general commanding department directs that you proceed at once to Tallahassee and other points in Florida, and collect such of the arms recently landed in Florida belonging to the Confederate States as may be in the possession of parties not authorized by the Government of the Confederate States to hold them. You will call on Governor Milton, of Florida, and the commanding officer at Tallahassee, for such assistance as you may require, in order to secure the arms referred to. After executing this order you will report immediately, first by telegraph and then by letter.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.429}

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RICHMOND, VA., April 8, 1862.

Gov. JOHN MILTON, Of Florida, Tallahassee, Fla.:

Before receipt of your dispatch of yesterday, Joseph Finegan had been appointed brigadier-general and assigned to command East and Middle Florida.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., April 8, 1862.

His Excellency JOHN MILTON, Governor of Florida:

GOVERNOR: Your letter of the 19th March, to the Secretary of War, was submitted by that officer to the President, who has requested me to inform you of the action that has been taken with reference to the appointment of a brigadier-general for command in Florida.

When the desire of General Trapier to be relieved from his command in Florida became known, the President was advised by prominent citizens of that State to appoint General J. Patton Anderson as successor of General Trapier, if the former officer could be spared from his present command. Acting upon this advice, the President proceeded to ascertain whether the services of General Anderson could be had. Before, however, this information could be obtained, and when the posture of affairs in the department to which General Anderson is attached rendered it unlikely that the commanding general would be willing to detach General Anderson, an application was made to the President by the Florida delegation for the appointment of General Jos. Finegan as brigadier-general in the event that the services of General Anderson could not be obtained. The application for appointment of a commander in Florida being urgent, and the necessity for prompt action being fully appreciated by the President, he availed himself of the advice of the members of Congress from Florida, and nominated General Finegan to the position of brigadier-general, and that officer, if his nomination be confirmed, will be assigned to command in Florida.

The President has no doubt, from the statements made to him by all the Representatives from your State as to the qualifications of General Finegan, that, while he has not been able to follow the recommendation of your excellency in making the appointment, you will find that your object in making that recommendation has been fully attained by the action that has been taken.

I am, governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. E. LEE, General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 8, 1862.

Maj. T. A. WASHINGTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant. A portion of the guns from the batteries near Georgetown are already in Charleston, the remainder en route, and all secure. The aggregate of all arms left for the protection of the local interests is 1,555, in which are included two companies of cavalry and a field battery-four pieces equipped with horses, two without, but soon {p.430} to be. These are all troops for local defense. Great stress has been laid by some who have objected to the removal of the guns from Georgetown on the asserted fact that but 8 feet can come over the bar. In reply I will only state that the Nashville, drawing 11 feet, passed in and out under a midshipman at less than half tide and without detention. Gunboats drawing over 12 feet might therefore readily engage our batteries, and to oppose them we had in position two 32-pounders, six 24-pounders, four 18-pounders, one 12-pounder rifled, one 6-pounder rifled, two 12-pounders rifled, two 12-pounder howitzers.

In my estimation such a battery was worse than useless, and if the destruction of the railroad bridge was an object, the capture of the guns would only have added a certain éclat. I will add further on this subject that almost two weeks before I issued the order in question I mentioned to General Gist, then adjutant and inspector general of the State, that I thought seriously of withdrawing the batteries from Georgetown, and he has since informed me that he stated to the governor and council that I contemplated so doing.

I will, however, in future be more particular in giving notice of any intended change, and have in fact done so to the planters interested in the Ashepoo. As to the probable speedy withdrawal of the battery from Chapman’s fort, so far as I am aware, I beg to assure the general commanding that perfect harmony exists between the Confederate States authorities, as represented by myself, and the government of South Carolina, notwithstanding the difference of opinion on the subject in question. Of this I am assured, having had several interviews with his excellency Governor Pickens since the date of his letter to the general commanding.

As regards Cole’s Island, the guns are still in position and will remain so until the works on Stono River are ready to receive them, which I trust will be in a very few days.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 80.}

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., April 8, 1862.

...

VI. Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan will report to Major-General Pemberton, commanding, &c., for assignment to the command of the Department of Eastern and Middle Florida.

...

XXII. Brig. Gen. S. B. Gist will report for duty to Major-General Pemberton, commanding Department of South Carolina and Georgia.

...

By command of the Secretary of War.

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, &O., Pocotaligo, April 9, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of a letter addressed by me to General H. C. Wayne, adjutant and inspector {p.431} general of Georgia. In reply I received a printed copy of Gov. J. E. Brown’s speech to the State troops at Savannah on the 15th instant, which General Wayne says “develops his (the governor’s) policy with regard to their continuance in service,” and adds, “if they do not revolunteer within the week, as set forth in his speech, he will replace them by an equivalent force of new volunteers.”

On the 7th instant I had a personal interview with Governor Brown, when the subject was discussed more at large. In conversation the governor authorized me to say that he did not think more than 3,500 of the State troops now in service could be counted upon at any one time within the next two or three months for the defense of Savannah. My own opinion is, after a great deal of inquiry, that even this number is an overestimate. I am convinced that there is a general indisposition to re-enter the State service, though the governor thinks differently.

I did not in any manner enter into the question of the comparative advantages or disadvantages of the organization of State troops for local defense; my object being entirely to ascertain how far I could rely on such forces to make up the requisite numerical strength for the protection of the city and State.

Allowing the estimate of Governor Brown to be correct, the effective force will be diminished by 4,000 at least for several months to come.

I do not consider the present strength as more than adequate to the defense, but the direct purpose I have in view is to bring to the notice of the department the fact that this strength is daily diminishing, and that, should the exigencies of the service elsewhere demand the withdrawal of troops from this department, it will become necessary to abandon at least a part of our line of defense and with it some of the approaches to the Charleston and Savannah Railroad. In view of the possibility of these exigencies, I am taking measures to secure an uninterrupted communication between the two cities, by requiring a connection to be made through Augusta of the Waynesborough, Augusta and South Carolina Railroad. I consider the connection referred to a military necessity, and I believe it to have been so regarded by General Lee, as I know that he desired it to be made. Some difficulties, however as to the particular route intervened to prevent it, and, the general leaving the department about that time, no steps were taken to enforce it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA AND GEORGIA, Pocotaligo, April 1, 1862.

General HENRY C. WAYNE, Adjutant and Inspector General of Georgia:

SIR: As the term of service of the Georgia State troops is about to expire, I would be glad to know the views of his excellency the governor in regard to that force, now forming so large and important a part of the army intended for the defense of Savannah and Georgia.

If it is the intention of the State government to continue the present or an equivalent force in service, it may be unnecessary for the Confederate Government to furnish more regiments. It is very desirable that this matter be determined without delay, as the safety of the city may depend upon prompt action.

{p.432}

I shall defer communication with the War Department on the subject, awaiting his excellency’s reply,

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. S.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF S. C., GA., C., Pocotaligo, S. C., April 9, 1862.

I. The undersigned having been officially notified from the Adjutant and Inspector General’s Office, Richmond, that East and Middle Florida as far west as the Choctawhatchie River is included within his command, hereby assumes command thereof. All reports-and returns will be made accordingly.

II. Maj. A. L. Long, P. A. C. S., in addition to his duties as chief of ordnance, is assigned to those of chief of artillery of the department.

By order of Major-General Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 81.}

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., April 9, 1862.

...

XX. Eastern and Middle Florida will hereafter constitute a separate department, under the command of Brig. Gen. Joseph Finegan.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, April 10, 1862.

Major-General PEMBERTON:

Beauregard is pressed for troops. Send, if possible, Donelson’s brigade of two regiments to Corinth. If Mississippi Valley is lost Atlantic States will be ruined.

Very respectfully,

B. E. LEE.

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POCOTALIGO, S. C., April 10, 1862-6.30 p.m.

General R. E. LEE, Richmond, Va.:

Your telegram just received. I consider it an order. Donelson’s brigade-two Tennessee regiments, aggregate 1,572-will move to Corinth as soon as transportation can be got ready. The enemy opened fire at 8 o’clock this morning from his land batteries on Fort Pulaski. Firing continuous. The Georgia State troops are being fast discharged. I shall order down the rest of the troops from Georgetown, S. C.

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.433}

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COLUMBIA, April 10, 1862.

Major-General PEMBERTON:

The President telegraphs me to send immediately troops to Beauregard. I have none, but I telegraphed Ripley to send Colonel Dunovant’s, Manigault’s, and Marshall’s, as best prepared, from Charleston. Please let me know. Let Ripley have your orders.

Very respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

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POCOTALIGO, April 10, 1862.

Gov. JOSEPH E. BROWN, Milledgeville, Ga.:

Two regiments have been ordered from here to Tennessee. I am not aware that they are to be replaced by Confederate troops.

J. C. PEMBERTON, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 20.}

HDQRS. DEPT. S. CAROLINA, GEORGIA, &C., Pocotaligo, April 10, 1862.

I. Brig. Gen. W. D. Smith, P. A. C. S., having reported at these headquarters, in obedience to orders from the War Department, is assigned to duty in the Military District of Georgia, and will report to Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding at Savannah, Ga.

...

III. Brig. Gen. D. S. Donelson, commanding Fifth Military District, with the Eighth and Sixteenth Regiments of Tennessee Volunteers, will proceed with as little delay as possible and report to General Beauregard at Corinth, Miss., for duty.

...

V. Col. P. H. Colquitt, commanding Forty-sixth Regiment Georgia Volunteers, is assigned to the temporary command of the Fifth Military District, which extends from Pocotaligo River to Ocella Creek.

...

X. Maj. Gen. Maxcy Gregg will take immediate measures to have Chapman’s fort, on Ashepoo River, dismantled, dismounting the guns, having at hand heavy logs to place in position as each gun shall be dismounted, and taking care that no more guns be displaced at a time than can be immediately removed. You will forward the guns immediately to Green Pond, S. C., for transportation to Savannah.

Colonel Graham will take immediate measures to move all troops and public stores under his command from Georgetown to Charleston.

By order of Major-General Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Richmond, Va., April 11, 1862.

Maj. Gen. J. C. PEMBERTON, Commanding Department of South Carolina and Georgia:

GENERAL: General Lee, commanding, directs me to inform you that he has notified General Beauregard by telegraph that the Tennessee {p.434} brigade, the two South Carolina regiments, and the two regiments of Georgia State troops would be sent from your department to re-enforce him temporarily, and that they must be returned to you as soon as their services can be dispensed with.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. A. WASHINGTON, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

COLUMBIA, April 11, 1862.

General PEMBERTON:

Telegraph received. Ripley has two raw regiments and also twelve new Charleston companies, just mustered in and well armed. I hope, therefore, it is not necessary to withdraw the troops from Georgetown, for it is the only protection they can have, even for domestic police. Colonel Manigault’s Georgetown regiment is one of the to send to Corinth, together with the regulars.

Very respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPT. SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, &C., Pocotaligo, April 11, 1862.

General N. G. EVANS, Commanding Third Military District:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the major-general commanding to say to you that he desires you to look rather to the approach of the enemy by the Willstown road than to the holding of the point of your line. You will therefore make such disposition of the troops of your district as will enable you to concentrate towards Rantowles Bridge, to resist the enemy should he approach in that direction. The general also suggests the immediate withdrawal of all batteries not absolutely necessary to the protection of Charleston. We need all the guns we can obtain for the defense of our extensive interior lines of intrenchments. Two regiments have been ordered to Tennessee from General Ripley’s command and two from the Fifth Military District. It becomes therefore more necessary for you to have your forces in hand and aid General Ripley if called upon.

Very respectfully, &c.,

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA &C., Pocotaligo, April 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. MAXCY GREGG, Commanding Fourth Military District:

GENERAL: I am instructed by Major-General Pemberton to say to you that you will immediately assume command of what is at this time and under existing order known as the Fourth and Fifth Military Districts, that is, the old Fourth Military District, recently commanded by himself.

The general goes to Savannah early in the morning and will remain {p.435} for several days. The order assigning Colonel Colquitt will be at once countermanded.

I am, general, &c.,

J. R. WADDY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, &C., Pocotaligo, April 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. MAXCY GREGG, Commanding Fourth Military District S. C.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to inform you that your military district is extended as far west as the Coosawhatchie River, including the station at Coosawhatchie, from and below Coosawhatchie Station, bounded by the east bank of the Coosawhatchie River.

The major-general commanding would suggest that you send a company of cavalry under your command to take the place of the company of Tennessee volunteers about to be removed, and also that, as soon as the guns on the Ashepoo River are removed, the company of German artillery now at Chapman’s fort be divided into three detachments, one to serve the guns at Combahee Ferry, the second to serve the carronades at Stony Creek work, and the third to man the heavy guns at Bee Creek battery, each detachment to be under the command of a commissioned officer; the captain to be stationed at such point as you in your judgment may designate.

Very respectfully, &c.,

R. W. MEMMINGER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, VA., April 11, 1862.

Governor PICKENS, Columbia, S. C.:

Thank you for your prompt attention to my request. General Pemberton has sent two of your regiments and the two from Tennessee. I am not willing to tax you further.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6