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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 4, Ch. XIII–Confederate Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XIII.
OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA AND SOUTHEASTERN VIRGINIA.
August 1, 1861-January 11, 1862.
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CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.632}

HEADQUARTERS, Bethel Church, August 8, 1861.

Dr. N. S. CROWELL, Medical Director of Department:

SIR: I am directed by General Magruder to say to you that they report to him that there are 1,800 sick at Yorktown; that there is a great deficiency in medical supplies for the different regiments. The supplies sent for the regiment under my care have been totally inadequate. I am without morphine, no alcohol to make tinctures with, and have never {p.633} had but three pints. Not less than half my regiment are unfit for duty. I am greatly in need of a good supply of medicine.

C. H. RICHARDSON, Surg. Sixth Georgia Vols., and Act. Med. Dir. in the Field.

[Indorsement.]

SURGEON-GENERAL’S OFFICE, August 22, 1861.

The medical purveyor reports that the bulk of supplies for 10,000 men (General Magruder’s command) were turned over for shipment to the quartermaster on the 8th and 9th instant; the balance of those supplies on the 21st instant, and that a special agent, with certain articles, was dispatched yesterday.

Respectfully returned,

S. P. MOORE, Acting Surgeon-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, August 9, 1861.

His Excellency HENRY T. CLARK, Governor of North Carolina:

SIR: The Hon. Warren Winslow, secretary of military affairs of North Carolina, has referred to the President, with your approval, a copy of the report of Brig. Gen. R. C. Gatlin, of July 17, 1861, with regard to the necessity of erecting additional batteries at points designated for the coast defense of North Carolina, and has further stated the proposition on your part to take charge of these operations if approved of by this Government, provided this Government would advance to you the sum of $50,000 in Confederate bonds.

These documents have been referred by the President to this Department for reply. This Department acknowledges the necessity for these works of defense, and approves of the plan proposed by Brigadier-General Gatlin. The proposal of your excellency to take charge of the construction of these works is also accepted, and the sum of $50,000 in Confederate bonds will be placed at your disposal for the purpose.

Respectfully,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, VA., August 14, 1861.

Maj. JOSIAH GORGAS, Chief of Ordnance, C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

MAJOR: By direction of Brigadier-General Magruder, commanding the Department of Yorktown, I have the honor to call your attention to the barbette gun-carriages in the works at Yorktown. These carriages are carelessly constructed, of very inferior pine timber, and are already much damaged from slight exposure to the weather and from their use in the exercise of the men at the guns. These carriages are so low that the guns cannot be used at ranges attained with the slightest depression without damage to the parapet. The general commanding the department, considering that the safety of the post depends very materially on this battery, earnestly requests that other properly-constructed carriages be furnished him immediately.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

RO. JOHNSTON, Colonel Second Virginia Cavalry, Acting Inspector-General.

{p.634}

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HEADQUARTERS, Young’s Farm, August 14, 1861.

A. T. BLEDSOE, Esq., Chief of the Bureau of War, Richmond, Va.:

MY DEAR SIR: This will be handed you by the late minister to one of the South American States, the Hon. Mr. Wheeler, of North Carolina, who has spent a night with us.

In one hour the enemy can land 20,000 men if he pleases at this point, mouth of Warwick River, 12 miles from Newport News, and if I can have the Quartermaster-General to send me thirty canal-boats, loaded with sand or stone, I can defend this position and a line from it across the Peninsula, and thus keep the Federal troops below all the time. There are hundreds of canal-boats unemployed which could be got. A steamer is necessary to bring the boats down, and a Navy officer detailed to bring them down and sink them. I have explained the matter to Mr. Wheeler, in hopes that his personal representations may have some effect. Please introduce him to the Secretary of War, and ask the Secretary to give the order to have this done without delay. There is a work going up on Mulberry Island, just above this river, and this work can be taken in rear by the enemy, landing on this river (Warwick River). If these boats are sunk at the mouth of this river, where the channel is 400 feet wide, it will secure the work on Mulberry Island.

Very respectfully and truly, your friend,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, Va., August 18, 1861.

Col. GEORGE DEAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have received information that the enemy is in the habit of landing in Matthews County, and that from $5,000 to $3,000 worth of negroes are decoyed off from that county per week. There are troops stationed at Matthews Court-House, I am told, but they have not reported to me, and I believe they are very inactive. Some murmurs, I learn, have been made as to their inactivity, and the inhabitants who have written or spoken to me on the subject seem to look to me for protection. Please do me the favor to inform me if I am in command of the troops in Gloucester, Middlesex, and Matthews, or if any of them are under my command. If so, I will call for their reports and give them the necessary orders. The troops at Gloucester Point and West Point are in this department, but I have no instructions as to troops elsewhere in the vicinity and on the other side of York River. I ask, lest I might interfere with the command of some other officer.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Yorktown, Va., August 19, 1861.

Captain PEYTON, Peyton’s Battery, Yorktown, Va.:

SIR: Your communication dated August 18, 1861, has been submitted to General Magruder. The following is his decision thereon:

{p.635}

Whenever your men are at drill, or on duty connected with placing guns in position, or during an action, Captain Henderson, or the Navy officer assigned to the naval battery, will have command. Captain Henderson, or other naval commander, will designate the hours and length of drill, and will have exclusive charge of magazines and ammunition for the guns. You will also furnish him with such details as he may require to mount or dismount guns, to repair gun carriages, and clean and take care of the guns. You will have command of your company when not on drill, and will have exclusive control of the internal regulations of your camp and company. You and your officers will attend all drills, and be assigned such duties, compatible with your rank, as Captain Henderson may order. You will make no regulations for your camp which will impede Captain Henderson in the proper discharge of his duties.

Inclosed is a copy of General Lee’s order in reference to the subject matter of your communication, and by which, in addition to the above, you will be guided:

As there are no sailors in the service, it is impossible to serve river batteries by them, and artillery companies must perform this duty. Naval officers, from their experience and familiarity with the peculiar duties connected with naval batteries, their management, construction, &c., are eminently fitted for the command of such batteries, and are most appropriately placed in command of them. In a war such as this, unanimity and hearty co-operation should be the rule. Petty jealousies about slight shades of relative command and bickering about trivial matters are entirely out of place and highly improper, and, when carried so far as to interfere with the effectiveness of a command, become both criminal and contemptible. Within the ordinary limits of a letter, it is impossible to provide for every contingency that may arise in a command which is not centered in a single individual. It is therefore hoped that mutual concessions will be made, and that the good of the service will be the only aim of all.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. B. COSBY, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, Va., August 24, 1861.

Col. L. B. NORTHROP, Commissary-General, C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: As I find it difficult to procure the amount of provisions necessary to enable me to keep the field, I have thought it best to communicate my purposes to you directly, in order that I may be furnished with a sufficient supply without delay. I desire to move the greater part of the troops from Williamsburg and Yorktown farther to the front and to within 10 miles of the enemy, and to maintain my position there; but I have not the necessary means to transport the baggage, rations, and forage of the troops all at the same time; indeed, not more than one-third of these means. I must, therefore, establish depots of provisions ahead before I move, say 10 days’ supply of rations at Warwick Court-House and at Harrod’s Mill, each place about 9 miles from here and 20 miles from Williamsburg. I wish to do this without loss of time. I hope to be able to get 6,000 men in the field. This would be 60,000 rations. If, there fore, you can send at once 100,000 rations here and 50,000 at the same time to Williamsburg, and follow it up with 60,000 every 5 days, 10,000 of which should be sent to Williamsburg and 50,000 to this place, I could keep my position in front. Please let me know as soon as you receive this if it can be done.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding Department.

{p.636}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 261.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES, Richmond, Va., August 26, 1861.

I. The counties of Gloucester, Matthews, and Middlesex are added to the District of Yorktown, and the troops serving therein will be included in the command of Brigadier-General Magruder.

...

By order:

GEO. DEAS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MONDAY, August 26, 1861.

The SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: In pursuance of the very satisfactory interview which we held with you this morning, we proceed to submit to you, very briefly, the objects of that interview in writing, as you desired:

Some six weeks ago General Magruder, commanding in the Peninsula, made a requisition on the slaveholders of the counties of Charles City and New Kent for one-half of their farm operatives, to throw up intrenchments at Williamsburg. The requisition was promptly complied with. The much longer detention of the slaves, which has delayed the thrashing of the wheat crop, has engendered some little feeling of discontent among some of our people, who begin to question the legal authority of the proceeding; nor has this disquietude been allayed by the fact that many of the slaves have returned to their masters, which has been followed by a hope to recover the fugitives [sic]. To allay all discontent, we ask to be informed, not for ourselves so much as for others, of your opinion of the legality of this proceeding on the part of the general, your opinion being entirely sufficient to quiet all further uneasiness.

We also submit whether it would not be altogether proper that the officer having charge of the laborers should give a certificate for the negroes of each proprietor, so as to protect the master against possible contingencies of loss.

We are, dear sir, truly and respectfully, yours,

JOHN TYLER, M. C. C. HILL CARTER, Colonel Fifty-second Regiment Virginia Militia.

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NORFOLK, August 27, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

The enemy’s fleet-2 steam frigates, 2 transport steamers, 8 smaller steamers with boats in tow, and a body of troops-left last evening, passed out of the capes, and steered south-I think to coast of North Carolina. No news of him this morning.

BENJ. HUGER, Brigadier-General.

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RALEIGH, N. C., August 29, 1861.

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

A fleet of steamers, with boats with men, left Fort Monroe on Monday evening, going south. Tuesday evening they appeared off Hatteras. {p.637} On Wednesday, about 9 o’clock a.m., they attacked the fort. The firing from the fort ceased after some hours, and the result is only known from rumor, which says the fort was captured. The fort was scarce of ammunition, which contributed to its fall. It is a most important point during the blockade.

HENRY T. CLARK.

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RALEIGH, August 30, 1861.

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

Fort Hatteras taken. Garrison, 550 men, including Commodore Barron and Colonel Bradford, prisoners. An extensive coast frontier now requires all the attention of Confederate Government.

HENRY T. CLARK.

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RALEIGH, August 30, 1861.

Adjutant-General COOPER:

Two regiments at mouth of Cape Fear, five companies at Fort Macon, one regiment captured at Hatteras, one regiment and two battalions at New Berne. A light battery at New Berne, but no ammunition. Two regiments organizing here, ready to move in two or three days. Any number of volunteers offering, but very scarce of arms.

HENRY T. CLARK.

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GOLDSBOROUGH, August 30, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

The steamer Winslow, just arrived here from Hatteras, Captain Sinclair, reports the forts there captured by the enemy at 11.30 a.m. Commodore Barron, Colonel Bradford, and the garrison, numbering about 580 men, including the field officers of Seventh Regiment of volunteers, surrendered. I will make such arrangements as lean for present defense against further disaster. Please order General Huger to send four regiments and a light battery to the eastern counties, and a number of heavy guns with an engineer to fortify such points as may be necessary. I have only the Seventh Regiment of State troops at my disposal.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 246.}

HEADQUARTERS VIRGINIA FORCES, Richmond, Va., August 30, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. T. T. Fauntleroy, Provisional Army of Virginia (at his own request), is relieved from the command of the troops in and about Richmond.

II. Colonel Dimmock, Provisional Army of Virginia, is assigned to the command of the Virginia troops in and near the city of Richmond, with his headquarters at the camp of instruction.

[No signature.]

{p.638}

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GOLDSBOROUGH, August 31, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

Owing to the capture of Hatteras it is very necessary to fortify the rivers running into the sound. Have no disposable officer for that duty. Please send immediately a good engineer.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General.

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RALEIGH, N. C., September 2, 1861.

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

The defense of North Carolina requires two regiments at New Berne and two at Wilmington. Send them down if you can. If North Carolina regiments are convenient they would be preferred. Will you let me know by mall on this subject?

HENRY T. CLARK.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., September 2, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: The loss of Fort Hatteras exposes so many points of attack and invasion, some of them of great importance from their connection with the railroad and public works, that I must ask for the immediate assistance of four regiments-two to be sent to New Berne and two to Wilmington. General Gatlin called on me for more troops (as many as I could spare), but did not specify what number of men or at what post they should go. Acting on my own judgment, I ask for the assistance of two regiments to go to each place; one to each place immediately, the others to follow afterwards. If convenient, the North Carolina regiments in Virginia might be preferable on many accounts, particularly the First Regiment, whose term of service expires in November (six months). I would suggest that General Gatlin’s command is too extensive to be overlooked by one man, being nearly 300 miles of seacoast, besides many inland points of great distance, and far separated from each other. This I hope you will regard as a mere suggestion.

I telegraphed to you this morning that I shall write you for these four regiments, giving you as much notice as I could, particularly as I was not aware that your arrangements with your Quartermaster’s and Commissary Departments were completed.

Very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

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YORKTOWN, September 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Commanding Department of the Peninsula:

GENERAL: We require at this post to work the guns about to be mounted from 250 to 300 men. There are seven 42-pounder carronades, four long 32-pounder guns, and two long 42-pounder guns, furnished by the Navy Department; four 24-pounder howitzers on field carriages furnished by the State armory at Richmond, and four long 24-pounder guns expected from the same quarter. Ten men to a gun would require 210 men, but to provide for casualties and sickness it would be well to increase the number to at least 15 men to a gun, or 320 for the whole amber. There are also two brass 12-pounder field pieces on the works {p.639} not assigned to any company. Should these be retained for the defenses of this post, it increases the deficiency of men for the artillery. We have now six 8-inch columbiads in the naval battery, to which the companies of Captains Peyton and Bouton have been assigned, and two 9-inch Dahlgren guns and three 32-pounder Navy guns on the land side to which the company of Captain De Gournay has been assigned. These companies are not more than sufficient for the guns committed to them, and we have no other artillery companies at the post except the howitzer battalion, which is frequently required in the field, and have their own batteries of field guns. I respectfully suggest, therefore, that four companies of artillery be ordered here to serve heavy guns. I presume that the redoubts recently determined on will be defended by field artillery, except that one situated in apple orchard, and I have not included any of them except the last mentioned in my estimate. I consider those redoubts as very important for the defense of the place. Without them the enemy can approach our present lines by means of ravines under cover until they are within 500 yards, and they may also plant batteries on a commanding point 800 yards from our inner line. Although our defenses will be somewhat extended by the redoubts, they will be considerably within the lines occupied by Cornwallis.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

GEO. W. RANDOLPH, Major of Artillery.

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RICHMOND, September 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOSEPH R. ANDERSON, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: The President having conferred upon you the commission of brigadier-general, Provisional Army Confederate States, you will proceed to North Carolina, and report to General Gatlin, at Goldsborough, N. C., for duty connected with the defenses of the coast of that State. Reserve forces must be held at Wilmington and Goldsborough. A battery will be erected below New Berne, and immediate attention given to Roanoke Island for obstructing the passage leading to Albemarle Sound, by erecting a battery at that point. One regiment of Georgia volunteers has been sent from Norfolk to Roanoke Island, and the governor of North Carolina reports two regiments at mouth of Cape Fear River, five companies at Fort Macon, one regiment and two battalions at New Berne, besides a light battery; two regiments organizing and ready to move (supposed from Raleigh), and any number of volunteers offering, but scarce of arms. The whole force available in North Carolina at different points is equal to seven regiments, one battalion, and one light battery. Besides, a large number of heavy guns for battery purposes have from time to time been sent to the State, and, if required, an additional supply may be forwarded, as also an additional force to the extent of our means, which are limited. The men for battery or artillery purposes need not be supplied with small-arms, as these will be required for the infantry.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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GOLDSBOROUGH, September 4, 1861.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy:

Fort Macon has not one practical gunner; has only forty reliable fuses, no rifled cannon, no ordnance officer, and only raw troops, without {p.640} proper supplies. It must fall. It should be supplied at once with a competent naval ordnance-officer. May I suggest Lieut. G. T. Sinclair, with gunners, with two rifled cannon, fuses, &c.? I beg to refer to Mr. President Davis for my position.

H. K. BURGWYN.

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HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 4, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

SIR: I inclose a copy of a letter from Colonel Crump, commanding at Gloucester Point, and also one from Major Randolph,* stationed at Yorktown. I desire to impress upon the department the urgent necessity of sending at as early a date as possible the five companies of artillery asked for. It appears there is one at the Fair Grounds at Richmond, and Captain Jordan, of the artillery, at Jamestown Island, assures me one company, commanded by his brother, could be obtained from Lynchburg. It is desirable the whole five companies, from whatever quarter drawn, should be sent down at once, as they are needed for the defense of the two posts named in the communications.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Commanding Army of Peninsula.

The guns are at Yorktown and Gloucester, but not the men to man and serve them.

* Seep. 638.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, Gloucester Point, August 31, 1861.

General J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that there are now five large guns placed on the fortifications in rear of the Point, viz, two short 32-pounders, one long 32-pounder (barbette), and two 42-pounder carronades, and have no company to take charge of these guns, the guns having been worked by one of the companies at the water battery, who in case of action would be compelled to stay at their post, and these five guns without even a boat’s crew. I therefore respectfully ask that a company be furnished without delay to take charge of these guns. There is now an artillery company at the Fair Grounds at Richmond, under the command of Captain Jeffress, who is a fine officer, and I should be pleased to have him, if possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. A. CRUMP, Colonel, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WILLIAMSBURG, September 5, 1861.

Colonel HODGES:

SIR: There are several gunboats and steamers at Newport News and in the Roads, probably with the intention of going up James River. Should the enemy go up the main channel by Day’s Neck, you will immediately take position with your whole force near the work at Mulberry Point, near Crawford’s house, and co-operate in the defense of {p.641} the place and in the prevention of a landing, so far as it may be in your power, leaving a party of dragoons at Mrs. Curtis’ farm, to inform you of the landing of any troops on Warwick River while you are at Mulberry Island Point; and in the latter case you will make such a distribution of your troops as will enable you to defend the causeway and approaches from the land side against the troops that may land on the Warwick River. Should, however, you be attacked yourself (while at Mrs. Curtis’ farm) by ships seeking to enter the mouth of Warwick River, you will defend the position, if the work is sufficiently thick and strong to protect your men, whom you will keep under cover as far as possible. But if you find the work untenable, you will pack what baggage you can in the wagons with you, unless they be required for the sick and wounded, strike your tents and pack them up in the woods, withdraw your force under cover of the trees, and remain there until the enemy passes up the river. Then you will take position, as before ordered, on Crawford’s farm, and make arrangements to defend the causeway across the marsh and other approaches leading to that place. Should they attempt to land, however, at or near Mrs. Curtis’, you will attack them from the woods, by issuing from the woods, and endeavor to cut them to pieces, if not in force much greater than your own, and regardless of the fire of the ships; remembering always that if you cannot prevent their passage up the river or drive them off, you will take position, as before indicated, at Crawford’s farm, to defend the approaches from the land side to the work.

Should the enemy engage the battery at Day’s Point, you will not quit your post until he succeeds in passing it, when you will also march (let it be done in perfect order), taking your artillery with you in any case. In case of an attack there or anywhere, when you are accompanied by artillery, remember to place your horses and caissons in such a way as best to screen them from the enemy’s fire. On the approach of an enemy, send notice to the work on Mulberry Island Point, to Warwick Court-House, to Cockletown, and Yorktown, and by a special message direct to Colonel McLaws, at Williamsburg. In a few days there will be 2,500 troops at Warwick Court-House, and the same number probably at Cockletown. Report the state of your command, the progress of your work, your ability to defend your position, or otherwise; send anything of interest at least every other day.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, September 5, 1861.

General HUGER, Norfolk, Va.:

Cannot you spare the sailors under your orders for duty on the coast of North Carolina? Send immediate reply.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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NORFOLK, September 6, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

I cannot spare another man. The forces in my front are increasing, and I need two more regiments. I have already sent more men to {p.642} North Carolina than could be spared from my command, with the hope that their places would have been supplied. I have reported both by telegraph and letter my actions, but no response have I received.

BENJ. HUGER, Brigadier-General.

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NEW BERNE, N. C., September 6, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Colonel Bridges writes me that the captain of the British steamer Rinaldo, lying off the harbor, sent word to him that the enemy would attack Fort Macon Friday night or Saturday morning. British vessels in the harbor ordered by the captain of war steamer out of range of the guns. Messenger left at 6 o’clock this morning. No ship in sight then. Please hurry on the troops required by Governor Clark.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General.

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RICHMOND, September 6, 1861.

General GATLIN, New Berne, N. C.:

Governor Clark reported some lays ago that he had two regiments ready for the coast besides the two regiments on Cape Fear River and the two regiments at New Berne. He has been telegraphed to send the first-named two regiments (supposed at Raleigh) immediately to Fort Macon, if he has not already done so.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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RICHMOND, September 6, 1861.

Governor CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

General Gatlin reports an expected attack on Fort Macon either on Friday night or Saturday morning, and suggests the hurrying on the troops required by you. We have no requisitions for troops by you. Please send forward to Fort Macon the two regiments reported by you some days since, if you have not already done so.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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ROANOKE ISLAND, September 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. HUGER, Commanding Forces, Norfolk:

GENERAL: I wrote you yesterday by the Junaluski, but as I learn she has broken down on the way I write again, to request that [you] will send on to this place Captain Caswell’s company of my regiment, and also Captain Vincent’s, if it has arrived. I hope to get arms for them from North Carolina in a few days. Please send then down immediately if my regiment is to remain here permanently, which I hope is not the case. Even without arms they can be of great service to us in the inclosure of the defenses here. The North Carolina troops that are here are in a state of disorganization, and but little can be expected from them. If you have not sent the baggage and teams you need not {p.643} do so, as I will try and get along without them; but if I find that I cannot, I will try and get them here. We hope to have seven guns mounted in the Pork Point battery to-night, and will commence on the Weir Point battery so soon as we can get the engineers to look after the work. He needs assistance immediately if the work is to advance rapidly.

We are all well, and the men are working cheerfully. No late news from the Hessians.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. WRIGHT.

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RALEIGH, September 7, 1861.

S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy:

The British ship Alliance, at Beaufort, communicated with a British war steamer off the port yesterday, which informed them that the blockading fleet would attack Fort Macon to-morrow. I hope the fort is ready, but they have no gunners who can manage the guns, and the same complaint is made at Fort Caswell. Can it be supplied with officers who understand the use of guns?

HENRY T. CLARK.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., September 7, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: Allow me to call your attention to the situation of the forts and batteries on the coasts of North Carolina. They are garrisoned with our volunteers in sufficient force, but their officers are all taken from the ordinary occupations of civil life, with no military instruction or education except what they have acquired amidst the labors of camp life, and I hear serious complaint of the inefficiency of all the gun batteries from the want of instructors or suitable drill-masters.

The forts on the sounds have been captured, and I am glad to know that Fort Macon had recently had some attention from the Navy officers who are now out of employ. But Fort Caswell and the batteries at the mouth of Cape Fear River are in urgent need of suitable officers for that purpose. I have received a petition from the people of Cape Fear to send them aid in this particular, and they suggested that probably Captain Whiting or Capt. John A. Brown could be sent to them, and I should be pleased if these gentlemen or any others might be sent them.

Allow me a further suggestion, that, as our coast is now invaded and possessed by the enemy in a vital point and threatened at various others immediately, the command is too extensive for the observation and care of one. The Cape Fear must have several regiments, and is distinctly and widely separated from the defense of Pamlico and Albemarle, and General Gatlin’s undivided attention is now demanded at one of the three divisions. I don’t know what duty or division is assigned to General Anderson, but if it is confined to the coast defense, that is over 300 miles long, with no facilities of travel, and a portion of it divided by the actual possession of the enemy. Under these circumstances I would suggest the assignment of General Hill to the Cape Fear forces. His military experience and success would give decided tone to that command.

Very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

{p.644}

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 7, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General, C. S. Army:

SIR: Additional re-enforcements have arrived at Newport News, and our lower picket has been driven in to-day. The enemy’s re-enforcements are now all sent to Newport News, none being kept about Old Point, as has been the case up to this period. His parties are advancing farther up the country than usual.

I have ordered about 2,000 men to take post at Warwick Court-House, under Colonel McLaws, with one battery of artillery. There will be, after their departure, about 1,500 men left at Williamsburg, and 1,000 of these will be advanced to within 5 miles of Warwick Court-House as soon as the wagons return. Warwick Court-House is a healthy position, and 2 miles in the rear of the line of defense (that is, from Young’s Mill to Harrod’s Mill), the advantage of which, when occupied by the enemy, in command of both flanks, by his vessels of war, I have had the honor to explain in person to his excellency the President. These flanks are on Warwick River and on the Poquosin River. The first emptying into the James River, and the second into York River, 12 miles below Yorktown.

For the sake of health, as well as with a view to defense, I have encamped at and within 2 or 3 miles of Harrod’s Mill at the head of Poquosin River; about 3,000 men infantry and artillery) on the York road, and intermediately all the cavalry except one company, half of which is kept here and the other half at Yorktown, for express duty. One regiment and a battalion of two companies are also at Mulberry Island Point, covering the fortifications on James River, now being erected there, opposite Harden’s Bluff I have left only two regiments at Yorktown. The Fifth North Carolina Regiment, which had (when heard from a few days ago) only 230 for duty out of 1,150 (total strength), is in Gloucester County, at a healthy position 6 miles from Gloucester Point, and I fear no great improvement in its sanitary condition can be expected until after frost.

The troops near Harrod’s Mill are under the immediate command of General Hill. I shall take command of the forces in front within a few days. As soon as it is possible to get through the arrangements necessary for their transportation and supplies, and for the organization of tie artillery here, a portion of which I am endeavoring to supply with horses or mules, caissons and harness. An excellent gun carriage for a 32-pounder has been manufactured here under my orders by Captain Morrison, of the artillery, the ordnance officer stationed here. I have also detailed a party of workmen from the Warwick volunteers, and put in operation, with the assistance of Captain Carter, of the Virginia Ordnance Department, a large saw-mill, on Warwick River, where there is already a large quantity of seasoned timber of the best quality. I have also erected earthworks for heavy guns at the mouth of Warwick and Poquosin Rivers, but have no guns of that description to place in them. This is necessary, to enable me to hold the line of defense, above mentioned, bedeviling Young’s and Harrod’s Mills, interrupted by the enemy’s ships of war.

I have caused four additional canal-boats, loaded with stone, to be sunk in the Swash Channel, near Mulberry Island Point, and hope soon to be enabled to sink twenty-five others across the mouth of Warwick River; but these latter will be of no avail unless the embankments which I have caused to be thrown up on the shores there can be furnished with the heavy guns above mentioned. I have written to Captain {p.645} Ingraham, of the Navy, for six heavy 42-pounder guns, with their carriages, implements, and ammunition. I desire that these should be sent to Yorktown, to be transported thence at night by water to the mouth of the Poquosin River, below the blockading steamers, which can easily be done, and thence to Jamestown in a lighter or lighters, towed by a light-draught steamer, thence to the month of Warwick River.

I also requested re-enforcements when in Richmond, as I considered the position at Yorktown as too vital a one to be permitted to depend any longer upon the chances of a battle in the field. If re-enforcements, therefore, can be spared, I would like to have them for Yorktown and Williamsburg in sufficient force to be in some degree independent of the troops in front of enemy below; but I have great confidence in the troops under my command and believe that they will do their whole duty under any circumstances. As additional security to the work going up on Mulberry Island Point, I have requested Captain Tucker, of our steamer of war Patrick Henry, so to place his ship as to assist in its defense, which he has promised. Should re-enforcements be sent, a portion should come to Williamsburg via James River, and a portion to Yorktown. There is no infantry at Jamestown Island at present, Colonel Hodges’ regiment and two companies of infantry, under Major Patton, formerly there, being now required at Mulberry Island Point as a covering force.

The land defenses at Gloucester Point require about 1,000 men more to man them. There should be a regiment at Jamestown, to prevent the enemy landing at the lower end of the island and taking the batteries afterwards in the rear. This supposes, of course, that their ships have passed our river batteries below Jamestown Island, which is not by any means impossible. With a regiment there, that island, I think, could not be taken. The landing of the enemy in rear of Gloucester Point can be effected easily and without opposition, an extensive shore and many navigable rivers affording every opportunity; hence the importance of that position being protected on the land side by strong works. These I have had strengthened, but there are not men enough there to defend them properly.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding Department.

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NEW BERNE, September 8, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

The enemy’s fleet is off Fort Macon. By 7 p.m. yesterday four ships had arrived and anchored. I have heard of no re-enforcements from Raleigh, nor have any arrived within the last five days. General Anderson is here. We go down to Fort Macon this morning.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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MOREHEAD CITY (via GOLDSBOROUGH), September 9, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

Only one war steamer now off Fort Macon. Very doubtful whether others were seen, as reported. Rifled cannon have reached this point. Will be placed in position in the fort forthwith.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General.

{p.646}

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HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 9, 1861.

Colonel FORNO, Fifth Louisiana Regiment:

SIR: You will keep a strong picket at Denby Church in front of Young’s Mill, and one in the woods at the head of the mill-pond, near Miranda Wall’s; encamp your troops in the strongest positions, and establish your guns in the most commanding places at or near Warwick Court-House, in front or rear, as the ground may offer the greatest advantages. If there be a cavalry guard at Young’s farm you will direct it to report to you at once the appearance of a fleet off the mouth of Warwick River and the landing of an enemy on either side of that river. Should the enemy land on the Mulberry Island side of the river, you will march your whole force down the Mulberry Island road to take him in rear, if he should attempt to attack Colonel Hodges on Mulberry Island Point, permitting him first to engage with Colonel Hodges before attacking him with all your force with the greatest vigor. Should he land on Young’s farm, which is the eastern side of the river, you will remain in your position at or near Warwick Court-House, taking care to call in your pickets at once from Miranda Wall’s and Denby Church, which is the name of the church in front of Young’s Mill, and will have the enemy watched at Young’s farm. You will also place a picket on Warwick River, which at that point is said to be half a mile from Warwick Court-House. About this spot you will consult Captain Curtis and his officers, they being acquainted with the country. Should the enemy advance upon you by Young’s farm, you will fall back to Blow’s Mill, taking your position on the west or Williamsburg side, and there defend it, in all cases sending information of his movements by express to General Hill, who is near the cavalry camp, and to the commanding officer at Williamsburg, as well as the commanding officer at Yorktown. In case it should be absolutely necessary to retreat farther, you will fall back upon the works at Williamsburg.

By order of General Magruder:

H. M. STANARD, Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

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C. S. STEAMER RALEIGH, Off Roanoke Island, September 10, 1861.

General B. HUGER, Commanding Forces:

GENERAL: As you have doubtless been informed by the engineer of the progress of our works here, I will confine myself to one remark; it is this: From all I have seen and heard since taking possession of this island, I am free to declare that I regard the maintenance of this position possible only so long as it is defended by troops from another State or from a more loyal part of North Carolina.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. HUNTER, Commodore C. S. Navy, Commanding Expedition for Defense of North Carolina.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 11, 1861.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy, C. S.:

SIR: Captain Henderson was detached from the naval battery at Yorktown three or four weeks ago. I have detained him, nevertheless, {p.647} until a naval officer could be sent to relieve him. When in Richmond, ten days ago, I was informed that Lieutenant Fauntleroy, of the C. S. Navy, had been ordered to report to me at Yorktown, to fill Captain Henderson’s place. He has not yet arrived, and I am much in need of his services. About the same time I ordered Major Randolph to report to the Navy Department the utter worthlessness of the carriages in this battery. He informed me that the Navy Department had immediately ordered every barbette carriage for these guns (8-inch columbiads, six in number), and that they would be furnished-probably one a week. I have not heard of the arrival of any as yet. Please do me the favor to let me know when to expect them. They are of the first importance, indeed, and absolutely essential to the successful defense of the mouth of York River. Please address me at Yorktown.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, commanding.

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HDQRS. THIRD REGIMENT GEORGIA VOLUNTEERS, Camp Georgia, Roanoke Island, September 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. HUGER:

GENERAL: The two wagons and four mules sent down by the quartermaster from Portsmouth arrived here last evening. I shall for the present endeavor to get along without the wagons, and I am to-day getting two howitzers, 12 and 24 pounders, which we brought down from the navy-yard, moved down by the mules to a point 5 miles below here, to protect us from a landing in our rear. I shall use the front wheels and axles of the wagons for limbers for these pieces, and think I shall get a pretty good battery of light artillery fixed up during the day. I have a 24-pounder brass field piece which is so heavy that with the teams sent I cannot handle it. I propose to place it this morning at Weir Point to operate upon the channel there until we get the battery completed. If I could get horses and harness for this piece, it would be much more effective placed on the lower end of the island. If possible these horses and harness should be sent at once. The battery at Pork Point is now ready to give the Hessians a warm reception.

The work on the Weir Point battery is under way, and shall be pushed as rapidly as possible. I need not call your attention to the fact that the force on this island is entirely inadequate to the proper defense of this point. I shall do all that man can do, but feel very much crippled for want of men. The North Carolina companies here are completely disorganized and demoralized. I can hope nothing from them.

Since commencing this letter I have received a communication from Edenton offering to furnish horses for artillery service, and also offering a small company of cavalry for vedettes on the island. I have no doubt I can get horses here cheaper than they could be bought in Norfolk, but I shall take no action in the matter until I hear from you. The citizens of the surrounding country have been very kind and obliging to us, ministering largely to our wants, and are still anxious to do more. I have some 200 negro laborers, and could easily increase the number to double that amount, but think that, with my own men and what we now have, we can get along for the present. We have some sickness among the men-bilious fever-but no cases as yet of a very serious character.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. WRIGHT.

{p.648}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, September 12, 1861.

Governor CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

SIR: I have been urgently requested by gentlemen of high position to have ordered to Wilmington additional troops. I regret to say that the necessities of the public service absolutely forbid the transfer of any troops from Virginia at the present time. Under these circumstances I beg to urge upon your excellency the importance of organizing at least one regiment to be sent on this special duty as soon as practicable. I trust that some means may be provided by which to arm it.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, VA., September 12, 1861.

General J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Commanding, Yorktown:

GENERAL: Every effort is being made to send you the six heavy guns required and to re-enforce your command by four regiments, orders in each case having been given; the guns and troops to be sent with the least possible delay. In explanation of order removing Captain Brown from your command, circumstances imperatively requiring his presence in North Carolina have come to the general’s knowledge to-day. So soon as one can be obtained an artillery officer will be sent down to replace him.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RICHMOND, September 12, 1861.

S. D. WALLACE, Esq. Secretary of Committee of Safety, Wilmington, N. C.:

GENTLEMEN: In reply to your resolution of September 4, 1861, requesting the President to appoint a general to supervise operations on the coast of North Carolina, the President directs that you be informed that Joseph R. Anderson, esq., a graduate of West Point, and formerly an officer of the Engineer Corps, U. S. Army, more recently engaged extensively in the manufacture of ordnance and munitions of war, has been appointed a brigadier-general, and ordered on duty in North Carolina, with special reference to the coast defenses.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GOLDSBOROUGH, September 13, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Governor Clark is urgent in his demand to have troops sent into Hyde County to counteract evil influences said to have extended from Hatteras to the main-land. I have no troops to spare unless I withdraw one of the regiments from the vicinity of Fort Macon, and am unwilling to do it without the sanction of the War Department, as from report that fort is threatened with siege or bombardment. The only regiment {p.649} put at my disposal is at Asheville, without arms, could not be and available here in a week.

Dispatch of yesterday just received. Colonel Riddick will give you the number of troops in the department. Will reply by mail.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General.

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RALEIGH, September 14, 1861.

Adjutant-General COOPER:

The disaffection in Hyde County demands the immediate presence of a regiment, which General Gatlin declines to order from another post-Macon-without your sanction. He promised to ask it.

HENRY T. CLARK.

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RICHMOND, September 14, 1861.

Governor HENRY T. CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

Brigadier-General Gatlin, being the commanding general of the forces in North Carolina, must exercise a sound discretion in distributing the troops for the defense of that coast. The importance of maintaining a sufficient garrison at Fort Macon need not be here urged further than to state that the fort must be defended against attack at all hazards, and that the garrison must not be reduced beyond the possibility of such defense. General Gatlin has been instructed to use his best exertions to call troops for local service for limited periods under a recent act of Congress, a copy of which has been furnished him, and it is hoped he will be enabled in this way to supply the necessities of Hyde County. The cavalry regiment from your State under Colonel Ransom had better be retained in the State for purposes of defense until further advised.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 14, 1861.

Captain HIGGINS:

SIR: I am instructed by the general commanding to say that he has received information from Headquarters, Adjutant-General’s Office, Richmond, that four additional regiments have been ordered to report to him at Yorktown, and consequently he desires you to make all necessary arrangements to receive them, and see that an abundant supply of provisions are on hand.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. STANARD, Lieutenant, Aide-de-Camp.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 14, 1861.

Colonel CRUMP, Commanding Gloucester Point, Va.:

SIR: You will take charge of the defenses of Gloucester and Matthews as far as the Piankitank River, inclusive. You will cause every boat on all the rivers leading into Mob Jack Bay, and the other waters, {p.650} forming the eastern boundary of these counties, to be seized and kept under direct guard, in a place of entire security. You will visit these rivers and the exposed places of these counties in person, and, after communicating with the commanding officers of the volunteers and militia in service in these counties, you will make such disposition of their forces and give such orders as in your judgment the security of the property of the citizens and the defense of the coast may demand, and you will make a report to me of what you have done with the least possible delay. And you will also recommend anything necessary for its defense that you may not have power to execute. You will consult with the commanding officers of the troops in Middlesex also ,and make a report of the state of defenses in that county. You will communicate to all these commanding officers the inclosed order.

By command of General Magruder:

J. M. JONES, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT, Go SPORT NAVY-YARD, Norfolk, Va., September 16, 1861.

Brigadier-General HUGER:

GENERAL: I am directed by the commandant to apprise you that already fifteen of the guns laid aside for the defenses of Norfolk and its vicinity, on the requisition of the engineer, approved by yourself; have been otherwise disposed of by the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, and to suggest the propriety of the speedy removal of the remainder to the custody of your own ordnance officers. The commandant also recommends the garrisoning of the outworks for the defense of this yard between Paradise and Scotch Creeks, previous to and preparatory to laying the platforms and mounting the guns, which would not be safe without a guard. There is as yet but one magazine among them all. Some definite understanding between the engineer and myself as to the kind of carriages to be used there is desirable. Your twelve last 24-pounder shells from Richmond will be ready to-day, with navy fuses.

Respectfully, &c.,

A. B. FAIRFAX, Inspector of Ordnance.

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WILLIAMSBURG, September 16, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Four large steamers passed down to Fort Monroe from Washington just before daylight this morning. Re-enforcements are reported at Newport News this morning. The above must be in addition to those already reported.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FLAG-SHIP MANASSAS, Off Roanoke island, September 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. HUGER:

GENERAL: So great is the breadth of Croatan Sound, with a channel of 6 feet near the main-land, 3 miles distant, that I am reluctantly {p.651} forced to the conclusion that but little dependence can be placed upon land batteries for its defense. After a careful reconnaissance I am persuaded that the defense of this sound must be made at the marshes, 7 miles below, with floating batteries and gunboats, there being no soil wherewith to construct redoubts. But, general, if my information be correct, there is another point demanding immediate and serious consideration.

The fortification at Oregon Inlet, being on the south side thereof; was of course untenable, with Forts Hatteras and Clark in the possession of the enemy; but if, as pilots represent to me, a fleet outside can sail within a mile of the beach, thus covering an advancing force towards Norfolk, it seems to me important that the northern side of the inlet be fortified, with a strong sustaining force at hand, and the troops upon this island be held in constant readiness to be conveyed across Roanoke Sound, to re-enforce the former.

I respectfully suggest, if the information I have received be confirmed by experienced pilots, that you send an officer, in whose judgment you confide, to accompany me to the inlet.

Before this I would have made a reconnaissance of that locality, but that I had not a vessel of sufficiently light draught at my command.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

W. F. LYNCH, Flag-Officer, Commanding Naval Defenses of N. C. and Va.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES, Norfolk, September 18, 1861.

Flag-Officer W. F. LYNCH, &c.:

SIR: I have received your letter of the 17th instant, and am obliged for the suggestions. As Col. Custis Lee, aide-de-camp to the President, has been to Roanoke Island especially to examine it and the defenses, and 1 hope to see him to-morrow, I will defer immediate action until I consult with him. It does not appear to me possible for any large body of men to advance on Norfolk by the sand-spit along the coast.

I remain, very respectfully,

BENJ. HUGER, Brigadier-General.

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RICHMOND, September 19, 1861.

General B. HUGER, &c., Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: Lieutenant Sinclair left a verbal message from you to the effect that six rifled cannon were much needed at Sewell’s Point. The Secretary of the Navy has directed all the rifled cannon at his disposal to be sent South, but Lieutenant-Colonel Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance Bureau, informs me that he will send you two 8-inch rifled cannon at an early day. These seem to be all the rifled pieces which can be sent you for some time to come.

I am, sir, respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.652}

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 19, 1861.

Col. WERNER T. JONES, Twenty-first Reg’t Virginia Militia, Gloucester County, Va.:

SIR: Brigadier-General Magruder directs me to inform you that the county of Gloucester is one of those included by special orders of the adjutant-general of the Virginia forces in the department under his orders, and that he considers the militia force called out by you as necessarily forming a part of his command. He instructs me further to direct that you take no steps towards discharging any portion of the militia under your immediate command, and to state also that, in deference to a difference of opinion, no doubt sincerely entertained by you as to your obligations to obey him, he has referred your letter, addressed to Colonel Crump, which will be accompanied by a copy of this communication, to the same headquarters from which he received his instructions. General Magruder directs me to say that he considers the militia called into service by you as efficient auxiliary forces for the accomplishment of the purpose he has in view, and would regret if any difference of opinion between yourself and him should deprive the country of their services. Should you decide to keep the militia in service, in accordance with the wishes of General Magruder, you will please inform the headquarters at Yorktown as to the date on which you entered into active service, and send the names of the field, staff; and line officers of your command. I am directed by General Magruder to add that it is very desirable to have in service as many troops from the country threatened with invasion as possible, not only from their natural desire to defend their own homes, but because of their more thorough acquaintance with the country. The general, therefore, hopes that your command may be increased, instead of diminished, and that, should he be deprived of your services as an officer in commission, you will nevertheless communicate freely with him on the subject of those public interests which have been intrusted to your charge.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. A. MAGRUDER, JR., Lieutenant and Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 19, 1861.

Colonel RANDOLPH, Chief of Ordnance:

SIR: I have just received your note of the 16th. You are authorized to have the two 9-inch guns mounted on the land defenses at Yorktown transferred to the center battery, and to mount two heavy guns (32-pounders) on the land side in their stead. Your views in regard to the defenses at Yorktown have been again sent to the Navy Department and the Adjutant-General of the Army.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-The three heavy 32-pounders, with barbette carriages, from Richmond, are intended for the defense of Ship Point, as that position is considerably inland, and ships are obliged to approach bows on, and, as a large number of troops can be assembled in the immediate vicinity, {p.653} supported by field artillery, I am of the opinion that this point, thus prepared, can be successfully defended. But until the naval expedition which is now fitting out by the enemy shall have chosen its destination, I think it prudent to have these guns also mounted at Yorktown, probably on the water side, if space can be had; if not, on the land side, and for this purpose you will direct Lieutenant Douglas or Mr. St. John to cause platforms to be laid without delay, and to have these guns put in position at once. When the expedition shall have sailed from these waters they can be removed to Ship Point, for which latter purpose you will direct, in my name, Lieutenant Douglas to cause platforms to be made forthwith, so that when we move them they may be placed in position without loss of time.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS Williamsburg, Va., September 19, 1861.

Captain LYNCH, Chief of Bureau of Ordnance:

SIR: Several weeks ago Captain Henderson was detached from the Yorktown naval battery, but no officer ordered in his place. I applied to the Navy Department for an officer, and was informed that Commander Fauntleroy had been ordered to repair to Yorktown in his place. He has not arrived. I have since written once or twice on the subject, but have received no answer. As Yorktown is perhaps the most important point on the coast at which there is a naval battery, I beg that this may be attended to as soon as possible.

The heaviest ships can be brought against naval batteries at the mouth of York River, and in great numbers. It is obvious, therefore, that the heaviest guns should be placed there. This subject has been again brought to my notice by Col. G. W. Randolph, Chief of Ordnance, an officer in whose judgment I place great confidence. He says in a letter just received:

If the expedition fitting out at Washington should come here, and bring with it a large number of 10 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns, the odds against us would be very great. Should our batteries be silenced, the fleet may pass up and land troops at defenseless points, and either take the James River batteries and the fortified lines of the Peninsula in reverse, or march on Richmond, passing by them. Guns of equal caliber are necessary to put us on an equal footing with the enemy.

I concur fully in this opinion, and would respectfully recommend that six of the long 32-pounder rifled guns, said to be now in Richmond, be placed in battery at this point, or that six of the 10 and 11 inch Dahlgren guns be sent, if possible. I would also report that I fired two shots from the 8-inch columbiad at Spratley’s farm, opposite Hog Island, on James River, with 15-second fuses and charges of eight pounds, giving the guns the highest elevation which its casemate carriage would admit. The river is about 1 3/4 miles wide, and the shells fell short of the other side and exploded in the water, showing that the charges were too small. The carriage, however, was a good deal injured even by these small charges; and if the charges were increased to ten pounds, it would be shattered after a few rounds. This carriage is like that on which similar guns are mounted in the naval battery at Yorktown-almost entirely worthless. The columbiads at Jamestown are mounted on equally unreliable carriages. I indulge a hope, however, from the {p.654} last letter received from the Navy Department, that the columbiads at Yorktown will soon be mounted on army barbette carriages, after which I recommend that those on James River be so mounted with the least possible delay. I beg leave to ask the attention of the Navy Department to the immediate necessity of placing in battery at Yorktown the 32-pounder rifled guns mentioned in the above.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, September 20, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

SIR: Some wealthy men of Lancaster County, and a Mr. Underwood, of Surry, have refused to send their slaves, on requisition signed by myself; to work on the fortifications. They are very incomplete, and my troops have worked until they are too sick to work any longer. I have ordered detachments of dragoons to bring them. They have done and will do it. If these gentlemen are sustained in their refusal, no negroes can be had when wanted. The laws of Virginia do not specify negroes, but it is a necessity of war. If sustained, I will carry out my plans. I have already the sanction in writing of the Secretary of War to this course, but will use the free negroes as far as possible. I have never called for more than one-half of the male working hands. I inclose one of my proclamations on this subject.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Williamsburg, Va., September 7, 1861.

The undersigned having received full authority from the Secretary of War to press into service all the slaves of the country, if necessary, he prefers to rely upon the patriotism of his fellow-citizens for the needful supply of labor, and therefore calls upon the inhabitants of the counties of -, -, - to send one-half of their male slaves to work on the fortifications for the protection of their families and property. They will send with their slaves the necessary implements of labor-spades, shovels, picks, grubbing-hoes, and axes. The negroes will be allowed 50 cents a day and plenty of provisions; the money to be paid by the quartermaster to their masters. All free negroes who are capable of labor will also be employed and paid at the same rate. The bearer of this is hereby authorized by the undersigned to give receipts for the negroes, and from that time the Confederate Government will be responsible for them.

These negroes will be sent to the nearest wharves, to be conveyed to Williamsburg.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.655}

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HDQRS. THIRD REGIMENT GEORGIA VOLUNTEERS, September 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. HUGER, Commanding Forces in Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: I have finished the earthwork for a six-gun battery on the main-land, nearly opposite Weir Point, at a place called Roberts’ Fishery. The men returned from the work yesterday, having been engaged there thirty-six hours. The lumber and other material necessary to complete it has been ordered from Plymouth, and will be here to-day or to-morrow. The Weir Point battery is nearly finished, and I will finish to-day a field work, about 6 miles below the Weir Point battery, at the causeway, across the marsh, on the center of the island. To complete the defenses of this island a small battery ought to be erected on Midgett’s Hammock (or Island), to command the channel of Roanoke Sound. Boats drawing 4 1/2 feet of water can avoid our batteries by coming up on the east side of the island through Roanoke Sound. The point I have indicated for a battery is about midway the eastern shore of the island, and the guns can be placed within 800 yards of the farthest side of the channel. Vessels drawing over 18 inches of water must come within 700 or 800 yards of the battery. I do not know whether the enemy have as light-draught vessels as that, but if they have they can get through Roanoke Sound.

Colonel Shaw’s regiment arrived here about midday yesterday, and I had indulged the hope that I should be relieved by him. I beg, if I am to remain here, that I be permitted to have the men’s clothing, shoes, tents, and cooking utensils brought down from our old camp. The work which they have been engaged on here has worn-out their clothing and shoes; many of them are barefoot, and when I send to the camp at Portsmouth for the clothing and shoes left there, the officer in command refuses to let the articles come, because we are to return soon. I am very anxious to return to my old command, and think now that the defenses here are so nearly completed that I might be withdrawn. At any rate, I beg, if I am to remain here permanently, that I be informed of it as soon as possible.

Major Lee, who will hand you this letter, can give you full information as to the state of the defenses here. He goes up to attend to the securement of our clothing, tents, &c., left in our old camp.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. B. WRIGHT.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, September 23, 1861.

His Excellency HENRY T. CLARK, Governor of North Carolina:

SIR: The President desires that you will issue your proclamation calling out the militia of the following counties of your State, viz: Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Chowan, Bertie, Tyrrell, Washington, Hyde, Beaufort, Craven, and Carteret. It is suggested that the call can be made by volunteers or by draft, at your discretion, but the number must be equal to 10 per cent. of the total population, after deducting volunteers already in service. Brig. Gen. D. H. Hill, now in the Peninsula of Virginia, will be ordered to the command of the coast defenses of North Carolina.

Respectfully,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

{p.656}

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, Va., September 23, 1861.

The following indorsement was forwarded to the Secretary of War on the letter from George Minor, Chief of the Bureau. I have acquitted myself of my duty only when all the facts in this case are made known to the Secretary of War and President. They are these:

First, the carriages for the naval batteries at Yorktown, under Captain Henderson, are so utterly wort-bless (being made of pine), that the guns will dismount themselves after a few fires; second, their manner of construction prevents their being elevated sufficiently to explode a fifteen-second fuse, and therefore their greatest range cannot be attained; third, carriages of a good pattern (barbette of the army) were promised one month ago by the Navy Department, but have not come; and, fourth, the water at the mouth of York River is so deep and ample, that the largest ships, &c., in any number can attack our batteries, and with our present carriages we cannot reach them.

I respectfully request, therefore, that the President, through the Secretary of War, be made acquainted with the exact state of this battery. This request is made with no other object than that he may have an opportunity of forming his own judgment as to the relative importance of the places to which these carriages may be assigned.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier. General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, September 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, C. S. A., Yorktown, Va.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War finds it absolutely necessary to send General D. H. Hill to North Carolina, and desires you to detach and order him to proceed to this point and report for detailed instructions. The Secretary hopes you may temporarily arrange to fill General Hill’s place until other general officers to be sent to your command shall report to you for duty.

R. H. CHILTON. Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. COAST DEFENSES OF NORTH CAROLINA, Wilmington, September 24, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I am persuaded from all the indications that the enemy design very shortly to land on this coast in force with a view of invasion, and considering the fact that by taking this harbor they will command the Cape Fear River, which penetrates the heart of this State, as well as the railways terminating here, thereby cutting off communication between important points of the country, I know of no point the seizure of which would give them so great advantage. I therefore think it imperative to organize a force here on a much larger scale than seems to have been proposed.

You are aware that the defenses here are divided by the river into two main classes, each of which must be nearly self-sustaining. These are again subdivided by the various inlets islands and narrow strips of sand bank.

I recommend, as the minimum force with which we may hope to cope successfully with the enemy, 2,000 infantry, two light batteries, and two {p.657} companies of cavalry, to be posted each side of the river, say at Smithville on one side and at Confederate (Federal) Point on the other, and a reserve of 2,000 men at Wilmington (these forces in addition to the garrison of Fort Caswell, 300); Teek’s Island, 100, and of Fort Fisher, on Confederate Point, 300. To make up this force it will be necessary to send here immediately four full regiments of infantry, three companies of cavalry, and horses and all the equipments for three light batteries, including the caissons and carriages, for which I have already made requisition on the Ordnance Department, viz, caissons for twelve 6-pounders and two 12-pounders and four 6-pounder gun-carriages. The harness for the light batteries I will endeavor to have made here. In my opinion the safety of this position is so surely menaced that the immediate supply of the forces and munitions named above may alone prevent the loss of all. And in addition to the force above mentioned, which may be overpowered by numbers, I recommend most earnestly that three regiments be posted at Goldsborough as a reserve, to be moved here or to Beaufort as circumstances may require.

Having no doubt of the willingness of the authorities and people of this State to do all in their power to repel the invasion, and as the danger is so imminent, I take the liberty of inclosing a copy of this communication to his excellency the governor of the State, with a request that he will send me without delay the required force in regiments or companies, provided you have not enough at this time subject to your control for this service.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

J. R. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., September 24, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War:

The occupation of Hatteras by the enemy gives them the command of the population on the sea beach, and affords them a fine position from which they can make inroads into our adjoining counties, and rumors have been quite current that our citizens on the banks had taken the oath of allegiance, being confined on the island, out of reach of intercourse or assistance, and that their influence and example were spreading on the main-land.

I have just had information from there which assures me that none beyond the island had been infected; but seven or eight islanders had come over into Hyde County, bringing proclamations with them, and offering inducements to the citizens to take the oath of allegiance. These persons were immediately arrested, and are now held as prisoners.

In our State there is no law of treason which will reach these men, and as they are now held by the officers of the Confederate Army, I should like to know what disposition to make of them.

I am, sir, very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK. {p.658}

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., September 25, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Attorney-General and Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: Since the fall of Hatteras, with a few exceptions, the inhabitants of the island commonly called the Banks, under the fear of the enemy’s guns, have taken the oath of allegiance to Lincoln’s Government, but the people of the main-land, separated from these Banks by Pamlico Sound, remain firm in their devotion and loyalty to the Confederate cause. The enemy has attempted communication with the people in Hyde County, and, through the post-office in that locality, to disseminate documents to influence the public mind in North Carolina. Major Hall, of the Seventh Regiment North Carolina State troops, now in the Confederate service, and in command of the forces in Hyde County, has recently arrested eight men from the Banks, most of whom had been at the headquarters of the enemy and taken the oath. They had in their possession manuscript proclamations (one of which is herewith transmitted) issued by the officer in command to the authorities of towns and villages, as well as certain private citizens in the State. It is very desirable that the prisoners thus taken should be removed from that section of the State. I suppose General Gatlin has reported to the War Department in full on this subject, but I wish especially your opinion as to the legal course to be taken against these prisoners. I herewith inclose a copy of our law of treason against the State, as defined by the recent Convention of our State. It may not reach the offense of all, if any, of the prisoners who have taken the oath to support the Constitution of the United States or others who simply had the proclamations referred to in their possession, besides a letter addressed by one who had taken the oath to a citizen of the State advising submission to the Federal Government.

As to the military defenses of this (eastern) part of the State, I am doing all in my power, in conjunction with Generals Gatlin and Anderson. I take it for granted that they keep you fully advised on the subject, but I cannot refrain from referring you again to the urgent necessity which exists for more arms and munitions of-war for the troops destined for the defense of the coast. The President has informed me that no troops for this defense can be withdrawn from Virginia, but I earnestly trust that if soldiers cannot be spared, I may at least hope that the requisitions for arms and powder and other munitions may be speedily and favorably attended to. I desire to impress upon the Confederate Government the great and pressing importance of defending the coast of North Carolina against actual and threatened invasion.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

HENRY T. CLARK.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS, FORT CLARK, Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina, September 17, 1861.

To the People of North Carolina:

Tue colonel commanding the Federal forces now in North Carolina, having heard of the erroneous impression which exists among the inhabitants as to the object and purpose of said forces, would state that it is no part of the object of said forces to pillage and plunder. We come not to destroy, but to secure peace and uphold the law of the {p.659} United States. The rights of property and persons will be protected and respected, and any Federal soldier infringing upon them will be most severely punished. It is no part of our intention to war against women and children; on the contrary, they shall be protected with all the power under our control. Loyal citizens can enjoy their homes and property without fear of molestation. No law will be abrogated or interfered with unless it comes in conflict with some law of the United States or the Constitution; all others will be obeyed and respected. It is with traitors and rebels in arms who are destroying peace and order and inciting rebellion that the Federal forces are to deal with. We come to give you back law, order, the Constitution, and your rights under it, and to restore peace. We call upon traitors and rebels in arms to lay them down, and upon good citizens, who respect the law, to aid us in our undertaking.

RUSH C. HAWKINS, Colonel Ninth New York Volunteers, Commanding the Post.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Be it ordained by this Convention and it is hereby ordained by the authority of the same as follows: Treason against the State of North Carolina shall consist only in levying war against her or in adhering to her enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act or confession in open court.

Read three times and passed, 18th June, 1861.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, September 26, 1861.

General B. HUGER, Commanding Forces in Norfolk Harbor, Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 24th instant.* We are under many obligations to you for promptly sending forward and occupying Roanoke Island. In doing so you but anticipated my wishes, as it was entirely out of my power to send a single soldier to that section. Since the fall of Hatteras I have been compelled to send the few re-enforcements which have reached me to protect the coast of Pamlico Sound, and to strengthen Fort Macon, which has been repeatedly threatened with attack. When I shall be able to send a regiment to relieve Colonel Wright I am unable to say, but until I do I hope you will continue to extend authority over the troops in that section. I should have written more fully, but my health will not permit.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., September 27, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: I have just seen an order from General Gatlin, announcing the decision of your Department that our troops should only be paid from {p.660} their transfer, and not, as heretofore from their acceptance by the State. This change of the rule will not only be inconsistent, but will work much wrong to our State, and also to the volunteers. All our volunteers in Virginia have been paid from their acceptance by the State. Why should a distinction be made against those serving the Confederacy in North Carolina? I think if you will look into it you will not allow another act of injustice to be done to North Carolina.

We turned over commissary stores to your commissary officer, and I am informed that your officers now make requisition for money on our officers and have been paid. Besides the arms sent to Virginia in the hands of our volunteers, we have sent to Virginia 13,500 stands of arms, and now we are out of arms and our soil is invaded, and you refuse our request to send us back some of our own armed regiments to defend us, and we are left to chances of buying a few odd arms which may be gathered up. We have disarmed ourselves to arm you, and now the additional grievance is added that our volunteers in Virginia are paid from the first step in the service, while volunteers who remained in this State are not to be thus paid.

The recent invasion compels us again to buy a navy for our protection, not receiving it from the Confederate States. We are denied powder, on the ground that we have received more than any other State, without adverting to the fact that the powder has been made into cartridges and sent back to Virginia with every regiment, and now we are driven to the expense of a powder-mill.

These facts are mentioned not as complaints, but as some inducement to continue the order of payment as it has been done heretofore.

The order, I understand, issued from Adjutant-General Cooper, and I trust these matters will be pleaded before him.

Very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, September 29, 1861.

His Excellency HENRY T. CLARK, Governor of North Carolina:

SIR: Your three communications of 24th, 25th, and 27th instant reached me together yesterday. I find that I have already responded to the principal matters referred to in the letter of the 24th. Instructions have already been sent to the district attorney at Goldsborough to indict for treason the men who brought over the proclamation from the Banks, and there seems to be no ground to doubt their conviction.

Immediate attention will be given to replacing Lieutenant-Colonel Bridgers, whose resignation you announce in your letter of 25th, if, indeed, this has not already been done by the general in command.

I now proceed to make answer to your excellency’s letter of 27th instant, in connection with that portion of the letter of 24th which refers to the military defenses of North Carolina. The order in relation to the payment of the North Carolina troops, to which the letter of the 27th is principally addressed, was given by the Adjutant-General under a misapprehension, and had been revoked some days previously to the receipt of your letter. I cannot, however, refrain from some observation on certain other statements in the letter of the 27th instant, lest the silence of this Department be misconstrued into the admission of the truth of the reproaches it has pleased you to lavish on the executive department {p.661} of this Government, and in relation to which your excellency has been most strangely misinformed.

You state that you are compelled again to buy a navy for protection, not receiving it from the Confederate States. If, as appears to be implied, your excellency means to assert the navy received from your State has been diverted to other purposes, and your State thus deprived of naval defense, you will doubtless be pleased to learn how grossly you have been deceived. Not only are the vessels received from your State retained for her defense, but large and costly additions are now being made to the full extent of the resources of your State in shipbuilding. New boats are contracted for, and all boats already existing that can be converted into war steamers have been ordered to be purchased.

You further state that you are denied powder, on the ground “that you have received more than any other State, without adverting to the fact that the powder has been made into cartridges and sent back to Virginia with every regiment.”

Feeling much disturbed that any State should have such good ground of complaint, I was preparing for the delinquent officers the just rebuke which such conduct would merit, when I learned from them that since the fall of Fort Hatteras there had been sent to your State 2,200 rounds of field ammunition, which remained some time at Goldsborough, as being in excess of your wants; that Captain Lawrence had been furnished with all the powder he required on application to the Ordnance Bureau; that there is now here at your disposal for public defense all the powder and fixed ammunition that can be necessary; and I have been unable to trace on the books of the Department any such ground of refusal as is suggested by your letter.

It is true that we have not been able to furnish your State all the cannon powder you desire, and in this respect you share the fate of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana, all of which make the same complaint. But rest satisfied with the assurance that the Government is straining every nerve to increase its supply of that article; that it is establishing factories at numerous points, and supplying the material for the manufacture to private factories; that it is distributing its supply as fairly as it can between the points threatened with immediate attack, and will daily add to that supply as its means increase. Each of those States has established powder mills, as North Carolina has done, and I feel persuaded your excellency, on being apprised of these facts, will not continue to believe that your noble and patriotic State could possibly have been treated with designed injustice by the Confederate Government. The labors of this Department deprive its chief of the repose even of the Sundays, as your excellency will perceive by the date of this letter; and it is, therefore, impossible for me to learn to what fact your excellency alludes when you state that the Confederate commissaries are making requisitions for money on the State officers. I cannot conceive how such a thing can be possible, still less that your officers should pay such requisitions, and still less again that the remedy of the evil complained of should not have been found in your orders to your own officers to refuse honoring requisitions utterly illegal and unauthorized. I will, however, make the proper inquiries of the Commissary-General to-morrow, and trust to be able to give you a satisfactory reply.

In conclusion, may I not pray your excellency to rest assured, in spite of any apparent evidence to the contrary, that it is not only improbable, but impossible, that any officer in high position in this Government can {p.662} have the remotest intention to do injustice to any one of the Confederate States Believe me, your own solicitude for your gallant and patriotic State cannot exceed that felt, not only by the President, but by every member of the Cabinet. Pray consider that the war has recently assumed such formidable dimensions as to make it impossible that human beings can satisfy all the exigencies of all the people at every point that may be exposed or threatened with attack.

In Missouri, in Kentucky, in Western Virginia, on the Potomac, in the Peninsula below the city, on the whole Southern seaboard, in Western Texas, everywhere, ceaseless efforts and vigilance are required. I feel sure that, in view of this extended field of labor, you will rather be disposed to aid in patriotic effort to defend your own coast by hearty co-operation than to complain of neglect or injustice which may possibly occur from other causes, but never from the absence of an earnest desire to do everything in our power in defense of your State.

Your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 166.}

ADJT. AND INSP’R GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, September 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. H. Hill is assigned to duty in North Carolina, and will be charged with the defense of that portion of the State lying between Albemarle Sound and the Neuse River and Pamlico Sound, including those waters. He will proceed to Goldsborough and report to Brigadier-General Gatlin, commanding North Carolina.

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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Abstract from return of the Confederate Department of North Carolina, Brig. Gen. Richard C. Gatlin commanding, for the month of September, 1861.

Troops.Present for duty.Total enlisted present. Aggregate present and absent. Aggr
Officers.Men.
DISTRICT OF CAPE FEAR (BRIG. GEN. J. R. ANDERSON).
Fort Caswell13371404483
Fort Johnston31412489601
Camp Wyatt36609740829
Confederate Point48285100
Camp Davis369651,0161,077
Wilmington and vicinity781,6681,6911,910
Camp Winslow4656872
Camp Hopkins496103107
Total2094,3394,6695,272
DISTRICT OF THE PAMLICO (BRIG. GEN. D. H. HILL).
Fort Macon25404 561648
Camp on Bogue Island681,1851,5841,808
New Berne and vicinity24497667855
Beaufort, Washington, and vicinity44682807926
Hyde City and Middletown15313213330
Roanoke Island621,1241,4681,729
Total2184,2055,4006,296
Grand total4478,54410,06911,568
{p.663}

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RICHMOND, October 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. H. HILL, (Care General Gatlin,) Goldsborough, N. C.:

SIR: Your letter of 29th ultimo* has been received and submitted to the Secretary of War, who instructs me to inform you, in answer, that the suggestion in respect to the transfer of the First North Carolina Regiment from Virginia to your command in the district of country assigned to you is under consideration, but cannot be determined until the President’s return to Richmond.

In answer to your several interrogatories, I am further instructed to state that you are subject to the orders of Brigadier-General Gatlin, commanding in North Carolina, and your brigade reports will necessarily be made to him. Being in command of a section of country confided to your care, you must exercise your judgment in making such arrangements for its defense, &c., as the means at your disposal will admit, without awaiting the sanction of the commanding general of the department. These arrangements will necessarily include all objects of defense and attack, such as the erection of batteries, the sending forth expeditions, and the engagement of the enemy. You are in no sense subject to the orders of the governor of North Carolina, as you are not acting under his authority, but under the authority of the Confederate States.

In respect to marauding parties caught in the act of burning and plundering, you must act according to the exigencies of the case, and with due regard to the rules of civilized warfare.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, N. C., October 1, 1861.

General B. HUGER, Commanding Forces at Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: I feel very anxious to increase the armament of Fort Macon by adding to it four rifled cannon. At this time they have but five long-range guns in the fort, viz, one 10-inch and two 8-inch columbiads and two rifled cannon. This number cannot be very effectual against such large batteries as the fleet may be able to bring against it. I am aware that you have nothing to do with this matter, but I have tried every means (official) to get the guns, as also the projectiles for the guns sent me from Norfolk, but have failed, and now, if you will not come to my assistance, in using your influence with Commodore Buchanan, I must give up the matter. The rifled 32-pounder has but seven projectiles. Ninety-three additional are desired; or, in case no other gun or guns can be furnished, then a much larger supply would be required. Please do me the favor to see the commodore and try to induce him to supply my wants. If he agrees to furnish-the whole or part, I will, upon being informed, send a messenger to see them safely to this point.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.664}

[Indorsement.]

DEAR GENERAL: Having been placed in charge of this part of the coast defenses, I would add my strong solicitations to those of General Gatlin. There is much apathy among the people. They do not want to have their towns destroyed, neither are they disposed to do much for their protection. We are greatly in need of cannon powder. If I could get a supply from Norfolk (as none can be had in Richmond), I would be able to fit up enough of small craft for the effectual defense of the river. Our batteries, too, are badly supplied with that essential article. Anything that you could do for me would be most gratefully appreciated. I will send a machinist in two days to Richmond, to get models of rifle balls of different calibers to be sent here. I know that you will assist him in every way. A letter addressed to me at New Berne would reach me.

Yours, truly,

D. H. HILL.

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NEW BERNE, N. C., October 2, 1861.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army:

SIR: I find things here in much confusion, but I trust to be able to make an efficient defense if the enemy allow a delay of ten days. We need cannon powder badly, fuses, and friction tubes. We have no fuses at all, and the shells have to be loaded with sand. We also need a regiment of cavalry as pickets and scouts. As the enemy can land at so many points on this flat coast, it is impossible for infantry to give notice of his approach or reach with rapidity the point of landing. A few more regiments of infantry are also needed very much. If authority is granted to me to raise them and recommend to the President their field officers, they can be raised without difficulty. I understand that the vesting of the appointing power in the State executive has been an obstacle in the way of raising troops, as many of these appointments have been of a political character. Again, the system of particular individuals setting out to raise companies is also objectionable. The soldiers feel bound to vote for the men who raise the companies, though it may be that these men are least qualified to command. I am told that the troops to be raised would prefer for me to designate beforehand not only their field but also their company officers. Would this be legal?

There are quite a number of sailors of the merchant service here who are anxious to get guns on their small craft to operate in the sound. Could I muster these men into service?

Are the naval officers commanding the Beaufort and other Confederate vessels in these waters subject to my orders? This is a point of great importance, which the President ought to decide. The co-operation of the Navy is essential to the defense of the sound.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

P. S.-I have omitted the most important matter. We need an experienced artillerist to command Fort Macon. It is at present in charge of Major Sloan, a merchant. I would be glad to get the services of three artillerists from the Confederate Army. If these cannot be procured, I would respectfully suggest that Lieutenant Pierson, of De Gournay’s {p.665} battery, at Yorktown, and Sergeants Crane and Hobson, of Randolph’s battalion of howitzers, be commissioned and sent here.

With great respect,

D. H. H.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND BRIGADE VOLUNTEERS, Intrenched Camp, October 2, 1861.

Maj. Gen. B. HUGER, Commanding Department of Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: Yesterday I made a more minute reconnaissance of the country in the immediate vicinity of Sewell’s Point, and determined upon advantageous locations for all the several forces at present designed for the support of that position, and at once gave directions for the immediate concentration of the Second North Carolina and Forty-first Virginia Regiments upon the ground respectively prescribed for these two commands. The remaining five companies of the North Carolina regiment at Ward’s farm were moved forward to-day and the Forty-first will be accordingly transferred to-morrow. I would now respectfully request that, in view of your previous conclusions with reference to the command of this position, the batteries, fort, and forces thereof be transferred by your order to the immediate jurisdiction of the brigade, in order that I may, by proper directions, place the same under the command of Colonel Chambliss. I would also respectfully urge that one, and if possible two, of the artillery batteries may be at once located with reference to-the defense of the position, and in like manner be made subject to the authority of the brigade. I shall visit Sewell’s Point to-morrow, in company with the governor of Virginia, and will see you on Tuesday or Wednesday.

I am, general, your most obedient servant,

WILLIAM MAHONE, Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, Va., October 2, 1861.

Colonel HUNT, Commanding Post at Williamsburg, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication in relation to the affairs of your post. I am aware of its wants in defensive means and its incompleteness of preparation, and I left orders with the engineers and other officers of the general staff; but I thank you for your suggestions, which I approve.

You will cause the three 42-pounder carronades to be mounted as soon as the engineers can provide platforms. These, and such other guns as may be left behind by the artillery officers ordered to the front, you will station for the present in the redoubts (from Tutter’s Neck to Fort Magruder, inclusive), in such manner as you think proper, after consultation with the senior engineer, Lieutenant Boswell. You will cause the ammunition and the necessary means for serving these guns in action to be ready for use, remembering that you cannot be attacked until the enemy’s fleet shall have passed three strong batteries, 15 or 20 miles below you.

As soon, however, as you hear of an attack below on the forts, you will march the Zouaves without delay to Spratley’s farm, to assist the Louisianians in defending that place. At the same time you will man {p.666} the forts with the four companies of your regiment now with you, who will act both as artillerists and infantry, and Colonel Marigny will have orders from me to fall back promptly to your assistance on the lines in front of Williamsburg, the few troops in that town being marched out for that purpose also. At the same time orders will be given by me for four regiments, with the other six companies of your regiment and Montague’s battalion, with four batteries of field artillery, to fall back rapidly on Williamsburg, three of the regiments to proceed directly to Spratley’s farm by means of the lighters, which I have had moored near the mouth of College Creek. Of the field batteries, three will be sent rapidly round by the road to 5pratley’s, whence two of them could be withdrawn for front defense, should the enemy land. As soon as you are perfectly certain that an attack in force is made on the forts below, you will immediately telegraph to Richmond for heavy re-enforcements, one regiment of which will stop at Jamestown Island, and report to Captain Jones, of the Navy, for my instructions.

As soon as you receive this letter you will send to Captain Jones for a navy officer, to teach a detachment from the battalion of your regiment, now at Williamsburg, the service of the 42-pounder carronades, and you will detail the officer of your regiment (of whom you spoke to me as being a good artillerist) to teach the rest of the battalion the use of the field pieces which you will have placed in position in the redoubts. The men of the battalion will have their small-arms at hand, to act as infantry in case of need, and their services as artillery will be temporary.

You will direct Captain Geddy to keep his company of cavalry together and to drill them twice a day, and particularly to see that his men feed and groom their horses thoroughly. You will please be very sparing of leaves of absence to these men, as it is hard to keep them together.

Regulations of the Army and the orders of this department will be your guide for the management of your post in other respects.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, October 2, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: In connection with the conversation which I have had the honor to have with you this morning, I beg to state that in my opinion the position west of Nansemond River, which is now under my command, absolutely requires for its safety and that of the surrounding country a re-enforcement of at least 1,500 men, and, if possible, a mounted battery of four field pieces. I beg to state that General Huger, commanding at Norfolk, concurs with me in these opinions.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON, Brigadier-General, P. A. O. S.

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, October 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. H. HILL, Goldsborough, N. C.:

SIR: Your letter of the 29th ultimo, requesting authority to draw directly from Norfolk such ordnance as the navy officer there could {p.667} spare, without the delay and hinderance of an application in any other quarter, was duly submitted to the Secretary of the Navy, who has control of the ordnance referred to. He has returned your letter to this office with the following indorsement, viz:

[October 3, 1861.]

[S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:]

We have sent from Norfolk to North Carolina, up to July 15, 203 guns; in addition, up to 2d October, 39-in all 242 guns, including six rifled 32-pounders. We have rifled and banded 23 guns, six of which have gone to North Carolina, and we cannot send any more rifled guns at present, our vessels being in want of them. Two additional were ordered yesterday to North Carolina.

S. R. M., Secretary of Navy.

Flag-Officer Lynch, of Confederates States Navy, is charged with the naval defenses of the coast of North Carolina. He is now at Roanoke Island, and it is suggested that you confer with him in regard to the armament of the coast within your district, as he may be able to give you more information on the subject than may possibly be had elsewhere.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, Va., October 3, 1861.

Col. A. C. MYERS, Quartermaster-General, C. S. Army:

SIR: I am instructed by General Magruder to state that, in consequence of the arrival of six additional regiments on the Peninsula without being accompanied by any means for their future transportation, he is seriously embarrassed in his contemplated change of position. The main body of troops have taken up a line some distance below their former location, and it is of the utmost importance that their supplies should be kept in advance some days, in order to facilitate any rapid movement against the enemy. The present number of wagons is inadequate for this purpose, and consequently the movements are greatly restricted. The roads in this neighborhood are exceedingly rough and bad in winter, and it is certainly requisite that the supply of wagons should be one to each company on hand. The number of ambulances is extremely limited, some of the regiments having none whatever; and, in case of a severe action, would not be sufficient for one-half the army. The number of wagons, required to make out our quota is forty-five and the number of ambulances fifteen. These are absolutely necessary for the efficiency of the command.

I am, sir, yours, respectfully,

W. A. ALSTON, Aide-de-Camp.

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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, Executive Department, Raleigh, October 3, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.:

SIR: Your letter of the 24th September informs me that the President desires me to issue my proclamation calling out the militia in the counties bordering on Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. I have given much consideration to the matter, and have concluded to ask a further consultation with you before it is done.

{p.668}

For some considerable time our militia have ceased to have any organization, but our legislature, which has just adjourned, has revised our whole militia system, and it is now undergoing a reorganization, and I doubt whether a call now would effect to much extent the desired object. Their great deficiency in arms presents another difficulty.

Among the acts just passed by our legislature is one authorizing the formation of companies for “local defense and special service,” similar to an act (229) of the Confederate Congress, which it is hoped will supersede the necessity of calling out the militia.

Under these circumstances I would respectfully suggest the propriety of postponing the call for the militia. I need not add that in the mean time I will give every attention to increase the efficiency of the militia.

Very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 89.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 3, 1861.

I. The infantry forces on the Peninsula are hereby organized into brigades, as follows:

The First Brigade: Tenth Georgia Regiment and Second Louisiana Regiment, Brigadier-General McLaws; Second Brigade: Fifth Louisiana Regiment, First Louisiana Battalion, and Louisiana Zouaves, Colonel Hunt; Third Brigade: Fourteenth and Fifteenth Virginia Regiments, Colonel August; Fourth Brigade: Sixth and Sixteenth Georgia Regiments, Colonel Colquitt; Fifth Brigade: Eighth and Thirteenth Alabama Regiments, Colonel Winston; Sixth Brigade: First and Fifth North Carolina Regiments, Colonel McKinney; Seventh Brigade: Tenth and Fourteenth Louisiana Regiments, Colonel Sulakowski; Eighth Brigade: Thirty-second Virginia Regiment, and Montague’s, Waddell’s, and Tomlin’s Virginia battalions, Colonel Ewell. The above organizations take effect upon the promulgation of this order.

...

II. The following assignment of troops is hereby made, to wit: To the position known as Young’s Mill, and extending from Mr. John Patrick’s on the left to the mouth of Deep Creek on the right, are assigned: First, McLaws’ brigade; second, Fifteenth Regiment Virginia Volunteers; third, Forno’s battalion, Fifth Regiment Louisiana Volunteers; fourth, Montague’s battalion, four companies; and, fifth, Second Florida Regiment, to be held in reserve in rear of Young’s grist-mill. These troops and this position will be commanded by Brigadier-General McLaws.

III. To the position known as Harrod’s Mill, commencing at John Patrick’s on the right and extending to Bartlett’s on the left, are assigned: First, the Fourteenth Louisiana Regiment on the right; second, the Sixth Georgia Regiment; third, the Sixteenth Georgia Regiment; fourth, ten companies of the Fifth North Carolina Regiment; fifth, Cobb’s Legion, which will be stationed at Cockletown and held in reserve. These troops and this position will be commanded by Brig. Gen. G. J. Rains.

IV. To the position at Land’s End, the Fourteenth Virginia Regiment, Colonel Hodges.

V. To the position at Ship Point: First, the First North Carolina Regiment; second, the remaining companies of the Fifth North Carolina Regiment; third, the One hundred and fifteenth Regiment Virginia {p.669} Militia, Colonel Mallory. Colonel McKinney will command this station and these troops.

VI. Colonel Hodges and Colonel McKinney will report, the former to General McLaws, the latter to General Rains. Major Waddell’s battalion will remain, until further orders, to garrison the works at Mulberry Point.

VII. The First Louisiana battalion will proceed to Spratley’s farm, near Williamsburg, and will report to Colonel Hunt. The battalion of the Tenth Louisiana Regiment, now at Spratley’s, will proceed to Lee’s Mill and report to Colonel Marigny. The battalion of the Tenth Regiment will leave as soon as it is relieved by the First Louisiana battalion, and will use the same wagons. The remaining infantry at Williamsburg will remain in their present positions.

VIII. To Yorktown are assigned: First, the Eighth and Thirteenth Alabama Regiments, Colonel Winston commanding the post; second, the water batteries at that post, which will be served by Peyton’s and Bouton’s companies, the detachment of Captain Macon’s company, De Gournay’s Zouaves, and such other men as may have been detailed to report to Captain De Gournay. The rifle section of Brown’s battery and Smith’s company (Hampton Artillery) will proceed to Ship Point and report to Colonel McKinney. The remaining section of Brown’s battery and Southall’s company of artillery will take post at Harrod’s Mill, reporting to General Rains.

IX. Cosnahan’s, Garrett’s, Hankins’, and Sands’ batteries, and the rifle section of Standard’s battery will take post at Young’s Mill, reporting to General McLaws. Positions for the artillery assigned to the stations of Harrod’s and Young’s Mills will, after consultation with General McLaws and General Rains, be designated by the chief of artillery, Colonel Randolph, and the officers and men made familiar with these positions, after which the pieces will be withdrawn and the artillery companies will be encamped-those designated for Harrod’s Mill at a convenient place in rear of that station, and those intended for Young’s Mill in a similar position. At each of these stations a school of practice will be established by Colonel Randolph-that on the right to be immediately commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Cabell, and that on the left by Major Brown, both of the Second Regiment Virginia Artillery, the whole under command of Colonel Randolph, of the same regiment.

X. The two 32-pounder guns on field carriages and the 12-pounder guns assigned to the batteries of Cosnahan’s, Garrett’s, and Hawkins’, respectively, will be placed in position by Brigadier-General McLaws in the work being erected on Young’s farm. Those pieces will be served by companies to which they have been assigned.

XI. Colonel Johnston, Second Cavalry, is placed in charge of all the vedettes that are or may be on duty in this department. He will equalize the details for this purpose from his own regiment, and from the cavalry of Cobb’s Legion, calling on its commanding officer for such cavalry details as may be necessary. Colonel Johnston will report directly to the commanding general of the department. The cavalry of Cobb’s Legion will remain encamped with the Legion when not detailed for other service. A squadron of dragoons, under the senior captain of the Second Cavalry, will be stationed at Bethel Church, with Sinclair’s and Hudgins’ companies of infantry, the whole to be commanded by Major Goggin, of the Thirty-second Virginia Regiment. Ten dragoons will be assigned to duty at Yorktown with the commanding officer of that post for express duty. On their arrival at that post the commanding {p.670} officer there will relieve Captain Vaiden’s company of cavalry, and order it to report to Colonel Johnston. Two squadrons (four companies) of the same regiment will take post on Deep Creek, about midway between Young’s saw-mill and the mouth of the creek. They will encamp in one body, but will be shown by General McLaws the positions they are to occupy on the creek in case of an attack from the front. Roads will be made by them from their camp to these positions. These squadrons will be commanded by Major Goode, Second Cavalry. The remaining companies of this regiment will take post, under the immediate command of Colonel Johnston, at Mr. John Patrick’s farm, about midway between Harrod’s and Young’s Mills.

...

XVI. The troops will be hutted for the winter under the direction of the commanding officers of regiments-and detachments, the work to be performed by details from each command.

...

XX. Troops stationed at or near Harrod’s Mill, including those at Ship Point, Cockletown, and Bethel, will constitute the First Division. Those at or near Young’s Mill, including the troops at Land’s End and Warwick Court-House, will constitute the Second Division.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Magruder:

[No signature.]

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ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, October 4, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Jamestown Island, Va.:

SIR: You will send Lieutenant de Lagnel to Mulberry Point to get the canal-boats to be sunk at the mouth of Warwick River, and cause them to be sunk as soon as they arrive. For this purpose you are authorized to take any steamer you can get.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CAPE FEAR, Wilmington, N. C., October 5, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War ad interim, Richmond:

SIR: When I assumed command here I found various works of defense in progress, for which the town of Wilmington was furnishing the money, and I understand is still willing to furnish it; but, inasmuch as I have no doubt a claim will be made on the Government some day for the amounts so expended, I do not feel that I would be authorized to sanction these expenses without further instructions. I therefore ask to be informed whether I am authorized to have constructed such batteries, intrenchments, and other works of defense as I deem necessary for the protection of my command, and to accept the money from the town of Wilmington to pay for them.

It has been stated here that the department has placed in the hands of the governor of this State funds for this purpose. If there be funds applicable to this purpose, I respectfully suggest that they should be {p.671} placed in the hands of the proper engineer officer here on the usual requisition.

...

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

J. H. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, October 7, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a copy of a letter from the Hon. Asa Biggs, judge of the Confederate court, in reference to an unhappy state of feeling among a portion of the citizens of this department. If I am correctly informed the feeling is not confined to Washington County, but has its ramifications along the sounds in many settlements. I have, by establishing troops at such points as the limited means at my disposal permitted, attempted to restore confidence and control the more openly disloyal. Some arrests have been made. The District of the Pamlico is now in some sort of security, but that of the Albemarle, excepting the forces at Roanoke Island, is yet without troops. I must again urge my request that an active and discreet officer be sent to me, in order that I may establish and place him in command of the District of the Albemarle. It is large enough and of sufficient importance to occupy the entire attention of such an officer, nor does the matter admit of delay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

WILLIAMSTON, N. C., October 3, 1861.

General GATLIN, Golds borough, N. C.

According to your request I now address you to give information of the state affairs in this section. This week I have been visited by two intelligent and worthy citizens of Washington County, who consider themselves quite unsafe in the present situation of affairs. They represent that in consequence of the volunteers being taken away from their county it leaves it doubtful whether there is a reliable majority of the people in case of invasion, and while the number is few that make any demonstration by word even of their disloyalty, yet there is that indifference which excites distrust. An attempt has been made to obtain guns for the fortification of the Roanoke River. They were promised at Norfolk, but they have not arrived, and there is no prospect of preparation. We think the river ought to be put in a state of preparation, and troops ought to be ready to sustain the fortifications in case gunboats of the enemy should pass the fortifications on Roanoke Island; and then it is thought that the presence of a battalion at least of troops in Washington County would suppress the feeling of disloyalty which it is feared exists in that county; certainly it would give a sense of security to the people there which does not now prevail. That county is subject also to approaches up the Pamlico River and across the country through that portion of the county which is thought to be {p.672} most disaffected; and these approaches can be made without coming into contact with our forces higher up the river or those stationed in Hyde County. It is seriously feared that an attempt will be made to make a lodgment by the enemy in some part of the Albemarle County for the winter, and if they are prevented by the forces on Roanoke Island they will attempt it up the Pamlico River, disembarking at some point not defended, cross the country, a distance only of 15 or 20 miles, and occupying Plymouth or some point on the Roanoke, with the hope of accessions to their strength from the disaffected population of Tyrrell, Washington, and Beaufort Counties; and therefore these gentlemen think there should be force in the county of Washington to protect the river and be on the alert to resist any invasion that may be attempted from the Pamlico River. I regret to hear there is fear to be apprehended from any disloyal feeling, but these gentlemen assure me it is so, and unless it is corrected soon, it will probably increase as taxes are imposed and collected. What we need is some discreet, intelligent officer sent to plan, direct, and control our defenses and preparations for defense. We want an intelligent head. The people are willing to work or fight, but their energies need direction. Our region of country is entitled to attention. It would be exceedingly difficult to dislodge the enemy if it be true that we have so many disloyal citizens in that county. I hope and believe the state of things is somewhat exaggerated, but I hope it will claim your earliest and promptest attention.

Yours, respectfully,

ASA BIGGS.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, October 7, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. Army:

SIR: There have been within the last few days two deserters from the enemy’s ranks, who bring very reliable and important information, which I desire may be laid before the Secretary of War without delay. One of these is an intelligent boy, a native of Saint Louis, Mo.; the other a Northern man, who has lived, and has a sister and other relatives, in Savannah. The statements of these men, who don’t know each other, and who deserted on different days, are corroborated by information through many other reliable sources. The important points are the following, to wit:

1st. It has been fully determined upon to attack Yorktown by water first, and then, if unsuccessful, by land and water at the same time.

2d. Re-enforcements to the number of 30,000 men will be sent to Fort Monroe and Newport News immediately, of which 5,000 arrived since last Monday.

3d. Seventy brass rifled field pieces, for field service, and 500 horses are now at Fort Monroe in charge of the regulars, and a great many covered wagons.

4th. The men of the command at Newport News have been informed that no quarters will be built for them there this winter, but that they will winter in Yorktown.

5th. General Wool, in a speech to his troops at Newport News on Monday, just a week ago, announced to them that their march would soon be for Yorktown.

6th. Troops are arriving at Fort Monroe and Newport News in considerable numbers daily. They are generally sent to Newport News at {p.673} night, to avoid being seen by General Huger’s troops at Sewell’s and Pig Point.

It is absolutely necessary, therefore, that the arrangements for the defenses of Yorktown should be made without delay, and should be in some degree commensurate with the importance of that place. The subjects to which I have repeatedly invited the attention of the War Department, and which have not been attended to successfully, are as follows:

1st. The supplying a battery of six rifled 32-pounder guns for the water defenses at Yorktown, rendered absolutely necessary there, as ships of the heaviest draught of water and in any number can attack that place from positions beyond the reach of our present guns. It is the key to Richmond, and therefore the most important point on our coast, as it is also the most assailable point.

2d. Some 250 artillerists were required by Colonel Randolph, approved by me, to serve the guns already here, but none have arrived.

3d. The ammunition for the Navy guns here is extremely limited, not more than 50 rounds for each gun. There should be at least 200 rounds each. The answer to requisitions on this subject, both from the Navy Department and the Army ordnance officer, in that there is no powder. If it is so, great injustice has been done to the public interests by not having sent a sufficient supply to Yorktown, for the reasons above given. Requisitions have been made almost weekly.

4th. Furnaces for heating shot for the Navy batteries, which have been repeatedly promised by the chief engineer, Colonel Talcott, have not been made, though I understand the castings are ready. These have been promised for four months, and are rendered the more necessary from the few rounds of time shell (fixed with fuses) furnished.

Other requisitions have but partially been attended to, to wit: The six carriages in the Navy battery, on which six 8-inch columbiads are mounted, are worthless, as they will be destroyed by the shock of fire of our own guns after a few rounds. Four of these have been replaced by four good carriages lately, but the two others it does not appear it is the intention to change. Again, shells are furnished without fuses. I asked for eight regiments more. Five have been ordered here; four have arrived. The fifth, that of Col. Howell Cobb, has not yet arrived. It is now most needed here.

I do not write in a complaining or fault-finding spirit; far from it. All have done their best, doubtless; but I do not think the extreme importance of Yorktown to the whole South, through its bearing upon Richmond, the most strategic point of all, has been properly kept in view, and it is my highest duty to present these facts plainly to the Secretary of War. There are now required, therefore, at this point alone:

1st. A battery of six 32-pounder guns, rifled.

2d. One hundred and fifty rounds to each additional for the guns already here.

3d. Ammunition for the 32-pounder rifled guns asked for.

4th. Two hundred and fifty artillerists, say four companies, of 60 or 70 each. These ought to be had easily, as no other arms are required for them than their cannon.

5th. Furnaces for heating shot for the Navy batteries.

6th. Two army barbette carriages for the remaining two columbiads in the Navy battery, already furnished with four army barbette carriages. {p.674}

7th. Col. Howell Cobb’s regiment, Sixteenth Georgia, not yet come.

8th. Four more regiments, if possible.

The six 32-pounders are the most essential. Without them the enemy will at his leisure dismount our guns and pass up to within forty miles of Richmond, in our sight, without our being able to raise a hand to prevent it, thus turning all the works on James River and those in front of Williamsburg.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Since writing the above I have received a letter from Richmond stating that two 32-pounder rifled guns will be sent here and four 24-pounder rifled guns, the former by the Navy Department, the latter by Colonel Gorgas; also that one 8-inch rifled columbiad, now being finished at the Tredegar Works, may possibly be procured. If the Secretary will order the latter in addition to the two 32-pounders rifled, and four 24-pounders rifled, and the proper ammunition, and in sufficient quantity, to be sent here, I think I can insure the safety of Yorktown. The men, furnaces, gun-carriages, &c, asked for can be furnished, I presume, with less difficulty.

J. B. M.

(Duplicate to Secretary of War.)

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 8, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Col. Howell Cobb’s regiment has not yet arrived, and I understand is still detained in Richmond for want of arms. I beg that they may be furnished, as I am in great need of the service of that regiment. There are but about 9,500 non-commissioned officers and men for duty in this department, with seven posts to garrison, and the enemy to be met in the field besides. The artillery companies, asked for yesterday and some time since, are for this post. In addition to these 250 artillerists, I require the following artillery companies to man the batteries already constructed or being constructed, viz: Williamsburg, three; Mulberry Point, one; Young’s farm, one; Ship Point, one; and Back River, one. As these companies do not require arms, I suppose they can be raised and dispatched at once. I have directed a copy of this letter to be sent to Governor Letcher, who may furnish some of then, Col. T. R. R. Cobb informs me that he was promised by the Secretary of War the return to his Legion of the artillery company which belongs to it, and which is now, I believe, with General Lee. In view of the large preparations now being made at Fort Monroe for field artillery, I have the honor to request that this may be done as soon as possible.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 8, 1861.

Colonel GORGAS, Chief of Ordnance, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: There is a great defect about our shells and spherical-case shot for field pieces. They explode (about one-half of them) at {p.675} the muzzle of the piece. It was so at Bethel. I at first thought it was owing to the cement between the fuse and shell, and had that carefully removed, but with the same result. I think, therefore, it must be in the composition. I cannot remedy that, and, as I expect to meet the enemy soon, must beg you to send me the proper quantity of good fixed ammunition. I have ordered my ordnance officer to make out the necessary requisition. The friction tubes also are worthless; not those made of brass, but those of lead or mixed metal. I think they came from the Virginia Armory. 1 tried many, and not one would explode. We shall be ruined unless you can send me good shell and spherical-case shot and good friction primers. Please let me know, on receipt of this, if you can send them.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 8, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN LETCHER, Governor of Virginia:

SIR: I have examined into the state of the defenses on the north side of the York River, and found that on the coast of Gloucester, Matthews, and Middlesex Counties no works have been erected, and that there are in Gloucester about 180 militia troops, under Colonel Jones; in Matthews, about 500 volunteers, with four small pieces of artillery, and a small force of volunteers in Middlesex.

Colonel Crump commands at Gloucester Point, and I propose to place all these troops under his immediate command, in order that I may have one head to carry out my orders in relation to the defense of these counties. I have already caused an inspection to be made of this coast by Colonel Crump, and have received his report. I have also sought and obtained an interview with Colonel Jones, commanding the militia of Gloucester, and he seems to agree with me as to the best available means of defending this coast. That there will be a descent upon it sooner or later by the enemy I do not entertain a doubt, and I think it will be in the course of this autumn or the ensuing winter. The enemy will attempt to get a foothold to operate upon the many slaves in these counties, and will then be guided by circumstances. If he be repulsed in his first attempt, he will probably abandon it. To prevent his success, it is necessary to fortify the months of the rivers leading into these counties. This can be done rapidly and easily by building inclosed redoubts, and placing in them guns of long range. But as, from there not being deep water in these rivers, his vessels must be of very light draught, I am of opinion that ten 4-pounder rifled guns, one or two in each fort, will be sufficient to repulse him or to deter him from making the attempt.

The forts will be good substitutes for a large number of men requiring more small-arms than we can spare. As it is obvious that the enemy will make his great attack this autumn and winter, I think all the militia of Gloucester, Matthews, Middlesex, King and Queen, and King William Counties should be called out and ordered to report to Colonel Crump at Gloucester, if arms of any kind can be furnished then. At all events, the ten rifled guns (4-pounders, of which Virginia, I am told, has forty) cannot be better employed than in the manner here indicated. I beg, therefore, that you will cause that {p.676} number to be assigned to this use, with their carriages, ammunition, implements, &c., with as little delay as possible.

I am, sir, very truly, yours,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-I have the honor to recommend that Captain Jordan’s company of artillery at Jamestown Island be furnished with a light battery, to remain in this department. Seventy rifled field guns are now at Fort Monroe, preparing for the field, as reported to me by intelligent deserters.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 8, 1861.

Col. ANDREW TALCOTT, Richmond, Va.:

It is a matter of great moment that the defenses at Harden’s Bluff and Mulberry Point should be as strong as possible. The work at Mulberry Point can contain two more guns; that at Harden’s Bluff I have not seen, but Captain Myers, the engineer in charge, informs me that several more guns could be mounted there to great advantage. The river is better commanded at that point than at any other below Jamestown; and if it can be rendered safe there, troops as well as field guns could be used below. I therefore respectfully invite your attention to it as having a bearing upon my operations below. I think, however, that the attack will probably be made at this place, as the great depth and expanse of water here will enable the enemy to attack with ships of any size and in any number, his fire being concentrated at a great distance upon any one of our batteries at a time. It is easier for a fleet to succeed at Yorktown than on James River, and the advantages of success here are much greater, since by it all the works on James River would be at once turned. I am pleased, therefore, to learn from Mr. St. John that there is a prospect of our getting rifled guns of large caliber here soon.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, October 9, 1861.

General R. C. GATLIN, Goldsborough, N. C.:

GENERAL: In reply to yours of the 1st instant* I am instructed to say that the assignment of General Hill cannot be changed, nor is it necessary that it should be. The senior officer at Roanoke Island would necessarily command the defenses at that place, while General Hill will have supervision of the whole district to which he has been assigned. General Huger has asked to be relieved from the command and supervision of Roanoke Island, as being entirely beyond the limits of his present command at Norfolk, and it was for this reason and the necessity for having a superior officer in that section that General Hill was sent to the North Carolina coast.

I am, respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-The light batteries now in North Carolina will remain there.

* Not found. {p.677}

WASHINGTON, [N. C.] October 9, 1861.

Adjt. Gen. J. G. MARTIN:

DEAR SIR: ... The object of my present letter, therefore, is to propose that the governor signify through the public press, that he will call out the militia in the counties bordering on the sound if volunteers enough are not raised by the 20th instant for the defense of the State; the commander of the district to be judge of the proper complement of men.

We are very much in need of three batteries of light artillery. I understand they can be purchased in Rome, Ga., and one battery received in fifteen days from the date of the order. I most earnestly urge the immediate purchase of these guns. There ought to be a battery on Shackelford Banks to prevent the landing of the enemy, &c.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 96.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., October 11, 1861.

The major-general commanding the Army of the Peninsula announces to the troops that he has received reliable information that the enemy will soon advance. Seventy rifled field pieces and 500 artillery horses, with a large number of wagons, are at Fort Monroe ready for the field. The commanding general of the troops at that post and Newport News has proclaimed to his men that no quarters will be built for them, but that they will fight for their winter quarters and find them at Yorktown.

From Saint Louis to Washington, from Washington to New Orleans, the command is: “Onward to the destruction of the South.” Let us, therefore, stand ready to welcome these strangers to “hospitable graves.” The commanding general knows too well the high character of the troops under him to believe that any would desire to be absent upon an occasion like this. Sickness of friends, pecuniary interests, and temporary physical disability, which in ordinary times would be good reason for expecting leaves of absence, can no longer be so considered. Therefore no leaves to officers or furloughs to soldiers will be granted until the month of January, and not then if they shall be considered injurious to the interest of the army. No leaves or furloughs based on certificates of disability will be granted to leave the department, the climate here being now healthy and the hospital accommodations good. In cases where surgeons recommend furloughs on account of sickness, the patients will be sent to the hospital at Bigler’s, or some one of the hospitals attached to the army, where they will be well cared for, and returned for duty when able to perform it.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, N. C., October 12, 1861.

General B. HUGER, Commanding Forces at Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: Since my letter of the 8th instant I have been informed from the Adjutant-General’s Office that it was designed that Roanoke {p.678} island should be embraced in General Hill’s district. I have instructed that officer accordingly. He is now in Hyde County, and will probably visit the island in a few days, with the view of assuming control in that quarter. I have instructed him that, in case he deems it necessary to detain Colonel Wright’s regiment for the present, he will correspond with you on the subject, and also request you to allow your engineers to continue to completion any works in that vicinity now in course of construction.

I am now much pressed for troops, and have none at my disposal to relieve Colonel Wright, and hope that you will not object to his regiment remaining. I presume it would not be prudent to decrease the force on the island.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS PENINSULA ARMY, Yorktown, Va., October 12, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that Captain Phillips’ Old Dominion Dragoons captured 12 of the enemy to-day near Newport News. Some 40 or 50 were pulling down a house about 4 miles on this side of it, when Captain Phillips, with his cavalry, charged upon them. The rest made their escape through a swamp. I send them up in charge of an officer. They represent that there are about 8,000 troops at Newport News and about 18,000 at both forts. They corroborate, in other particulars, the reports of the deserters. Col. Howell Cobb’s regiment has not yet arrived.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General. Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS PENINSULA ARMY, Yorktown-, Va., October 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General MCLAWS, Commanding Young’s Mill, Va.:

GENERAL: The enemy will probably be up as far as Lee’s Store tomorrow morning in force. I wish you to move early to-morrow morning (say at early dawn) with the Second Louisiana, Tenth Georgia, and the Fifteenth Virginia Regiments, with Stanard’s rifle section, Sands’ battery, and two companies of cavalry which will be sent you by Colonel Cobb, and two from Johnston. You will order the guns of Stanard’s sect-ion to be replaced by two guns (12-pounders preferable) from the remaining batteries. I request that you place below Smith’s, or opposite to his farm, the Second Louisiana Regiment, one or two pieces of artillery (one a rifled piece), and one company of cavalry, the rest of your force to be kept just in rear of the pickets and out of sight of the enemy, who will probably come by the main road with cannon, and will have flankers for about 200 yards. Your men ought, therefore, to be at least 400 yards from the road, concealed, with the pieces also concealed. If the picket is attacked they can retire, and will probably be followed. When they are in the open field you can open fire upon them with artillery and infantry. Keep them engaged until they are attacked in rear, then charge with all your forces; but you must judge of the {p.679} ground yourself, and make such dispositions as the nature of the position admits of. I merely throw out the above as a hint.

I will send Colonel Marigny’s regiment up to Young’s Mill, to remain there during your absence. I also order Colonel Cobb to take Colonel Levy’s place, and will be at Young’s Mill myself to-morrow. The artillery can follow the infantry and overtake it before you can reach Lee’s Store or Langan’s Mill.

Yours, very respectfully,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Raleigh, October 14, 1861.

Gen. D. H. HILL, C. S. A., Washington, N. C.:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 9th instant has been received and submitted to the governor. He directs me to inform you that he regrets there are no arms at his disposal, and if the men were raised, could not arm them, and this is a serious difficulty in calling the militia. He will at once make a call, however, for volunteers for local purposes.

The governor says you should make your requisitions on the Confederate States Government for batteries and other military supplies, as he has none on hand. He is willing and ready to give every assistance in his power, but these things should be supplied by that Government.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. MARTIN, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORFOLK, October 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. H. HILL, Commanding, &c.:

DEAR SIR: I had a letter yesterday from General Gatlin, informing me that Roanoke Island was assigned to your command; that you were then in Hyde County, and would soon be at Roanoke Island. I hope this will meet you there, so I inclose it to Colonel Wright. You will see and find out in a day or two what has been done and the many things left undone far better than I can tell you.

I shall be very glad to have you there. I first took Roanoke Island to prevent the enemy getting a position in the sound. I considered it most important. They now, unless they move across to the main-land, must keep all their troops in Fort Hatteras or stretch out on the beach. Chicamacomico shows they cannot stand on open ground. If they extend up the beach we must run them again.

More troops have no doubt gone from here there. General Mansfield is sent there.

I do not see how a large number can stay in or near Hatteras in winter; and if we can deprive them of the use of the light, Hatteras will not be over-agreeable or easily reached.

There is great activity at Fort Monroe and Newport News; troops arriving and departing. They threaten me with a large force in front; so many vessels. I fear to reduce my force, but if there is a chance at the Hessians your way, I am ready to help you.

{p.680}

I must keep a control over my forces, but I have no doubt you and I can act in concert.

I hope soon to hear from you.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

BENJ. HUGER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Mouth of Warwick River, October 17, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 13th instant, and in answer state that I found two 32-pounder guns at Mulberry Point some six weeks since, and was told by Captain Fitzgerald, then in command there, that he had taken them from the steamer Teazer, in order to have something to fire with while the work was being prepared for heavy guns. I learned subsequently that the Teazer has been laid up for repairs in Richmond. I therefore had these guns, which were lying idle at Mulberry Island Point, transferred to the work then being erected at the mouth of this river, where they are now in position with one other gun, a long 32-pounder. I send a map of the lower peninsula, which I had prepared solely from observation, but which is sufficiently correct to show the line I occupy.

The lowest fort on James River, on the left bank, is Mulberry Island Point; opposite is Harden’s Bluff fort, both strong on the water fronts. By a glance at the map it will be seen that if the enemy can land at the mouth of Warwick River he can march to Mulberry island Point and take the fort there in rear. The troops on my line from the mouth of Deep Creek, which is the same as that of Warwick River, to Harwood’s Mill, at the head of Poquosin River, cannot go to the succor of Mulberry Island Point without making a march of some 20 miles around the head of Warwick River; besides, the right flank of my own line is below Warwick River. That flank must be secured and the fort at Mulberry Island Point, both in full sight of the enemy at Newport News, now at least 8,000 strong. I have therefore caused one regiment (500 strong) to take post at Land’s End, on the right, at the mouth of Warwick River, and have thrown up an intrenchment there, but these guns of the Teazer are necessary for the armament of this intrenchment. I have caused rifle-pits to be made to protect the men, and sunk canal-boats across the mouth of the river. I had two old 32-pounder guns without carriages at Williamsburg. I have made field carriages for them here (at Williamsburg), and have had them placed in position on the left bank at the mouth of this river. These obstacles at the mouth can easily be removed by the enemy unless I have a strong battery or batteries to prevent it. Some days since I received a message from Lieutenant Minor, of the Navy, saying that he could send me a heavy 32-pounder for the light 32-pounders, weighing 31 cwt. I answered that such an exchange would be very beneficial to my operations, but that the heavy gun ought to be sent down at once and before the other was taken away.

With this explanation I am ready to deliver up the two light 32-pounders, but beg that at least one heavy one be sent to replace them, and I respectfully suggest that as the enemy may attack us at any moment, it would be advisable to have the heavy gun in battery before the light ones are removed. The Teazer had better be sent to Mulberry {p.681} Island Point with the heavy gun and land it there. I will leave orders with Colonel Hodges, commanding the troops at Land’s End, to send for it, put it up, and then to send over to the fort at Mulberry Island Point the two light guns, or, should the Secretary of the Navy or yourself prefer it, I will send the two light guns to Mulberry Island Point at once. I will mention that I informed Capt. William Blair, of the Navy, by note, of my having taken the two light 32-pounders, Capt. William Blair being in charge of the naval defenses of James River. They were not in position, and were entirely useless where they lay. I heard nothing more on the subject, and presumed everything was satisfactory.

I have the honor to send a report of Colonel Randolph, chief of artillery.* I beg that an indorsement be made on this report directing that the ammunition which will be required by Colonel Randolph for this battery be furnished without delay.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

[Indorsements.]

Referred to Hon. S. R. Mallory. I will issue such order as he may desire.

J. P. B.

Let General Magruder retain the guns.

S. R. M.

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HDQRS. OF THE DISTRICT OF THE CAPE FEAR, Wilmington, N. C., October 18, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond:

SIR: There are two good gunboats here, the Uncle Ben and Mariner. The former has been purchased and prepared for service, wanting only a good rifled gun for her bows, which I understand will come from the Norfolk navy-yard. The Mariner, supposed to be worth about $16,000, could be purchased, and I understand from the Secretary of the Navy he would like to purchase her. These two boats, with a powerful forward gun and one young, energetic Navy officer on each, would, in my opinion, be of great service here, cruising at and near the mouth of the river. There are constantly hovering on this coast vessels of the enemy of various descriptions, some steamers and others said to be sailing barks. Two days ago a very large steamer came near to the beach, with a great many men on board. Occasionally they entice pilots on board, and sometimes negroes. I am of opinion that these gunboats, commanded by suitable officers, by watching an opportunity, could occasionally run astern of some 01 these vessels and capture them. They could also daily visit the various forts, carrying supplies, and exert a good moral effect. I therefore suggest to the Department that it would be well to ask the Navy Department to put them both in service.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

J. R. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.682}

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PORTSMOUTH, VA., October 18, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the condition of the defenses intrusted to my care:

Fort Macon has but four guns of long range, and these are badly supplied with ammunition, and are on very inferior carriages.

New Berne has a tolerable battery, two 8-inch columbiads and two 32-pounders. it is, however, badly supplied with powder. This is also the condition of Washington.

Hyde, the richest county in the State, has ten landings, and only one gun-an English 9-pounder, of great age and venerable appearance.

Roanoke island is the key of one-third of North Carolina, and whose occupancy by the enemy would enable him to reach the great railroad from Richmond to New Orleans. Four additional regiments are absolutely indispensable to the protection of this island. The batteries also need four rifled cannon of heavy caliber. I would most earnestly call the attention of the honorable Secretary of War to the importance of Roanoke Island. Its fall would be fully as fatal as that of Manassas. The enemy has now 8,000 men at Hatteras, and Roanoke Island will undoubtedly be attacked. The towns of Elizabeth, Edenton, Plymouth, and Williamston will be taken, should Roanoke be captured or passed. The inhabitants of those towns have been most criminally indifferent about efforts to fortify them.

I came up last night to this place to get rifled guns, but none can be procured without an order from the Secretary of the Navy. I have written to him on the subject, but fear that no attention will be given by him to the matter. With ten additional rifled guns and a few more regiments I trust to be able to hold the line intrusted to my care. At present I must pronounce my entire inability to do so.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

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PORTSMOUTH, VA., October 18, 1861.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, Secretary C. 8. Navy:

SIR: Having been placed by the honorable Secretary of War in charge of the coast defense of North Carolina from Fort Macon to the Virginia line. I have the honor to call your attention to the following statement of the condition of the fortifications. I make my report to you because the only hope of getting the proper ordnance is the navy-yard in this place.

Fort Macon cannot be held without four more efficient guns of long range. There are but four guns now of long range, and these are illy supplied with ammunition and are mounted on very inferior carriages.

The battery at New Berne is well constructed and has two heavy 8-inch columbiads, but the ammunition is very scarce.

Washington has two good batteries as far as the earthwork is concerned, but the guns are of inferior caliber.

Hyde, the richest county in the State, has ten landings, and only a 9-pounder field piece, an old English gun.

Roanoke Island is the key to one-third of North Carolina, and its possession by the enemy would enable him to seize the great railway connection between north and south of the Confederacy. This all-important {p.683} island is in want of men and guns. It should have at least six more rifled cannon. Feeling that everything depended upon holding it, I came up last night to apply to the Navy Department for ordnance and ordnance stores. I found Commodore Forrest, Captain Fairfax, and General Huger fully as much concerned about the island as I was, but they could do nothing for me without your order. Under these circumstances I most earnestly appeal to you for six additional rifled cannon, four for Fort Macon and two for Roanoke Island. There ought to be, however, four at least for the latter place. I am confident that Manassas itself is not more important than it.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS OF FORCES, Roanoke Island, N. C., October 18, 1861.

Maj. Gen. B. HUGER:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 16th is just received. I am greatly embarrassed. I am ready to go to Hatteras, and would have been there to-day, as the weather is just right-wind from the southwest-but for an order of General Hill, a copy of which I herewith inclose. I have a number of flats or large fish-boats, enough to transport and land 1,200 or 1,500 men. The commodore’s fleet is here, and he is willing and anxious to make the attack. I do not believe the enemy are 8,000 strong, as General Hill seems to think, and, if he wishes, can whip him with 1,200 or 1,500 good men, just such as I have here. I do not like the idea of letting the rascals off without another flogging. For God’s sake, and our country’s too, send down a few more men and let me go at them. I send the Cussatuc back immediately. There is no other boat here. All the barges have been sent to Norfolk. I am very sorry that General Hill interposed and ordered me to remain on the defensive. I thought, and still think, that he should not have given me this order, as I was acting under orders from you; but I was left no discretion and had to obey. The men under my command are, as you know, here with but little clothing. The winter is fast approaching, and, if possible, I would like to get the overcoats we captured on the Fanny to give out to the men. Will you do us the great favor to write to Commodore Lynch or the Navy Department in relation to our getting them. Please allow me to suggest that the quartermaster begin to make arrangements for our winter quarters at Norfolk, if we are to return there. It seems a difficult matter to get our batteries ready for action. Ammunition and the implements to work the guns at Weir Point battery are still wanting. The battery at Roberts’ Fishery is complete; carriages up, but no guns to mount. The small battery on the Roanoke Sound (Midgett’s Hammock) will be commenced to-morrow, and I shall push on the work on an intrenched camp as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. WRIGHT.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT, October 17, 1861.

Col. A. R. Wright, commanding Confederate States forces on Roanoke Island, will retain the troops sent down from Norfolk until further orders. {p.684} He will confine his attention for the present to the defense of the island and will have the land and water fortifications complete as soon as possible. No expedition for offensive operations will be undertaken without my sanction and authority.

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, October 20, 1861.

General COOPER:

SIR: I understand that the enemy are advancing in large force, and that there is a fleet ready to attack us. I urgently request that such troops as can be spared from Richmond may be sent down immediately.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, VA., October 20, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army:

The rifled cannon for this place are at West Point, but no ammunition with them. Please have it sent instantly.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, October 20, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army:

I wish this communicated to the Secretary of War immediately:

Sergeant Dougherty, of the Washington Artillery, Captain Smith, at Hampton, whom I deem a very intelligent and reliable man, has reached this point from the other side of Poquosin River, and reports that he was informed late this evening by his father-in-law, who resides there, that he was just from Fox Hill, and ascertained that some 22 large ships of war had arrived at Old Point within the last week, also 17 gunboats; that he ascertained this fact from men living inside the enemy’s pickets; that a movement was contemplated on Yorktown, with 30,000 men by land and a simultaneous movement by water with the large shipping. The gunboats were intended for the Poquosin River. Three deserters attempted to escape yesterday from Colonel Levy’s regiment. Two of them were captured by my men; the other, it is supposed, made his way to the enemy. A well-executed map was found of the works at Pensacola on the person of one of them.

Very respectfully,

CHAS. MALLORY, Colonel One hundred and Fifteenth Regiment Militia.

I have received a similar letter from General Pemberton. This information may be relied upon. The left flank of my position is open to the enemy. If he lands there, I will be obliged to fall back on Yorktown. Heavy re-enforcements will be necessary to keep him back below my present position and to keep in check a large force which may land on the Poquosin River. The steamer Logan is laid up until Tuesday, broken down. Troops can be sent by James River, to land at Grove Wharf. If the enemy should come up James River, then to land at Jamestown Island. The 10-inch rifled columbiad has not arrived.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.685}

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HEADQUARTERS FORCES ROANOKE ISLAND, Camp Georgia, October 20, 1861.

Maj. Gen. B. HUGER, Commanding Forces, Norfolk, Va.:

GENERAL: The commodore sends up this morning one of his gunboats for repairs (the Raleigh), and I avail myself of the opportunity to let you know that we are still in statu quo. I have no news from the enemy. We have had for two days bad, rainy weather, and yesterday afternoon we had a severe blow from the southwest. I hope the rascals will be driven from Hatteras before many days by Providence, as it seems that we can’t get at them. Commodore Lynch contemplates removing in a day or two his fleet from this quarter and going round to New Berne. If he leaves we will not be able to make any offensive demonstrations against the enemy for want of water transportation. I was greatly in hope that we would be able to give the Hessians a blow before he left, but I almost give it up now. I am ready to start at a moment’s notice, and even without the expected re-enforcements; indeed, I should have gone yesterday but for the written order of General Hill forbidding it. I have been compelled to charter the Cotton Plant, as she is the only boat down here that can get about from the different defenses in progress here. The Navy have had her until yesterday, when at my request the commodore turned her over to me. She is a very poor boat, but we are compelled to have some means of transportation between the different batteries.

The engineer is engaged now in perfecting the floating battery defenses, and if the weather permits we will commence the battery on Roanoke Sound to-morrow. General Hill directed some addition or alteration to be made (as I learn) to the Pork Point battery. I don’t know what they are or how they are progressing, as he said nothing to me about it. I thought that it was due to me as the senior officer here that he should have given his order and direction through me; he, it seems, thought otherwise, and has left me in the dark as to his intentions and operations here. I hope soon to be relieved; indeed I (and the whole regiment) rely on your promise that we should be withdrawn from here and ordered to rejoin our old command. We are more anxious now than ever. So long as you remain in command here we are content to remain, but as this place is assigned to the command of General Hill, we beg to be removed as soon as the interest of the service will permit.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. R. WRIGHT, Colonel, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, October 21, 1861.

Hon. R, M. T. HUNTER, Secretary of State:

You may rest assured that there should be re-enforcements sent here.

I have conversed fully and freely with General Magruder, and his call for more troops should be responded to at once. You could not have a better man here. Rely fully upon his judgment.

HOWELL COBB.

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NORFOLK, October 21, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

A large fleet is about sailing from New York for the purpose of attacking Beaufort and New Berne. This information has been communicated {p.686} to me by a man who represents himself to be a deserter from the frigate Minnesota-an officer-and confirmed by letters found in his possession.* Will send him up to Richmond to-morrow.

BENJ. HUGER, Major-General.

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YORKTOWN, VA., October 21, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have reliable information that the enemy will attack this place with 30 ships of war and 22 gunboats by sea and 30,000 men by land. My left flank, on the Poquosin River and above, is most unsafe, and I can bring but 8,000 men into the field, leaving out regiment and some artillery in the works at Yorktown and Williamsburg, respectively. I want infantry to beat back the enemy, who will land below Yorktown, on York River. If besieged here, they will be sent to Williamsburg, and could, after the crisis passes, in any case be liberated for other points. I send an express to-day with fuller information, but no time should be lost. The steamer Logan will not be ready until Wednesday. These troops can be sent by Grove Wharf or can be landed at Jamestown Island; the former preferable if the enemy be not ascending James River when the steamer passes Jamestown Island, as he may enter both James and York Rivers at the same time. Six thousand men at least are necessary.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, &c.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, October 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. R. ANDERSON, Wilmington, N. C.:

SIR: Your letter of October 18 has been referred to the Secretary of the Navy, who informs me that the Uncle Ben is being fitted out with all dispatch by the Navy Department, and that the Mariner will be, if adapted to service. The disposition of these boats, however, will rest with the Navy Department.

Respectfully,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, October 23, 1861.

General GATLIN, Goldsborough, N. C.:

We have reason to suspect that the expedition now about to sail from Fort Monroe is intended to land a force of about 15,000 men on your coast a few miles below Fort Macon with the view of marching on New Berne. Keep a good lookout. Concentrate your forces so as to repel such an attack. As soon as we are satisfied that our suspicions are correct, we will send you re-enforcements.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

Telegraphed by Cooper to Gatlin same day.

{p.687}

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NAVY DEPARTMENT, C. S., Richmond, Va, October 23, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: Brig. Gen. p. H. Hill, in a report upon the condition of certain coast defenses of North Carolina, informs me that “Fort Macon cannot be held without four more effective guns of long range”; and he calls upon this Department to furnish him with “six additional rifled guns, four for Fort Macon and two for Roanoke Island.” I regret to say that I cannot furnish these guns, and respectfully refer the subject to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy.

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YORKTOWN, October 23, 1861.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

The enemy can land anywhere on the coast of York River within 8 miles of this place below us, and between such point of landing and this place there are no defensible positions. Heavy re-enforcements are therefore necessary, as I consider this post in imminent danger. Everything has been done that could possibly be done with the means at my disposal. If there are not means to afford them in Richmond, I would respectfully suggest that all the cavalry companies there may be armed with rifles or shot-guns, be dismounted, and sent here forthwith, and that all the armed infantry disposable be also sent, with the full supply of ammunition. The enemy’s fleet at Fort Monroe amounts to seventy sail. Please send down also 50,000 cartridges for the Minie muskets. 30,000 for the Enfield, 20,000 thousand for pistols, 50,000 for Sharp’s carbines, and 150,000 for the percussion muskets, and send the proper proportion of caps for each. I am much embarrassed for transportation. Please send 20 ambulances and 50 wagons. All these things have been required for repeatedly, and have no doubt been supplied as fast as the proper departments could do so, but they are now absolutely necessary. I cannot too strongly urge upon the Department the sending immediately such heavy rifled cannon as can possibly be spared, with the ammunition and everything that may be necessary to them, and particularly that the flannel cylinders may be filled there with the proper charges of powder. Colonel Gorgas will oblige me by letting us know what is the proper charge for the rifled 10-inch guns already sent and for any other rifled guns that may be sent.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, October 23, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

The light-ship brought round from East River by Colonel Crump and Captain Page a day or two since has been ordered to assist in transporting troops, their stores, &c.; also the heavy guns and their ammunition, implements, &c. She is capable of carrying 500 men at a time, with their stores.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General.

{p.688}

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YORKTOWN, October 23, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

Information has just been received by telegraph, Norfolk, that large bodies of troops, to effect a landing, it is thought, on York River, are being embarked at Old Point, Re-enforcements should be sent at once.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, VA., October 23, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

I have undoubted authority, an eye-witness, that 25,000 troops have left Annapolis for Fort Monroe. The ships bringing the men are now at Old Point. I cannot urge upon the Department too earnestly the necessity of re-enforcements. The steamer Logan came to-day, but, brought no troops, except one company, previously ordered.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, October 23, 1861.

General COOPER:

A New York paper of 17th instant gives a list of vessels lately arrived at Fort Monroe, with accommodations for 15,000 men. The ship Great Republic, I learn from a prisoner, has landed at the same point 500 horses.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General.

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YORKTOWN, VA., October 23, 1861.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy:

There is not more than powder enough for one day’s fight in the naval battery at this place-Yorktown. Three thousand pounds are required to sustain a siege, and the flannel cylinders sufficient for that quantity of powder. This should be sent immediately, as we look for an attack hourly. Captain Henderson, of the Navy, attached to this battery, is ill and absent.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General.

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YORKTOWN, October 23, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

Have re-enforcements been sent, and by what route?

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General.

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RICHMOND, October 23, 1861.

General J. B. MAGRUDER, Yorktown:

No re-enforcements yet sent.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

{p.689}

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RICHMOND, October 24, 1861.

General B. HUGER, Commanding Norfolk:

GENERAL: I am instructed to say, in reply to your letter of the 21st instant, that the Third Georgia Regiment cannot be spared at this critical moment from Roanoke Island. The rear of your command is threatened by the enemy over that route, rendering the presence of the regiment referred to important there.

Very respectfully, &c.,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GOLDSBOROUGH, October 24, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

Your telegram of yesterday just received (9.30 a.m.). I have but thirty-five companies in the vicinity of New Berne and Fort Macon, including those in the batteries, and no reserve. The other forces are so scattered as to make it difficult to bring them together; hence I beg that re-enforcements be sent at once. Will keep you informed of the movements of the enemy.

R. C.

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RICHMOND, October 24, 1861.

General R. C. GATLIN, Goldsborough, N. C.:

I send you in the morning train to-morrow a regiment and a battalion of seven companies of Georgians with one battery, to rendezvous at Goldsborough, and will send you further re-enforcements as soon as we know you are the object of attack. At present it is conjectural. A part of the enemy’s expedition sailed last night for the South, but to what point is unknown. General Cooper sends you written orders. Don’t move the Georgians from Goldsborough till you are sure that your coast is the point of attack.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, October 24, 1861.

General R. C. GATLIN, Commanding, &c., Goldsborough, N. C.:

GENERAL: Colonel Wofford’s Georgia regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel Stovall’s Georgia battalion, with its light artillery attached, are ordered to proceed immediately from this place to Goldsborough, N. C., for an emergency, either at Wilmington or New Berne, as the case may be, and to be held in hand at Goldsborough under your orders, as the necessities of your command may require. Should the contemplated attack on your coast not be made, you will cause this force to be returned to this place for service elsewhere. In case of a descent of the enemy on the, coast of North Carolina, you will immediately telegraph here, in order that further aid may be sent you.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General. {p.690}

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., October 25, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War:

SIR: I have received various rumors of large fleets and expeditions fitting out at New York and Fortress Monroe, supposed to be designed for our coast. I will make all preparation in my power to repel any invasion, but my resources are now restricted almost to the militia, and they are unarmed, undrilled, and some not yet organized; but with all their imperfections they have been ordered to hold themselves ready with whatever arms and ammunition they have. We feel very defenseless here without arms, and I will not again repeat to you that this has been effected by our generosity to others, but I allude to it in reference to another claim we have on the Confederates of Virginia. We see just over our lines in Virginia, near Suffolk, two or three North Carolina regiments, well armed and well drilled, who are not allowed to come to the defense of their homes, and two of them posted remote from any point of attack. This is not a criticism on their military position, but rather a suggestion of anxiety to have their services when we are so seriously threatened.

I understand that the President objects to sending back any troops, lest he should accomplish the very design of the enemy in drawing off forces from the defenses of Virginia, but the enemy’s designs may change, and finding North Carolina defenseless, may think they can damage the Confederacy as much in North Carolina as in Virginia, and policy as well as experience will prompt the enemy to assail the weakest point. We are threatened with an expedition of 15,000 men. That is the amount of our seaboard army, extended along 400 miles of territory, and at no point can we spare a man, and without the use of arms can’t increase it. Our forts might resist their attacks and landing, but out of reach of the forts we cannot concentrate a force of any magnitude. We have now collected in camps about three regiments without arms, and our only reliance is the slow collection of shot-guns and hunting rifles, and it is difficult to buy, because the people are now hugging their arms to their own bosoms for their defense.

Having been fairly notified of the President’s policy, I would not press this again except that you may be properly apprised of our situation and slender means, with a hope that when a change of policy was discovered on the other side and their demonstrations on our coast became settled invasion, there might be a corresponding change on our side.

Very respectfully,

HENRY T. CLARK.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Asst. Adj’t Gen.’s Office, Yorktown, October 25, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General Confederate Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: The quartermaster general of this department has had a draft in his possession for six weeks of $179,000 (about) for the payment of six or seven regiments under my command, among others the First North Carolina Regiment, whose term of service expires in fourteen or fifteen days. These regiments have not been paid since 30th of June, and the men and officers evince much dissatisfaction. I have been assured by the acting quartermaster here (Captain Bloomfield, assistant {p.691} quartermaster, being absent, sick) that he has sent a special messenger three times to Richmond with this draft, and that each time this messenger has presented the draft at the Treasury several times, and he has not been able to get the money, the statement there being that they could not get the notes. I beg that this be made known to the Secretary of War. Nothing except an unavoidable necessity should prevent the troops being paid.

The artillery horses which have been furnished this department are, almost without exception, worthless. The order has been given, no doubt properly, by the Quartermaster-General, but only the vilest refuse has been sent here. I must have at least one hundred good artillery horses. I have not a single battery in the Peninsula furnished altogether with horses except Randolph’s navy howitzers, which were furnished before I left Richmond. The pieces here are drawn by miserable horses, the caissons by miserable mules, and the harness to a great extent plow harness. The roads are now almost impassable. Of course the field artillery will be useless or lost.

I was willing to submit to these things in the commencement and for a reasonable time, but further neglect in these matters is criminal, and I hope the attention of the departments whose duty it is to furnish these supplies will be called to this neglect.

The friction primers received from the Ordnance Department (a fresh supply), only received a few days since, to supply the place of others which were worthless, turned out to be worthless themselves, and I send a special agent-an officer who can be illy spared from here-to get from the Ordnance Department the means of firing the guns. I wish also at least fifty more wagons and twenty ambulances, with horses and harness for same. They can be had, and should be sent here. Requisitions have been made and repeated, messengers have been sent again and again, and standing agents kept in Richmond to procure these supplies, but with very inadequate results, both as to quantity as well as quality. I need now artillery harness for at least two hundred horses. This is a low country, the roads are flooded with the rains, and these means are necessary here if anywhere. I am informed by the Quartermaster-General that I must depend upon this country (I presume from West Point down) for forage, and when I send agents to purchase, I find that the forage is being purchased by agents of the Quartermaster’s Department from Richmond. Again, no forage can be had in this Peninsula unless it is hauled by our, wagons, and I have not wagons enough to move the troops. The artillery and cavalry horses are dying for want of long forage. I am endeavoring to remedy this, but cannot do it without at least fifty wagons more.

I hope that you will bring this letter to the notice of the Secretary of War, and that he will order from the Quartermaster’s Department one hundred good horses for artillery and fifty good wagons, with four mules and four sets of harness each; twenty ambulances, with the horses and harness corresponding for each. From the Ordnance I wish regular artillery harness for two hundred horses, in the proper proportion of lead and wheel, and friction primers of the best kind.

I should not request that these things should be ordered by the Secretary except that I shall not be otherwise able to obtain them, at least in any reasonable time.

No re-enforcements have yet arrived.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.692}

It is necessary to have two hundred wheelbarrows to transport the earth for fortifications, where it is necessary to erect them in places that afford only surface earth. There are many of these, and the works cannot be erected in any reasonable time without them. I hope they also may be ordered and furnished without delay.

Respectfully,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

OCTOBER 28, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. It appears to me that this is a most extraordinary demand-so I may term it-made at this late day, when it is considered that the Department has not been previously advised of its importance.

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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YORKTOWN, October 26, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

SIR: A statement has just been made to me by an officer below that the whole fleet of the enemy, crowded with troops, has sailed up the Potomac. I do not know that this is reliable, but it is so important, if true, that I think it proper to communicate it. I will endeavor to obtain further information if possible, and transmit it by telegraph, for which purposes the operator at Richmond had better be ordered to sit up. Since writing the above a special messenger, one of my own men, has brought reliable information from the neighborhood of Hampton, and states that there are thirty regiments this morning between Hampton and Fort Monroe; that part of the fleet had set sail with other troops-destination not known; that a considerable quantity of artillery are with the thirty regiments now between Hampton and Fort Monroe, and that it is stated there that by 3d November they will drive our troops from Yorktown, and in six weeks they would be in Richmond. The statements in regard to the number of troops are deemed to be reliable. They were doubtless in that number and position this morning. General Wool has changed his headquarters to Newport News, General Mansfield being in command of the forces at and near Fort Monroe.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND October 28, 1861.

General JOSEPH R. ANDERSON, Wilmington, N. C.:

The enemy’s fleet has just left Hampton Roads. Our spies in Washington report that the expedition is aimed at Wilmington, Smithville, and Fayetteville Arsenal. Keep a good lookout, and telegraph us the instant it shows itself. There are about 1,500 Georgia troops at Goldsborough. If the fleet approaches you, telegraph also to General Gatlin, at Goldsborough, to forward the Georgians, with their field battery, to your aid, and we will send further re-enforcements. I dare not send more troops now, as the information may not be correct.*

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

* Similar dispatch to Gatlin, same date.

{p.693}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, October 28, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose herewith a letter from Brig. Gen. D. H. Hill, containing a partial report of a tour through his district. You will perceive that he strongly urges that two regiments be sent to Roanoke Island to take the place of Colonel Wright’s. The post is of such importance that could I have done so I should long since have re-enforced it, but I am unable to send a soldier there without withdrawing them from points already insufficiently defended. I must, therefore, request that the general’s letter be submitted to the President, hoping that he may see some way of furnishing the required force. I have repeatedly urged upon the governor the necessity of sending every man he can arm to the coast. His reply has been that he can send men, but has no arms with which to furnish them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

FORT MACON, N. C., October 27, 1861.

General R. C. GATLIN:

DEAR SIR: I must again repeat my earnest convictions that the occupation of Shackelford Banks by a regiment of infantry and a battery of artillery is essential to the defense of Fort Macon. I learn from Captain Pool, stationed on the Banks, that in the last twenty-eight days the Yankees have been employed twenty days in sounding the approaches to the Banks. They have landed in small parties several times, and have sought to gain all information from the Bankers about the island, the force on it, width, extent, &c. Should the enemy occupy it, he could establish a mortar battery against the fort and drag their surf-boats without difficulty across into Core Sound. Let me entreat you to send a regiment to occupy the Banks.

In regard to a battery, I wrote to the governor three weeks ago that he could get one from Rome, Ga., in ten days. He replies that it is the business of the Confederacy to finish the battery.*

...

I am very much troubled about Roanoke Island. They have three formidable batteries, but badly located and without adequate infantry support. I went to Norfolk, and Succeeded in getting two rifled cannon for that point, shell and powder, three carronades for Hyde and two rifled cannon for Washington, and the promise of rifling two more for Pungo River. I established a battery at Pungo, but could get nothing but two 24-pounders with carriages and two without. The occupation of that river by the enemy would cut off Hyde and serve as a place of operations against Washington.

General Huger told me that he could not spare Colonel Wright, and wanted you to supply his place immediately. There ought to be two North Carolina regiments on Roanoke besides Colonel Shaw’s command. There is bad feeling between the North Carolina and Georgia troops. Should we attempt the recapture of Hatteras Roanoke is the proper place to start from. The newspapers could not inform the enemy about {p.694} the expedition if started from Roanoke Island. I am having a line of defense thrown up to defend the approaches to New Berne, Washington, Hyde, and Roanoke. The spade has been set agoing everywhere I have been, even in lazy Elizabeth. I have also got the promise of a little work from Beaufort. Should it be done, the age of miracles is not yet over.

I will go to-morrow to Swansborough. I understand that there is a large amount of cotton in the neighborhood, which is attracting Yankee cupidity. I will direct its removal to the interior. The Yankee force at Hatteras is said to be 8,000. I fear for Roanoke Island. That place and this are the weak points in my department. Two more regiments should immediately be sent to Roanoke Island one with a battery to Shackelford Banks.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, C. S. Army.

* Something omitted in copy as forwarded by General Gatlin

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HEADQUARTERS, WILMINGTON, N. C., October 29, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War:

Your dispatch was received this morning. I have made arrangements to concentrate my forces as early as practicable when he indicates his point of attack. Very little of my requisition of 27th ultimo for ordnance stores has been sent me. Please have the following essentials sent me by express: 5,000 friction primers; 1,000 rounds 6-pounder canister, fixed; 200 rounds 12-pounder canister, fixed; 200 rounds 12-pounder spherical case, fixed; 5,000 pistol caps; 8,000 musket caps, extra; 100,000 ball cartridges, musket; 10,000 Mississippi-rifle ball cartridges. I am in great want of an experienced artillery officer, to command Fort Fisher, on Confederate Point. Send me, if possible, one from the old Army or Navy, with the temporary rank of major.

J. R. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, October 30, 1861.

General JOSEPH R. ANDERSON, Wilmington, N. C.:

Ammunition, as required, was sent you by special messenger this morning.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. N. C. TROOPS, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Raleigh, October 30, 1861.

Col. SAMUEL T. CARRON, Washington, Beaufort County, N. C.:

COLONEL: Under existing circumstances it is desirable that the militia be in condition to be called out at the shortest notice. With this in view you will call them out in the county of Beaufort as often as you may deem necessary (at least once a week) for inspection and instruction, {p.695} being careful that they understand that when called out they must appear with arms and ammunition. When called out for active service it must be done in accordance with section 80, page 422, Revised Code of North Carolina. You will please call the attention of the justices to this law, and impress upon them the importance of not being too late with their call when the time comes.

Very respectfully,

J. G. MARTIN, Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. N. C. TROOPS, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Raleigh, October 30, 1861.

Col. SAMUEL T. CARRON, Washington, Beaufort County, N. C.:

COLONEL: In my circular of the 23d instant you were informed that the militia of your county would be (if necessary) called out by the justices of the county. I would now add that should Generals Gatlin or Hill call them out, you will respond immediately.

Very respectfully,

J. G. MARTIN, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, October 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. H. HILL, Commanding District of the Pamlico, New Berne, N. C.:

GENERAL: I am further directed to say to you that the general commanding wishes you to call out in his name the militia of the counties of Duplin, Lenoir, Onslow, Jones, Craven, Beaufort, Hertford, and Carteret whenever you may think the emergency demands it, agreeably to the authority vested in him and the instructions given to the colonels of militia in those counties by Adjt. Gen. J. G. Martin, of North Carolina, dated October 24, 1861.

You will please understand that you are authorized to call out the militia from the whole or any one or more of those counties at one time in his name.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. RIDDICK, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Some matters of detail omitted.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, October 31, 1861.

[Extract.]

Brig. Gen. D. H. HILL, Commanding District of Pamlico, New Berne, N. C.:

GENERAL: I do not think it worth while to call out the militia except in case of great emergency, for I have no confidence in their usefulness.

{p.696}

Please direct Major Thompson to make estimates on the governor for funds. I have done so, but as yet he has not complied. The President has placed a large amount in the hands of the governor for coast defense, but if any has been appropriated, it has been for Wilmington only.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, November 1, 1861.

General D. H. HILL, Comdg. District of the Pamlico, New Berne, N. C.:

GENERAL: I regret that you should have misunderstood me in regard to the calling out of the militia. I presume I must have badly expressed myself, as I had no idea of ordering you not to do it.

Lieutenant-Colonel Riddick will inclose to you the authority of the governor to call them out, which you will do at your own discretion.

I regret I shall not be able to go down to New Berne this afternoon, as the destination of the fleet is not yet determined.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS NORTH CAROLINA TROOPS, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Raleigh, October 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. R. C. GATLIN, Comdg. Dep’t of North Carolina, New Berne, N. C.:

GENERAL: Inclosed I send a copy of a circular sent this day to the commanding officers of militia in the following-named counties: Currituck, Camden, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Chowan, Bertie, Martin, Washington, Tyrrell, Hyde, Beaufort, Craven, Carteret, Lenoir, and Jones.

This circular I directed to be sent at the time the others were, but by some mistake it was not done.

Copy of circular.

In my circular dated 23d instant you were informed that the militia of your county would be (if necessary) called out by the justices of the county. I will now add, should Generals Gatlin or Hill call them out, you will respond immediately.

Very respectfully,

J. G. MARTIN, Adjutant-General.

The name of General Hill is inserted in the circulars sent to those counties that he will be most likely to call upon and that of General Anderson in the others.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. MARTIN, Adjutant-General.

{p.697}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, November 2, 1861.

His Excellency Gov. HENRY T. CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of October 25, in regard to the condition of North Carolina. The dangers which have threatened or may still threaten your State have not escaped the solicitude of the Government, and no effort has been spared or will in future be spared to provide against every attack. Before your letter was received a regiment, a battalion, and a battery of artillery had been ordered to Goldsborough, to be in readiness to re-enforce any point which might be threatened with an attack, and three more regiments were held in readiness in Richmond for the same purpose. I trust your excellency will believe me when I assure you that your own solicitude for the safety of North Carolina cannot be greater than ours. No safeguard which we can command for your defense will be overlooked. The safety of all parts of the Confederate States engages equally the solicitude of the Government, and the people of North Carolina may be encouraged in their efforts for their own defense by the assurance that no assistance which the Government can afford them against the-common foe will be withheld.

Respectfully,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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ENGINEER BUREAU, Richmond, Va., November 9, 1861.

Maj. Gen. J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Commanding Army of the Peninsula, Yorktown, Va.:

SIR: Your application for an additional force of 500 hands, to be employed upon the defenses of the Peninsula, has been laid before the honorable Secretary of War. He expresses himself as not apprehensive that the enemy will undertake a winter campaign in that quarter. He deprecates the heavy expense of such an additional hired force, and fears that the hands hitherto employed have been kept too long from important agricultural labors. Under these circumstances I am instructed to say that your requisition has not been approved.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

D. LEADBETTER, Major of Engineers, Acting Chief of Bureau.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 105.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Bethel, Va., November 10, 1861.

So much of General Orders, No. 89 (October 3), as refers to the organization of the Army of the Peninsula into brigades is hereby revoked. The commanding officers of regiments, battalions, and separate detachments will send their reports to their respective generals of divisions. The troops at and in the vicinity of Bethel, including Broken Bridge and Half-way House, will send their morning reports, through Colonel Winston, to the commanding general. Such troops as, in the absence of the commanding general, may remain at and in the vicinity of Bethel, including Halfway House, will report directly to Colonel Winston.

The First Division of the Army, Brig. Gen. G. J. Rains commanding, {p.698} will be composed of the troops stationed at the following posts, viz: Yorktown, Upper Grafton Church, Ship Point, Harrod’s Mill, Camp Marion, Half-way House, Broken Bridge, and Bethel.

All the other troops on the Peninsula, except those stationed at Williamsburg, Jamestown Island, Mulberry Island Point, and Major Phillips’ Cavalry (which latter will be under the immediate command of Colonel Johnston) will constitute the Second Division, Brig. Gen. L. McLaws, commanding.

Such troops as may be temporarily operating with the First Division will, upon their return to their respective encampments on the Warwick road, revert to the command of Brigadier-General McLaws.

By command of Major-General Magruder:

TH. JEFFERSON PAGE, JR., Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF PAMLICO, New Berne, November 14, 1861.

Lieutenant SELDEN:

I was much pleased with your zeal and ability in the construction of the new battery. You know it is my intention to have the lower battery moved up and a line of intrenchments thrown entirely across the island for infantry defense.

I do not wish a gun moved from Pork Point battery until the works at the new battery (position) are completed, with platforms laid, and then to move them with great rapidity.

I presume that by extending the new battery to the right or left you can find room for all the guns below.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS PENINSULA ARMY, Bethel, Va., November 14, 1861.

Col. CHARLES SMITH, Thirty-Ninth Va. Vols., Camp Huger, Northampton, Va.:

SIR: I have been instructed by the major-general commanding to acknowledge the receipt of your communication by Lieutenant Parramore, stating that from 3,000 to 5,000 of the enemy are advancing upon the Virginia line of Accomac and Northampton, and asking for re-enforcements. He regrets that he has neither the re-enforcements to send nor the means to send them, but feels convinced, from the state of the enemy’s fleet, that you will not be attacked at present by water. He hopes that the 32-pounders, the arrival of which at Gloucester he accidently heard of, will reach you very soon, conducted by Lieutenant Bayley, whom you sent for them. Though he takes great interest in your situation, he must inform you that the counties of Accomac and Northampton have not been assigned to this department. Nevertheless, he takes the liberty of suggesting that, as he understands from Lieutenant Parramore, your bearer of dispatches, that you can bring into the field (militia and all) about 2,500 men, with various arms, accompanied by eight pieces of artillery, it would be the best policy to march upon the invading foe the moment he crosses the line, and attack {p.699} him with great vigor and devotion. A victory to your arms will probably be the result, and a second attempt by the enemy will not probably be made. The major-general commanding has given an order for one hundred and fifty percussion muskets, with ammunition, to be turned over to Lieutenant Parramore, in order to strengthen you.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY BRYAN, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CAPE FEAR, Wilmington, November 15, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond:

SIR: It becomes my duty to report that, in pursuance of the instructions of the honorable Secretary of War to “send all the force I could possibly spare to the aid of South Carolina in the event she should be attacked,” I sent two regiments of infantry and one field battery of six brass pieces (Captain Moore’s). It will be understood that this is a force I thought I could spare when the enemy had passed this point and actually attacked our brethren in another State, but it is a force which cannot be spared after the emergency has passed, looking to the general defense of this part of the coast, especially since the withdrawal of the reserves from Goldsborough. If these regiments are likely to remain in South Carolina long-and in any event to be prepared for attack-I respectfully request that two of the three regiments which I learn from his excellency the governor of North Carolina he has organized, but for which he has no arms, be armed if practicable, and ordered to report to me as early as practicable.

Whilst the matter of sending this force to South Carolina was left to my judgment I did not hesitate a moment, and I am well assured that those to whose assistance they were sent would promptly have come to my aid if the attack had been made here, and it is proper that I should remark upon the alacrity with which my orders were obeyed by both officers and men without exception. Indeed, the only difficulty with me was to say who should not go when all were volunteers for the post of danger.

It is due, too, to the militia of the neighboring counties that I should formally announce to you that when I conceived it my duty to call for their assistance on occasion of the recent apprehended attack, they almost to a man rushed to their country’s standard, each man with a weapon. So universal was the turn-out, that I found it prudent to detail detachments to return to the counties for police purposes.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

J. R. ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Bethel, November 16, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have received two communications from Colonel Smith, commanding, and one verbally, representing the state of things on the {p.700} Eastern Shore of Virginia, giving the amount of infantry and cavalry in that country at 800 volunteers, eight pieces of field artillery, which can be furnished with horses, and about 1,000 or 1,200 fighting men of all ages, who can be variously armed.

I learn also that there are six 32-pounders at Gloucester Point, en route for the Eastern Shore. Colonel Smith, the commanding officer there, calls upon me for re-enforcements, stating that there are from 3,000 to 5,000 of the enemy near the Maryland line, I presume awaiting re-enforcements. I have answered him that I have neither the re-enforcements nor the means of sending them if I had, the only steamer, the Logan, within my command being broken down and not likely to be repaired for some weeks. I advised him to attack the enemy as soon as he crossed the line with all the force he had.

All this has no doubt been represented to the War Department, but as these counties have not been attached to my command, I am without information as to the line of policy adopted at Richmond in respect to them.

While I sympathize deeply with the inhabitants of these counties from their present extreme peril, I am nevertheless of the opinion that it is impossible to prevent the enemy overrunning them, and that the present is the best opportunity to withdraw the troops and munitions of war from that region. The political question, however, is one for the Government and not for me, and upon that subject I offer no opinion.

I have the utmost confidence in the gallantry of these citizens, and from an interview with Colonel Smith, the commanding officer, I am favorably impressed with his ability.

Should an action take place at present between the forces opposite each other, I entertain a strong hope that a victory on our side will be the result, and that the enemy thus repulsed might find such other occupation for his arms as would relieve this region from further molestation.

In the mean time, if the Government considers me in any manner in command of the troops on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, I shall be happy to receive instructions.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 224.}

ADJT. AND INSP’R GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., November 16, 1861.

...

VI. Brig. Gen. L. IB. Branch, Provisional Army, will relieve Brigadier-General Hill in command of district in North Carolina. Brigadier-General Hill, Provisional Army, is assigned to the command of the North Carolina brigade in the Potomac District, and will immediately repair to Centreville and report to General J. E. Johnston, commanding the Department of Northern Virginia.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.701}

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BETHEL, VA., November 17, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

SIR: I beg leave to state that Dr. William S. Morris, president of telegraph company, has failed to send forward the materials and chemicals necessary to keep the telegraph lines in operation which I have constructed with so much labor, and that I have sent Mr. Conner, one of the telegraph operators, to Richmond for the purpose of getting the necessary chemicals, and not having returned, so far as I have learned, I presume Dr. Morris has kept him also. For the want of these articles the line is seldom in operation between Yorktown and Richmond even. The enemy have advanced 5 miles from Old Point to-day, and have occupied an important position, which he may desire to fortify, but which I do not wish him to do. It is nearly half way between his two positions at Old Point and Newport News, he having probably at each of these places troops superior in numbers to my own. In front of this advanced position there is a narrow but deep and unfordable river; nevertheless, if I can find the means of crossing it and driving away this force by attacking it in flank and rear, I will endeavor to do it, if he attempts to fortify it. I have refused to send the men from this department which Dr. Morris, president of Southern Telegraph Company, requires, as their services are necessary to me, and I hope the War Department will sustain me in it, and cause Dr. Morris to send Mr. Conner back, with the necessary chemicals and wire, forthwith.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Bethel, Va., November 18, 1861.

Colonel MCKINNEY, Broke Bridge, Va.:

SIR: I am instructed by Major-General Magruder to inform you that you will take charge of the column to proceed on the Back River road to-morrow morning, which will be formed and proceed, as usual, to Hudgins’ Corner. Two pieces, one rifled and one howitzer, from Hudnall’s battery, will go, as usual, instead of the Albemarle Artillery, which went to-day, and the Old Dominion Dragoons will take the lead, and be sent forward as before, when the column halts at Hudgins’ Corner. Then Colonel Cobb will be sent to Mrs. Hudgins’ with his Legion and as many wagons as he may think necessary, which will be loaded by the Legion. The balance of the wagons will be loaded with wheat from the fields on the right. In case an advance of the enemy is reported, the wagons will be sent back by the new road and bridge, constructed by Lieutenant McKee, through Winder’s and Curtis’ farms. Otherwise the column will return, as usual, by the main Back River road. I am further instructed to direct you to draw your rations, including fresh meat, from the commissary at Bethel.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY BRYAN, Aide-de-Camp.

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NORFOLK, November 18, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN:

Enemy sending troops up James River. Embarked at Newport News in steamers. Chartered gunboats. Our steamers in the river should {p.702} be notified accordingly. No idea of where they purpose making a demonstration.

J. P. MILLIGAN, Captain and Signal Officer.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, November 21, 1861.

His Excellency HENRY T. CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

SIR: Your letter of 18th instant, in regard to the condition of some of the border counties of North Carolina, and as king for arms for two regiments, has been received. I regret that I am not able to fill your requisitions for arms. If we had them to spare they should cheerfully be placed at your disposal for the purpose designated. The supply just received by the Fingal is by no means so large as has been represented. We received but 9,000, and these have been divided between Generals Lee and A. S. Johnston, in whose-departments the danger of attack by superior force seemed most imminent. I can assure you, however, that arrangements have been made to secure the safety of Eastern Tennessee and Northwestern North Carolina, and to crush out all treason in that section, which will doubtless prove effectual.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., November 25, 1861.

Brigadier-General MCLAWS, Commanding at Young’s Mill, Va.:

SIR: I have lost and am losing the services of the efficient body of engineers who have been in the service of the State of Virginia since the war, and who have been engaged in constructing most of the defensive works on this Peninsula. It is not possible to do without these officers, as the line of our Army cannot furnish military engineers. These officers are all of them well educated, and many (such as Mr. St. John and Captain Rives) distinguished for great talent and energy. All have devoted themselves also to military engineering, and all are highly qualified for the duties required of them. From the very large number of points requiring defense, there are of necessity a great many works. Those on the water must be completed and properly armed or they cannot be defended, however devoted the garrison may be. The last storm almost entirely destroyed the works at Mulberry Island Point, on James River. The work is in sight of the enemy. Negroes have deserted from it and informed the enemy of its situation. They will attack it, I presume, as soon as they can make preparations, and, if they carry it, as they probably will, in its present state, a great disaster may happen. It was under the command of Captain Noland, late U. S. Navy, then in the service of Virginia. Be has resigned, as he could not obtain the rank of major in the provisional or volunteer service, and would have been ranked by the two captains, who had been under him, and who, from the nature of the service, cannot know the duties with which Captain Noland is familiar. I beg that Captain Noland may receive the rank of major, Provisional Army. I do not write in a spirit of complaint. I know the difficulties which surround the President, and, for one, fully appreciate them, and explain them to {p.703} others; but the great, if not insurmountable, embarrassments produced by the loss of the engineers at this moment and of the services of the Navy officers I am obliged to make known to the War Department.

Mr. St. John, of the engineers, under Colonel Talcott, is acting chief engineer in this department, employed as engineer by Colonel Talcott, and appointed by me to act as chief. His services are beyond price. His energy and talent exceed any that I have ever witnessed. No provision, I am told, is made for him, but he remains steadfast to his post, and 1 hope the President will have it in his power to bestow upon him the commission of captain in one of the corps. He is recommended in the strongest terms, I understand, both by Colonels Leadbetter and Talcott, and mine, in his favor, cannot be made as strong as his own merit. His loss will be irreparable.

I have just returned from below, having secured a supply of about 20,000 bushels of corn and other forage. A regiment of the enemy was routed within 3 miles of Hampton by a display of a few cavalry, under Captain Adams, Third Virginia Cavalry, and three shells from a section of Sands’ battery, commanded by Lieut. Walter H. Robertson, Virginia Artillery. One man of Captain Adams’ company was wounded in three places on our side, and 3 or 4 of the enemy killed and wounded.

The enemy made an unsuccessful attempt at ambuscade a few days after, within a mile of Hampton. Another party was flushed by a discharge of one of the rifle pieces of Maurin’s Louisiana Battery.

On the 22d instant, at 12 o’clock at night, two of enemy’s steamers fired forty-six shots on our picket guard on James River, just below Warwick, injuring no one. They must have been 3 miles from the shore, yet their shells reached at least half a mile inland. The shell appears to be percussion. I sent one to Colonel Gorgas on account of the excellence of the range and for examination.

There are but twenty-four guns at Yorktown and Gloucester Point, both bearing on the water point. There are not more than an average of fifty rounds of ammunition per gun. I have exhausted all the means of representation in my power to obtain more guns and ammunition, and can do nothing more than to keep the fact before the Department, by stating it from time to time.

The engineers (Colonels Leadbetter and Talcott), before the fall of Port Royal, represented that fifty was the smallest number of guns by means of which a successful defense of this place could be expected.

I hope, in view of the great public interests involved and of the excellence of the officers themselves, that the President will have it in his power to commission all of the engineers who have been and are employed on this Peninsula.

The following are the names of the officers who have served and are serving with me:

Mr. A. L. Rives, captain, Virginia Engineers; I. M. St. John, chief of engineer department ; E. T. D. Myers, captain, Virginia Engineers; Mr. Clark, on duty at Gloucester Point, as principal engineer; J. H. Boswell, first lieutenant, Virginia Engineers; M. Derrick, engineer, now at Mulberry Island Point; J. R. Crump, first lieutenant, Virginia Engineers; R. L. Poor, second lieutenant, Virginia volunteers; Mr. Morton, engineer, assisting Mr. St. John; Mr. Dade, engineer, assisting Mr. St. John, and W. Belleyens, second lieutenant Virginia volunteers.

All the above names, I presume, are handed in to the office of the Chief Engineer, Colonel Leadbetter.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.704}

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, November 26, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN LETCHER, Governor of Virginia:

SIR: I think Matthews and Gloucester will certainly be attacked very soon. I am informed of it through gentlemen who have left the Eastern Shore, and have heard the fact stated by the enemy. I have no doubt of it. There were six 32-pounders here on their way to the Eastern Shore of Virginia. They are of 45,000 pounds’ weight, and are the very pieces to be put in position at once on the coast of Matthews and Gloucester. Captain Page, of the Navy, has been ordered to send them back to Richmond by the Navy Department. Three were shipped yesterday and three to-day. Please see the Secretaries of War and Navy, and get them ordered back without delay. An inspection of the map will show you what disastrous consequences must follow their invasion, if successful, both to the people of that region and the operations of the Army of the Peninsula. There are but few men on the Gloucester side of York, and none can be spared from here. Something must be done at once or it may be too late. I shall order out all the negroes that may be necessary at once to build works, but must have the cannon, if possible. I have not been able to get the guns or the promise of them before; therefore did not think it right to take the hands from their owners to construct works which without guns would be useless. I am now in hopes that the immediate vicinity of the enemy may induce those in power to send me guns, particularly those six 42-pounders now on their return to Richmond. Please ask them to send me also as many artillery companies, with or without guns, as can be sent, and at least four regiments of infantry-all that you can get. I write the substance of the above by telegraph.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, November 28, 1861.

This letter, received to-night, is respectfully referred to the consideration of the honorable Secretary of War. The letter is so earnest in its language, that I lose no time in laying it before you.

I am, truly,

JOHN LETCHER.

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YORKTOWN, November 26, 1861.

His Excellency JOHN LETCHER, Governor:

Please ask the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy to cause the order to Captain Page, of the Navy, to send back the six 42-pounder guns intended originally for the Eastern Shore of Virginia to be countermanded, and these guns ordered to be used for the defense of Gloucester and Matthews. These guns are now at West Point, en route to Richmond. Ask for four companies of artillery, with or without pieces; also, if possible, four regiments of infantry-as many as you can get.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.705}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 240.}

ADJT. AND INSP’R GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., November 26, 1861.

...

4. Roanoke Island will hereafter constitute a portion of General Branch’s district in General Gatlin’s command. General Gatlin will send to Roanoke Island a regiment of North Carolina troops to relieve Colonel Wright’s Third Regiment Georgia Volunteers, and then order the latter to report for duty to General Huger, at Norfolk, Va.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, November 29, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: In accordance with Special Orders, No. 240, I have ordered Colonel Jordan’s regiment of North Carolina volunteers to proceed to Roanoke Island.

Under instructions from these headquarters, dated the 11th ultimo, Brigadier-General Hill assumed command of the forces upon that island, as being included in his district. Brigadier-General Branch has relieved Brigadier-General Hill in command of the District of the Pamlico.

Having more than once addressed the Department on the subject of establishing another district in the Department of North Carolina, I renew the subject at this time with some diffidence; yet the removal of Brigadier-General Hill and the appointment of a successor of less experience makes it advisable that I should represent the necessity of a division of the district now commanded by Brigadier-General Branch. General Hill, with all his activity, was never able to make a tour of his command in less than fifteen days, such is its extent coastwise. As it is impossible that one officer can give proper attention to the whole district, I beg respectfully to recommend that it be divided, and that a district be formed out of it and a small part of the District of the Cape Fear, embracing the country along the coast from New River to the Neuse River, including the waters of the latter. Within the limits of the proposed district there are now stationed three regiments of infantry, five companies of artillery, three of cavalry, and a number of local companies, and within the remaining part of the District of the Pamlico there are four regiments of infantry, two of cavalry, and a number of local companies; quite troops enough in either to require the entire attention of a brigadier-general.

Permit me to recommend that Col. Reuben P. Campbell, of the Seventh Regiment of North Carolina State troops, be appointed a brigadier-general, and assigned to the command of the proposed district, which may be denominated the District of the Neuse. Colonel Campbell resigned his captaincy in the Second Dragoons upon the secession of North Carolina, and was appointed to his present command, in which he ranks next after Colonel Bradford, who is the senior colonel in the State service.

Hoping that these suggestions and recommendations will meet with favorable consideration, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding. {p.706}

Abstract from return of the Department of Norfolk, Maj. Gen. Benjamin Huger, C. S. Army, commanding, for November 3d, 1861.

Commands.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.
Officers.Men.
First Brigade1612,7213,3983,626
Second Brigade2413,6964,5905,469
Third Brigade1362,4182,8485,252
Craney Island35455677760
Suffolk41717918971
Fort Nelson10144172189
Fort Norfolk48996101
Navy-yard4848893
Pinner’s Point484121148
Lambert’s Point5106121136
Tanner’s Creek battery6497172
Battalion field artillery17279502335
Young Guard4364951
Total66810,87813,45115,143

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RICHMOND, VA., December 5, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President C. S.:

SIR: You did me the honor to request that I would address you a note, by way of memorandum, on the subject of want of guns at the mouth of York River. I therefore present the following statement:

1st. There are twenty-six heavy guns at the mouth of York River, to defend the entrance, and four looking up the river to fire upon ships, should they pass the mouth.

2d. Three rifled pieces, constituting a part of the above, have about 100 rounds of ammunition each, the rest about 46 rounds each.

3d. The chief engineer, Colonel Leadbetter, and Colonel Talcott, Chief Engineer of State of Virginia, having inspected the work, at my request, a month since, state that fifty is the least number of guns with which a successful resistance can be anticipated. It will be seen that I have but twenty-six for defense against an approaching enemy. The minimum required is therefore twenty-four guns, and there should be 100 rounds (the usual allowance is 200) of ammunition to each gun.

I reported the opinion of these distinguished engineers to the Adjutant-General about a month since and made the proper requisitions but neither the guns nor the ammunition have been furnished, except two rifled guns, which are included in the number above reported. The Secretary of War has promised five, to be forwarded within a few days. I have the honor to request that twenty-four guns of the heaviest caliber, with 100 rounds of ammunition to each gun, being the minimum recommended by the engineers, be ordered to Yorktown as soon as they can be got ready; six to be furnished to Captain Page, of the Navy, at Gloucester Point, and two to Captain Maury, of the Navy, at the naval battery at Yorktown, by the Navy Department, and the rest, eighteen, including those ordered by the Secretary of War, to be furnished by the Ordnance Department, with their carriages, and without delay.

The President is so thoroughly acquainted with the subject, that I will not fatigue him by repeating the urgent reasons, already given him verbally, for this immediate supply.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.707}

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RICHMOND, December 6, 1861.

Major-General HUGER, Commanding, &c., Norfolk, Va.:

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you proceed as fast as possible to erect bomb-proof batteries at Sewell’s Point and at all your other batteries not already provided with such proofs, according to the plan herewith inclosed. He also desires you to report which of your batteries are and which are not now provided with bomb-proofs.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WILLIAMSBURG, December 7, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I have received reliable information from Old Point that Yorktown will be attacked within a week by 40,000 troops, by land and water. All told, I have only 11,000 troops on the Peninsula fit for service, and require more troops, if possible. I request that Colonel Armistead’s regiment be sent to Gloucester Point, as the citizens in Richmond can guard the prisoners. I have also requested the governor to call out the militia of the counties about Richmond. Heavy re-enforcements of infantry and a large force of cavalry have been landed at Old Point.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, December 8, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

I have information from an eye-witness of undoubted reliability that there were 10,000 men on parade at Newport News yesterday and troops were also landed there to-day. As I telegraphed to-day, I have not the slightest doubt of an attack by overwhelming force. They report 40,000 men. I am making the best arrangements I can to receive them, and feel assured that McClellan’s plan is to keep an army occupied at Manassas whilst he makes his real attack here. No doubt the heaviest fleet the enemy can possibly bring will also attack us by sea. We have an average of about 50 rounds per gun, which will last us at the longest not more than five hours. I have had a meeting of most of the colonels to-night, and have taken the line of the Warwick River, which I had previously prepared in some degree, the flanks of the front line being exposed to shipping, and therefore could not be defended without heavy re-enforcements. I think I can arm 1,500 men, if they are sent me, with the muskets of the sick and absentees. Please say if my telegram that Yorktown is to be attacked by 40,000 men by land and water has been received. It comes from a source in every way reliable. Our chances are these: The ships may be beaten off and the land forces of the enemy be defeated, or the ships may succeed and the land forces be defeated. In either case we are safe. If the attack by the ships be on York River or James River, and the lower batteries are passed, the troops for the defense of Williamsburg will proceed immediately to that place. Those to constitute the garrison of Yorktown could Lot probably hold out long without a sufficient supply of ammunition. The number {p.708} of troops in Yorktown in that case would be about 3,500. We will do our best to defeat the enemy, but it is proper that the facts should be made known to the Department.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, December 9, 1861.

General J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Yorktown:

Your dispatches received. It is not believed that any such forces as are represented to you can possibly be within the enemy’s line. The unarmed regiment you desire will be sent to receive the arms you have at your disposal. It is quite impolitic to call out an unarmed militia, and no call for them can be sanctioned. We have no news whatever of any fleet at Fort Monroe threatening your department, but are glad to find that you are vigilant and hopeful.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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RICHMOND, December 9, 1861.

General J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Yorktown, Va.:

SIR: Your requisition for additional forces has been received through the telegraph. You have just returned from this city, where you passed some days, and must have been satisfied of the extent of our means and wants. This is the only answer that can just now be made to your requisition; but it is proper to say in this connection that, in communicating your wants to this Department, it is deemed unsafe to employ the telegraph at this time. They had better be conveyed by express and with caution.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General

P. S.-The Twenty-third Regiment of Georgia Volunteers is ordered to report to you; then to be armed as you have suggested.

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YORKTOWN, December 11, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

I can properly arm 2,000 men. The works at Jamestown Island are left without defense by infantry, and those at Williamsburg have neither infantry nor artillery to defend them, as all the artillery except three guns is in front on field. The call I made for militia would not produce probably more than 1,000 men. Many of these would be armed with shot-guns. I want them to hold the works at Spratley’s, at Jamestown, and at Williamsburg, so that if the enemy should pass our posts below, on James River, he may find these works occupied; otherwise he would of course occupy our own works in our rear. I cannot but think it hard that I am not permitted to call upon and arm the posts in defense of the country. This description of troops will do well behind breastworks. I beg that the Twenty-second Georgia Regiment, promised me, may be sent without delay. If there are any regiments in Richmond without {p.709} arms, please send them to me. I have field artillery here not manned, field light guns, three 12-pounders and three 24-pounder howitzer guns. If there are artillery companies in Richmond waiting for light batteries, please send me two, at least, and I will give them guns and horses. I am in immediate want of five. I am not surprised that our batteries are taken by the enemy when we cannot get artillerists to serve them, and when infantry are drilled as artillerists they are frequently ordered away and new infantry placed at the guns, as was the case with the two Alabama companies recently ordered away from here. I had to substitute two Mississippi companies of Taylor’s battalion for them. I hope the President will authorize the governor to call out the militia asked for, as the objection seemed to be a want of arms, which I can in a great degree remedy.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, December 11, 1861.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: In addition to the militia called for by me by telegraph to the governor, I think I can also arm such of the regiments from Richmond as cannot bring arms with them. I have placed in depot at Williamsburg and Jamestown Island about twenty days’ rations each for 10,000 men. If I am forced from below by overwhelming numbers I am sure that, with the small number of troops I now have Yorktown would soon be invested, and I doubt of its being able to hold out long after the ammunition of the large guns is exhausted. Though I think we shall make a strong fight, perhaps drive them entirely off, they will bring against us their Port Royal ships of war and all others they may have. As it will take some time for the militia to assemble, I hope they may be ordered out at once. I have the honor to request that General Cooper will cause a telegram to be sent to Savannah to know, if possible, whether the Wabash and Susquehanna are still on the waters of South Carolina or Georgia. From the magnitude of the naval preparations, and especially from the size of the ships, I may infer on which river-York or James-the attack will be made.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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YORKTOWN, December 11, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army:

GENERAL: Having received a circular from the governor of Virginia directing the colonels of militia to respond to the call of any of the Confederate generals, I have called into the field the militia of Charles City, James City, and New Kent; those counties being in my department. I have done this because, in consequence of the large number of sick and absentees and the necessity of operating with my whole force in the lower country, Jamestown Island and Williamsburg have been left for the present without any infantry garrison. I have also been informed by the adjutant-general of the State of Virginia that the Nineteenth and the One hundred and seventy-ninth Militia Regiments, city {p.710} of Richmond; the Thirty-third, Henrico; the Seventy-fourth, Hanover, and Twenty-third and One hundred and ninety-seventh, of Chesterfield, will be added to the above. I have supposed that the course pursued by the governor in authorizing the calling out of the militia had met with the approbation or the Department, as the services of these troops are absolutely necessary on the Peninsula. I beg that this call may be sanctioned by the Department. I think I can arm all those who may come without arms.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST BRIGADE Smithfield, Va., December 14, 1861.

To the Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: In every respect the battery at Hardy’s Bluff is the most important of the defenses on James River in this vicinity. It is supported, nevertheless, by the very inadequate force of five companies, which number only 350 in the aggregate. Of these, one company, and that the largest, is detached a distance of some 2 miles, to protect a work at Stone House wharf. Under these circumstances I beg leave respectfully to recommend that the force at Hardy’s Bluff be increased by the addition of five companies, so as to constitute a full regiment. The officer in command, Lieut. Col. F. H. Archer, is a soldier of experience, ability, and the most zealous devotion to the cause. If it were admissible, I would venture to suggest that his services already entitle him to promotion. The suggestions I presume to offer in this communication are prompted by a deliberate conviction of public necessity.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROGER A. PRYOR, Colonel, Commanding First Brigade, Department of Norfolk.

[Indorsements.]

DECEMBER 17, 1861.

Respectfully forwarded and approved.

BENJ. HUGER, Major-General.

DECEMBER 18, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to Secretary of War. I know no better way to increase this force than to authorize General Huger to detail a portion of the unarmed regiment recently sent to him to serve at the battery at Hardy’s Bluff. There are no troops in Richmond that can be sent anywhere.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Yorktown, December 15, 1861.

To His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President of the Confederate States:

SIR: The grave interests with the defense of which I have been honored in this Peninsula must be my apology for sending the gentlemen {p.711} to you, one of whom will bear this communication. This step is not taken from an ignoble desire to avoid the responsibility, but from my knowledge of the extent of the disaster which must ensue if the enemy shall be able to penetrate the country by this route. My left flank, which I had hoped would by this time have been made secure, is entirely exposed, and I cannot possibly prevent the enemy landing on it in any force he may choose. I have neither the guns to mount there nor the works to put them in. The latter have not been commenced, for I knew I could not get guns to place in them even if finished. There is not time now to erect them for any immediate defense. It must, therefore, be defended by troops, and I have not troops in numbers sufficient for that purpose, at the lowest calculation. I venture to suggest that perhaps 4,000 or 5,000 volunteers might be temporarily ordered to me from North Carolina, as that State must be deeply interested in the results here. With these I could defend, I feel assured, successfully this flank, and with the few militia I asked for, and whom I could arm, I could man the works at Williamsburg and Jamestown, and make the Peninsula secure against a land attack. As guns were made they could be furnished for this place and the James River, and we could then defy the Federal Government in this quarter.

I beg to commend the gentlemen, Col. Hill Carter, Colonel Randolph, chief of artillery, and Mr. St. John, chief engineer, of the latter of whom I spoke to you when in Richmond, to your kind attention.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Raleigh, N. C., December 16, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President of the Confederate States:

SIR: The possession of Hatteras affords the enemy a position or nucleus to form expeditions, almost without observation, to radiate to different points, even in opposite directions. To be in front, we must be in constant occupation and vigilance of the entire circumference of two large inland sounds. The sounds may be suddenly and at any unexpected time filled with a superior and overwhelming force of gunboats and steam-tugs, so that their navigation for any purpose is very hazardous and rash; and yet both of these sounds, with all their tributaries and seaport towns, are under the command of one brigadier-general.

A glance at the map will satisfy you it is too extensive a command even if it were readily accessible, but the precarious navigation of the sounds not only separates the command, but requires a circuitous inland route for either officers or their orders. Let me therefore respectfully ask of you to divide our coast defense (now two divisions) into three or more.

An examination of the map, or any further inquiry into this subject, will satisfy you of the propriety of this suggestion.

In connection with this subject I will invite your special attention to Roanoke Island, which separates the two sounds. Here are the fortifications and batteries on the west of the island to prevent the passage of the enemy from Hatteras or Pamlico into Albemarle.

{p.712}

The channel in front of the batteries is 3 1/2 miles wide, with no obstructions to aid the guns in battery, and any fleet that can navigate the sound can run this channel (certainly in the night) without being hurt by the guns. It was understood that this was to have been done immediately after the fall of Hatteras, but it is yet so imperfectly done as to amount to no protection. A little promptness may even now effect much; for the possession of Albemarle Sound would entail one of the heaviest calamities of the war, not only to North Carolina, but would cut off Norfolk, and secure its capture or starvation. The direction of a superior engineer officer at Roanoke Island for a few weeks might now render the most material service of the war.

My favorite idea of defending the towns, rivers, and sounds on our coast was to recapture Hatteras. I don’t think there has been a day since its capture that 3,000 men (selecting the opportunity) could not have retaken and destroyed it; and in lieu of its recapture it is feebly and insufficiently guarded by 15,000. Having failed to impress these views on the various commanders, I must now urge the fortification of Roanoke Island to defend one-half of the exposed territory; and it is necessary for the superintendence of a separate command, as the other positions on Pamlico require, and generally obtain, the attendance and vigilance of the commanding officer.

Most respectfully, yours,

HENRY T. CLARK.

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YORKTOWN, December 17, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have this moment received information (of the truth of which there is no doubt) that a larger number of troops than have ever been at Fort Monroe is now there under orders to march up the Peninsula at a moment’s warning. My informant does not know for what signal they are waiting, but I feel assured it is the appearance of the fleet from Annapolis at Yorktown. I deem it important to communicate this.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 553.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, December 19, 1861.

...

II. The commanding general has the honor to announce to the garrison of Yorktown that, after a minute and most rigid examination of the defensive works at this post, he has entire confidence in their ability, when defended by the gallant soldiers of our Confederacy, to resist the most powerful attacks of the enemy with any number of ships. The enemy cannot succeed in getting possession of our works under any circumstances whatever.

The commanding general, therefore, congratulates the troops on the prospect which the expected sailing of the enemy’s fleet from Annapolis affords them of repulsing an insolent foe, whose object is to invade our land and destroy our homes.

There is much more apparent than real danger from an attack by ships, and the gallant manner in which the attempt on Pensacola was {p.713} defeated by our comrades there, as well as the state of the works here, justifies the confident expectation of the commanding general of a result still more glorious to our arms. Should this fleet turn its guns against another point, our brother soldiers elsewhere will esteem themselves fortunate in having the opportunity to drive them from our waters.

At the signal which has been fixed upon by General Rains, the commanding officer of the garrison, the men will repair promptly to their several posts. The batteries will be kept in a constant state of preparation, shot will be ready heated in the furnaces, and those intrusted with the important duty of ascertaining the approach of an enemy and giving the alarm will exercise the utmost vigilance to insure its successful performance. It is recommended to the commanding officer of the post to cause the men to retire at an early hour, for a few nights at least, and to be stationed at their posts one hour before daylight. This arrangement is suggested to avoid, as much as possible, fatiguing the garrison.

The commanding general will station himself in the midst of his troops, and, having the greatest confidence in their gallantry, again congratulates them on their approaching triumph.

By command of Major-General Magruder:

HENRY BRYAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

YORKTOWN, December 20, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

SIR: In answer to my application to him, Major-General Huger informs me that he has referred to you the whole matter of my calling out the militia in the counties on the south side of James River. I have now the honor to state that as this militia is required to defend the works at Jamestown Island and Williamsburg, which they can quickly reach, I have directed that, by virtue of the authority granted me by the governor of Virginia, I will order the commanders of this militia to hold their forces in readiness to march at a day’s notice to the above-named posts, which are almost without garrisons. I understand from Col. George W. Randolph that the President has sanctioned the ordering out the militia for the purpose above mentioned. This will make those works secure, I think, against any attempt by James River.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, December 20, 1861.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have been able to strengthen this work (Yorktown) greatly within the last week by bringing guns from other points where they were in my opinion less needed. I stated by telegraph, as I state to the troops in the inclosed order,* that I think {p.714} the defenses of this place will be successful against any ships the enemy can bring to attack it. At the same time I think it proper for me to state, in order that the Department may not misunderstand me, what I could not state in orders or by telegraph, that I think the enemy, if he be persevering, may dismount some of the guns and may exhaust our ammunition, and therefore may pass up the river; but he cannot take the place by water, even if he silence our guns by exhausting our ammunition or by dismounting them, if the men will fight to the last, as I have no doubt they will. I therefore say, that whilst I hope guns and ammunition may be sent as soon as they can be spared, I entertain a confident belief that, strengthened as the works have been within a few days past, they will resist successfully any naval attack the enemy can bring against them at this time.

I have also strengthened my advanced line and left flank, caused the sick to be sent to the rear, established depots for the heavy baggage on the second line, and ordered all my available troops to the front line in light marching order, to give him battle there, without yielding an inch of ground to the west of that line. This is the line I originally intended to defend, ad this decision is taken in opposition to the advice of some of my best officers. I believe it affords, how ever, a greater chance of success, as the country east of that line affords better fighting ground than that west of it. I have ordered the troops into winter quarters on this advanced line, and will keep them there, I hope, whatever may happen. Bethel, the most advanced position, is held by about 1,000 men. Two regiments, looked upon as part of the garrison of Yorktown, are on the left flank of the second line, and one regiment on its right, where it has always been. If it had been convenient to have sent more troops it would have been safer; indeed, it would have been only ordinary prudence to have done so. But I am satisfied that the Government has done its best to sustain me and I will omit no effort to insure success, whether the enemy attacks me now or hereafter. I send a copy of my order of battle, which I have only communicated to the commanding officers and directed them to keep as private as possible; also a copy of an order to the troops of the garrison here. As I expect the attack here first, I remain here. When it is repulsed, should there be a land force, I shall command in the field. I learn that the militia from the vicinity, especially from the south side of James River, can soon be brought to Williamsburg, where the works are without a garrison, and I shall, therefore, content myself with directing them to be held in readiness to march, if necessary, to that place, the commanding officers to report the number of the militia and the number of arms they can bring with them. In the mean time I shall cause such arms as are not in use in regiments to be deposited there, with ammunition and provisions, to be in readiness for them. I have armed some militia under Col. Hill Carter, and stationed them at Jamestown Island. As soon as the sick sent to Richmond shall be sufficiently recovered I will thank you to have them sent in squads of 8 or 10 to join their regiments. I learn this morning, since writing my order of battle the day before yesterday, that 6 regiments left Fort Monroe very recently-destination unknown.

There are now forty-three guns at this place and Gloucester Point bearing on the water side, being seven less than the minimum prescribed by the engineers.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

* See p. 712.

{p.715}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 272.}

ADJT. AND INSP’R GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., December 21, 1861.

...

8. That part of North Carolina east of the Chowan River, together with the counties of Washington and Tyrrell, is hereby constituted a military district, under Brigadier-General Wise, and attached to the command of Major-General Huger, commanding the Department of Norfolk.

9. That part of the coast of North Carolina between the above described district and Bogue Inlet will form a separate military district, under Brigadier-General Branch, and the remainder of the coast of North Carolina a district under Brig. Gen. Joseph R. Anderson. These two last districts will remain, as heretofore, attached to the command of Brigadier-General Gatlin.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

–––

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 120.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE PENINSULA, Yorktown, Va., December 25, 1861.

The major-general commanding desires to announce to the Army of the Peninsula that the troops will winter where they now are. If the enemy attack we will defeat him, and after the victory we will have better quarters at Fort Monroe and Newport News.

By command of Major-General Magruder:

[No signature.]

–––

YORKTOWN, December 28, 1861.

General S. COOPER:

SIR: I am informed that negroes can be hired by the year for $100 each, the Government agent giving bonds, payable at the end of each quarter. I have pressed negroes because the Government could not hire them heretofore. Now that it can hire them, I would by all means recommend that it should be done-100 for Gloucester Point and 500 for the Peninsula, exclusive of the quartermaster’s department. Without this I am sure the works ordered by the Government and those that in the opinion of the engineer are necessary to secure the works already ordered will not be completed and made safe. I will forward a request of the acting chief engineer to-morrow on this subject; but no time can be lost, as the day of hiring is the 1st of January next. The quartermaster’s department alone would require a large number. This Plan will not interfere with the farmers, and will be cheaper in the end to the Government. Colonel Randolph and Mr. St. John, the former being chief of artillery and the latter chief engineer here, concur with me in opinion as to the propriety of this course. I beg an answer by telegraph.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.716}

–––

RICHMOND, December 29, 1861.

General J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER Yorktown:

Your telegram of yesterday received. You are authorized to hire the negroes for the year at the price stated by you in your letter and dispatch.

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

–––

Abstract from return of the Army of the Peninsula, Maj. Gen. John B. Magruder, C. S. Army, commanding, for the month of December, 1861.

Commands.Present for duty.Aggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Pieces of Artillery.
Officers.Men.Heavy.Field.
Yorktown2283,9265,3626,5851044
Wynne’s Mill681,1011,6251,726
Young’s Mill891,3931,8852,488
Lee’s Mill30518651709
Harrod’s Mill37622763897
Mulberry Point3708487
Gloucester Point721,0561,4721,774186
Ship Point337299511,311
Jamestown Island11288365412
Williamsburg22186227377
Land’s End375296327134
Matthews Court-House333804435724
Deep Creek30341521753
Fort Grafton273424916885
Camp Marion376608901,0394
Spratley’s farm18306463551
Total77512,44716,82520,6853362

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, January 3, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: The current report of another fleet being about to sail South induces me to draw the attention of the Government to the want of troops in this department.

Since the 1st of December two regiments of infantry and a battery of artillery have been sent from Wilmington to South Carolina and one regiment of infantry from Washington to Roanoke Island, thus decreasing the force nearly 3,000 men. To replace this force the governor can furnish but some 500 well-armed effective men. Two other regiments are in camp, but are very unhealthy and without arms.

Should any point on the coast be attacked, I shall not be able to concentrate, without unreasonable delay, any other force than that serving in the immediate vicinity, as I have no reserve. I must therefore beg that a reserve force be sent to this place, with a competent commander, and placed at my disposal.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.717}

–––

YORKTOWN, January 3, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General:

About 300 of the enemy’s cavalry advanced to-day as far as Bethel, which is occupied only by a picket, and attempted to set fire to the wooden church, which is the only building there, but upon the appearance of our cavalry they retreated, and were followed some distance. I do not know whether this is a real advance or not. The papers sate that the Minnesota, Commodore Goldsborough, belongs to Burnside’s fleet, which is now rendezvousing at Old Point. I judge by the draught of water of this frigate, and from the fact of their having four bomb vessels, that either Yorktown, James River, or Norfolk will be the point of attack. It will be well if the Patrick Henry and Jamestown remain as they are, between Harden’s Bluff and Mulberry Point.

I would respectfully suggest that the steamer from Newport News with the exchange of prisoners be not allowed to come above Day’s Point battery, which is our lowest battery on James River.

Your telegraph announcing the arrival of the fleet at Old Point has been received.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

YORKTOWN, January 4, 1862.

General COOPER, Adjutant-General:

Just returned from inspecting left flank of position. Works advancing rapidly; hope to prevent a landing; will prevent an advance. Forty-seven guns now mounted here. Should the fleet now at Fort Monroe attack us, will beat it off. Bethel not occupied by us except by a picket; only one building there, a wooden church, not burnt; the enemy in too great a hurry. I sent strong forces of all arms to Bethel and below; the enemy had retired to Fort Monroe and Newport News. It would be well to have the Teazer, if ready, join the Patrick Henry and Jamestown between Harden Bluff and Mulberry Island.

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

RALEIGH, January 5, 1862.

J. P. BENJAMIN:

We have reliable information that the Burnside expedition at Fort Monroe is destined for Pamlico Sound and New Berne. The batteries at New Berne are slight, and manned with inexperienced volunteers, and there are only two imperfect regiments there. We have no arms for volunteers or militia. Will you send us troops from Richmond or some of our own regiments from James River? Can we have arms for three regiments from the recent arrival at Wilmington?

HENRY T. CLARK.

–––

RICHMOND, VA., January 6, 1862.

Gov. HENRY T. CLARK, Raleigh, N. C.:

We are fully alive to the necessity of defending your coast; have {p.718} much better sources of information than you can possibly have. Be assured we are vigilant, and will use our utmost means for your defense.

J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORFOLK, Norfolk, January 6, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

SIR: In obedience to the orders of the Department of War, Brigadier. General Wise has assumed command of the military department assigned to him, and left here on Friday, 3d instant, to visit Roanoke Island and other points within his command.

As I have been fully occupied with my front, and the position of Roanoke Island has been without my control, I hardly know what to do to strengthen this important position (I consider it the key to Albemarle Sound) until I get the reports of General Wise.

All the work that has been done there has been done by my direction, and with the assistance of the Navy (Commodore Forrest, commanding dock-yard, and Captain Lee, the executive officer, having aided me most materially) all the batteries have been erected, gun-carriages and ammunition supplied. I cannot see that any one else has done anything towards its protection, except the sending of two regiments of North Carolina troops there. Much of the work I recommended has been neglected. One very important thing-obstructing the channel-has yet to be done. I have now sent the means, and directed General Wise to prosecute the work with all vigor. I have dispatched all the most necessary supplies, but powder I have none to send.

I regret I had not the preparation of the defenses of this place during the last few months. With the disposition to a panic apparent in that section of the country, if the flotilla of the enemy now assembling under the guns of Fortress Monroe makes a dash at Roanoke Island, I do fear a stampede. As soon as powder can be obtained I must beg you to send me some.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER, Major-General, Commanding.

P. S.-I beg to refer to my reports concerning the part I took in occupying Roanoke Island from the 31st August last.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORFOLK, Norfolk, Va., January 7, 1862.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

In reply to your letter of 25th ultimo, informing me of the passage of an act by Congress allowing army rank to be conferred upon such officers of the Navy as are commanding batteries on shore, I submit herewith the names and rank of such officers, viz:

1. Commander R. P. Pinkney, commanding Fort Norfolk and inspector of batteries, to rank as lieutenant-colonel.

2. Commander Charles F. McIntosh, commanding Fort Nelson, lieutenant-colonel.

3. Commander W. L. Maury, commanding Sewell’s Point battery, lieutenant-colonel.

{p.719}

4. Lieut. G. W. Harrison, commanding Pinner’s Point battery, major.

S. Lieut. R. R. Carter, commanding Pig Point battery, major.

6. Lieut. B. P. Loyall, assigned to Roanoke Island, captain.

7. Bvt. Capt. J. S. Taylor, formerly lieutenant in the Navy, who has not been appointed in the Confederate Navy, but has received the appointment of second lieutenant C. S. Army and brevet rank of captain (a most valuable artillery officer), commanding Lambert’s Point battery, now ordered to Roanoke Island, to rank as major-he to resign his former commission in the Army.

The only other naval officer holding a commission in the Army is Bvt. Capt. Jas. F. Milligan, signal officer, who is second lieutenant C. S. Army and brevet captain. He was in the revenue service, resigned, and took service under the State of Virginia. He might retain his present commission, or be appointed captain, as considered best.

The three batteries at Cedar Point, Barrel Point, and Pagan Creek, lately in charge of Commander R. L. Page (relieved and ordered away), have at present no naval officer in charge of them.

The batteries at Day’s Point and Harden’s Bluff, James River, in First Brigade, have been in charge of naval officers. They were ordered there from Richmond, and have not reported to me. I would recommend a commander for rank of lieutenant-colonel, and lieutenant commanding battery the rank of major.

As the pay of the navy rank of these officers is more than they would receive in the rank above mentioned, I presume they would be paid (as the act refers only to rank) as heretofore, except Capts. J. S. Taylor and J. F. Milligan, who have no navy rank, and must receive the army pay.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. HUGER, Major-General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA, Goldsborough, January 9, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: I have received a communication from the adjutant-general of North Carolina of the 7th instant, informing me that the Thirty-third, Thirty-sixth, and Thirty-seventh Regiments of North Carolina troops were under orders for New Berne, and the Thirty-fourth for Wilmington, N. C. All these regiments, it is understood, have been or will be paid by the State to the 31st December, 1861. They are to be turned over to the Confederate service as soon as they arrive at their destination. Six companies of the Thirty-third went down last night, which, with the three now in Hyde County, make nine in the service. The tenth, I learn, is nearly completed. The other regiments will follow as fast as transportation can be provided. To avoid the necessity of making out pay rolls for a few days, cannot the transfer of these regiments be made to take [effect] from the 1st January, 1862?

I learn that the Thirty-third and Thirty-fifth Regiments are fully and well armed, but the other two imperfectly so. All, I am informed, are considerably reduced in effective men by sickness, principally measles and mumps.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. C. GATLIN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.720}

–––

C. S. S. SEA BIRD, Off Roanoke Island, January 10, 1862.

Hon. S. R. MALLORY, Secretary of the Navy:

SIR: I understand that it is contemplated to improve the navigation of the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal. To carry out improvements, which will very much enhance the usefulness of the canal, I further learn that the co-operation of the Government is indispensable.

Being enabled to speak from experience, I feel justified in saying that without the use of the canal heretofore, supplies from and imperatively requisite repairs at Gosport navy-yard could not have been received or effected. The vessels composing the squadron under my command could not without regular supplies and effectual repairs-have been kept together, and by consequence, acting dispersively, would have been prevented from periodically maneuvering in sight of the enemy, and thus up to this time deterred him from venturing within Pamlico Sound, the great reservoir of the waters of North Carolina this side of Cape Fear.

Although very great facilities have been afforded by the canal, through which every vessel of the squadron save one has repeatedly passed, the occasional lowness of the water, consequent upon prevalent northerly winds, has repeatedly caused delays highly detrimental to the service. I therefore most earnestly recommend the canal to your fostering care, the more so that a large portion of its stock will be confiscated by the Government, and submit to your better judgment a consideration of the proposed improvements.

I have the honor to be your obedient servant,

W. P. LYNCH, Flag-Officer.

–––

DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, Yorktown, January 10, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjt. Gen. C. S. Army, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: The vedettes, as I am informed by an official communication from General McLaws, report that the enemy the night before last was sounding the Swash Channel above the mouth of the Warwick River.

I think it not improbable that an attempt may be made to land between Land’s End and Mulberry Island fort and to carry the fort from the rear. I believe that with the assistance of the ships of war and the fort under the command of Mr. C. St. George Noland, its present commander, late of the Navy, the attack, if made, will be unsuccessful.

I spoke to the Secretary of War on the subject of Mr. Noland’s commission, and recommended him also in writing. He is acting as commanding officer of this fort (naval battery it was), much to-the gratification, I believe, of the captains who rank him; but as he is an officer of great merit and a gentleman of honor and delicacy, he feels the neglect of the Government acutely, and considers himself, as he really is, in a false position. I beg leave therefore to recommend him again to the favorable consideration of the Department, and, as he would have had high rank had he remained in the U. S. Navy, would suggest that the rank of lieutenant-colonel be tendered to him.

I have not the boat to send him which he needs, and respectfully request that an order be sent to the Quartermaster’s Department in Richmond to send him without delay a boat of the description he requires.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.721}

–––

YORKTOWN, January 10, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

DEAR SIR: I understand that my lines of defense are under discussion at Richmond. I know I can expect from you the justice to postpone any decision until I can report at length, which will be in a few days. In the mean time I will venture the remark that I have taken not-only the best but the only way of successfully defending this Peninsula with the means at my disposal, and that its defense will be successful. I did not call out the militia, though at one time I had determined to do so, but merely requested to be furnished with the strength of certain regiments to prepare arms for them, which arms I could procure from the colonels of regiments, belonging, as they informed me, to their States. I only desired to prepare for the emergency of a landing in this Peninsula or on the Rappahannock, which I now think more probable, or for an attack on James River. These arrangements required time. I therefore anticipated the emergency. Colonel Randolph informed me that I was authorized by you to do this; that is, to call out all the militia I could arm.

Very respectfully,

J. BANKHEAD MAGRUDER, Major. General, Commanding.

{p.46}

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6