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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 4, Ch. XII–Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XII.
OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY AND TENNESSEE.
July 1-November 19, 1861.
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UNION CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.251}

ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., July 1, 1861.

Lieut. WILLIAM NELSON, U. S. N., Cincinnati, Ohio:

SIR: Your services having been placed at the disposal of the War Department for the performance of a special duty, the Secretary of War directs me to communicate to you the following instructions:

It being the fixed purpose of the General Government to maintain the Constitution and execute the laws of the Union and to protect all loyal citizens in their constitutional rights, the Secretary directs that you muster into the service of the United States five regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry in East Tennessee, and one regiment of infantry in West Tennessee, to receive pay when called into active service by this Department. You will designate the regimental and company officers, having due respect for the preferences of the regiments {p.252} and companies, and send their names to this office for commission. The Ordnance Bureau will forward to Cincinnati, Ohio, 10,000 stands of arms and accouterments, six pieces of field artillery, two smooth and two rifle bore cannon, and two mountain howitzers, and ample supplies of ammunition, to be carried thence through Kentucky into East Tennessee, in such manner as you may direct, for distribution among the men so mustered into service and men organized as Union Home Guards. You will also, at the same time, muster into the service, or designate some suitable person so to do, in Southeast Kentucky, three regiments of infantry, to be commanded and officered in the same manner as herein provided for the Tennessee regiments.

All of the regiments aforesaid will be raised for service in East and West Tennessee and adjacent counties and in East Kentucky. Blank muster rolls and the usual instructions to mustering officers will be sent to you from this office, and in carrying out this order you are authorized to employ such service and use such means as you may deem expedient and proper for its faithful execution. You will likewise report frequently to this office as you progress with your work.

I am, sir, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 16, 1861.

To the ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY:

SIR: For your information I beg to report what has been accomplished towards the Tennessee expedition.

On Sunday, 14th, I met the principal gentlemen of Southeast Kentucky at Lancaster, Ky., and Crab Orchard, and after examining the whole question I appointed Speed S. Fry, of Danville, to be colonel of the First Regiment of Infantry in the expedition; Theophilus T. Garrard, of Clay County, colonel of the Second; Thomas E. Bramlette, of Adair, colonel of the Third, and Frank L. Wolford, of Casey County, to be lieutenant-colonel of the cavalry regiment authorized, reserving the colonelcy for W. J. Landram, who served in a cavalry regiment during the war with Mexico. Runners were immediately started in all directions, and thirty companies of infantry and five of cavalry will soon be raised-sooner, in fact, than the arms, &c., will reach here for them. To each of the colonels I addressed a letter, a copy of which is inclosed herewith, the place of rendezvous only differing. The transportation of 13,000 stand of arms, with ammunition, accouterments, artillery with its ammunition, &c., also supplies and camp equipage from Cincinnati beyond the Cumberland Gap, a distance of 240 miles, is an undertaking of no little labor. To Nicholasville, Ky. 110 miles, I shall forward them by railroad; thence to Crab Orchard, 34 miles, is a good turnpike road; thence to the Gap, 96 miles, is a tolerable dirt road.

I have directed the captains of the armed Home Guard at Nicholasville to furnish a sufficient guard for the stores while detained at that place, and also detailed a guard to escort the trains along the road and guard all the bridges to Crab Orchard, where I have ordered five companies to rendezvous immediately to guard the depot at that place, Crab Orchard being at the end of the turnpike. There the wagons must be unloaded and reloaded, for a wagon can haul double on a good pike than on a dirt road. Crab Orchard becomes necessarily the depot of the expedition. The number of wagons to be hired will be large. It is cheaper to hire than to purchase. The articles to be transported {p.253} will afford you the best idea of the scale of transportation necessary; 13,000 muskets, weighing 185,000 pounds; ammunition, weighing 54,000 pounds; accouterments, weighing 75,000 pounds; rations, weighing 250,000 pounds; artillery, ammunition therefor, camp equipage, tents, &c. A good wagon can haul on a dirt road about 2,000 pounds. It will require 350 wagon loads to carry this farther. I have ordered 120 wagons to meet me at Crab Orchard.

The gaps in the mountains are all guarded by rebel troops, but not in sufficient numbers to prevent my going through whichever gap I may select, there being seven. The one that affords the most easy access I will of course choose. I want 100 “broken mules” for pack-mules, with proper pack-saddles. Without them I will be confined in my movements to roads that are passable for wagons. With them I can move 1,000 men by a bridle-path through the mountains any reasonable distance. They are absolutely necessary to the success of the undertaking, and I shall go on and procure them on four months’ time, which is the usual method in Kentucky.

In reference to rations, I have stricken out everything but the substantials, retaining only bacon, pork, flour, coffee, sugar, and vinegar. These I have purchased at sixty days after delivery.

In reference to clothing, I have directed the purchase of 10,000 flannel shirts; 10,000 pairs of socks; 5,000 hats; 5,000 pairs of pants, 5,000 pairs of shoes; all which, as well as the purchases before mentioned, were purchased at the same prices that the quartermaster and commissary pay here, and from the same persons mostly. Also 2,500 pairs of blankets; 5,000 haversacks; 5,000 knapsacks; 5,000 canteens.

I shall forward to-day estimates to the Quartermaster-General and to the Commissary-General of the amounts of articles required in their departments, including besides the foregoing camp equipage only that which is absolutely necessary for the regiments authorized.

I have to request that Dr. J. J. Mathews, of Louisville, Ky., lately appointed a brigade surgeon, may be ordered to report to me for service in the expedition.

Owing to the absolute necessity of guarding these stores in their transit through Kentucky from destruction by the secessionists, I will muster in the companies now on duty immediately. The main body will be upon active duty from the hour of their arrival at their rendezvous, and I have to request that their pay will commence from that time. The only cash payments I propose making are for the service of the daily transportation.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. NELSON.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, July 30, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, War Department:

From reliable information I learn that about 7,000 or 8,000 Mississippi and Tennessee troops have left Corinth, Union City, Camps Cheatham and Trousdale for Eastern Virginia.

About 2,400 Tennesseeans from Mound City have gone down the Tennessee River to Big Sandy, where they have boats; thence they intend going by Paducah and receive re-enforcements; thence to Caledonia, on Ohio River, above Cairo, and land. A portion are to cross to Illinois Central Railroad track and destroy bridges. The batteries of 32 {p.254} and 64 pounders I informed you of, which were at Dover, on the Cumberland River, are to go with this division. They have also eight 6-pounders and four 12-pounders. Troops sickly and discontented. Ammunition rather scarce. All armed with mixed description of muskets and rifles.

I telegraphed you on the 12th to Roaring River, Virginia, of Tennessee and Arkansas troops going by White River to Pocahontas and Pitman’s Ferry; to this I have to add that on the 23d , 24th, and 25th instant about 12,000 troops from Union City, Randolph, Memphis, and other points left Randolph by steamer John Walsh and four more boats for New Madrid, Mo., distant from Bloomfield, on the other side of the Great East Swamp, about 30 miles, over which I have just discovered a good plank road.

Bloomfield is distant from Pittman’s Ferry 55 miles by good county road. A portion of the troops landed at New Madrid are to march to Bloomfield and join the troops from Pocahontas and Pitman’s Ferry, thence proceed to Thebes, Ill., opposite Cape Girardeau. All boats are to be stopped going down the Mississippi at Cape Girardeau, while the forces at New Madrid are to stop all boats coming up, and the troops going down the Tennessee River are to stop all the boats on the Ohio, and a simultaneous advance made on Cairo and Bird’s Point from Thebes and the Ohio bank, in the rear of Cairo, and the expedition from New Madrid.

The rebels have taken possession of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad for their exclusive use. I know the camp at Cairo and Bird’s Point is full of spies, good fellows, and gay ladies, who are bestowing their favors on and spending their money liberally with the general and regimental officers. I do not say they reside in the camp, but they visit it daily, and by some means also at night. The rebels are in possession of accurate drawings of the whole defenses at these points, corrected daily when necessary.

Rosecrans telegraphs me from Clarksburg, Va., that he fears there is something wrong with Cox, as he has not heard from him since the 26th. All was right when my men left Cox. He is reported to have left Charleston-direction of the Gauley-Wise retreating. I advised Cox fully of the dangerous points between Charleston and the Gauley. Will send men there and investigate and report to you and Rosecrans, as he desires.

E. J. ALLEN.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 57.}

WAR DEP’T, ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, August 15, 1861.

I. The States of Kentucky* and Tennessee will in future constitute a separate military command, to be known as the Department of the Cumberland, under the command of Brig. Gen. Robert Anderson, U. S. Army.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

* So much of this State as lay within 100 miles of the Ohio River had constituted the Department of Kentucky, under General Anderson’s command.-(General Orders, No. 27, A. G. O., Washington, May 28, 1861.)

{p.255}

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 17, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: Unless there be reason to the contrary, not known to me, make out a commission for Simon [B.] Buckner, of Kentucky, as a brigadier-general of volunteers. It is to be put into the hands of General Anderson, and delivered to General Buckner or not, at the discretion of General Anderson. Of course it is to remain a secret unless and until the commission is delivered.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

[Indorsement.]

Same day made.

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INDIANAPOLIS, August 29, 1861.

THOMAS A. SCOTT:

I earnestly hope that the Government will not lose a moment in preparing for the crisis in Kentucky.

A large force should be concentrated at Evansville, and another at such points that they can be thrown in Louisville in a few hours, that they may be used in interior of Kentucky.

Five thousand are needed for militia in the Indiana border counties. Send any of the altered muskets or whatever can be had. Can you not send some artillery for the defense of our river towns? There is a large number of old-style guns in the arsenal at Pittsburg. The volunteering goes on with unabated vigor. With assurances of good arms we can run our regiments up to forty.

O. P. MORTON, Governor.

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INDIANAPOLIS, August 29, 1861.

THOMAS A. SCOTT:

Civil war in Kentucky is inevitable. The advices from my secret scouts leave no doubt on this subject. A force should be provided, ready to march to the support of Union men at a moment’s warning. All the State arms having been put into the hands of the State troops, it is of the first importance to provide arms for the Home Guard in the border counties. Too much importance cannot be attached to this subject.

O. P. MORTON.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 1, 1861.

Secretary CHASE:

Just arrived. Hardly time to form an intelligent opinion of the state of affairs in Kentucky. Met several gentlemen of Louisville, who seem to think an invasion from Tennessee immediately threatened.

We need everything, arms, accouterments, &c., but with the promises we had in Washington need an abundant supply of money. We will do all that is possible. Will report further from day to day. Please have as many regiments as possible placed, subject to my orders and {p.256} within call, in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. Do not let General Buell be diverted. I must have him.

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General.

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INDIANAPOLIS, September 2, 1861.

Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

At the risk of being considered troublesome I will say the conspiracy to precipitate Kentucky into revolution is complete. The blow may be struck at any moment, and the southern border is lined with Tennessee troops, ready to march at the instant the Government is ready to meet them. If we lose Kentucky now, God help us.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

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INDIANAPOLIS, September 2, 1861.

President LINCOLN:

Kentucky desires that Governor Morton be authorized to send at once to the Ohio River five regiments and two batteries, including Colonel Wallace’s regiment. This is also the desire of General Anderson.

We are here representing the views of the Union men of Kentucky to the Governor of Indiana. Governor Morton is apprised of this dispatch and concurs.

J. T. BOYLE, JOHN J. SPEED, Of Louisville.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. E. A. PAINE, Commanding Post, Paducah, Ky.:

I have just received instructions from General Frémont, Saint Louis, that the detachment of Colonel Oglesby’s regiment shall remain at Paducah until re-enforcements arrive from Saint Louis, which will be in a few days. You will therefore consider the order from General Grant to return the detachment superseded, and the detachment will remain at your post until further orders. I am expecting Colonel Smith’s regiment from Cape Girardeau every hour, and they will immediately proceed to Paducah. General Grant has gone to Jackson to see what forces can be spared there. He will return to-day.

WM. S. HILLYER, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding, &c., Cairo, Ill.:

You will please detail a regiment of infantry and two pieces of light artillery to proceed without delay to Paducah, Ky., to be placed upon their arrival under the command of General E. A. Paine, commanding post. You will also furnish such steamboat transportation as may be necessary.

WM. S. HILLYER, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

{p.257}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding Post, Paducah, Ky.:

In accordance with telegraphic instructions received from Major-General Frémont, you will throw up earthworks and plant guns at Paducah, but make no advance. You will occupy Smithland with four companies if they can be spared. Heavy guns will be received here to-morrow and next day, and as many as you will require, not exceeding six, will be sent you. You will please report the number you desire.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

WM. S. HILLYER, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 2.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Cincinnati, Ohio, September 7, 1861.

I. The headquarters of this department are hereby removed from this point to Louisville, Ky.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Anderson:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 10, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. George H. Thomas, having reported for duty will repair to Camp Dick Robinson, and will assume command of the brigade organized there. Lieutenant Nelson, U. S. Navy, who has done such good service to the cause of the Union by the zeal and untiring energy he has displayed in providing and distributing arms to the Union men of Kentucky, and in collecting and organizing troops at Camp Dick Robinson, will accept the thanks of the brigadier-general commanding, and who will be pleased to see Lieutenant Nelson and confer with him in reference to further action he may be charged with in this department.

By order of Brigadier-General Anderson:

C. B. THROCKMORTON, Acting Aide-de-Camp.

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INDIANAPOLIS IND. September 12, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The war in Kentucky has commenced. Bowling Green has been seized by the secessionists. Will you not order one regiment to Evansville immediately, to act under the direction of Major-General Love, of Indiana? Can you not send some arms at once? Our border is nearly defenseless. Let me entreat you to give this your attention at once.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana. {p.258}

FRANKFORT, KY., September 14, 1861.

General THOMAS:

SIR: A committee from the Union caucus, composed of the members of the legislature, go to Louisville to-night; they return Monday morning. We advise that you do nothing as to the occupation of Mr. Bowler’s road until the committee see and confer freely with General Anderson. It would be well if you could come down and see the committee. We suppose it would be best that both the main roads be simultaneously occupied, unless you should learn something making it necessary to act. Doubtless you and General Anderson are fully posted and may have matured a plan as to these roads; if you have not, you can know General Anderson’s plans here on Monday morning.

Respectfully, yours,

JOHN F. FISK, Speaker of the Senate. RICH’D A. BUCKNER, Speaker of the louse.

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BERRY, KY., September 14, 1861.

General THOMAS:

You will here see a plan of operation submitted for your consideration. First, perhaps a reconnaissance of the principal points should be had by yourself &c.

The movement on railroad must be a profound secret or the bridges will be burned. Then, say, a simultaneous movement [from] Camp Robinson and Covington, starting so as to be through before daylight. (Trust not the wires.) At the long tunnel, 11 miles south of Covington, leave 100 men; at Grassy Creek, 26 miles south of Covington, leave 300 men; at Falmouth, 39 miles south of Covington, leave 400 men; [at] a small bridge or two near Morgan Station, and up to Boyd’s, 14 miles, (Stowers, secesh, part owner of railroad), 100 men; from Boyd’s to Cynthiana unsafe-secesh armed companies. At Berry’s Station and Boyd’s troops would be with friends; and although the bridge [is only] 2 miles from Berry’s, I think it would be safer to encamp near that place, as all the land or stations from Barry’s to Cynthiana are secesh. Say at Berry’s place 500 men, to scour, &c.; at Cynthiana two cannon and 1000-from Cynthiana to Paris, except Kiser’s (I consider unsafe at Kiser’s place), 100; at Paris two cannon and 1,200; thence to Lexington (not much danger at Lexington), 80; total, 3,780.

What I mean by unsafe is that a small number of men as marked [sic] could not withstand the secesh force in those localities, and my opinion is that they will fight if they can get the advantage. This all done up in order, and the legislature order out 20,000 troops for sixty days, and [the] rebellion will be flat in Kentucky.

And last and not least, a bill of pains and penalties will be passed by our legislature, and the 20,000 troops will insure the enforcement of draft bill.

Respectfully,

G. W. BERRY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 15, 1861.

His Excellency Governor MORTON, Indianapolis:

MY DEAR GOVERNOR: I must thank you for the kindness and great courtesy with which you received my friend and colaborer General {p.259} Sherman. Events are hastening on which may compel me to take the field before I am ready. Should the necessity arise, and I think the cloud is so threatening that it may be wise for me not to wait any longer, I hope you will give our dear native State all the aid you can.

The movements recently made by Polk and Zollicoffer show that they will make another move as soon as they are ready. The bearer of this note, Captain Prime, is a very discreet, judicious soldier, and will give you my views.

If you can let me have a sufficient number of troops, and I find that I am not too late, I will intimate to you the desire that you shall throw your force forward by simply telegraphing “Yes.” It would add greatly to our strength if you could spare a battery of artillery.

I am interrupted and must close.

I have the honor to subscribe myself, with sincere regard and respect,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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PARIS, KY., September 16, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: Not being possessed of the future military plans of the United States Government, I am not prepared to offer you any views that even I myself would consider to be entitled to any reflection.

Nevertheless, believing it to be both the expectation and the purpose of the administration to overcome the military power of the Confederate States and to give effective relief to the Union men of East Tennessee, and also that Kentucky is now an active party to the war, I will on these general assumptions give you a few thoughts.

The most pressing duty is to give Kentucky all the protection possible; to that end Paducah ought to be held by an adequate United States force, and the Louisville and Nashville Railroad ought to be taken possession of at once by the military authorities as far south as Bowling Green, and a strong force put there and strong works thrown up for its protection.

All the force that can be obtained from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri ought to be put in camp at proper points on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, and be diligently drilled and prepared for service. The recruiting of the three years’ men in Kentucky should be pressed with the utmost activity and ought to be brought up to 15,000 or 20,000. The legislature should authorize the raising of 40,000 twelve-months’ men in Kentucky by volunteering and drafting, to be mustered immediately into the service of the United States.

Men are of no efficiency without arms, and one of the most serious wants for troops to be raised in this State is a proper and sufficient supply of arms. If the arms were at suitable depots, the men could soon be raised. By the time the General Government could be ready to move on East Tennessee from Western Virginia and on Memphis from Missouri, and down the Mississippi, the forces from and through Kentucky would be ready to mnove on East Tennessee by the Cumberland Gap, on Middle Tennessee and Nashville from Bowling Green, and towards Memphis from Paducah, and the different columns could continue their march towards the Atlantic coast and occupy North and South Carolina and Georgia, whilst the fleets and other armies were taking possession of all the ports in those States.

The first work to be done for Kentucky is for the United States to {p.260} have at convenient points at the earliest day a full supply of proper arms, and for General Anderson and our legislature to have an immediate and perfect understanding, and then the promptest concurrence of action. Let General Anderson at once and in distinct and precise terms inform Union members of the legislature what he desires that body to do, and, it being thus clearly informed, let it proceed to do it. It is no time for the parties to be procrastinating or palavering when they understand each other. General Anderson ought first and immediately to take military possession of the railroads and telegraphic lines in the State, to be the master of all the communications; that would be a potent signal, that would bring every true Union man in the State to his utmost exertions to give the most execution to such programme as might be agreed upon.

I have given a few views crudely but frankly.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GARRETT DAVIS.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, September 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

GENERAL: Your letter of the 16th instant has just been received. I will send a supply of buck and ball cartridges (at least 100,000) as soon as they arrive; they have been ordered, and will probably reach here to-morrow. In the present imperfect knowledge which we have of the movements of the rebel forces, I can only direct you to guard strictly the passes on the roads leading from Barboursville to Richmond and Mount Vernon, and intercept and arrest any parties who may be going to join the rebels.

I regret that you have not been able to get staff officers. I am in the same condition, and have so far been unsuccessful in my efforts to obtain the necessary staff.

You had better retain the wagons now hired until you receive those required for from Cincinnati.

General Sherman has been sent to secure Muldraugh’s Hill, which was occupied yesterday afternoon by some secessionists.

I hope that the Kentuckians will rally now rapidly and in strength.

Yours, very respectfully,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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INDIANAPOLIS, IND., September 17, 1861.

Hon. O. P. MORTON:

A messenger from General Anderson came up this evening, bearing a communication to you, saying a crisis in Kemitucky’s position will probably occur in the next five days, and asking whether he can depend on you for any assistance. I have informed Captain Prime that we have not any regiments fully organized, and if we had, have no arms to give them. It seems to be a matter of the greatest importance. General Anderson thinks Polk and Zollicoffer will both soon invade Kentucky. Cannot General Frémont send a few regiments? Two batteries {p.261} sent promptly to Kentucky might save the State. Press the matter. I have informed Lieut. Col. T. J. Wood, First Cavalry. Have seen messenger from Anderson and had Colonel Wood informed of the above.

SCHLATER.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., September 18, 1861.

Hon. S. P. CHASE, Secretary of the Treasury, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: It has become necessary to make an advance into the interior of this State by all the disposable force at my command. Many of the men of Rousseau’s brigade and some of the regiments coming in to our assistance are too sick to go forward. Our general hospitals are not yet established; immediate accommodation is required for the sick. Under these circumstances I would respectfully request permission to put the sick of the Army in the U. S. Marine Hospital in this city. The accommodations as far as space are ample, and the medical purveyor of the Army will furnish bedding and bedsteads for the soldiers sent there. An arrangement can be entered into between the War and Treasury Departments in regard to the expenses incurred by keeping these men.

The surveyor of this port has very kindly offered to receive these sick soldiers, but requires your sanction, which I beg you will grant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 18, 1861.

Mr. W. M. BRICKEN:

DEAR SIR: The city of Louisville has sent off her Home Guard today to aid in driving the traitors from the position they took last night at Muldraugh’s Hill. The people are commencing the same disgraceful course they have pursued elsewhere, burning bridges and destroying property.

Understanding from you that there are several companies of Home Guards in your neighborhood who are very anxious to be allowed to save their State and our country in this hour of our need, I will thank you to say to them that I will be greatly gratified to hear that they have promptly reported themselves to Brigadier-General Sherman. It would be well for them to take blankets and haversacks with them: also as much ammunition as they can take.

I omitted to state that while in the service they will receive the same pay as the volunteers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 18, 1861.

SAMUEL GILL, Esq.:

I will thank you to issue order at once and send runners to the different counties recommending the Home Guards, with their arms, to rendezvous {p.262} at Camp Dick Robinson, Lexington, and other points which you may deem advisable. In this way we can secure then for my force for defense, and prevent the taking of the arms from the scattered Home Guards.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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LEXINGTON, September 18, 1861.

General THOMAS, Camp Robinson:

DEAR SIR: You will see from the inclosed dispatch that your request for cannon has been granted, and that it is deemed proper to have them go another route in place of coming to this place by rail. The Home Guards of this place have all been notified to be on hand to-night, ready to protect the cannon, if they have been shipped this way, as first intended. This will be handed you by Mr. Milward, one of our best men, unless he should meet with your messenger at Nicholasville. See that Warner attends to the dispatch inclosed from Bowler.

Yours, respectfully,

JOHN C. COCHRAN. JOHN B. WILGERS.

[Inclosure.]

FRANKFORT, September 18, 1861.

To Capt. SANDERS D. BRUCE:

General Thomas can get six pieces of cannon, 6-pounders, and ammunition and horses. He must send a mounted force by Nicholasville and Versailles or by Danville and Harrodsburg. Send this to Camp Robinson forthwith. This is better than railroad.

JAS. HARLAN.

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FRANKFORT, KY., September 18, 1861.

General THOMAS:

SIR: From indications that point to a gathering of the rebels in Lexington on Saturday next from the surrounding country, we deem it of vital importance that you move a regiment there forthwith, fully prepared for a fight.

The State Guards from all this part of the State meet in Lexington on Saturday ostensibly for drill. They have been buying and stealing all the powder and lead they can get, even tearing up lead pipes. We will take measures to have a large force of Home Guards to meet you. You take the Fair Grounds for a camp, unless you can do better. No time is to be lost. They have taken Muldraugh’s Hill, we are informed, 1,500 strong, and burned the bridge over Rolling Fork of Salt River.

General Rousseau is after them, with from 2,000 to 3,000 men; but the loss of the bridge is a great misfortune. If they take Lexington with 2,500 men, as we fear they will, they will take the arsenal and magazine here, and disperse or capture the legislature.

Please let there be no delay.

Respectfully, yours,

JOHN F. FISK, Speaker of the Senate. RICH’D A. BUCKNER, Speaker of the House.

{p.263}

[Indorsement.]

DEAR GENERAL: I doubt not that the secessionists contemplate taking Lexington and seizing the banks. It is of vital importance that you send a regiment to Lexington by Friday evening. I have harness sufficient for the guns and limber, but not for the caissons. I am preparing some ammunition. Send with your regiment some extra ammunition for the Home Guards. I will let you have six guns, 6-pounders, and caissons, if you desire them. Send your force for these guns directly to this place by way of Nicholasville and Versailles.

Yours, truly,

SAM. GILL.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 19, 1861.

Lieutenant-Colonel OLIVER, Comdg. Independent Rifle Battalion, Cincinnati, Ohio:

COLONEL: You would place the State of Kentucky and our Union under great obligations to yourself and your command if you could come down to our assistance. General Sherman is in advance, and needs all the force we can raise. Kentucky has no armed men whose services I can command. If you come, bring all the camp equipage and ammunition you can get. Whilst in the service, you shall have the same pay as given by law.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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NICHOLASVILLE, September 19 [1861]-11.30 p. m.

General THOMAS:

I have just sent forward some of my men to Lexington. Will have trains in two hours, and by 3 o’clock a.m. will be at Lexington with my regiment. I have not seen or heard of the cavalry, but will order it forward when it arrives. We are in advance of all expectation, and will take them by surprise. I met the inclosed dispatch at this place from General Anderson. We will do what men may do; rely on us for that. I deem it better to go forward to-night, as it will avoid the tricks of the secessionists on the road.

In haste, respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

[Inclosure.]

LOUISVILLE, September 19, 1861.

To S. D. BRUCE, for Brigadier-General THOMAS, Camp Robinson:

You are authorized to send a regiment to the camp at Lexington, Ky.

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 80.}

WAR DEPARTMENT, A. G. O., Washington, September 19, 1861.

I. The Military Department of the Ohio will in future consist of the State of that name, Indiana, and so much of Kentucky as lies within 15 {p.264} miles of Cincinnati, under the command of Brigadier-General Mitchel, of the U. S. Volunteers; headquarters, Cincinnati.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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CINCINNATI OHIO September 20 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Camp Robinson, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: I commenced the shipment of wagons to you, and before I had gotten fairly under way I had orders from Western Virginia for 400. The consequence is, you are left without for the present. I will cheerfully do anything I can for you at any time, but these same difficulties will be constantly occurring. General Rosecrans’ orders must of course take precedence.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. H. DICKERSON, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by General Anderson to report to you that there are now in the field at Rolling Fork Bridge, on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, nearly 2,500 men, 1,800 of whom are very reliable troops, of Colonel Rousseau’s command. The remainder are Home Guards, and are of but little value, lacking very much in discipline, organization, and equipment. The Forty-ninth Ohio Regiment, Col. W. H. Gibson, arrived here to-day from Cincinnati, and will shortly proceed to Rolling Fork Bridge. A detachment of 200 Fifteenth Infantry recruits, under command of Capt. P. T. Swaine, Fifteenth Infantry, have also arrived, and will to-day proceed to join forces already at the bridge. Two regiments are telegraphed as ready to leave Indianapolis for here as soon as transportation can be secured. Two regiments were telegraphed as ready to come from there also, if they could be supplied with arms. They were telegraphed to come and arms would be furnished. Other regiments are expected and detachments of men are being collected all over the State of Kentucky, so that in a day or two we shall outnumber the rebels, and in the mean time the general thinks he is sufficiently strong to prevent any further advance on their part. The general instructs me to again request that you will order Captain Gilbert’s company to his department from Saint Louis. He considers it almost absolutely indispensable that line should have a company of regular infantry here-at present at least. He has now no means of enforcing his order in the city.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 21, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Your letter of instructions was handed me a few minutes since by Mr. Ware. I understand that there are now 600 Home Guards watching {p.265} the railroad. It occurs to me that they can sufficiently guard the road, and in case of emergency I am near enough to re-enforce them. You are aware that we have no tents with us, and I learn from Major Buford, who knows the localities, that there is no place where our men can be quartered with sufficient shelter near the bridge. To quarter at the depot would separate the main body too far from the guard for efficient support. Many of the men are without blankets, and all without coats or blouses, and the weather is such that to occupy the open air and sleep on the ground without shelter or blankets would be dangerous to the men, especially as they have measles in the camp. We have five new cases here.

Our quarters are comfortable here, and the men seem well pleased with the place. There is considerable stir amongst the secessionists; they are alarmed. I think their meeting here will not take place; they are fixing to run, rather than fight. Rumors through the night last night were constant of movements on foot, and it is thought they ran off the 140 rifles last night to flee to the Southern Army.

I have this moment learned, through Mr. Crittenden, of Missouri, now at this place, from what he deems reliable authority, that the arms are at Leonidas Johnston’s, in Scott County; that the secesh of Harrison and other points collect there this evening to make a run to the Southern Army to-night through Anderson County. The Home Guards of Mercer ought to be on the lookout, and a strict watch kept along the line from Lebanon to Louisville. I will, if the news be confirmed, in the course of the day telegraph to Louisville to General Anderson.

I have sent for Captain Bruce and Dr. Dudley, to consult about moving to Cynthiana. My own opinion is that this is the point for a few days at least. We are doing good by being here, and it is the finest place for drilling the men I have seen. Plenty of the best water at hand.

I wish you could take time to come and inspect the position, and determine whether it would not be well to keep an encampment here for instruction, as well as for security of the roads.

In haste, respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel, Commanding at Camp Robert Anderson.

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WASHINGTON, September 22, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT

Governor Morton telegraphs as follows: Colonel Lane, just arrived by special train, represents Owensborough, 40 miles above Evansville, in possession of secessionists. Green River is navigable. Owensborough must be seized. We want a gunboat sent up from Paducah for that purpose. Send up the gunboat if, in your discretion, you think it right. Perhaps you had better order those in charge of the Ohio River to guard it vigilantly at all points.

A. LINCOLN.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 22, 1861.

A. LINCOLN, President, Washington:

Your dispatch received. I have immediately ordered Captain Foote with gunboat to dislodge the rebels from Owensborough, and will take measures to guard the Ohio.

{p.266}

Have placed my two Illinois regiments at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, at the disposal of General Anderson, and so informed him by telegraph.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 22, 1861.

Capt. A. H. FOOTE, Commanding Naval Forces Western Waters, Cairo, Ill.:

In pursuance of telegraphic instructions received from headquarters Western Department, you will proceed with the gunboat Lexington from here and Conestoga from Paducah to Owensborough, Ky., where the Confederates are said to have taken possession, and dislodge them. General Frémont’s instructions are that the Ohio River is to be kept open.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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INDIANAPOLIS, September 22, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

I much regret that subsequent events have prevented me from sending you the troops. Reliable advices on Friday show an advance on Louisville by a force of not less than 10,000 men and Anderson had not more than 3,000. Anderson begged for troops. Our own safety required that they should be furnished. We have sent him four regiments, and one to Evansville. We are out of arms. Can you not lend us 5,000 for the time? Louisville is considered in great danger this morning, and many doubt whether it can be saved. Please send us arms by special train.

O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND Louisville, Ky., September 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

GENERAL: Your two notes of September 20* have been received. Messrs. Hoskins and Howard have been authorized to procure tents. We have none here, and no proper material for making them.

The danger in which Louisville is at this time renders it impossible for me to comply with your request that I would send you four well-drilled regiments and a battery of artillery. The latter has already been forwarded; the former cannot be obtained from any source.

A rally has been ordered of the militia and Home Guards, and I trust that you will have a force of true men, who, battling for their firesides and their homes, will soon drive the bandits from our soil.

God save our country!

Respectfully and sincerely, yours,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

* Not found.

{p.267}

CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 22, 1861-5 p.m.

General THOMAS:

I inclose letter just handed to me by Judge Buckner.* He informs me that steps are taken to have forces fall in here and at Camp Robinson-Home Guards, &c., to act under your command-and that I am expected to protect the place, and, if you think right, move forward to secure the railroad, part of which is now in possession of General Mitchel, with 2,000 forces.

I can’t hear from my family at Columbia. If any letters or news comes from there to me, do me the great kindness to forward it. I rest uneasy for news from my wife and little children at that place, now held, as I learn, by traitor troops.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

* Probably Fisk to Buckner, p. 268.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 22, 1861-11.39 p.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I have just sent out two companies to watch the various passes, and seize guns, which my scouts think will be attempted to be moved tonight by the rebels. While engaged in instructing the commandants of the different squads I received the inclosed letter, which I forward to you, as I have no cavalry with which to operate at the distance from here required. Lawrenceburg is about 25 miles from Camp Robinson, and there is no doubt in my mind but it is in the direct line of the rebel movements. I have it from so many reliable sources, that I am well assured that their line of communication and for stealing purposes lies through Versailles, Lawrenceburg, and Spencer County.

Some point which could be secured, and which Morgan Vance, of Harrodsburg, could designate, ought to be secured by 200 or 300 cavalry, so as to intercept arms, &c., and seize any armed traitors who may attempt to move in that direction.

We are getting along pretty well here, and I think our presence here has greatly alarmed and disconcerted them in their movements.

Breckinridge and others fled the night we reached here and in advance of our arrival, having been warned by a scamp by the name of Smith, from Nicholasville. They are not far, I learn to-day, from Mount Sterling, at a little place called Hazel Green, and it is thought are concentrating forces in that vicinity. I send this by the same gentleman who brought the letter inclosed. Captain Hoskins’ indorsement of them is sufficient.

In haste, respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

[Inclosure.]

VERSAILLES, KY., September 22, 1861.

Colonel BRAMLETTE, Commanding at Camp Anderson:

DEAR SIR: We believe, from reliable information, that many of the secessionists from the surrounding country are collecting in Anderson County, for the purpose of joining our enemies in Tennessee or the southern part of this State. They are constantly moving in that direction {p.268} by way of Lawrenceburg. I was informed to-day that they had taken possession of the State arms in that county for the purpose of taking them with them to the Southern Confederacy. I state these facts for the purpose of suggesting the propriety of sending a sufficient force on that line to intercept then. I send this by my friends H. C. McLeod, &c., and recommend them to your confidence.

Yours, truly,

J. E. HOSKINS, Captain, Woodford Home Guards.

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FRANKFORT, KY., September 22, 1861.

Hon. R. BUCKNER:

Please send speakers [regiment], as desired by Mr. Gill. The track this side of Falmouth is torn up for 2 or 3 miles. Humphrey Marshall is assembling a force at Drennan Springs. Don’t let General Thomas send too much force against Zollicoffer, but let him open the Covington and Lexington Railroad promptly. Our munitions must come that way. The mountaineers will whip Zollicoffer as soon as they get ammunition.

By all means send them lead, lead, lead!

Respectfully, yours,

JOHN F. FISK.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, Camp Dick Robinson, September 22, 1861.

Brig. Gen. ROBERT ANDERSON, U. S. A., Commanding Department of the Cumberland:

GENERAL: Mr. Corcoran arrived here last evening. I am constantly beset with importunities from citizens near the border to advance to their relief; and to do so with these troops in their present disorganized state will lead to certain disaster, and in that event we shall have to fall back upon the Ohio, and lose all the advantages we now have by holding this place. I cannot think of it for a moment, unless I could have 4,000 well-drilled men and a battery of artillery.

My latest advices from Barboursville are to this effect, that the enemy are concentrating in East Tennessee, both from Virginia and the far South. This looks like an invasion of Kentucky in force, and we should be prepared to meet them; but my hands are completely tied, unless the Government will give me an organized force to work with.

It is absolutely necessary that an engineer, a quartermaster, and the four regiments of infantry, and a battery of artillery above referred to, all equipped for the field upon reaching here, should be sent to me without a moment’s delay.

I am assured by the most reliable people from East Tennessee that an invasion of Kentucky from that quarter is intended, and I beg that the Government will place me in a condition to defend this part of the State.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.269}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

GENERAL: By the direction of the general I write to say that for the present he can afford you no assistance as you required. Louisville is very strongly threatened, and until that point is-out of danger he can send no re-enforcements to you.

He considers your views of the emergency as eminently just and proper, and nothing would afford him greater pleasure than to aid you with all the re-enforcements you ask if it was possible. Until he can send them (which he hopes will be very soon), he trusts you will be able to hold your position.

The general directs me to say that he gives his cordial approval to your course in occupying the asylum at Harrodsburg with the Home Guards.

You are fully authorized to contract for the subsistence of the men, in any detachment you may send out, in the manner you think most desirable. You are also authorized to contract for clothing and tents, in amount equal to your necessities, at any point where they can be obtained.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ESTILL SPRINGS, September 23, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Camp Robinson:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 23d instant, directing me to hold my main body at Irvine, &c., is received. We encamped here yesterday with two full companies raised in this county, and we are looking for another from Owsley County this evening; also one from Jackson County. Other companies are forming in this and other counties I learn. I have several companies in Camp Robinson who propose to join my regiment. Will it be inconsistent or incompatible for me to ask you to permit them to be sent here. I hope not. We need blankets, tents, and other camp equipage, and guns, and I know we ought to have them right away.

Great activity in the counties around on the part of the secessionists. Our people are recruiting rapidly. I have house room at my place (Estill Springs), adjacent to Irvine, to lodge several companies and officers, but we can’t do without blankets. Straw is the best we can do, and the use of it makes it dangerous on account of fire, &c.

Samuel Gill, of military board, ordered or directed me to use my houses for quarters for men and officers until further orders, stating that he had had full conversations with General Anderson, and that it met his entire approbation; but for this, and other information from reliable sources, I would have sent my men forward to your camp. A camp at my place will greatly facilitate enlistments for the Government and hold the secessionists in check.

Can’t we have some cavalry for scouts sent us? They are greatly needed, and will be more so very soon. Quick work. Blankets, tents, guns, &c., will help us and give our people confidence. More depends {p.270} on this than men ordinarily imagine. The mountain people are peculiar, and I know them.

Hoping that these hasty views will be regarded in the proper light, and made in the utmost good faith and respect, I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIDNEY M. BARNES.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 23, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I send this evening, under escort of the Jessamine Home Guards, three caissons to Nicholasville.

Upon the 11 o’clock train to-morrow I will forward to Nicholasville, under escort of one company, 82 boxes musket cartridges, 20 boxes minie cartridges, and 50 kegs rifle powder. Should anything else come this evening I will forward mt.

I have no further news or rumors. I can but think that the movements of the secessionists are from fright and not for battle, yet many very prudent and wise men differ with me, who think we shall be assailed here soon-this week. Such is the opinion of Dr. R. J. Breckenridge, with whom I have held counsel. Your superior military judgment must determine what course to pursue. I can move in one hour, if required, but am of opinion that this post ought to be held as a rallying point for Home Guards and place for organizing other troops, besides giving protection to such goods as may be shipped to Camp Robinson.

Respectfully,

THO. E.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 23, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I have just learned from a reliable man, who gets it through rebel relations now engaged in the movement, that the activity of the secessionists is to embody a larger force than we have, they think 3,000, and attack this camp this week. There is an unusual stir in all the adjacent counties, either for preparation or from fright. If we had a few experienced artillerists and some grape and shrapnel, &c., I will hold the place while a man lives to fight; but I need some cavalry for pickets and scouts. The inertness of the Union men, their sensationalism, their utter backwardness in rushing to the call of our country is annoying.

This would be a good point for your headquarters, the communications being rapid, the means of transportation being better than your present position.

To fall back from this place now would give encouragement to the traitors; they have scampered, but would soon return if we leave; they doubtless would return with force enough, in such event, to rob the banks, for they need money. I think it probable, if they can embody sufficient force to give them confidence, they may make the attempt; but I doubt their ability to do so. It will do no harm, however, to be ready for the emergency, whatever may come.

If I had sufficient cavalry to scout the country for some distance around some valuable discoveries might perhaps be made as to the movements of the traitors. As I wrote you last night, Breckinridge and {p.271} others fled to the mountains the night of my arrival here in advance of arrival, having been warned by a rebel by the name of -, who posted forward upon our arrival at Nicholasville. Should you deem it advisable to move more forces forward, it would be well to precede the movement by sending forward to have him watched and arrested if he makes any movement. If there is any necessity or probable necessity for your forces remaining at Camp Robinson, I will, if you so direct, undertake to hold this position so long as you may require it.

We have so many sensational rumors that I give but little reliance to any, except so far as to be on my guard. I have just learned, since I commenced writing, that some kid-gloved gentry, who pretend to be Union men-Buckner, Johnson, and others-last night, in caucus, are disposed to censure me for suffering guns to be run off the night after my arrival here. I hope it is not true that they do so, for it would be an act of sneaking cowardice in them, which I should be sorry to have to brand them with. I was not advised of any such movement, left the matter to Dudley and Bruce, and told them I would back them when they required it with all my force. They became satisfied that nothing was done, and that the arms were still concealed in the city. We have been using all activity to ascertain, and last night arranged upon what was deemed good authority to intercept them; now rumor says they were run off on Friday night. If these men make any censure upon me for not accomplishing what they had not the spirit to do for themselves, or even to notify me to do, they will lose in the game.

Just handed me the inclosed dispatch, which I hasten to you and close. You will perceive that something is up.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

P. S.-I have employed a messenger to bear this, deeming it necessary that you get the dispatch forthwith.

[Inclosure.]

FRANKFORT, KY., September 23, 1861.

Maj. E. L. DUDLEY:

Dispatch from New Castle, stating that Humphrey Marshall, at head of 1,000 cavalry, in Owen; supposed to be moving on to Frankfort. Hold yourself in readiness to come with as many men as you can.

I will apprise you again.

J. M. MILLS.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 23-7.30 p.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I inclose you telegram from Frankfort. I have moved with one battalion, leaving Colonel Scott in command here. We should be re-enforced here forthwith.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

[Inclosure.]

FRANKFORT, Ky., September 23, 1861.

Col. THO. E. BRAMLETTE:

Come on with your men. All arrangements for your accommodation made.

H. J. TODD.

{p.272}

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MOUNT VERNON, Monday Morning, September 23, 1861.

General THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding Camp Robinson:

GENERAL: I have been detained here a short time to have horses shod, but shall leave in a few minutes for Rockcastle Hills, and then cross over to the London and Richmond road. I hope to employ men to-day to obstruct the London and Winding Blades roads.

I learn by a person who left London last night that the rebels had 400 cavalry at Laurel Bridge, a point 6 miles south of former place. I hope to stay on the Big Hill to-night, unless we should be cut off by the enemy’s pickets.

Will it not be well to dispatch a force without delay to occupy Big Hill, letting them march across the country from Lancaster and enter the Richmond road at Morris, 13 miles south of Richmond? I shall return by that way; meet and give them such information as I may gather. I hope the force for Rockcastle Hills will be hurried up.

If you desire it, 600 to 800 Home Guards may be gathered on Rockcastle Hills at twenty-four hours’ notice; at least, so I am advised here.

In haste, respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy (on special duty).

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EIGHT MILES FROM LONDON, Monday Evening, September 23, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., &c.:

GENERAL: I have examined the roads thus far, and find that almost the entire way from Big Rockcastle River to this point can be defended against a superior force. I have selected for the present a point 14 miles south of the river as the best position, all things considered, although but for the scarcity of water there may be other points which an experienced military man would prefer.

I have learned this afternoon that the rebels have evacuated Barboursville and returned to Cumberland Ford. They have not been near London. There seems to be no danger of an advance by them.

I shall now retrace my steps, and go over the Winding Blades road to the London and Richmond road.

In haste, respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER.

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FRANKFORT, KY., September 23, 1861.

Colonel BRAMLETTE:

The capital is thought to be in danger. Send down to-night 300 men immediately after the train gets in; they will stop in the depot. Bring rations. Bring no cannon.

JOHN F. FISK, Speaker of Senate.

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SEPTEMBER 24, 1861.

[General THOMAS?]:

DEAR GENERAL: Colonel Bramlette left here last night for Frank-fort, and, as you will see from the inclosed dispatch, he apprehends more {p.273} danger here than at that point. You had better send us 100 or 200 cavalry until Colonel Bramlette returns. The secessionists were very busy running around this vicinity last night with guns. We succeeded in taking five guns. If you cannot send us the cavalry, we think you had better send us 400 or 500 men from Garrard’s or Fry’s regiments. If you conclude to send the infantry, they can be here to-night by 9 o’clock. We consider this of vital importance or we would not ask it.

Your obedient servants,

W. T. SCOTT, Lieutenant-Colonel. S. D. BRUCE. S. H. CHIRMO, Captain.

P. S.-We have but 340 or 350 men in camp, including Home Guards. If you cannot re-enforce us, send a special messenger, so that we can have Colonel Bramlette with us.

Respectfully,

W. T. SCOTT.

P. S.-We have reliable information that two secession cavalry companies left here last night-that is, from this county and Clark; they are gone in the direction of Cumberland Gap; they are not well armed, and if intercepted could be easily taken.

W. T. SCOTT, First Kentucky Volunteers.

[Inclosure.]

FRANKFORT, September 24, 1861.

Col. W. T. SCOTT:

I send by express some grape and canister. I believe you are in as much danger at Lexington as here. General Thomas, I hope, will send you re-enforcements. If he does not, telegraph to me, and I must return. Give me anything that occurs. Be watchful-vigilant.

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 24, 1861.

In obedience to instructions from the War Department the undersigned assumes command of the Department of the Cumberland, composed of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee.*

...

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

* The records show that Anderson was exercising this command as early as September 4, 1861.

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OWENSBOROUGH, September 25, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Commanding Western Army, Saint Louis:

GENERAL: Agreeably to your orders, per telegram of the 22d inst., and further instructions from General Grant, commanding at Cairo, to proceed to Owensborough with the gunboats for the purpose of keeping {p.274} the Ohio River open and to dislodge the rebels supposed to have been in possession of that place, I proceeded to Paducah, on the morning of the 23d, in the steamer Bee, before the gunboat Lexington, Commander Stembel, was ready to leave Cairo, for the purpose of calling on General Smith, and having the gunboat Conestoga, Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, ready, on the arrival of the Lexington, to accompany me up the river. On arriving at Paducah, I ascertained from General Smith that the Conestoga had gone on a short cruise. Consequently, on the arrival of the Lexington, I immediately proceeded with her alone up the river, taking with us the steamer Bee, as the water was low and the river falling, that we might have the means, if grounding, of getting afloat more readily. I also sent the Bee up the Cumberland River 15 miles, in a vain search for the Conestoga. After grounding twice, at 1 o’clock on the morning of the 24th instant we were compelled to anchor and lie over till 8 a. m., when, in company with the Bee and she towing us, we proceeded up the river to Evansville, from whence I telegraphed you at 11 p.m. This morning (25th) we reached Owensborough; found no batteries, but were boarded by Colonel McHenry, who, with Colonel Hawkins, had each a skeleton Kentucky regiment, which had arrived the morning previous. I sent for the authorities of the place and directed them to prevent the display of secession flags. A strong disunion sentiment is manifest in the place, but no disrespect was offered me, although I have been much among the people, but I directed Commander Stembel to hold as little communication with the shore as practicable. The colonels, with their force, as previously designed, left the town during the day, although I strongly importuned them to remain, as I did the Cincinnati company, but they declined on the ground of not being properly equipped nor having been mustered into the service. Under these circumstances, and the water requiring the Lexington soon to leave, I went down to Evansville, in the steamer Bee, and telegraphed to Governor Morton, at Vincennes, Ind., asking for 500 men for Owensborough. If I get no reply, I purpose telegraphing General Anderson at Louisville for the same number. On returning to Owensborough in the evening I again communicated with the shore; after which, and giving my orders to Commander Stembel to remain till the low water required him to leave in order to reach Cairo safely, I ran down to Evansville, meeting and boarding the Conestoga en route, and giving her instructions and here have telegraphed to General Anderson for 500 men to be sent to Owensborough.

Having done all in my power in this-quarter, and the preparations of the gunboats in Saint Louis demanding my immediate attention, I leave for that place at 10 a.m. to-morrow, and trust that I may personally communicate with you in the evening.

In haste, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. H. FOOTE, Captain.

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CAMP ROBERT ANDERSON, September 25, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I went to Frankfort. The enemy came not. I am now back and ready for action.

The measles is still amongst my troops; there are 70 just recovering and just taking measles now on the sick list.

H. Marshall took fright and moved his forces, about 500, from near the Franklin line, in Owen, to Caney Creek, near the Scott line; they {p.275} are evidently trying to run. If I had sufficient cavalry I could surround and cut them off. I think, however, they will stampede for Hazel Green, where Breckinridge is forming an encampment in the extreme edge of Morgan, adjoining Wolfe County. They no doubt intend to pass down through Breathitt, Perry, and Clay, to Knox, and join the invaders at Cumberland Ford. I shall try and get some reliable scouts, and, if I can find their position in striking distance, shall move upon them. If you have any use for me, however, my longer stay here is, I think, unnecessary, as I can effect but little or nothing with infantry against the flying rebels.

This is a good place to instruct; is convenient to move, and being at the end of the telegraph, news readily passed. I await your orders.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE.

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SAINT LOUIS, September 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General SMITH, Camp at Paducah:

SIR: The rebels having occupied Owensborough, you are directed to send to that place the regiment ordered to Evansville on the 25th instant, together with two gunboats. After dispersing the enemy the force will return again to Paducah, as the latest movements of the enemy require the concentration of our troops as far as possible at that place.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, [Cincinnati,] September 26, 1861.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Your telegram of the 25th instant is received. Only two regiments of Illinois troops have been in Camp Dennison. Both of these have been sent to General Anderson at Louisville by order of General Frémont.

I reached these headquarters on Saturday evening, the 22d instant, and found the city greatly excited. General Anderson was reported to be in great peril, and Louisville threatened with attack by a large force under Buckner, approaching by Muldraugh’s Hill, near the point of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, where the railroad crosses the Salt River; also by turnpike road leading to the mouth of Salt River and thence to Louisville. It was further stated that Zollicoffer had already entered Kentucky by the way of Cumberland Gap, laying waste the country, and marching on Lexington and Frankfort, while Breckinridge was assembling in force in Morgan County and Humphrey Marshall in Owen County, Kentucky.

I telegraphed the legislature of Kentucky, asking to be placed by them in a position to act within 15 miles of this city. A reply came promptly, with full authority, and an earnest appeal to send 5,000 troops to their aid, and to drive back Zollicoffer; also requests came for assistance to General Anderson through his brother, Larz Anderson, esq., of this city.

General Buckingham came to this city at my request, arriving-day {p.276} morning, bringing Colonel Whittlesey, a military engineer. We examined the Kentucky Hill, opposite the city, and decided on a plan of defense. The engineers are at work. General Buckingham and myself then reviewed carefully the condition of all the fragments of regiments in this State, and I ordered into Camp Dennison all regiments more than half full. We then prepared the necessary papers and instructions to inaugurate greater alacrity in recruiting volunteers.

Monday morning General Morris arrived from Governor Morton, of Indiana, with the most earnest appeal for arms from Ohio. After consultation, Governor Dennison and Governor Morton were called to the city by telegraph to concert measures, and General Anderson was desired to come or send a confidential representative. The meeting was held Monday afternoon and evening, and resulted in this State furnishing Indiana 3,000 muskets for the emergency, and a determination to urge forward troops to possess and hold the strong points in Kentucky.

I have already a regiment in possession of the hither extremity of the Covington and Lexington Railroad. To-day a regiment proceeds to Cynthiana and Paris to hold the entire road, and will be followed by another this evening to hold the Lexington and Louisville Railroad, These will be followed by a force sufficient to render it possible (when combined with the troops under General Thomas at Camp Dick Robinson, 130 miles from this) to commence active and immediate operations to drive Zollicoffer and Breckinridge out of the State or to capture them.

Holding as I hope the entire region based on the Ohio from Portsmouth, Ohio, to Louisville, Ky., with the two railways already mentioned, with secure lines of communication by rail with Cincinnati and Louisville and by turnpike with Maysville and Portsmouth, a powerful force may be moved from the region near Lexington and Frankfort, and may operate either towards the Cumberland Gap, or, after shutting up that pass, concentrate a powerful column and drive the enemy back from Muldraugh’s Hill, secure Louisville, and threaten Nashville.

Such are my present ideas. I have no knowledge of the views of General Anderson further than he begs me to aid Lexington and Frankfort and General Thomas.

I have thus presented in as few words as possible the position in which I am placed and the general outline of defense for my Department of Ohio and Indiana.

I have directed the staff officers to send forward to General Rosecrans supplies of all kinds without consulting me, up to the point where it becomes a doubt whether if more be sent it will not endanger the safety of this department; then to stop and be governed by my orders. In like manner I am ready to send troops to Virginia or to Washington so long as in my judgment I retain a force sufficient to insure the protection-of Ohio and Indiana. In adopting this course I am, as I conceive, acting strictly up to my orders.

I deem the immediate occupancy of Kentucky as a matter of the greatest importance and the fall of Louisville as a disaster the consequences of which cannot be overestimated. I therefore urge the necessity of placing in supreme command of this expedition to Kentucky and to Tennessee an experienced general, who will command the entire confidence of the Government.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Comdg. Dep’t of the Ohio.

{p.277}

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COLUMBUS, OHIO, September 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The urgent call for troops in Kentucky compels me to send six or eight regiments before their organization is entirely completed. ,They have the men and arms and are ready for service, but owing to the want of mustering officers many of the muster rolls are unfinished, and the field and staff and many of the company officers have not been mustered in, and under your order No. 66 cannot take command and draw pay. This will create great embarrassment, unless you authorize me to give in all such cases effective commission of proper date.

W. DENNISON, Governor of Ohio.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding at Elizabethtown:

GENERAL: The general directs me to say that, as the ten days of the Home Guard will expire on Saturday evening, he suggests the importance of arranging for your rear guard.

He thinks that Colonel Crittenden’s portion of a regiment would probably be the most available for that purpose, but he leaves it with you to decide.

The postmaster here informs me that there is a large amount of mail matter in the office here for your command. He says if you will send in some properly authorized person the mails will be turned over to him, put up in packages for the different regiments. The general suggests the appointment of some competent person to come in here as often as you may deem desirable.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MAYSYILLE, KY., September 26, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson, Bryantsville:

DEAR SIR: I inclose herewith a copy of the instructions under which I purchased the mules. I thought that I had sent it to you before.

These mules were to be purchased because of the political effect it would have, and these instructions were issued at my instance.

I think that I wrote you that Morgan Vance, of Harrodsburg, would indicate the persons from whom the balance of the mules were to be taken.

Very truly,

W. NELSON.

[Inclosure.]

WAR DEPARTMENT, August 29, 1861.

Lieut. W. NELSON, U. S. N., Camp Dick Robinson, near Bryantsville, Ky.:

SIR: Understanding that you may need 600 mules of the largest class for purpose of transportation, you are authorized by the Department to purchase them at a price not to exceed $125 each, to average fifteen hands high.

{p.278}

If you deem it to the interest of your command not to have these mules delivered immediately, you can arrange to have them transferred to your possession any time within the next two months, not to be paid for until delivered.

This Department desires that purchases shall, as far as possible, be made in the country where the troops are raised, in the hope that it will have a beneficial effect upon the Union sentiments of the people.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND Louisville, Ky., September 27, 1861.

J. J. ANDERSON, Esq.:

SIR: Your letter asking for information with regard to the meaning of General Anderson’s proclamation* is received.

In reply I am authorized by the general to say that no one will be arrested for mere opinion’s sake. All peaceable citizens, of whatever opinion, will be protected if they do not engage in giving aid in any manner to the enemies of our country.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, MULDRAUGH’S HILL, KENTUCKY, September 27, 1861.

Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Louisville, Ky.:

SIR: When I left Louisville in the cars, in charge of the Home Guard, followed by Rousseau’s brigade, I understood my orders to be to station parties along the road to guard the bridges, secure the road, and to occupy the Muldraugh’s Hill. On reaching the Rolling Fork of Salt River we found it a deep stream, with railroad bridge burned down and still burning. This, of course, stopped our progress, and we disembarked the men. Various rumors of the force of the enemy which had done this wanton mischief and stolen various cars and locomotives reached me, but estimating the force not to exceed 200, I sent forward a strong picket of 400 men, under Colonel Rousseau, and afterwards strengthened it by another 400, but receiving a telegraphic order from you on the 21st, I recalled Rousseau. Finding the effect of this to be very bad, and that great importance was attached to Muldraugh’s Hill, and having notice of re-enforcements, I concluded we should reoccupy the hill; and accordingly, on Sunday morning, the 22d instant, I put in motion Rousseau’s brigade, and followed up with the Thirty-eighth Indiana Colonel Scribner, and the Forty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Gibson, and a detachment of regulars, under Captain Swaine. We ascended Clear Creek Valley, near the railroad, to the top of Muldraugh’s Hill. We examined the ground near the tunnel, and then proceeded to Elizabethtown, and encamped near the town. The next day we moved on the Lebanon road to this camp, where we have been ever since.

Since our arrival the command has been re-enforced by the Thirty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Harrison. On our way up I left Colonel Crittenden’s regiment to guard the road to Colesburg, but have since called him forward, and he is now posted beyond Elizabethtown, the guarding {p.279} of the road being intrusted to Colonel Hughes’ [Hecker’s?] Illinois Regiment.

This is not an isolated hill, but a range separating the waters of the Rolling Fork of Salt Creek and Green River, the ascent from the north being very abrupt and the descent to the south being very gradual. Our position is far from being a strong one when held against a superior force. Roads will enable an enemy with cavalry to pass around us and cut off our communications and starve us out. We have no safe line of retreat, and must stand our ground let what will happen. Our opponents, led by General Buckner, who is familiar with the ground, are now supposed to be along the railroad from Green River to Bowling Green. Their forces are variously estimated from 7,000 to 20,000 men, and I doubt not they have 15,000, some well and some poorly armed, but all actuated by a common purpose to destroy us.

I am fully alive to the danger of our position and to all its disadvantages, especially that of supplies. Our provisions have been hauled up the rugged valley of Clear Creek by hired wagons and by some which were brought along by the Thirty-ninth Indiana. We can barely supply our wants, and are liable at any moment to have those wagons seized. The reason I came to Muldraugh’s Hill was for effect. Had it fallen into the hands of our enemies, the cause would have been lost, and even with it in our possession a week nobody has rallied to our support. I expected, as we had reason to, that the people of Kentucky would rally to our support, but, on the contrary, none have joined us; while hundreds, we are told, are going to Bowling Green. The railroad from Bowling Green towards us is broken at Nolin, 10 miles off, and at another trestle beyond some 7 miles. I doubt if this was done by Buckner’s orders, but rather by the small parties of guards left to protect them, and who were scared at our approach. I have from time to time given you telegraphic notice of these events, and must now await the development. We should have here at least 20,000 men; but that has been an impossibility.

Truly, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., September 28, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Intimations from various quarters are that this place is to be attacked soon by a heavy force from Columbus. We need more artillery, say 24-pounder howitzers, with plenty of ammunition for the same.

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., September 28, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General Frémont’s letter of September 26 just received. The gunboat Lexington has just returned from Owensborough, and reports no enemy there. The gunboat Conestoga is now at Owensborough.

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.280}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., September 28, 1861.

General O. M. MITCHEL, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cincinnati, Ohio:

DEAR SIR: I have had as full a conversation with General McCook in reference to the condition and wants of my department as the press of business has permitted.

I need, as the general will tell you, all the regiments you can spare. I shall not attempt to guard neighborhoods, but will form not more than three corps d’armees. Forward the regiments, as rapidly as you can get them ready, to this point. Here is where the most urgent call is for additional force, and the sooner here the better. It would give me great pleasure to correspond with you, but I am without assistance, and have not time to make the proper reports and communications to the War Department. You will aid me greatly if you will order General McCook down to assist me in my department.

In haste, yours, very respectfully,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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CAMP WILDCAT, September 28, 1861-5 p.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Colonel Wolford has sent me a special messenger to notify you the rebels are within 8 miles or less of London. They suppose there are from 5,000 to 7,000; does not say whether they have artillery or not.

I am in camp one-half mile this side of the intrenchments, and will do our best to maintain our position. It is unnecessary for me to make any suggestions as to more men, as you will understand all.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD.

P. S.-I will not seal this. I will authorize the messenger to show it to the commander of any troops he may meet. It is 13 miles from here to London.

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 28, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

On the 26th instant, at the request of General Anderson and the Kentucky legislature, my own judgment concurring, I ordered Colonel Van Derveer, commanding Thirty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, to take and hold the Central Kentucky Railroad from Covington to Lexington. This has been successfully accomplished, the bridges all guarded, and our communications with Camp Dick Robinson are now secure. On the 27th instant Colonel Steedman, commanding Fourteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers, left Covington under orders to occupy a point on the Lexington and Louisville Railroad near Locks 2 and 3, Kentucky River. We thus surround a force supposed to be concentrated in Owen County, Ky., commanded by Humphrey Marshall, while we secure our communication between Camp Dick Robinson and Louisville.

A Union company is forming at Maysville, Ky., giving us a cordon {p.281} of troops extending from Maysville, by Lexington and Frankfort, to Louisville. I have taken possession of the Kentucky Central Railroad in the name of the Government.

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP WILDCAT, September 29, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson:

Colonel Wolford came into camp bringing with him the Home Guard under Colonel Brown.

The enemy have taken London. The colonel says they are in large force, and have about 600 cavalry. We might defend this place, and could if they were to come the road, but they can go through the woods with infantry. They could go the Richmond road until they cross Rockcastle River several miles, then there is a good road that intersects this road 1 1/2 miles this side of Mount Vernon.

Should they take that road, we would be then completely cut off from your camp, there being no road for us to travel with wagons, and none that infantry could travel, except through the woods. It is 8 miles from this to the Richmond road, and it runs nearly parallel for some 15 or 20 miles, several miles beyond Mount Vernon.

Owing to the present circumstances, Colonel Wolford will remain with us.

The Home Guards that have been run off will have to be supplied with provisions from our stores, there being no provisions in the neighborhood. Corn is scarce; no old corn except that that is brought some 10 or 12 miles.

I will await your answer, unless I am perfectly satisfied we should retreat.

Hawkins, Burton, Walker, and five others are with the rebels, they having been conveyed through the woods or by-ways. They passed the Home Guards under the pretense that they were from Camp Robinson and sent there as spies to report to you. I have no doubt Burton, &c., were sent by their friends to carry the rebels into Madison County, knowing they were defenseless.

From what I have written you can see through the scheme (provided I am not mistaken). The last heard of the pickets they were this side of London, about half way between London and the forks of the Richmond road.

I consulted with Colonel Wolford before writing this. One of Colonel Wolford’s men fired on another of his men, wounding the man, and killing one horse and wounding another. The private that shot himself at camp, which I informed you of, died yesterday, so the bearer of your dispatch informed me.

There is but little water here, not sufficient for horses and men without hauling, which we could do.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment.

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LOUISVILLE, September 30, 1861.

To PRESIDENT UNITED STATES, Washington, D. C.:

The following telegram just received from General Thomas: “The enemy is at London, about 50 miles from here, and approaching this {p.282} way in force. Send re-enforcements immediately.” With Buckner in our front, I cannot withdraw any troops from-Sherman. Shall send a regiment which arrived last night, also Steedman’s from Eminence-all that I think can now be spared. I will telegraph to the governors of Indiana and Ohio. I hope you will send off all the troops from the North you can raise. Arrangements in the proper departments must be made for securing supplies for the forces which will be thus suddenly collected in this State.

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, Ky., September 30, 1861.

General THOMAS, Lexington:

I have ordered two regiments to re-enforce you, and sent telegrams to the President and to the governors of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois to forward re-enforcements as rapidly as possible. Do your best.

I hope that it will turn out that the enemy’s force has been magnified.

ROBERT ANDERSON.

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CAMP WILDCAT, September 30, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson:

My wife sent a messenger to me that has just arrived. The rebels have taken Manchester, pulled down the flag, tore it up, and placed theirs on the same pole. The messenger says they turned back from Manchester, taking from one of the furnaces fifty wagon loads of salt.

I have nothing of importance to write you since Colonel Wolford left. I would like very much to have Colonel Wolford with us or some more experienced person. Lieutenant Dillion is quite young, though he appears to be very active.

The Home Guard are still coming in. Colonel Brown is trying to make arrangements to feed them with beef and flour. Captain Adams has written you, I suppose, on the subject of supplies.

I have no definite news that the enemy is this side of the forks of the road, though the messenger from my house says he heard guns firing this morning in the direction of the forks of the road.

Many of our men have never drawn blankets, and some who have joined since we left have no clothing. Captain McDaniel, of Colonel Barnes’ regiment, has some 12 or 15 recruits that joined him on the road that have no clothing. If you have a supply of clothing I would like for you to have furnished sufficient for the recruits. None of the regiment have received coats, and the nights are quite cool. We had frost last night.

There are many persons here who cannot purchase food. They are willing to fight if they are fed, as they say they cannot go home. They are also willing to work or do anything else required.

If you could see proper, I would like to see you in regard to our fortifications. I am not pleased with them; they are very good, provided the enemy would march up to them, but infantry could flank us on either side. It is quite difficult to do so, but infantry can go anywhere a common hunter can. If it will not be convenient for you to visit the camp (and I cannot see how you can leave), I would like for some experienced person to come immediately.

When I reached [here] the work had been commenced 2 miles or more {p.283} from the river. We have been still cutting timber in all the points or hollows that we think will be of service. I will return there if not instructed to the contrary-to the point near the meeting-house.

I would like to hear from you at your earliest convenience.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

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EVANSVILLE, September 30, 1861.

General PAINE:

General Buckner was at Greenville at 3 o’clock yesterday-destination, Lock and Dam No. 1, on Green River-with 5,200 men. Information strictly reliable. Send 3,000 troops with gunboat-400 forthwith. We have 400 men there.

JOHN G. HOLLOWAY.

[Indorsement.]

Can’t be furnished. I don’t know Mr. Holloway;

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General.

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CINCINNATI, September 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Lexington, Commanding:

General Mitchel has ordered Seventeenth Ohio and one more regiment on to-night. Four more regiments will follow to-morrow, accompanied by two batteries.

I will report myself to you to-morrow at 10 a.m.

G. C. KNIFFIN.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, September 30, 1861.

General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

In answer to your request, just received, I have ordered the following commanding officers to report to you for duty: Colonel Steedman today; Colonel Walker leaves to-night at 9; Colonel Connell leaves tomorrow at 2.30 p.m.; Colonel Bradley at 7 a.m. October 2; Colonel Dickey at 12 o’clock October 2; Colonel Norton at 6 a.m. October 3. Two batteries of 6-pounders will accompany these troops, and I hope to forward a third very soon.

I will take the field in person in case I find it possible to leave my headquarters here.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, September 30, 1861.

Colonel LANDRAM, Or the Officer in command of Home Guards on Big Hill:

SIR: The enemy is reported to me as occupying London in force. I therefore wish, and direct, you to obstruct the Richmond road by cut {p.284} ting trees across it and filling it up with rock from the cliffs, commencing on the London side of the Rockcastle River, and extending as far back as the Natural Bridge, on the Big Hill, and station your men at the most advantageous position and defend the road. Also send men and have the road from the Richmond to the Mount Vernon road obstructed so that troops cannot march along it.

Do anything in your power to keep the enemy from crossing Rockcastle River.

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, September 30, 1861.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commanding Department of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have just had a conversation with Mr. W. B. Carter, of Tennessee, on the subject of the destruction of the Grand Trunk Railroad through that State He assures me that he can have it done if the Government will intrust him with a small sum of money to give confidence to the persons to be employed to do it. It would be one of the most important services that could be done for the country, and I most earnestly hope you will use your influence with the authorities in furtherance of his plans, which he will submit to you, together with the reasons for doing the work.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 1, 1861.

Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Headquarters Department of Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that General Mitchel has ordered the Seventeenth Ohio Regiment to report to me immediately, and will send four more, with two batteries of artillery, as rapidly as they can come. This force will be sufficient for the defense of this position at present, and I have respectfully to ask that hereafter troops may be assembled at Camp Dennison and held in readiness to move whenever I may call for them. An encampment at Lexington also would be very convenient, as the troops could easily get supplies at that point, and I could call upon them from here to move either by this road or by the road through Richmond, according to circumstances.

I have at last found a gentleman who seems to comprehend the duties of the quartermaster’s department, and I am in hopes we may be able to get along with less confusion than heretofore.

The enemy is still held beyond the Rockcastle Hills, and I am in hopes in two days more we shall have those hills sufficiently fortified to prevent any further advance.

Colonel Hoskins was permitted by me to go to Pulaski County to see about the organization of his regiment. On the 29th ultimo, soon after {p.285} his arrival in that county, hearing of an invasion of Albany by the rebels, he assembled together a party, consisting of some of his recruits, the Home Guards of the adjoining counties, and a company of Colonel Wolford’s cavalry, which I had sent down, pursued the enemy to Travisville, surprised their camp, and dispersed them, killing 4 and making some captures of horses and other property. I will send a copy of his report by next mail.*

If the general approves of my plan (submitted a few days since) of forming encampments at Somerset, Burkesville, Columbia, and Greensburg, I think that part of Kentucky will soon be relieved.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

* See p. 203.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: Your communication of the 30th ultimo was received this afternoon, and I take this occasion to express my thanks for the promptness with which you have responded to my call. Our means of transportation is now so limited, that I will respectfully suggest that all the wagons that can be sent with these regiments be forwarded, to facilitate any forward movement which I may find it in my power to make.

If you could send a column of about four regiments up the Big Sandy and move it south through the counties of Floyd, Letcher, and Harlan, in co-operation with my advance by Barboursville, I believe that we might easily seize the railroad and cut off all communication between Virginia and the South through Tennessee before the enemy will have time to re-enforce Zollicoffer sufficiently to prevent it.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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OCTOBER 1, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding Camp Robinson, &c.:

GENERAL: I sent your letter to Colonel Landram from Mount Vernon this morning, and wrote him a note requesting him to take possession of the Big Rockcastle Ford and a hill on the south side of the river bank, as well as to close the road [at] the fords. I also requested him to employ men to destroy the McKee road without delay.

From all I can learn, the rebels have retreated some distance south of London. I presume they have fallen back only temporarily.

I fear that the Home Guards will not do much towards defending Big Hill, from the sample they gave near London. Organized troops are needed there.

The impression seems to be that the rebels will take the Madison road or go by McKee’s.

I find the cavalry are returning to Camp Robinson, but if I can get enough at Camp Wildcat I shall send them to the Big Hill.

Excuse this; I write on horseback.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER.

{p.286}

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 1, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson:

I have information, reliable, that the rebels retreated 9 miles beyond London on Sunday. A negro of mine reached camp last night with a letter from my wife; she says they left there Sunday morning and returned towards their encampment on Cumberland River. Rumor says they have destroyed much property in Knox.

They destroyed Captain Murphy’s property. He is in the Third Regiment of Volunteers from Clay County. They tore down haystacks and burnt some rails for another person, is all the damage they done except taking the coffee and salt, for which I learn they left Jeff. Davis bonds.

Colonel Wolford and myself made arrangements to blockade the Madison road to-day, but we, on consultation last night, agreed to countermand the order this morning; though, should you desire it, please say so, and we will have it attended to immediately.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

P. S.-I would like very much for General Crittenden to send some one here to take command of his forces; they are organizing three companies; though I suppose Colonel Brown will do so. I will endeavor to get Colonel Brown to move them on the river, 2 miles from us; they are in our camp, and it is almost impossible to do anything with them or our men.

T. T. GARRARD.

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CAMP AT ALBANY, October 1, 1861-8 a.m.

Brigadier-General THOMAS:

SIR: I find it impossible to hold the Home Guards of Casey and Lincoln longer than forty-eight hours from this time.

I learn that the Confederate troops are rallying again at Travisville, with the intention of attacking us. From the best information, they cannot muster a force exceeding 1,150. Last night at 9 o’clock our picket guard were fired upon by a party of seven persons within 3 miles of the camp; they returned the fire, with what effect I have not ascertained. None of ours were injured that I know of, though one of the picket has not yet come up.

I have ordered a detachment of fifty cavalry to scout the whole country in the neighborhood of the beat at which the pickets were stationed, as also that in which the absent picket was stationed.

We are occupying what I consider a strong natural position and one of importance to the cause, rendered so by many circumstances, among which are the following, viz:

Within the camp guard we have three good flouring mills; within the county we have an abundance of wheat and forage, and, it being situated south of the Cumberland River, could they get possession of the county it would serve as a rallying point to which they could gather re-enforcements by way of the Cumberland River, while the number of roads diverging from this point would enable them to move forward in the direction of either Monticello, Jamestown, or Burkesville. Between this and the Cumberland River there are five beds of stone-coal, an article of importance to them. Below, at Burkesville, there are five salt wells, the possession of which is all-important to the rebels.

{p.287}

I hope to be sufficiently re-enforced by night to proceed with the work of blockading.

While I cannot expect to hold for any length of time the Home Guards from the counties of Casey and Lincoln, yet it is due them to mention the heroic conduct of Colonel Barnes, as also the men under his command. When the alarm was given by the driving in of the pickets, at the command they came to position like veteran soldiers, and promptly obeyed every order.

If it is desired, under the circumstances, that our position should be held, I will await your orders. If we should be compelled to abandon it, had I not best order the destruction of the mills at this place, as they would be all-important to the permanent occupancy of the place by the Confederate troops?

If it should be ordered to hold the position, please send forward Lieutenant-Colonel Howard, with all the forces under his command, and other forces, numbering, in all, say, 800 men.

Major Brents is here, by order of Colonel Wolford, and has proven himself a most active and efficient officer, and one whose services I shall need at least until the camp can be properly organized. He desires to know whether it will meet your approbation for him to remain for that time.

I shall also ask the aid of Captain Morrison, with his command, as they are familiar with the country, and the number of roads leading into this place requires a strong picket force.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS, Commanding Post.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 1, 1861.

General THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: The enemy, in full retreat, are by this time in Barboursville. I am starting my men by squads to Camp Dick Robinson, and will be there myself day after to-morrow, or as quick thereafter as I can, unless I receive different orders from you.

FRANK WOLFORD.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., October 1, 1861.

The following proclamation of the governor of Kentucky, and resolutions and enactments passed by the legislature of the same at its present session, are commended to the careful consideration of the people of the western part of the State, viz:

PROCLAMATION.

In obedience to the subjoined resolution, adopted by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the Government of the Confederate States, the State of Tennessee, and all others concerned, are hereby innformed that “Kentucky expects the Confederate or Tennessee troops to be withdrawn from her soil unconditionally.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my name and caused the seal of the Commonwealth to be affixed. Done at Frankfort, this the 13th day of September, A. D. 1861, and in the seventieth year of the Commonwealth.

[L. S.]

B. MAGOFFIN.

By the Governor:

Thos. B. MONROE, Jr., Secretary of State.

{p.288}

“Resolved by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That his excellency Governor Magoffin be, and he is hereby, instructed to inform those concerned that Kentucky expects the Confederate or Tennessee troops to be-withdrawn from her soil unconditionally.”

RESOLUTIONS.

Whereas Kentucky has been invaded by the forces of the so-called Confederate States, and the commanders of the forces so invading the State have insolently prescribed the conditions upon which they will withdraw, thus insulting the dignity of the State by demanding terms to which Kentucky cannot listen without dishonor:

Therefore,

Resolved That the invaders must be expelled.

Inasmuch as there are now in Kentucky Federal troops assembled for the purpose of preserving the tranquillity of the State and of defending and protecting the people of Kentucky la the peaceful enjoyment of their lives and property: It is

Resolved That General Robert Anderson, a native Kentuckian, who has been appointed to the command of the Department of Cumberland, be requested to take instant command, with authority and power from this Commonwealth to call out a volunteer force in Kentucky for the purpose of repelling the invaders from our soil.

Resolved, That, in using the means which duty and honor require shall be used to expel the invaders from the soil of Kentucky, no citizen shall be molested on account of his political opinions; that no citizen’s property shall be taken or confiscated because of such opinions, nor shall any slave be set free by any military commander and that all peaceable citizens who remain at home and attend to their private business, until legally called into the public service, as well as their families, are entitled to and shall receive the fullest protection of the government in the enjoyment of their lives, their liberties, and their property.

Resolved That his excellency the governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky be requested to give all the aid in his power to accomplish the end desired by these resolutions and that he issue his proclamation calling out the militia of the State, and that he place the same under the command of General Thomas L. Crittenden.

Resolved, That the patriotism of every Kentuckian is invoked and is confidently relied upon to give active aid in the defense of the Commonwealth.

ENACTMENT.

1. Be it enacted by the general assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That as the soil of the State of Kentucky has been invaded by armed forces acting under the authority of the so-called Confederate States, therefore, for the purpose of repelling said invasion, the governor of the State of Kentucky is hereby directed to issue his proclamation, calling out not less than forty thousand soldiers, residents and citizens of Kentucky, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years, to be mustered into the service of this Commonwealth for any term of service not less than twelve mouths nor more than three years from the time they were mustered into service, unless sooner discharged.

2. That the governor be, and he is hereby, authorized, in order to raise said force, to accept of the services of any volunteer companies who shall within three months from the date of his proclamation tender their services; and he shall commission for that purpose all officers duly elected by the companies aforesaid, necessary and proper for the command of such volunteers.

3. That all volunteer officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, whose service may be tendered and accepted under the provisions of this act, shall be mustered into service at such places of rendezvous in the Congressional district la which they shall volunteer as the general in the field shall appoint by his order; and when so mustered into service, shall be then and there entitled to receive in advance one month’s pay, to be taken and considered as part of their pay.

4. That the forces to be raised and organized, as provided for by this act, shall, when mustered into service, be under the command of the general commanding the State forces in the field.

5. That the governor be also authorized to accept the services of fifteen hundred men, in addition to the forty thousand men provided for by this act, one thousand to be used as sharpshooters and scouts, and five hundred to be used as horsemen and scouts, they furnishing their own horses: Provided, That no person shall be accepted in this arm of the service unless his skill and capacity have been tested by the general in command or such officer as he may detail for that purpose: And provided also, That such person shall receive five dollars per month of extra pay.

6. That each horseman for the service of his horse shall receive five dollars per month; and in case his horse is killed by the enemy, he shall be paid the value of the horse, not exceeding one hundred and fifty dollars.

7. That the commander in the field may organize individuals who tender themselves into companies, and such companies as may tender themselves into squadrons, battalions, {p.289} and regiments, and permit them to elect their officers, who shall, when so elected, be commissioned by the governor on the certificate of the general commanding.

8. That the governor is authorized so accept the services of squadrons, battalions, and regiments, when tendered as such, and commission the officers elected by the squadrons, battalions, and regiments so organized; the election of officers by any company, battalion, squadron, or regiment shall he superintended and conducted by any justice of the peace or judge of in-he county court who may be called on for that purpose, and such justice or judge shall certify to the military board the names of the officers elected and for what office each is elected, and thereupon said board, if they approve the proceeding, shall certify to the governor the names of the officers elected, and what office they have been respectively elected to fill, who shall issue commissions in conformity to such certificate.

9. That the commanding general shall he entitled to appoint and employ such staff officers, and with such rank, as the inspector-general is empowered to appoint by the fourteenth section of the third article of the act entitled “An act for the better organization of the Kentucky militia,” approved March 5, 1860; and he shall have the authority conferred on said inspector general by the tenth, eleventh, and twelfth sections of said article of said act.

10. The troops raised under this act shall be organized into squadrons, battalions, regiments, brigades, and divisions, and have the same number of officers for each squadron, battalion, regiment, brigade, and division as are allowed in the Army of the United States, and shall receive the same pay and rations as are allowed the troops of the United States of the same rank and grade. When brigades and divisions are formed out of the troops so raised, they shall be officered according to existing laws.

The brigadier-general commanding calls the attention of the loyal inhabitants in this part of the State to the address of Judge R. K. Williams, of this date, who is authorized to raise a regiment of volunteers for the service of the United States.

By order of Brig. Gen. C. F. Smith:

THOS. J. NEWSHAM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 2, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding Camp Robinson, &c.:

My note of yesterday advised you that I had dispatched your letter to Colonel Landram. I saw some of the Home Guards this morning from Madison, and directed them to move a portion of their force to ford of Big Rockcastle, and obstruct the road at once. I suppose the work will be commenced this afternoon.

If you design sending a force to Big Hill by way of Lancaster and Moore’s, will it not be advisable to keep the road open north of the river? Yesterday only about 150 of the rebels (according to report) were left in Barboursville; all the rest had-fallen back to Cumberland Ford. Only some 2,000, according to best information I can get, came as far as Laurel Bridge; perhaps 150 cavalry entered London. Theirs seems to have been a mere marauding expedition. They gutted the houses at Barboursville before the infantry left on Monday. We are all safe here.

I hope to return to Camp Robinson to-morrow evening.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. CARTER, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy (on special duty).

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 2, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Since General Carter arrived we have been over considerable country. The general thinks when the work is completed we will be secure against almost any force. With strangers they could not find passways, but {p.290} persons acquainted with the country could get into our camp many ways. Still, they could not do so if we had a small force at each point. The distance from Little Rockcastle River to Big Rockcastle is some 3 1/2 miles. A considerable portion of this distance is defended by natural cliffs, so that it relieves us from performing much labor at those places. Ten miles of the road south of our camp is almost a dense thicket on each side of the road, and could be defended, or at least we could annoy the enemy with infantry the entire distance, whilst we would be comparatively secure, provided we acted cautiously. General Carter can explain more explicitly.

Colonel Brown desires me to say to you that he can supply his command of twelve-months’ men with beef and bread, but will be dependent on you or General Crittenden for sugar, coffee, soap, candles, and such other articles as are furnished. He has no tents or camp equipage. Many of his men are bare of shoes, clothing, and blankets.

Colonel Brown desires to know whether or not he must open a correspondence with General Crittenden or must he address you on all matters connected with his military affairs? He desires such instructions as you may from time to time think proper to give.

Colonel Brown has now enrolled and in camp some 250 twelve-months’ soldiers. He has muskets, but no cartridge-boxes, caps, pouches, nor bayonet scabbards. He desires to hear from you as soon as convenient. Mount Vernon is the post-office, if sent by mail.

I have not heard anything of the rebels since they reached Barboursville. The last account is that some 100 or upwards were in Barboursville. I have heard, but do not say that it is reliable, that there is a robbing party going through Knox County, plundering every person (almost) they come across, and that it is headed by men by the name of Arthur, citizens of Knox County, Kentucky.

I have got Colonel Brown to move all of his men to the river except one company, and they are outside our camp in a rock house. We have been much annoyed by them, as well as visitors and others who were driven before the rebels. Some of them returned this evening part of the way home, but heard of the rebels below London, and they returned to camp. The report, I am satisfied, is false.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

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OCTOBER 3, 1861.

I have not said anything about the cavalry, as I supposed they would return. It will be very inconvenient for our men to go so far from camp as they should to be effective. The road from our camp towards London for several miles is only tolerable, but from that point to the rebel camp on Cumberland River is as good if not better than any other dirt road in Kentucky that I know.

Respectfully,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, October 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: I have the most urgent appeals from important points in my department for military protection. There are two strategic points of the {p.291} very first consequence which I desire to occupy in advance of the enemy.

I trust, therefore, you will take prompt measures to inform yourself of the strength and position of the advancing forces, and advise me daily by special messenger and telegraph of your own strength, that I may be able to decide how the troops from Ohio and Indiana now getting ready for the field should be distributed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 3, 1861.

Capt. OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. Army:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report to the general commanding the arrival here of the Fourteenth and Thirty-first Ohio Regiments and the Thirty-third Indiana. There are three other regiments at Nicholasville which could have been here to-night if our means of transportation had been sufficient to bring them over. Only one of these regiments has any transportation, the Indiana, and the want of it has embarrassed me very much. Our supply as yet is very limited, and all the mules have to be broken, so that we are embarrassed in that respect also; but as soon as I can get up enough wagons I propose moving on beyond London and strengthening the position, so as to relieve as much of the country as possible from the depredations of the rebels. The report to-night is that they have again retired, after finding I had got possession of Rockcastle Hills. I shall move with caution, how ever, but endeavor to drive them out of the Cumberland passes before re-enforcements can reach them. I could move at once if these regiments had been supplied with transportation; but as it is impossible to hire enough in the country, I shall have to wait until I can have it sent to me. A battery of artillery completely equipped would give me a great advantage.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 3, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I have no information in regard to the rebels more than I wrote you, except the inclosed order of General Zollicoffer, which I have no doubt is genuine. I could not doubt it, be cause they carried out the instructions to the letter. I also inclose you a letter directed to Hon. Green Adams, &c.* The bearer of this letter, Mr. Hurst, is reliable, and was in Tennessee sometime since and taken prisoner. The order from Major Coffee, countermanding the blockade of the Madison Fork of the Richmond road, was sent me this evening. If we have one day’s notice, which we certainly will have, I can have the road blocked up completely. However, we have been doing and undoing so much, that you may begin to think we are fickle. I should not have ordered the blockade the second time if it had not have been for General Carter, and he was for carrying out instructions.

{p.292}

You will see before this reaches you that Colonel Brown has moved to the river some 2 miles from us. I would be afraid to place them between the enemy and our camp. Some of his men are, I fear, a little timid, and I doubt whether or not they will do their duty on that side of us. There is a tolerable good camping ground about 2 miles beyond our camp. General Carter spoke of it as we passed it, looking out the points to blockade. It is near Little Rockcastle, and near a point where the road passes between the point of a ridge and Little Rockcastle River. At the point where we are camped there is but little room, though we can stick our tents about on points and sides of hills, and could find room enough to place another regiment on the same kind of ground.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

P. S.-Are there any cartridges for rifled muskets at Camp Robinson? The muskets I received of Captain Cardwell, of Harrodsburg, are rifled. I have not examined, but learn from others the ordinary cartridge will not suit them. Surgeon Hogan has not yet been furnished with a tent. He desires one sent, if there is any to be had.

* Not found.

[Inclosure.]

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS, Camp Buckner, September 25, 1861.

Col. James E. Rains will march at 4 o’clock to-morrow morning, via Barboursville, to Laurel Bridge, on the London road, with his regiment, provisioned for six days, three rations of which should be cooked, leaving his tents in this encampment. Colonel McNairy’s command will accompany him or follow him, by a right-hand road crossing Laurel Creek about 2 miles above the bridge. Colonel R. will have command, and will dislodge a supposed force of the enemy at the bridge by attacking simultaneously with infantry and cavalry at both ends of the bridge. He will be furnished a guide, who will give him information of some arms, which he will capture, if practicable. He will take with him also Lieutenant Falcond’s section of artillery. A battalion of Colonel Statham’s infantry, with three companies of Colonel Branner’s cavalry, will be posted on the road to be pursued by Colonel McNairy about 10 miles back, to give support, if necessary. Simultaneously, Colonel Cummings’ regiment, with two companies of Colonel Broydton’s [Brazelton’s?] cavalry, will escort a train of wagons to the Goose Creek Salt Works, 16 or 18 miles east, in Clay County, to load with salt. The different detachments will communicate by express messengers with each other and with me, and when the salt train returns all will return to this encampment. Much is trusted to Colonel Rains’ discretion in whatever may transpire on the way.

F. K. ZOLLICOFFER, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, October 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have just received yours of the 1st instant. The regiments sent from Ohio to your camp have been compelled to leave without {p.293} their wagons, owing to the fact that no time could be lost in getting them into the field. I have now the wagons, horses, and harness, and am organizing a force of teamsters, and hope very soon to supply all the regiments with transportation.

You request me to send the column of about four regiments up the Big Sandy, to co-operate with you in your advance upon the Cumberland Gap. You do not advise me what amount of force is indispensably necessary at Camp Dick Robinson before you will feel it expedient to commence your advance.

We have in Ohio at this time a limited number of arms. The number of regiments which we can put in the field is necessarily limited. Admitting we have but three regiments remaining prepared to move in all this week, do you prefer them to be sent to your camp, or do you prefer them to undertake the expedition up the Sandy?

Send your answer by a mounted messenger to the telegraph office, that it may promptly reach me.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP KENTON, MASON COUNTY, Near Maysville, Ky., October 4, 1861.

Captain GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I desire to call the attention of General Anderson to the following intelligence that comes to me from a person in whom I have the highest confidence, and who is himself high in secession counsel, but is in truth a Union man, true and loyal. This person has never yet deceived me.

Breckinridge is not in Prestonburg or that vicinity, but is in Richmond, Va. He sent a messenger to W. H. H. Stanton, who arrived day before yesterday, saying that he (Breckinridge) would return in a very few days as general, and that the secession companies would hold themselves in readiness and be prepared to meet him at Hazel Green, in Mason County, on his return, of which event they would be early notified.

The message went on to say that the whole of Beauregard’s army was on its way to Kentucky, and will winter in Kentucky, and will be here in time to take advantage of the hay crop; that there was but a thin line of troops in front of Washington masking the movement.

Now, see, this comes to me from such a source that I believe it. The sudden accessions to the strength of Zollicoffer, Buckner, and Polk show that such a movement, or one similar, is on foot. A virtual panic exists in this part of Kentucky; a fear of the General Government’s ability to aid them.

I beg to call the general’s attention to another point which is doing injury to the cause here. A number of persons are establishing camps in impossible and out-of-the-way places, and raising troops for regiments that can never be found, acting in competition with each other, all desirous of having a camp on his own or his immediate neighbor’s farm, and all claiming to be acting under the authority of General Anderson, and pitch in without the slightest reference to me. The consequence is that there is no head here, no authority or control. If the general will confide to me the raising of troops in this section and give me authority over that which immediately surrounds me, it seems to me that I can {p.294} manage the affairs rather more successfully than it proceeds at present. I have at least some experience in raising an army. The utter confusion in which affairs are in this section impels me to call attention to it.

Very respectfully,

W. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, Garrard County, Kentucky, October 4, 1861.

General ROBERT ANDERSON, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have been informed to-day privately, and I do not know that it is true, that 25,000 men will be sent to Kentucky within ten days to meet any movements on the part of the rebels against Kentucky. Should it be so, I have to ask that four of the best regiments, with two batteries, may be sent to me, supplied with transportation and ammunition. 1 believe if I could get such a force here, and be ready to march in ten days from this time, that I could seize on the railroad at Knoxville and cut off all communication between Memphis and Virginia.

The information I receive at this time from Tennessee is, that there are now but few troops in East Tennessee, but that it is the intention of the rebels to concentrate a large force there to act against Kentucky, and that they intend to invade this State and winter here if they can. I told General Scott, when in Washington, that I believed they would attempt the occupation of Kentucky, but fear I failed to impress upon his mind that it would be an important move on their part, and that we ought to be on the lookout lest they get ahead again.

The regiments I am receiving are raw, and as little prepared for a daring enterprise as those I found at Camp Dick Robinson, besides which there is but one regiment among them supplied with means of transportation.

Zollicoffer has retired again, but I have a strong force in Rockcastle Hills, prepared to prevent any advance he may make. Two efficient batteries and four good regiments is all the additional force I want.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 4, 1861.

Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL, Commanding Department of Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:

GENERAL: Affairs in this quarter are looking much better. The six regiments you have sent me are sufficient, unless the Southern force now in Virginia fall upon Kentucky. Should any movement of this kind be made I will give you timely notice of it.

My greatest want now is means of transportation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.295}

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 5, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

About two hours after the messenger left this morning I learned the rebels were in London. In a short time I ordered Major Cardwell, with 200 soldiers, to take a position about 3 miles from camp, on a hill beyond Little Rockcastle, &c. I would have written you immediately, but I was not satisfied as to reliableness of the statement. A gentleman has just arrived, but he did not see a rebel; but there is no doubt but that some 9 cavalry were in London this morning, and they reported a force of 600 a short distance off. It may possibly be a plundering party.

I would not write you, but I think it better to keep you posted with their movements.

I would like very much to have some cavalry here. We have no doubt about sustaining our position.

I send this by Mr. Pitzer, of Barboursville. He will return to camp with any dispatch you may desire to send.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Volunteers.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 7, 1861.

To ECKERT:

Returned from Muldraugh’s Hill Saturday evening. W. T. Sherman says his force is only 4,000 raw troops. Kentuckians are not enlisting, and give no aid whatever. If he is expected to make any diversion or offensive movements he must have large re-enforcements. The Louisville and Nashville Railroad has but eighty cars all told, and not reliable for military transportation. All Federal troops recently arrived in Kentucky have been sent to General Thomas. The enemy’s main force is in front of W. T. Sherman, but no indications of an intended advance.

ANSON STAGER.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 7, 1861.

General THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: Your communication of 4th instant is now before me. I have no information as to the movement of troops to Kentucky suggested by you. Should such, however, turn out to be the case, I will grant the request you make.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Cincinnati, October 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: Your telegram of the 6th is received. At the earnest solicitation of Brigadier-General Nelson I have ordered the Second Ohio Reg. {p.296} ment, Colonel Harris, to take position at a place called the Olympian Springs, about 20 miles east of Mount Sterling, in order to close the mountain gorge through which small bands of the enemy are constantly passing to Prestonburg to re-enforce a camp forming at that place. I have General Anderson’s authority for sending this regiment to the point already named.

I look upon it as a strategic point of great importance in the contemplated advance towards Cumberland Gag.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 7, 1861.

The commanding general learns with deep regret that arrests are being made in some parts of the State upon the slightest and most trivial grounds. He desires the civil authorities and orders the military not to make any arrests except where the parties are attempting to join the rebels or are engaged in giving aid or information to them, and in all cases the evidence must be such as will convict them before a court of justice. In some cases it is understood that the Home Guards have gone into adjoining counties and arrested and carried off parties who have been quietly remaining at home under the expectation that they would not be interfered with, provided that they did nothing in violation of the spirit of the proclamation bearing date of September 24, issued from these headquarters. Some instances are mentioned of persons having been arrested and taken out of the State.

This is all contrary to what the commanding general has declared to be his wish, and he trusts it will not be repeated.

It is believed that many of those who at one time sympathized with rebellion are desirous of returning to their allegiance and wish to remain quietly at home attending to their business. A conciliatory, fair course pursued towards such persons will join them to our cause; the reverse may force them into the ranks of our enemies.

The commanding general entreats and urges his fellow-citizens to discountenance and endeavor to put a stop to these ill-timed and unlawful arrests, and to aid him in keeping peace among ourselves.

By command of Brigadier-General Anderson:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.

The following telegraph order was received yesterday at the headquarters:

WASHINGTON, D. C., October 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General ANDERSON:

To give you rest necessary to restoration of health, call Brigadier-General Sherman to command the Department of the Cumberland. Turn over to him your instructions, and report here in person as soon as you may without retarding your recovery.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

In obedience to the above, orders, I hereby relinquish the command of the department to Brigadier-General Sherman.

{p.297}

Regretting deeply the necessity which renders this step proper, I do it with less reluctance, because my successor, Brigadier-General Sherman, is the man I had selected for that purpose. God grant that he may be the means of delivering this department from the marauding bands, who, under the guise of relieving and benefiting Kentucky, are doing all the injury they can to those who will not join them in their accursed warfare.

ROBERT ANDERSON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.

Brig. Gen. Robert Anderson having relinquished the command of this department in General Orders, No. 6, of this date, the undersigned assumes command of this department.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General CRITTENDEN:

SIR: I have made an order for you to go to Owensborough and to assume command of the regiments organizing in that quarter.

I am aware that whilst regiments are being formed and equipped they can do little service, yet our enemies give us little time, and we must do the best we can.

If one of the regiments could show itself on Green River, make a circuit south of the river and return, it would have a good effect. Hopkinsville has 1,000 men, but poorly armed, and a demonstration on it would probably lead to its evacuation.

Kentucky looks for some bold stroke, and with such men as Jackson, Johnson, Burbridge, Hawkins, and McHenry almost anything might be attempted.

You may purchase subsistence or hire wagons at discretion. Certify the bills and I will have them paid here.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 8, 1861.

GARRETT DAVIS, Esq., Paris, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: In reply to your letter of 7th instant* I state that General Anderson has already ordered an Ohio regiment to the point suggested by you in your favor. No further troops will be ordered now.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I am forced into the command of this department against my will, and it would take 300,000 men to fill half the calls for troops.

* Not found.

{p.298}

LOUISVILLE, KY., October 8, 1861.

GARRETT DAVIS, Esq.:

DEAR SIR: Yours of this date is received.* You will be surprised to learn that we have not the arms you mention. Arms are coming forward very slowly. I have written and telegraphed to General Nelson, at Maysville to take a regiment from Portsmouth, Ohio, up the Big Sandy, and at the same time for the Ohio regiment at Olympian Springs to advance towards Prestonburg. If Colonel Davis can by any means at hand scatter that camp I will approve of all the steps, but an advance up the Sandy, now navigable, would be almost sure to result in the retreat or dispersion of the force. But we have not the arms.

Men are offering, but arms and equipments are wanting.

The real struggle in Kentucky is to be between this and Nashville.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 8, 1861.

Colonel JACKSON, Owensborough:

DEAR SIR: Yours of the 6th * is received. I am forced to organize and operate with insufficient means and materials. Your regiment has more facilities than any other, and I hope you will make rapid progress. Keep some runners down to Christian to keep up the hearts of your people, and if you could make a push of a few hundred men towards Hopkinsville it would disturb Buckner a good deal. I send General Crittenden down to Owensborough. They have not sent me a single regular officer from Washington, and so engrossed are they with Missouri, that they don’t do us justice. The more necessity for us to strain every nerve.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General NELSON, Commanding at Maysville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to say that if in your judgment you can by a sudden march or by chartering a steam boat to go up the Sandy surprise the rebel camp at Prestonburg, he fully authorizes you to do so, and desires you to do so.

He is aware of your being greatly deficient in arms and ammunition for an expedition, but he hopes you may be able to arm a sufficient number of men for the purpose with the arms of the country.

The general does not order this expedition, but hopes it can be undertaken. It is left entirely to your discretion.

I am, general, yours, &c.,

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.299}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 8, 1861.

General WARD, Greensburg, Ky.:

I have been called here by General Anderson to assume command in Kentucky. Until regiments are organized and equipped it will be almost impossible to brigade them. Still, if you hear of Buckner’s forces advancing from Bowling Green, you could show your force on his flank about Glasgow or Little Barren and cause him to hesitate.

Gather in all the Home Guard arms you can find. They are the property of the United States, confided to them for special reasons, but now that armies are in the field these scattered muskets are of little use.

We are moving heaven and earth to get the arms, clothing, and money necessary in Kentucky, but McClellan and Frémont have made such heavy drafts that the supply is scant.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 38.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. H. Rousseau will move his camp as soon as practicable forward to the vicinity of Nolin, selecting, with the advice of Captain Prime, a position for a large force.

He will cause scouts to be sent forward towards Green River, and take every advantage of position left unoccupied by the enemy.

By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant. General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 39.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. T. L. Crittenden will proceed with as little delay as possible to Owensborough and Henderson, and take command of the United States forces at these two points. He will report in person to the general commanding, before his departure, for special orders and instructions.

By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Dep’t of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: The falling back of the rebels under Zollicoffer indicates the necessity of an outward movement on our part to seize the Cumberland Gap and afford protection to our friends in East Tennessee, and with this in view the instructions (a copy of which is inclosed) to Brigadier-General Mitchel have been given. It is hoped your judgment accords with the views of the Secretary of War, and will cheerfully aid {p.300} in carrying them out. The Secretary of War will arrange a meeting with you in a few days.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure.]

CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:

GENERAL: By direction of the Secretary of War you are hereby assigned to duty in the Department of the Cumberland, and will repair to Camp Dick Robinson, and there prepare the troops for an outward movement, the object being to take possession of Cumberland Ford and Cumberland Gap, and ultimately seize the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad and attack and drive the rebels from that region of country. You will report your instructions to Brigadier-General Sherman, in command of this department, and be governed by such further orders as he may give.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 10, 1861.

President LINCOLN:

My own belief is that the Confederates will make a more desperate effort to gain Kentucky than they have for Missouri. The force now here or expected is entirely inadequate. The Kentuckians, instead of assisting, call from every quarter for protection against local secessionists. I named T. J. Wood at Governor Morton’s instance, because he is a Kentuckian and has been mustering officer at Indianapolis. He should have a brigade of Indiana volunteers. Col. R. W. Johnson is now with Colonel Jackson’s cavalry regiment, in process of formation at Owensborough. Both have good reputations in Regular Army. McCook has not arrived. All the men in Indiana and Ohio are ready to come to Kentucky, but they have no arms, and we cannot supply them arms, clothing, or anything. Answer.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 10, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

The point called Laurel Hill I am unable to say anything definite. When I wrote you some days ago I was of the opinion that the hill known as Laurel Hill was beyond Little Rockcastle, and not more than 3 miles from this camp; but now I am induced to believe the hill is beyond Big Laurel Creek; if so, I cannot say anything definite about it.

There is a bridge over Big Laurel, though the stream is not 50 feet wide. There is no ford for several miles either above or below, as I am told by citizens, except near the bridge.

The country on the opposite [side] of the creek from this is level for some 300 yards; then the road forks, one by Barboursville, the other by Payne’s Cross-Roads, and-unite 8 miles beyond Barboursville, near the {p.301} Flat Lick. The hill beyond the bridge, some say, commands the roads, though I cannot see how it does.

I have been informed that the rebels have been examining a hill beyond London 9 miles, where there is a meeting-house, near McHargue’s. I understand this hill commands the Barboursville road for some distance. They may establish a temporary camp there for the purpose of getting grain, &c., it being one of the best neighborhoods on the road, though this would not command the road that runs by Payne’s Cross-Roads.

I have understood, but place no confidence in the report, that the rebels intend going through Whitley County and Pulaski, so as to surround this camp. They were in Williamsburg Saturday last; that is, about 200 cavalry.

When Captain Smith, of the cavalry, reached here there was not one of Colonel Wolford’s men in camp, nor had there been for several days, and if my informant is correct, some of them that are now here will do no good. They were seen drunk on picket yesterday at or near London, some 10 miles from this camp.

In regard to surgeon and assistant, I will write to Dr. William Atkisson, tendering to him the appointment on conditions, which conditions I will state to him. If he accepts, I will tell him to report to you as he comes to join the regiment.

I would like very much to have had Dr. Hogan as assistant surgeon, as he is very attentive, and so far has treated the cases which he has been called upon to attend in such a manner as to give satisfaction. If it is not contrary to orders, I would like for Dr. Hogan to remain as assistant with the surgeon, so that the surgeon acting-with him may have an opportunity of testing his qualifications practically. Dr. Hogan says that he was embarrassed, but still thinks he could undergo an examination.

Inclosed I send you Zollicoffer’s proclamation,* also statement of [illegible] about the location of troops. The proclamation was copied from Zollicoffer’s.

Captain Smith, of the cavalry, has several men that will not do any good here. I have advised him to send them to Camp Dick Robinson, so that he may get some others in return. I have 975 non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates in the regiment.

Inclosed I send you list of articles received in the regiment agreeably to the different captains’ reports.

OCTOBER 11.

I have no late news of the rebels, that is reliable, near us, though some of the officers believe a squad was seen between this camp and Mount Vernon.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Cincinnati, Ohio, October 10, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson:

GENERAL: Under orders from the Secretary of War of this date, I am directed to repair to Camp Dick Robinson, and there prepare the {p.302} troops for an onward movement, the object being to take possession of Cumberland Ford and Cumberland Gap, and ultimately seize the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad.

In compliance with these orders, I desire you to move the three Ohio regiments now in Camp Dick Robinson to some convenient point beyond your camp, in the hope that they may thus escape the epidemic now prevailing among your men. You will order the regiments at Nicholasville to remain there until their transportation shall arrive.

I beg you, general, to make every preparation in your power for this expedition in which we are about to be united.

It is my purpose to leave for the camp as soon as I am assured that supplies, transportation, ammunition, and other necessaries are certain to be sent forward.

In the hope of soon greeting you in camp, I have the honor to be, very truly, your obedient servant,

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., October 10, 1861.

To all whom it may concern, greeting:

Since the undersigned assumed command of the troops at this place his purpose has been to pursue such a course as to show the inhabitants of this region that it was not the intention of the Government to interfere with their comfort and well being in any respect, not excepting those who were well known to sympathize with the people of the States in rebellion. The person and property of every one has been protected, and quiet and good order preserved. If any discomfort or annoyance has occurred, it has been incidental to a state of war and from military necessity.

The undersigned hoped that such course would open the eyes of the population to the falsehoods industriously circulated by the leaders and politicians of the South respecting the intention of the Government in sending troops here. Perhaps it may have done some good; but the course taken by some of the inhabitants of this city, and by many in the neighborhood, satisfies him that the conciliatory policy ceases to be a virtue.

He will, accordingly, take such measures as the circumstances call for and justify. What those may be, time will develop. As one measure, he has forbidden the outposts to pass out any person without a written permission from these headquarters, which will only be given to persons of approved loyalty to the Government of the United States. Nor will goods or stores of any description be permitted to pass out without the same permission.

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 11, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: It is very important you should make an advance movement in the direction of the Cumberland. I know your means of transportation {p.303} are insufficient, but our adversaries are no better off, and we should fight with similar means. Can you hire some wagons and show a force in the direction of London? Of necessity I cannot give minute directions, and can only say that if your men simply move, the effect will be good. Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CINCINNATI, October 11, 1861.

Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

General Cameron [Secretary of War] has placed me in command of the force at Camp Dick Robinson, Central Kentucky, and has ordered preparation for an immediate advance towards Cumberland Gap. I have no division staff except a medical director. Am I at liberty to name an adjutant-general with the rank of colonel, a division quartermaster with the same rank, an inspector-general with same rank; commissary, chief engineer, aides, with the rank of captain? Where can I obtain money? Please answer, as I am ordered to act with the greatest promptitude.

O. M. MITCHEL, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, Garrard County, Kentucky, October 11, 1861.

Brig. Gen. O. M. MITCHEL, Commanding Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:

GENERAL: Your communication of the 10th instant was received today at the hands of Governor Johnson, of Tennessee.

I have been doing all in my power to prepare the troops for a move on Cumberland Ford and to seize the Tennessee and Virginia Railroad, and shall continue to do all I can to assist you until your arrival here; but justice to myself requires that I ask to be relieved from duty with these troops, since the Secretary has thought it necessary to supersede me in the command, without, as I conceive, any just cause for so doing.

I have already sent one regiment forward, and shall send the others as soon as I can get the transportation. It was my desire to have advanced two regiments and a battery about 6 miles beyond London, to secure the road to Barboursville and to protect a large tract of country abounding in forage, but up to this time have not been able to get the transportation.

I have also been very much embarrassed in my operations from the want of funds, not having received any since my arrival here, nearly a month ago. I hope the Government will be more liberal with you.

I am, general, respectfully, &c., your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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CAMP KENTON, October 11, 1861.

General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: I inclose herewith the copy of a letter received this afternoon from Colonel Harris, of the Second Ohio Regiment, at Camp Gill, at the {p.304} Olympian Springs. A copy of this I have forwarded to General Sherman, at the same [time] telegraphing him requesting that two regiments from Lexington or Nicholasville might be immediately ordered to the assistance of Colonel Harris, and that I will go so soon as I can possibly hire wagons. General Sherman sends me the inclosed telegraph in reply. Accordingly I send Lieutenant Duke, Second Dragoons, to you, and beg that two regiments be immediately sent to the support of Harris.

I have called on all the Home Guards in this and the Ashland districts, but they show great indisposition to turn out; in fact, they cannot be depended upon. They are “fireside” rangers and nothing more. I look to you for support.

Very truly, W. NELSON,

Brigadier-General.

[Inclosures.]

CAMP GILL, October 10, 1861.

Brigadier-General NELSON, Maysville, Ky.:

SIR: I arrived at this point this evening with my command 900 strong. I found Colonel Grigsby with 300 men.

From reliable information just received I have no doubt that there are now at the rebel camp at Prestonburg, at the very lowest calculation, at least 4,000 men. They are very well armed and well mounted, and are receiving constant accessions from above and below. They have also two pieces of artillery, an 8 and 6 pounder, that we know of.

Colonel Grigsby has been very active in procuring information, and there can be no doubt of the correctness of it. It is absolutely impossible for them to subsist their force in that region for any length of time, and I feel assured that unless a sufficient force is rapidly concentrated at this point they will be down upon us in less than five days.

From information brought this evening I believe that their forward movement will commence on the 12th instant.

We will push a force of 200 men into the mountains to-night after a detachment on their way to join them. I cannot impress upon you too strongly the necessity of pushing forward as rapidly as possible, and to bring along a section, if not a full battery, of artillery of light pieces. If you have no artillery, I think by telegraphing General Mitchel you can be supplied. I know that he will cheerfully accede to almost any request I may make; I also know that artillery in this region is very, very essential.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

L. A. HARRIS, Colonel Second Regiment O. V. M. L. B. GRIGSBY, Colonel [Kentucky Militia]. JNO. S. HURT, Major [Kentucky Militia].

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, Ky., October 11, 1861.

General NELSON [Camp Kenton]:

Send messenger to Thomas, at Dick Robinson. He has two regiments at Nicholasville. A movement from Prestonburg on Olympian Springs cannot be made so promptly. General Anderson has just {p.305} started for Lexington and Dick Robinson, and will hear of any movement in that direction.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: I am officially notified that a detachment of recruits for the Thirty-third Indiana, Colonel Coburn, has been sent to him via Cincinnati, and the governor asks me to send arms for them. We have not the arms, and I can find none. An agent of the State from Washington assures me 17,000 arms have been sent for the Kentucky troops. Regiments of men from Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio are offering, all without arms and I am powerless.

I can only suggest that you reduce the regiment to its number of arms by ordering the sick back to their State. When arms come, the regiment can again be filled. This is very discouraging, but is the only remedy that suggests itself to me.

I am, &c., your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: General Nelson telegraphs me that the rebels encamped at Prestonburg have begun to move forward. The regiment of Colonel Harris, at Olympian Springs, was posted there to watch the only practicable avenue of approach from that quarter. I directed him to send a messenger to you, and you may detach from, say, Nicholasville, or your own camp, to either re-enforce Colonel Harris or General Nelson, who is directed to move with all the volunteers he can arm to check the movements, and, if possible, disperse them. General Nelson asks for arms, but we have none, and the only alternative is to give him the two regiments at Nicholasville.

As to your own movement, I leave to yourself, until I can come to see you. I do not believe you can cross Cumberland Gap this year, but you can compel Zollicoffer to fall well back in the mountains beyond the Cumberland.

The State board are now actively engaged in raising regiments, and I hope may prove successful. They have funds, and can offer inducements to the volunteers not heretofore enjoyed by us. All volunteers raised in that quarter will fall to you, and can be used in pushing towards the south and east. I do not think it likely a force superior to yours can come from that direction. But it is different towards the south and west. The railroads come from Nashville and Memphis and meet at Bowling Green, whence it is continuous to Green River, where is Buckner’s present advance. Ours are at Nolin about 23 miles this side, and volunteers are forming in the neighborhood of Greensburg and Monroe County, and at Henderson and Owensborough, {p.306} on the Ohio River. Thousands on thousands of men could be had from the States north of the Ohio, but arms and accouterments are wanting. These are promised, but are very slow in coming.

If I observe no signs of movement on the other side of Green River within a few days, I will come down to see you, and we can then agree on some combined action. The season is now far advanced, and we must not delay.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 51.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. A. McD. McCook, U. S. volunteer forces, having reported at these headquarters, in obedience to instructions from the War Department, will proceed to the camp at Nolin Creek, and assume command of all the United States forces in that vicinity.

By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Comdg. Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: Your letters of the 11th and 12th of October,* were received last night.

I would start for your camp at once, but am notified by the Secretary of War that he will be here to meet me.

The paymaster is here with funds. Colonel Swords, quartermaster, has ,just reported, and I am assured that ample funds will be provided for all necessaries. I myself was compelled to indorse a draft to get money in bank. The fact is, the arrangement for the supply of money promised us before leaving Washington has not been promptly kept, but I am certain that very soon we will be supplied, and your loan of the bank shall be paid, if my order will accomplish it. In like manner I authorize you to go on and prepare your command for active service.

General Mitchel is subject to my orders, and I will, if possible, give you the opportunity of completing what you have begun. Of course I would do anything in my power to carry omit your wishes, but feel that the affairs of Kentucky call for the united action of all engaged in the cause of preserving our Government.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 14, 1861.

A. LINCOLN, President United States:

I have reliable intelligence from Bowling Green that Simon Buckner has over 20,000 men, with cars sufficient to move them. He has Tennesseeans, {p.307} Texans, and Cherokee Indians. Hardee is there, and 6,000 from Columbus.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-Green River Bridge blown up.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 15, 1861.

Colonel TURCHIN:

DEAR SIR: Two gentlemen unknown to me, but introduced by Mr. Guthrie, say some negro slaves have taken refuge in your camp and are there sheltered.

The laws of the United States and of Kentucky, all of which are binding on us, compel us to surrender a runaway negro on application of negro’s owner or agent. I believe you have not been instrumental in this, but my orders are that all negroes shall be delivered up on claim of the owner or agent. Better keep the negroes out of your camp altogether, unless you brought them along with the regiment.

Yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. [A. MCD.] MCCOOK, Comdg. Camp on Nolin:

SIR: I have ordered Colonel Willich to move by the road to Hodgensville to your camp with eight companies, the two others to follow as soon as Colonel Pope can reach New Haven with his regiment of Kentucky volunteers; also Captain Cotter’s battery of five of James’ rifled guns. He has not all the proper ammunition, but must use the best at hand. I have a regiment now unarmed. I will arm them with the best foreign muskets on hand and send forward as soon as possible.

I must go to Camp Dick Robinson on business ordered by the Secretary of War, but will leave orders here for all staff officers to supply you with all things possible, and to forward any armed troops that may arrive. The destruction of the railroad bridge at Green River, the defensive preparations at Bowling Green, and other facts lead me to conclude that an enemy awaits us on the other side of Green River.

But you must be prepared for anything. I leave orders for Generals Wood and Johnson to hasten to you the moment they arrive, and I wish you to divide your command into three brigades and push the drill. Look well to the ammunition, and if you need any, telegraph or send down a special messenger.

I am now fully alive to the fact that we have not strength adequate to the case, but I have done all possible to hasten forward re-enforcements; but the difficulty is the want of arms. The Kentuckians, too, are slow in organizing, though they promised much.

There is one regiment (Grider’s) already formed in Monroe County, south of you. Brigadier-General Ward, at Greensburg, also has three regiments forming. They are ordered to threaten the flank of Buckner’s position. At Owensborough, on the Ohio, are also forming four regiments. I have sent General Crittenden there to hurry forward the organization and to make demonstrations on that flank. I know {p.308} these are mere demonstrations, but that is all that can be attempted. The main reliance is on what you have in hand.

You must act on the defensive until much strengthened, but the safety of our nation depends on you holding that ground for the present.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 55.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 15, 1861.

Upon their arrival in this city Brig. Gens. Thomas J. Wood and R. W. Johnson, U. S. volunteer forces, are directed to proceed with all possible dispatch to the camp at Nolin and report to Brigadier-General McCook, commanding, for further orders.

By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, October 16, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

Matters are in a much worse condition than I expected to find them.* A large number of troops needed here immediately.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Thomas to Cameron, October 21, 1861, p. 313.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 16, 1861.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

Arms and re-enforcements needed here immediately. How many muskets, pistols, and sabers can be had? Is Negley’s brigade ready to march, and where is it?

SIMON CAMERON.

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PADUCAH, KY., October 16, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: A few days since the gunboat Conestoga (Captain Phelps) went up the Tennessee to Fort Henry. He describes it as a respectable earthwork, mounting heavy guns, with outworks, and a garrison of probably 1,700 to 1,800 men.

Since then I have learned from three different sources that the number of guns is 20 and the garrison 2,000; that they are constructing three gunboats, iron plated, to mount heavy ordnance, and expect to attack this place, aided by a land force from different directions. The old scheme.

I went up the Tennessee this morning in the Conestoga to the Chain of Rocks. I can render the gunboats useless to the enemy hereafter, if need be, by sinking at this place two or three coal barges filled with stone.

{p.309}

To-morrow the gunboat will go up again to secure a ferry-boat about 40 miles up the Tennessee, used by the enemy from time to time.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LEXINGTON, KY., October 17, 1861.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Washington, D. C.:

Send Negley and his command at once to General Sherman, at Louisville. If Randall has no guns, order his men to Louisville, and send guns there for him. Send 3,000 guns to Governor Morton, Indianapolis, who will put them into the hands of his men at once. Send the remaining muskets to Sherman at Louisville.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, October 17, 1861.

General NEGLEY, Pittsburgh:

Proceed with your command to Louisville, and report to General Sherman for orders. I presume your river transportation will take you there, it the water is good, quicker than any other. If stores are aboard, set off immediately. Answer.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 17, 1861-12 p.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Two messengers have just arrived from 9 miles beyond London, informing rue certainly that Zollicoffer with his force is approaching and are at Stephen Collier’s to-night. I must have aid here to-morrow. They say they have information that they have some 6,000.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment.

It is 25 miles from here to Zollicoffer’s camp. Your artillery can reach here before the enemy does.

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PARIS, KY., October 18, 1861.

Captain GREENE, Assist ant Adjutant-General, Louisville, Ky.:

SIR: Night before last I wrote to General Sherman, saying that I would march at daylight yesterday (the 17th) to take possession of McCormick’s Gap, on the State road from Mount Sterling to Prestonburg, by way of Hazel Green, and that I would find the enemy and report his numbers. I ordered the Second Ohio Regiment and Colonel Grigsby’s militia to move-the militia at daylight and the Ohio troops at 8 o’clock. When the militia were called out to move they flatly refused, and, notwithstanding all the exertions of their officers, broke up, with the exception of about 120, turned in their arms, and started home.

Some who made the excuse that they could not march 13 miles in the direction of the enemy, did march from the Springs to Winchester last night, a distance from the enemy of 30 miles.

{p.310}

The consequence is that Harris’ regiment is now at McCormick’s Gap without support. The enemy, I believe, from all information I can gather, to be 1,500 strong at Hazel Green, 18 miles from McCormick’s, and 500 at West Liberty, which is 5 miles from Hazel Green. Sill’s regiment is making forced marches to get up, and to-night will be at Mount Sterling. If the rebels get the pass at McCormick’s they will then hold the three passes into the blue-grass region, and be able to come down whenever it suits them. If I can hold McCormick’s I turn the other two, Betty’s Gap and Yokum, and move and break up their force. The whole mountain, whence we expected to get many soldiers, is becoming completely demoralized, and they are enlisting under Williams.

From the passes to this town is but 45 miles, and their forward movement must flank the whole line of operations going on towards Dick Robinson.

I beg that such force as the general commanding will deem proper be immediately sent to my assistance. With two regiments from Lexington, or elsewhere, I can finish this business. Without such assistance I cannot be certain as to the result.

I rode to this place to get near the postal lines and the telegraph, and return immediately to join Colonel Harris.

Very respectfully,

W. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 18, 1861-1 p.m.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I have information now beyond doubt that Zollicoffer is coming on with a large force and six pieces artillery.

I saw the colonel of the Indiana regiment last night at the river when Mr. Faulkner left. I insisted on his returning to his regiment and coming up and joining me immediately. He said he could not do so unless he was ordered by you.

I am now making arrangements to move my sick and commissary’s stores across the river, and intend, if I do not receive more troops, to abandon this place and retreat towards Camp Robinson. I have no idea of having my men butchered up here, where they have a force of six or seven to one, with artillery. I would like to hear from you immediately.

Very respectfully,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

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CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 19, 1861.

Brigadier General THOMAS:

SIR: Having inspected your position and situation, I must say you are surrounded by difficulties and exposed to labors of the most serious character.

We all occupy the strange position of carrying on war to defend Kentucky against an invasion of secessionists from abroad and refugees from the State.

A force threatens the fertile basins of Kentucky from the east by {p.311} way of Prestonburg and West Liberty. I have given General Nelson all the force disposable to meet that danger, viz, three regiments of Ohio troops. His proper base is Paris, Ky., and he will draw his supplies from Cincinnati.

Your force is distributed from the Kentucky River to the Rockcastle Hills. I understand the pass through these hills is now menaced by General Zollicoffer from Cumberland Ford; that Colonel Garrard is defending the pass with his Kentucky regiment, and that Colonels Connell and Coburn are in support.

The distance is too far from you, and either those regiments mist fall back on you or you advance to their support. The latter is the better plan, and you will move forward with all of your command that is prepared to move to some point at Crab Orchard or Mount Vernon, and either recall the troops in advance to you or sustain the advance in or near the Rockcastle River. The details must be left in a great measure to yourself; only keep your forces as well together as possible, and do the best you can.

Colonels Bruce and Dudley, at Lexington, are instructed to guard Lexington and the railroad as far as Nicholasville.

You had better leave the sick and such as you determine to leave behind either here in camp or back near the bridge over the Kentucky River. I have also instructed General Mitchel, at Cincinnati, if possible, to gather another Ohio regiment at Paris, and to guard the railroad back to the Ohio River.

The critical condition of affairs at Louisville recalls me to those headquarters.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 19, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

On yesterday the rebel cavalry advanced as far as 1 mile this side of the forks of the road; there they had a skirmish with a squad of cavalry of ours. I only know what the cavalry men report. They say they killed one of the rebels-they got a clever horse and his hat; Captain Smith has his hat. Bibb, of the cavalry, says he killed the person and brought the horse into camp. Four or 5 of our men are missing, though they may not be killed. Three of their horses followed into camp. Some of our men report that several of our men found their horses giving way, and jumped off and took to the brush. Up to this time I have heard no more from our men.

A messenger arrived here about-midnight, and says the rebels had all withdrawn from this side of the forks of the roads. As the messenger passed the forks of the road, Mrs. Pitman told him the rebels said they had killed 1 of our men near there, and they ought to have him buried, though the messenger saw nothing of any dead body.

The infantry at 4 o’clock yesterday evening had not reached Laurel Bridge, but some 400 cavalry had been this side of London. The rebels say they have some 11,000 infantry, 600 cavalry. They have a large force, and were re-enforced the day before they left Flat Lick.

The river has been up, but will be fordable to-day or to-morrow. I have had all my commissary stores put on the other side of the river, and intend retreating unless I receive re-enforcements. They have men enough to come to this camp in every direction. I have had the road {p.312} blockaded for several miles and a bridge torn up, but they can soon cut out the road.

I have not heard one word from you since I wrote on the morning of the 17th instant. If they have 1,300 cavalry, they have almost two to one of our effective forces. The messenger says he saw a tolerably large, nearly white-headed, person with the cavalry, who said he lived between Lancaster and Camp Robinson, and that he said his name was “Anderson”; also that Gabriel Saulter was with them; that they had a company of 38 Kentuckians, principally from Montgomery and Bath Counties.

Inclosed I send you a note from a reliable person from Flat Lick. He differs from the messenger as to numbers, though several persons are in camp now that saw then leave Flat Lick. They say the troops commenced moving early Wednesday morning, and it was 11 o’clock before they passed.

Yours, very respectfully,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 13.}

HDQRS. FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, Camp Dick Robinson, October 19, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. Albin Schoepf having reported to these headquarters for duty, agreeably to Department Orders, No. 58, is assigned to the command of the troops now in the Rockcastle Hills. He will proceed at once to that point and make all disposition in his power for the defense of his position against the advance of the enemy.

...

By order of Brigadier-General Thomas:

GEO. E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., October 20, 1861.

SECRETARY OF WAR, Washington, D. C.:

Found Camp Dick Robinson partially supplied, and much troubled for want of money. Rumors of an advance. Thomas had sent forward two regiments to Rockcastle. Ordered him to concentrate near Crab Orchard or Mount Vernon. On return here find all at Camp Nolin quiet, but confirmatory intelligence of Buckner’s strength on the other side of Green River, with the purpose of an attack on Louisville and Cincinnati. General Ward, at Greensburg, on a report of an advance of 2,000 rebels, fell back to Campbellsville, where, being re-enforced by volunteers, he made an attack. He calls for re-enforcements, and I have none to give. The Pittsburgh troops are floating down the river, and have not reached Cincinnati. General Mitchel reports he is ordered by you to remain at Cincinnati.

Answer.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.313}

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 20, 1861.

Colonel WOLFORD:

You will join us immediately. Our advance guards are firing, and have been at it for some time. I have no means of telling the force that is engaged against us.

Yours, respectfully,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Regiment.

N. B.-Please send this to General Thomas or to some one in command of troops from Camp Robinson.

[Indorsement.]

TEN A. M.-2 miles west of Mount Vernon.

The Ohio regiment is up, and the Indiana will be up by 1 p.m. The whole force in the rear has been hurried up. Send us all you can spare.

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., October 21, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to submit the report requested in your letter of the 19th instant.*

...

We left Saint Louis October 14, and arrived at Indianapolis in the evening. Remained at Indianapolis October 15, and conversed freely with Governor Morton. We found that the State of Indiana had come nobly up to work of suppressing the rebellion. Fifty-five regiments, with several batteries of artillery, had been raised and equipped; a larger number of troops in proportion to population than any other State had sent into the field. The best spirit prevailed, and it was manifest that additional troops could readily be raised. The governor had established an arsenal, and furnished all the Indiana troops with full supplies of ammunition, including fixed ammunition for their batteries of artillery. This arsenal was visited, and found to be in full operation. It was under the charge of a competent pyrotechnist. Quite a number of females were employed in making cartridges, and I venture to assert that the ammunition is equal to that which is manufactured anywhere else. Governor Morton stated that his funds for this purpose were exhausted, but the Secretary desired him to continue his operations, informing him that the Government would pay for what had been furnished to the troops in the field. It is suggested that an officer of ordnance be sent to Indianapolis to inspect the arsenal and ascertain the amount expended in the manufacture of ammunition, with a view to reimbursing the State.

Left Indianapolis October 16 for Louisville, Ky., where we arrived at 12.30 o’clock p.m., and had an interview with General Sherman, commanding the Department of the Cumberland. He gave a gloomy picture of affairs in Kentucky, stating that the young men were generally secessionists and had joined the Confederates, while the Union men, the aged and conservatives, would not enroll themselves to engage in conflict with their relations on the other side. But few regiments could {p.314} be raised. He said that Buckner was in advance of Green River, with a heavy force, on the road to Louisville, and an attack might be daily expected, which, with his then force, he would not be able to resist, but that he would fight them. He as well as citizens of the State said that the border States of Kentucky must furnish the troops to drive the rebels from the State. His force then consisted of 10,000 troops, in advance of Louisville, in camp at Nolin River, and on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad at various points; at Camp Dick Robinson, or acting in conjunction with General Thomas, 9,000; and two regiments at Henderson, on the Ohio, at the mouth of Green River. [See inclosure.] On being asked the question, what force he deemed necessary, he promptly replied 200,000 men. This conversation occurred in the presence of Mr. Guthrie and General Wood. The Secretary replied that he supposed that the Kentuckians would not in any number take up arms to operate against the rebels, but he thought General Sherman overestimated the number and power of the rebel forces; that the Government would furnish troops to Kentucky to accomplish the work; that he (the Secretary) was tired of this defensive war, and that the troops must assume the offensive and carry the war to the firesides of the enemy; that the season for operations in Western Virginia was about over, and that he would take the troops from there and send them to Kentucky; but he begged of General Sherman to assume the offensive and to keep the rebels hereafter on the defensive. The Secretary desired that the Cumberland Ford and Gap should be seized, and the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad taken possession of, and the artery that supplied the rebellion cut.

Complaint was made of the want of arms, and, on the question being asked, “What became of the arms we sent to Kentucky?” we were informed by General Sherman that they had passed into the hands of the Home Guards and could not be recovered; that many were already in the hands of the rebels, and others refused to surrender those in their possession, alleging the desire to use them in defense of their individual homes if invaded. In the hands of individuals and scattered over the State, these arms are lost to the army in Kentucky. Having ascertained that 6,200 arms had arrived from Europe at Philadelphia, 3,000 were ordered to Governor Morton, who promised to place them immediately in the hands of troops for Kentucky; the remaining 3,200 were sent to General Sherman at Louisville. Negley’s brigade, at Pittsburgh, 2,800 strong, two companies of the Nineteenth Infantry from Indianapolis, the Eighth Wisconsin at Saint Louis, the Second Regiment of Minnesota Volunteers at Pittsburgh, and two regiments from Wisconsin were then ordered to Kentucky, making in all a re-enforcement of about 10,000 men.

We left Louisville at 3 o’clock p.m. for Lexington, accompanied by General Sherman and Mr. Guthrie; remained there a few hours, and proceeded to Cincinnati, arriving at 8 o’clock p.m. At Lexington also we found that the opinion existed that the young men of Kentucky had joined the rebels; that no large bodies of troops could be raised in Kentucky; and that the defense of the State must necessarily devolve upon the free States of the West and Northwest.

Having accomplished the object of our visit to the West we left Cincinnati on the 18th and reached Washington on the 21st, having spent the 19th and 20th at Harrisburg.

Respectfully submitted.

L. THOMAS Adjutant-General.

{p.315}

* On p. 533, Vol. III of this series. That portion of the report here omitted relates to affairs in Missouri, and will be fonud on pp. 540-549 of Vol. III.

[Inclosure.]

In camp at Nolin River and on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad at various points.

Sixth Indiana, Colonel Crittenden, Nolin River.

Twenty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Miller, Nolin River.

Thirtieth Indiana, Colonel Bass, Nolin River.

Thirty-eighth Indiana, Colonel Scribner, Nolin River.

Thirty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Harrison, Nolin River.

Thirty-second Indiana, Colonel Willich, New Haven.

Tenth Indiana, Colonel Manson, Bardstown.

Nineteenth Illinois, Colonel Turchin, Lebanon Junction.

Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Hecker, Colesburg.

Thirty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Kirk, Nolin River.

Fifteenth Ohio, Colonel Dickey, Nolin River.

Forty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Gibson, Nolin River.

Third Kentucky, Colonel Rousseau, Nolin River.

Fourth Kentucky (cavalry), Colonel Board, Nolin River.

Stone’s Kentucky light battery, four pieces, Nolin River.

Cotter’s (Ohio) six rifled pieces will be in camp in two or three days at Nolin River.

At Camp Dick Robinson, or acting in conjunction with General Thomas’ command.

Two Tennessee regiments, nearly full and nearly ready for service.

Four Kentucky regiments, in same condition as Tennessee regiments; one regiment cavalry.

Fourteenth Ohio, Colonel Steedman, Nicholasville.

Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Connell, Nicholasville.

Thirty-third Indiana, Colonel Coburn, Camp Dick Robinson.

Thirty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Ohio, Camp Dick Robinson.

Three batteries of artillery, Ohio.

Four Ohio regiments on line of Covington and Lexington Railroad, acting with General Thomas.

Thirty-first Indiana, Colonel Cruft, Owensborough.

Also three or four Kentucky regiments at Owensborough, under General Crittenden, not full nor ready for the field, but probably 1,500 men could turn out under arms.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 22, 1861.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: On my arrival at Camp Dick Robinson I found General Thomas had stationed a Kentucky regiment at Rockcastle Hills, beyond a river of same name, and had sent an Ohio and an Indiana regiment forward in support. He was embarrassed for transportation, but I authorized him to hire teams and to move his whole force nearer to his advance guard, so as to support it, as he had information of the approach of Zollicoffer towards London. I have just heard from him that he had sent forward General Schoepf, with Colonel Wolford’s cavalry, Colonel Steedman’s Ohio regiment, and a battery of artillery, followed on a succeeding day by the Tennessee brigade. He had still two Kentucky {p.316} regiments, the Thirty-eighth Ohio, and another battery of artillery, with which he was to follow yesterday. This force if concentrated should be strong enough for the purpose, and at all events is all he had or I could give him. I explained to you fully when here the supposed position of our adversaries, among which was a force in the valley of Big Sandy supposed to be advancing on Paris, Ky. General Nelson, at Maysville, was instructed to collect all the men he could and Colonel Sill’s regiment of Ohio volunteers. Colonel Harris was already in position at Olympian Springs, and a regiment lay at Lexington, which I ordered to his support. This leaves the line of Thomas’ operations exposed, but I cannot help it. I explained so fully to yourself and the Secretary of War the condition of things, that I can add nothing now until further developments. You know my views-that this great center of our field was too weak, far too weak, and I have begged and implored till I dare not say more.

Buckner still is beyond Green River. He sent a detachment of his men, variously estimated from 2,000 to 4,000, towards Greensburg. General Ward, with about 1,000 men, retreated to Campbellsville, where he called to his assistance some partially formed regiments to the number of about 2,000. The enemy did not advance, and General Ward was at last dates at Campbellsville. These officers, charged with raising regiments, must of necessity be nearer their homes to collect men, and for this reason are out of position; but at or near Greensburg and Lebanon I desire to assemble as large a force of the Kentucky volunteers as possible. This organization is necessarily irregular, but the necessity is so great, that I must have them, and therefore have issued to them arms and clothing during the process of formation. This has facilitated their enlistment; but inasmuch as the legislature provided the means for organizing the Kentucky volunteers, and intrusted their disbursements to a board of loyal gentlemen, I have endeavored to cooperate with them to hasten the formation of these corps. The great difficulty is, and has been, that as volunteers offer we have not arms and clothing to give them. The arms sent us are, as you already know, European muskets of uncouth pattern, which the volunteers will not touch. General McCook has now three brigades-Johnson’s, Wood’s, and Rousseau’s. Negley’s brigade arrived to-day, and will at once be sent out. The Minnesota regiment has also arrived, and will be sent forward. Hazzard’s regiment of Indiana troops I have ordered to the mouth of Salt Creek; an important point on the turnpike road leading to Elizabethtown.

I again repeat that our force here is out of all proportion to the importance of the position. Our defeat would be disastrous to the nation, and to expect of new men who never bore arms to do miracles is not right.

I am, with much respect, yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 22, 1861.

Hon. GARRETT DAVIS, Paris, Ky.:

Yours of October 18* is just received, and I hasten to answer. I regret I did not meet you, as I could have communicated much that I {p.317} cannot on paper. I went to Camp Dick Robinson to see the camp and troops there, and found the same rumors of the approach of Zollicoffer from the Gap. I gave my orders, and then directed an Ohio regiment at Lexington to re-enforce Nelson. He is the only officer. I could command on that expedition, the importance of which I admit. Nelson’s reports to me warrant the belief that he will be energetic and pushing, and I hope successful. I am compelled to keep a strong force in front of Green River, and the authorities have given me very few officers, and these I have distributed to the best advantage. The Secretary of War insisted that he had fulfilled the request of the Kentuckians in Washington, and rested strongly on the people themselves, who he thought would act with vigor and promptness as sooni as the legislature took positive grounds. How far they are fulfilling this supposition you can judge.

Nelson has three Ohio regiments, and the men of Marshall and some Home Guards. I also instructed General Mitchel to put a regiment at Paris. I have to work with the materials at hand; I cannot create them. The Union men must act more spontaneously and vigorously. I believe the authorities are now alive to the importance of this State, and will strain every nerve to provide the men and materials. The State Military Board has also undertaken to organize and partially equip the volunteers of the State. The President, Secretary of War, and General Anderson gave so many authority to raise regiments that it is impossible to reconcile their claims. Still I hope and trust a respectable force will be organized in Kentucky. I shall at all times be glad to hear from you, and hope you will never cease your efforts to inspire your fellow-citizens with the same spirit that actuates you.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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MORGAN COUNTY, TENNESSEE, NEAR MONTGOMERY, October 22, 1861. (Received November 4.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS:

SIR: I reached here at 2 p.m. to-day. I am within 6 miles of a company of rebel cavalry. I find our Union people in this part of the State firm and unwavering in their devotion to our Government and anxious to have an opportunity to assist in saving it. The rebels continue to arrest and imprison our people.

You will please furnish the bearers with as much lead, rifle powder, and as many caps as they can bring for Scott and Morgan Counties. You need not fear to trust these people. They will open the war for you by routing these small bodies of marauding cavalry.

It is said here that Buckner has 9,000 men at Bowling Green, and that Zollicoffer has 12,000. I do not give this as reliable. I find our people have suffered beyond all forbearance. Hasten on to our aid.

To-morrow night I hope to be near our railroad. I have not been able as yet to gain any information as to my prospects of success.

I am obliged to send this note unsealed.

In haste, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. BLOUNT CARTER.

Since writing the within I learn there were 300 troops with 140 wagons. Report says they are going to Bowling Green, and that 20,000 more are to follow. You shall hear from me again soon.

W. B. CARTER.

{p.318}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 67.}

HDQRS. DEP’T OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 22, 1861.

I. Brigadier-General Negley’s brigade of Pennsylvania Reserves will proceed via Louisville and Nashville Railroad as soon as practicable to the camp on Nolin River. General Negley will report in person upon his arrival in camp to Brigadier-General McCook, commanding, for further orders.

...

By command of Brigadier-General Sherman:

OLIVER D. GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 23, 1861-7 p.m.

Brig. Gen. A. SCHOEFF, Commanding U. S. Troops, Rockcastle:

SIR: Your dispatch of the 22d has just been received. Provisions for the Seventeenth Ohio, Thirty-third Indiana, and Third Kentucky Regiments were forwarded yesterday, and ten days’ supply for all the troops will be forwarded to-morrow, along with a supply of 6-pound canister and shrapnel shot, under the charge of Capt. Alexander Miller, ordnance officer of this brigade. Please have the ammunition equally distributed between the two batteries. Have the obstructions taken out of the road, and everything prepared for an advance party being thrown into London. I cannot determine yet whether we shall be able to advance until I can find out more about the forwarding of clothing and ammunition. Your success and the good conduct of the troops will afford General Sherman as much satisfaction as it has me, and I wish you to receive for yourself and express to them my gratification for their success.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 25, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson:

SIR: Don’t push too far. Your line is already long and weak. I cannot now re-enforce you. Nelson has got into difficulty with the militia, and I have no person to send there. An interruption of the railroad, by an incursion from Prestonburg, would cut you off from that source of supply. Call to your assistance the regiment from Irvine. The State board is impressed with the necessity of engaging in the organization of the volunteers but we are still embarrassed for want of clothing and arms. Promises are a poor substitute for them, but are all we have.

I will again urge on the Department the pressing necessity for more good officers and large re-enforcements of men.

Yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier General, Commanding.

{p.319}

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 25, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

GENERAL: Your aid arrived in time to save us from a certain defeat (what others may say to contrary notwithstanding). It is not necessary for me to say one word about the fight, for you have no doubt been fully posted. Though don’t be deceived as to the number killed by us; my impression is that we did not kill to exceed 16 and wounded some 30 or 40. Many say we lost a great victory by not pursuing the enemy. It is true, if we had have known as much then as now we might have done wonders. But we expected an attack the next morning and every one was sleeping on their arms, and we never knew the enemy had left camp until near 8 o’clock. We have a great many here who know precisely how to manage affairs when the enemy is out of hearing, but would be as much at a loss to do so in a fight as I would be.

The teams you ordered turned over to me have for some cause been retained. I have but one team in my regiment. I have detailed Lieutenant-Colonel Ridgell to go to your camp for the purpose of getting some teams for my regiment; also to remain until he can procure clothing for the soldiers. I do not attach blame to any one, but my men are actually suffering.

Yours, very respectfully,

T. T. GARRARD, Colonel Third Kentucky Regiment Volunteers.

P. S.-When I get my train I would like to get permission to move near London, as I would like to be with my family a short time, and I do not want to leave the regiment. I could send for my family to come to London. General Schoepf no doubt would let me go if I was to make the request, unless it was against your wish.

T. T. GARRARD.

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CAMP WILDCAT, October 25, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Camp Dick Robinson:

GENERAL: Yours per express of 24th received. Inclosed is a list of killed and wounded [October 21].*

The First Kentucky will, in compliance with your orders, fall back today to Crab Orchard.

I he Seventeenth Ohio (Connell) and Fourteenth Ohio (Steedman) will move out in the direction of London to-day a few miles, where they will encamp and await further orders.

I would respectfully request that I be furnished with two companies of Kentucky cavalry for special service. I need them much. Let Major Helveti command and Captain Dillion be one of the detailed.

Inclosed is a requisition for medicines and hospital stores, which I need very much.

It would be prudent for the cavalry detachment asked for to bring with them as much corn as they can find transportation for, that being a scarce article in this neighborhood.

Respectfully, yours,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

* See p. 206.

{p.320}

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NEAR KINGSTON, ROANE COUNTY, TENNESSEE, October 27, 1861. (Received November 4.)

General THOMAS:

SIR: I am now within a few miles of our railroad, but I have not yet had time to obtain all the information I must have before I decide on the course best for me to adopt. If I can get half a dozen brave men to “take the bull by the horns,” we can whip them completely and save the railroad. If I cannot get such leaders, we will make a desperate attempt to destroy all the bridges, and I firmly believe I will be successful.

There are 1,400 rebel troops at Knoxville, some poorly armed, some not armed, and many of them sick. There are 160 at the Loudon Bridge. I know of no other troops in East Tennessee except the 300 about whom I wrote to you from Montgomery. They have gone to Wolf River.

Zollicoffer has 6,000 men all told; 1,000 of these are sick; 600 or 800 are not armed; 1,600 of the 6,000 are at Cumberland Gap; the balance beyond the gap.

Our enemies here are very uneasy for the safety of Zollicoffer, and have been calling on Davis for help; but, as I am informed, Davis says he is so pressed on the Potomac that he can spare none of the Virginia troops.

I can gain no reliable information from Kentucky by way of Nashville. I hear of no troops passing over our railroad.

We hear, by way of Knoxville, that Garrard has driven Zollicoffer back 6 miles. I suppose it is true, as secessionists tell it.

This whole country is in a wretched condition; a perfect despotism reigns here. The Union men of East Tennessee are longing and praying for the hour when they can break their fetters. The loyalty of our people increases with the oppressions they have to bear. Men and women weep for joy when I merely hint to them that the day of our deliverance is at hand. I have not seen a secession flag since I entered the State. I beg you to hasten on to our help, as we are about to create a great diversion in General McClellan’s favor. It seems to me, if you would ask it, he would spare you at once 5,000 or 10,000 well-drilled troops. Will you not ask for more help?

I know you will excuse a civilian for making suggestions to a military man, when you remember that I am risking my life and that I am about to ask my people to do the same. I find more deficiency in arms in this part of East Tennessee than I expected. You must bring some small-arms with you. I am satisfied that you will have to take the road by Monticello and Jamestown, unless you come by Cumberland Gap.

I can assure you that whoever is the leader of a successful expedition into East Tennessee will receive from these people a crown of glory of which any one might well be proud, and I know of no one on whom I would more cheerfully bestow that crown than on yourself.

I regret that I can give you no more information, but I will communicate with you as circumstances may require. Perhaps it would be well for you to let General McClellan know that I have reached East Tennessee, as I know he is very anxious for my success.

I write in great haste, but believe you may rely on all I have written.

Very respectfully, your obedient-servant,

WM. BLOUNT CARTER.

{p.321}

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have just returned from the Rockcastle Hills. Our troops have a decided victory, repulsing the enemy upon very nearly equal terms, and feel very much elated and are anxious for an advance.

We are informed that Zollicoffer has retired to his old position behind the Cumberland, and intends to make a stand there. I am very sorry that we are not in a condition to march upon him at once, as I believe he could now be easily driven out of Kentucky; but the men have no clothing, and we are scarce of forage. The road, too, is very long-in fact, too long to transport supplies during the coming winter, unless I had funds in hand to pay the necessary expenses as we proceed. I have advanced the troops from Rockcastle Hills to the point where the road forks to Richmond. That position commands the road leading to this place also. I have established a depot at Crab Orchard, and have made arrangements to have all our supplies hauled direct from Nicholasville to that place; but as we shall have the greatest difficulty in getting supplies over the road through the Rockcastle Hills, which are exceedingly precipitous and boggy in the winter season, I think it would be best to change the route of supply entirely, establishing a shipping depot at Lexington, and transport goods over the road through Richmond to London. That road is reported as being practicable all winter. If we remain where the troops are now encamped, it will be necessary to get forage from the neighborhood of Richmond, and the constant travel over that road I fear will make it impracticable before spring.

To advance into Tennessee, I ought to have four more regiments from some other State than Kentucky to follow after us as a reserve, and money in the hands of the quartermaster and commissary to defray necessary expenses. By taking in a train along with the army two months’ supply of sugar, coffee, and other small stores, I think we can get on without any very serious difficulties.

With the exception of Sharp’s rifle ammunition, we have an abundant supply now. I would be obliged if you would send me 50 boxes as soon as possible, with the requisite supply of percussion caps.

If you approve of my advance, let me know as soon as possible. I shall move in a day or two to Crab Orchard.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: My reason for advancing beyond the Rockcastle Hills was the impossibility of remaining in that inhospitable place any longer. Animals could not be foraged except by sending from 12 to 14 miles. I have therefore sent all the troops who reached the Hills forward to within 3 miles of London, at the point where the Cumberland Gap road forks to go to Richmond and to come to this point. {p.322}

For the convenience of supplying provisions to the troops I have established a depot at Crab Orchard, which depot I propose to supply from Nicholasville by hired transportation, at the rate of 50 cents per hundred, and the transporter to pay all tolls. By that means we shall be relieved of the annoyance of the toll bills. The regiments can obtain their rations and other supplies from the depot at Crab Orchard and transport them in their regimental wagons.

Should you approve of the other route, I am told that everything we may want can be sent us by hired transportation direct from Lexington through Richmond, and it is said that road is practicable all winter.

The Kentucky River, as you know, is crossed on this road by a bridge, which will have to be guarded. On the other road it is crossed by means of a ferry, which it will be necessary to guard also, as all the people living in the immediate vicinity are secessionists. Madison County also is of doubtful loyalty, and it is possible that it may become necessary to send escorts with trains on that road.

The company of pioneers of which I spoke to you when here is nearly completed, and it is possible I may be able to repair the road between Crab Orchard and the camp so as to make it practicable all winter. If, however, you think I have advanced too far, I will cheerfully obey any orders you may give to fall back.

If the regiment at Irvine is of any more account than the Kentucky regiment I have, I think it is now well posted to prevent communication between the rebels at Prestonburg and Zollicoffer’s forces. If it is no better than those I have with me, I shall be only so much the more embarrassed by having it with me. If I could get four additional regiments of Ohio or Indiana volunteers, I would be perfectly willing to dispense with all the Kentucky regiments I have.

The Ohio troops here have no brigade commander. I need an officer to take charge of them very much, and would be very much pleased if I could get your acting inspector-general (Capt. C. C. Gilbert) appointed a brigadier and sent here. The Government could not confer the appointment on a better man.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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CAMP CONNELL, NEAR LONDON, Laurel County, Kentucky, October 28, 1861.

[General GEORGE H. THOMAS:]

GENERAL: In compliance with your instructions I have moved my command forward, and now occupy a position about 3 miles north of London, at the junction of the Crab Orchard and Richmond roads.

I have in camp the Fourteenth and Seventeenth Ohio and Thirty-third Indiana and two batteries (Standart’s and Kenny’s).

I have sent Colonel Garrard’s-Kentucky and the First Tennessee ahead to occupy London or some convenient point adjacent. The Second Tennessee will be up to-night.

Please advise me of the location, strength, &c., of the several columns of our forces now in Kentucky. I am feeling my way somewhat in the dark, and would like to be kept posted up with reference to the movements of both friends and enemies. I reconnoitered this morning a few miles beyond London to find a better camping ground, but found no {p.323} position as good as my present. I can here obtain wood, water, forage, and some provisions, which is more than I can do on the other side of London, except by hauling a long distance.

It is reported that Buckner has advanced upon Greensburg. Is it so? A Mr. Burnsides reports himself as beef contractor, but has no documents to show the fact. I understood you to say that he had contracted. Did I rightly understand you?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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MCCLARIES’, PULASKI COUNTY, KENTUCKY, October 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade:

GENERAL: I left Camp Hoskins this morning at 3 o’clock to visit my family, being summoned to attend a little daughter who I fear is dead ere this; but I am overtaken by a courier with information, reliable, that the rebels are advancing with an expressed determination to break up our encampment. I must return to my command.

The rebel-force is estimated at 3,200, which I suppose is not exaggerated, as they also have a train of 140 wagons.

I learn that they have also a body of cavalry stationed at Travisville, numbering 1,200, which of course will join their main force at Albany, making in the aggregate 4,400. I have no fears from an attack should it come from the direction of the main road leading from Monticello, but apprehend that they may attempt to flank us by crossing lower down the river. It is likewise reported that they have two batteries of artillery, and if true they may shell us from our present position. Can you send us aid-say at least one regiment and a battery? Should they effect a crossing of the Cumberland, they might prove troublesome. I shall not abandon the position we now hold unless ordered or driven, conceiving, as I do, it to be of the utmost importance that it should be held. I shall improve the time by fortifying our position as well as I can and blocking the passes more effectually above and below. In conclusion, I would state that I have received the news of their advancing from too many reliable sources to justify me in doubting it.

Please send me what assistance you can and as speedily as possible.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS.

P. S.-If cavalry can be spared I should like to have at least one company, that which I had having been recalled.

This will accredit my nephew, W. F. Hoskins.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. A. SCHOEPF:

GENERAL: I have just received a letter from General Sherman. He objects to advancing the troops too far on this route, and directs that we go no farther than your camp for the present.

...

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.324}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 30, 1861.

General CRITTENDEN, Henderson, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: Yours of October 29* is received. Colonel Jackson was here and took such arms, &c., with him as we could spare. I am well informed of the army that is in front of me and aware of the danger.

I want you if possible to engage the attention of a part, and if possible to threaten Russellville.

Depend mostly on the resources of the country. Of course have lances made if you prefer and have not arms enough for your mounted men; the price is nothing. The account, sent to me, shall be approved and paid.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, LOUISVILLE, KY., October 31, 1861.

Assistant Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I was out at Camp Nevin when Mr. Palmer called about the body guard of General Anderson now designated for me.

I merely desire to put it on record that such guards at this time are vain things. The fate of Kentucky, and it may be the Union, will be settled whilst those gentlemen are dwelling in security at Carlisle.

Yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 31, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Camp Dick Robinson, Ky.:

SIR: Yours of October 28 and 29 are just at hand, as I was over to Camp Nevin. I know that forces are pouring towards Kentucky, and they cannot come in large numbers through the Gap. They will pour towards the fertile regions from Nashville, the southwest, and Somerset. If you could watch the latter point and fall upon one of the parties that will come up from the direction of Somerset, you are in position to do so. I also apprehend that Buckner will detail a force of not over 3,000 towards Lexington from his main body, between Bowling Green and Munfordville, in hopes that we will cross Green River in detail in pursuit. Wolford’s cavalry, and maybe Burbridge’s regiment, could do good service in the direction of Burkesville, where a Tennessee force under Stanton is committing outrages.

A Colonel Haggard is now at Columbia with a regiment, and very anxious to drive off the party from the neighborhood. If you can detail them, Colonel Haggard assures me he will guarantee they can be subsisted in that quarter. There are some regiments in Ohio ready, and after consultation with Andrew Johnson I will probably send you one or more, but I do not believe this winter they will give us a chance to invade East Tennessee by the Gap. Winter is near at hand, and the roads will be almost impassable. I am apprehensive of your rear, but am assured the people are gaining in loyalty.

{p.325}

If General Lee assumes the command at Cumberland Ford, he will occupy all your time, and I cannot pretend to control your movements.

I will instruct my staff officer to furnish you with money as liberally as possible.

Yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., October 31, 1861.

General WARD, Campbellsville, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: I have been up to Camp Nevin, and am now in possession of your letter of the 26th. At a time like this men must work with the means at hand. I cannot send you the arms and materials you demand. The people of the country are the government, and you must not wait for somebody to come to your help. A hundred wagons and teams could not be sent you now, nor the arms you ask, with all the ammunition. If you will call on the people with such arms as you now have, and incur any amount of debt in providing for them, I will cause it to be paid. I trust to you to prevent the passage of any force between Muldraugh’s Hill and Green River in that direction.

I sent Boyle down to you, but I was away when he got back.

Yours, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP CALVERT, London, Ky., October 31, 1861.

[General THOMAS:]

GENERAL: Yours of 30th, informing me of the threatened position of Somerset, is received.

I am about 3 miles south of Pitman’s; changed to this point for the purpose of securing a better camp. Will await further orders. Men much in need of shoes. I very much need a regiment of cavalry.

Zollicoffer is reported to be 40 miles ahead, toward Cumberland Gap. I have scouts out in the vicinity of his camp who will promptly report his movements. I have scouts in the direction of Somerset also; shall probably hear from that quarter to-day.

I have this moment learned that there [are] at Barboursville 100 cavalry of the enemy. If I had two companies of cavalry I could secure them. This band of Zollicoffer’s are said to be a hard set-plundering, violating women, and such other rascalities.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP DICK ROBINSON, October 31, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I shall start for the Crab Orchard Springs to-day. I have directed the quartermaster to make arrangements to have all the stores {p.326} for the troops hauled from Nicholasville to Crab Orchard by contract, and will endeavor to have a Government train organized to transport the surplus supplies from the latter place to the camp in advance and gradually work out of the confusion into which the transportation has fallen in consequence of the inexperience of those gentlemen who have been performing the duties of quartermaster.

I cannot learn anything positive of the movements of the enemy, either in direction of Barboursville or Somerset. I have sent Colonels Bramlette and Wolford to Somerset to the assistance of Colonel Hoskins, simply because he (Hoskins) urges me to send him re-enforcements; but I must think that the information he has of the advance of the enemy on his camp is not very reliable. I wish very much that I could get four Ohio or Indiana regiments, so as to enable me to place the Kentuckians in permanent camps. I do not think they will ever be in the least reliable. All but one regiment (Colonel Fry’s) are in bad drill, and in worse discipline.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 1, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Crab Orchard, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: Yours of yesterday is received. I am fully conscious of the difficulties you describe as to the Kentucky regiments.

The telegraph is now completed to Nicholasville. Please have some trusty persons there to telegraph me news from yourself and Somerset.

There are several regiments at Cincinnati, but I deem it wise to hold them in reserve till the development of the game, whether they go to Nelson, yourself, or McCook.

From all I can learn, no large force can come in by the Gap this season, but the case is different towards Somerset and Nashville. I trust you have got clothing for your men, and that you have well secured the budge over the Kentucky.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP CALVERT, London, November 1, 1861.

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General, First Kentucky Brigade:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 31st ultimo, directing that no troops be thrown forward farther than Pitman’s, near this place.

My present position (London) was occupied in obedience to what I understood to be the verbal order of General Thomas, and was indeed necessary to the securing of supplies and a good camping ground. I shall advance no farther without orders to that effect.

I have started a corn mill in the vicinity, with which and the present means of transportation, I can, I think, keep my command supplied.

{p.327}

I have established relays of expresses at Dr. Joplin’s, at Hackney’s, and at Kemper’s, points along the road between Crab Orchard and London. This will secure a more prompt communication.

A train starts to-day for Crab Orchard for provisions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 2, 1861.

General W. T. WARD, Campbellsville:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of 31st is received. When prisoners are received have the papers all handed to Judge Bullitt, a good Union man, and a member of the court of appeals, to whose decision I leave the case. We cannot imprison and keep in custody all suspected persons, and the only safe course is to follow the law of the State of Kentucky, which makes arrests only proper when overt acts of treason are established. The cases you mention are certainly such as the safety of the community would justify in having imprisoned, and I will caution Judge Bullitt on the point.

By my request Judge Catron has appointed a number of commissioners to reside along the line, one of whom was designed for Campbellsville. His examination and commitment will be final, and will obviate our hitherto trouble of judging cases from mere letters and the explanations of the accused. So many improper arrests were made by self-constituted authorities that there was a physical impossibility of keeping them. To inflict any cruelty on them would not be tolerated by the laws of war or peace, and the consequence is many dangerous men are set free. Judge Catron says the commissioners can put them under bond, and the bond will be good against their property or the property of their sureties.

As you can well understand, we would soon fill all the places of confinement in Louisville were we to arrest and imprison all who may be dangerous. Leaders and conspicuous men never should alone be arrested, unless in strong cases, and then an examination should be had before a commissioner of the United States.

I expect you up this week.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAMP WOLFORD, ONE AND A HALF MILES FROM CAMP GOGGIN, November 2, 1861. (Received November 6.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I reached here with my command last evening.

The enemy on 31st ultimo threw forward to Monticello 400 to 600 of his cavalry. I learn to-day that he withdrew them the same night to some point not ascertained below Monticello, toward the Tennessee border. His infantry is yet in Clinton County, and I think will not now advance.

I have dispatched a messenger to Columbia, where I learn Colonel Haggard [and] Colonel Grider are with their regiments; and one of my {p.328} wagoners, who had just come into camp from Adair, reports two Ohio or Indiana regiments are in camp. By to-morrow night I shall get reply. I have written to them to know what effective force they have at Columbia; whether they can move in concert with me, and whether they have sufficient force to throw in the rear to cut off his retreat, and, if so, can they still furnish, and how much, force to join with me in front.

If they will throw forward to Burkesville sufficient force to hold the passes and cut off communication with Buckner’s line, the rebel and rabble crew can be effectually crushed.

I have ordered 400 of Colonel Wolford’s cavalry go forward one hour before day to reconnoiter, to advance as far as they can prudently go, gather all they can of the strength, character of forces, positions, and movements of the enemy and return and report, by which time I shall hear from Columbia. From all I can gather I take it that this is the same body of unorganized, badly-armed rebels who have been heretofore gathered near Monroe, in Overton County, Tennessee. Their strength has doubtless been greatly exaggerated. There were for some two months near Monroe 2,000 to 2,500; they left there to join Buckner, and returned through Monroe County, Kentucky, Cumberland County, and to Clinton, where they were at last accounts, with the purpose of breaking up the unarmed camps at Burkesville and then at this place. Their failure to advance, I suppose, grows out of the fact that they ascertained that the camp at Goggin was armed.

Colonels Wolford and Hoskins requested me in your absence to take command.

I have sent back for the provisions we were unable to bring up.

There is no possible chance for the enemy to advance upon our front without being cut to pieces. He may attempt a flank movement, but I will guard that in time to meet him at equally as formidable a pass.

Respectfully,

E. BRAMLETTE.

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CAMP HOSKINS, PULASKI COUNTY, KENTUCKY, November 2, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding First Kentucky Brigade:

GENERAL: I have just received three dispatches from Wayne (all concurring), stating that Zollicoffer, with his full force, estimated by some as high as 20,000, arrived at Monticello on last night, and to-day are on their march in this direction.

On yesterday some five Tennesseeans arrived at our camp from near Hartsville, Tenn., and they reported that Zollicoffer’s forces were marching across from Cumberland Gap to Jamestown, Tenn.; but having heard so many false rumors, I was indisposed to trouble you until I had news which was reliable.

I shall contest this point until resistance is useless. I have just ordered the destruction of all the ferry-boats at this point, and shall so distribute my picket guards along the river above and below this point as to guard against a flank movement.

I repeat it, the news of the approach of Zollicoffer is reliable, and aid cannot reach us too soon.

Zollicoffer has artillery, as it has been heard even to this point.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS, Colonel Comdg. Fourth Regiment Kentucky Volunteers.

{p.329}

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CAMP CALVERT, London, Ky., November 2, 1861.

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: Your communication of the 1st instant was duly received. The regimental reports called for will be forwarded as soon as they can be made out with any degree of accuracy. A want of blanks much retards this business.

The county of Laurel will not supply forage for more than 10 to 20 days, and even now the utmost dissatisfaction prevails among the inhabitants. Zollicoffer had already plundered the county to a large extent, and we are at this time virtually plundering the people of what little they have left. Our promises to pay are looked upon by the people as a mere sham, amounting to nothing. We are taking at the point of the bayonet what the citizens really need for the support of their families, without returning to them anything available therefor; thus turning against us a public sentiment which we should endeavor to cherish.

It is evident that our means of transportation will hereafter prove inadequate to the required duty. Many of the mules are shoeless (a requisition for which was made some ten days since). Many of our men need shoes, blankets, and great-coats, and are unable properly to perform duty without them.

Empty trains will be kept on the road to Crab Orchard as fast as discharged at this point. The report of Captain Adams, brigade commissary of subsistence, is herewith inclosed; also that of Captain Standart.*

The expresses stationed on the route to Crab Orchard are to receive the pay and allowances of privates of cavalry.

Sickness in camp is increasing. I had to hire a hospital to-day for 100 men.

I inclose a note or memorandum just received, said to be from a citizen of Greensburg, having reference to rebel forces.

Respectfully, yours,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

* Reports of Captains Adams and Standart not found.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, Crab Orchard, November 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Brigadier-General Schoepf has just written me that the supply of forage in Laurel County will be exhausted in twenty days, and that the inhabitants are very much dissatisfied that they do not receive the money down for what has been purchased from them.

It is reported that an abundance of corn can be bought in Madison, and that the road from Richmond to London is practicable all winter. I will send an officer in a few days to make an examination of the road and report its exact condition. I would be glad to know whether we are to make preparations for a winter campaign or go into winter quarters.

For a winter campaign we shall need more wagons, and ought to have a supply of Sibley tents; but the latter can be dispensed with to a great {p.330} extent if we can get wagons. I send you Capt. A. J. Mackay, brigade quartermaster, who can explain to you fully the embarrassments we labor under in this poor country, and I would be obliged if he can be furnished with funds to pay all small bills against the department, as being able to do so will give confidence to the people, and enable us to get forage, &c., much more easily than by the present method of giving certified accounts of purchases. This is a poor region of country. If we are compelled to winter here, nearly if not all of our supplies will have to be brought from a distance.

General Schoepf has found it necessary to appoint his assistant adjutant-general, Capt. T. S. Everett, chief of the quartermaster and commissary departments for the troops at London, as he could find no one else who has any knowledge of the duties of those departments. I have also to ask that you will direct Colonel Swords and Captain Symonds to furnish Captain Everett with sufficient funds to pay all small bills against these departments contracted by him or any of his subordinates.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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CAMP CALVERT, London, Ky., November 3, 1861. (Received November 5.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding, &c., Crab Orchard:

GENERAL: Yours of the 2d is received. Captain Adams has arrived and Captain Everett has turned over to him the duties of the subsistence department. Captain Everett thinks that with a good degree of patience and perseverance on his part he can get Captain Adams into a reasonable knowledge of the business of the department, he (Adams) being attentive and willing to be instructed. Captain Everett will continue at the head of the quartermaster department until relieved by an officer of that department.

The timely arrival of the fourteen wagons, on the 31st, sent with supplies from Crab Orchard, relieves us from any immediate fears of getting out of provisions. I now have two trains on the road, and am grinding from 50 to 80 bushels of corn per day.

If I can get my mules shod I shall get along, but at present they are in bad condition, some of them having to remain in camp wholly unfit for the road. If the quartermaster at Crab Orchard has a shop in operation, please let him render us as much assistance in this line as possible. Also try to send us shoes and nails, a requisition for which has been made.

No news of importance from the enemy. I inclose a few more of the reports called for by your chief of staff on the 1st instant. I have so far found it impossible to get the commanders of regiments to furnish proper monthly returns for October. My adjutant-general has been untiring in his efforts for the last three days to get something upon which he could frame a report for the Adjutant-General’s Office, but so far without effect. The want of suitable blanks for regimental returns is one great obstacle in the way. If proper returns cannot be obtained in the next twenty-four hours, Captain Everett must take the matter in hand and make out the returns for each regiment. Have you any blanks for post or brigade returns? If so, please send me a few sheets.

{p.331}

In considering the future movements of my command, we must not lose sight of the fact that the Rockcastle River is liable at any time now to present an impassable barrier between us and cut off my means of procuring subsistence, first by freshets, and next by ice. We cannot subsist from the adjacent country.

I experience much annoyance from the citizens of the county, each pressing his views, prompted in most cases by his individual interest. It is evident that public sentiment in this locality is divided, and that we have many enemies amongst and around us who are friends for the moment from self interest, but who would not fail to turn their hands against us should an opportunity offer, while I am afraid that the number of this latter class will be augmented by our non-payment policy as at present pursued.

The rainy weather has rendered our camp most uncomfortable. Our men are nevertheless in good spirits.

I am somewhat at a loss as regards the position of General Carter, who claims a kind of command of the Tennessee brigade. Although no inconvenience has so far arisen from this claim, it is certainly liable to produce clashing at any moment. Please advise me in the matter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

P. S.-I have just received reliable information that the enemy has withdrawn to a point beyond Cumberland Ford, two of his regiments having been disbanded and returned home in consequence of expiration of service.

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LOUISVILLE, November 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

DEAR SIR: You must know that we in Kentucky are anxious about the condition of the State. The Confederates have possession of the seven counties west of the Tennessee River, with the exception of the town of Paducah. They have also possession of Bowling Green and the south bank of Green River for 50 miles, and are threatening Louisville. They have twice invaded the State immediately south of the counties of Clinton and Cumberland, and have a threatening army immediately within the boundary. They have also Zollicoffer at Barboursville and passes in the mountain gaps and river upon us. At Prestonburg they have an assembled army of rebels from 3,000 to 6,000 strong, and a sprinkling of disunion men in most of the counties of the State.

We suppose that General McClellan has more than 200,000 men in Virginia and about Washington, and that Frémont has more than 70,000 men in Missouri, whilst General Sherman, in command of the central army in Kentucky, is not able to concentrate much more than 15,000 men, and all these are raw, undisciplined troops. We want more trained men, and we want disciplined men for this important army. We know that the Indiana and Ohio troops wish to serve in Kentucky, and we suppose General Reynolds’ troops are the next best thing to regulars. We should hope, if they are not wanted in Virginia, that you will be able to send them to General Sherman forthwith. Kentucky, in thirty days, will have in the field her full quota of the 500,000 {p.332} soldiers, and they will fight, but they will be undisciplined men. Give us 60,000 men on General Sherman’s center, and we will awake the Union men in Tennessee.

We hope you will act promptly on this subject and strengthen our hands.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES GUTHRIE.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 4, 1861.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In compliance with telegraphic orders of General McClellan, received late last night, I submit this report of the forces in Kentucky and of their condition.

The tabular statement shows the position of the several regiments. The camp at Nolin is at the present extremity of the Nashville Railroad. This force was thrown forward to meet the advance of Buckner’s army, which then fell back of Green River, 23 miles beyond. These regiments were substantially without means of transportation other than the railroad, which is guarded at all dangerous points, yet is liable to interruption at any moment by the tearing up of a rail by the disaffected inhabitants or a hired enemy. These regiments are composed of good material, but devoid of company officers of experience, but have been put under thorough drill since being in camp. They are generally well clad and provided for.

Beyond Green River the enemy has masked his forces, and it is very difficult to ascertain even the approximate numbers. No pains have been spared to ascertain them, but without success, but it is well known that they far outnumber us. Depending, however, on the railroads to their rear for transportation, they have not thus far advanced this side of Green River, save in marauding parties. This is the proper line of advance, but will require a very large force-certainly 50,000 men-as their railroad facilities south enable them to concentrate at Munfordville the entire strength of the South. General McCook’s command is divided into four brigades, under Generals Wood, R. W. Johnson, Rousseau, and Negley.

General Thomas’ line of operations is from Lexington towards Cumberland Gap and Ford, occupied by a force of Tennesseeans under the command of Zollicoffer. He occupies the position at London in front of two roads which lead to the fertile part of Kentucky, the one by Richmond and the other by Crab Orchard, with his reserve at Camp Dick Robinson 8 miles south of the Kentucky River. His provisions and stores go by railroad from Cincinnati to Nicholasville, and thence in wagons to his several regiments. He is forced to hire transportation.

Brigadier-General Nelson is operating on the line from Olympian Springs, east of Paris, on the Covington and Lexington Railroad, towards Prestonburg, in the valley of the Big Sandy, where is assembled a force of from 2,500 to 3,500 Kentuckians, waiting re-enforcements from Virginia. My last report from him was to October 28, at which time he had Colonel Harris’ Second Ohio, 900 strong; Colonel Norton’s Twenty-first Ohio, 1,000; and Colonel Sill’s Thirty-third Ohio, 750 strong, with two irregular Kentucky regiments, Colonels Marshall and {p.333} Metcalf. These troops were on the road near Hazel Green and West Liberty, advancing towards Prestonburg.

Upon an inspection of the map you will observe these are all divergent lines, but rendered necessary from the fact that our enemies in the State chose them as places of refuge from pursuit and there cluster to receive the assistance of neighboring States. Our lines are all too weak, probably, with the exception of that to Prestonburg. To strengthen them I am thrown on the raw levies of Ohio and Indiana, who arrive in detachments perfectly fresh from the country and loaded down with baggage; also upon the Kentuckians, who are slowly forming regiments all over the State at points remote from danger, and whom it will be an almost impossible task to assemble together. The organization of this latter force is by the laws of Kentucky under the control of a military board at the capital (Frankfort) and they think they will be enabled to have 15 regiments towards the middle of this month, but I doubt it, and deem it unsafe to rely on them.

There are four regiments forming in the neighborhood of Owensborough, near the mouth of Green River, who are doing good service; also in the neighborhood of Campbellsville, but it is unsafe to rely on troops so suddenly armed and equipped. They are not yet clothed or uniformed. I know well you will think our force too widely distributed, but we are forced to it by the attitude of our enemies, whose force and numbers the country never has and probably never will comprehend. I am told that my estimate of troops needed for this line, viz, 200,000, has been construed to my prejudice, and therefore leave it for the future. This is the great center, on which our enemies can concentrate whatever force is not employed elsewhere.

Detailed statements of present force inclosed with this.

With great respect, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

  • BARDSTOWN, KY.
    • Tenth Indiana, Colonel Manson.
  • CRAB ORCHARD, KY.
    • Thirty-third Indiana, Colonel Coburn.
  • JEFFERSONVILLE IND.
    • Thirty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Steele.
    • Thirty-sixth Indiana, Colonel Grose.
    • First Wisconsin, Colonel Starkweather.
  • MOUTH OF SALT RIVER, KY.
    • Thirty-seventh Indiana, Colonel Hazzard.
    • Ninth Michigan, Colonel Duffield.
  • LEBANON JUNCTION, KY.
    • Second Minnesota, Colonel Van Chive.
  • OLYMPIAN SPRINGS, KY.
    • Second Ohio, Colonel Harris.
  • CYNTHIANA, KY.
    • Thirty-fifth Ohio, Colonel Van Derveer.
  • NICHOLASVILLE KY.
    • Twenty-first Ohio, Colonel Norton.
    • Thirty-eighth Ohio, Colonel Bradley.
  • BIG HILL, KY.
    • Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Connell.
  • COLESBURG, KY.
    • Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Hecker.
  • ELIZABETHTOWN. KY.
    • Nineteenth Illinois, Colonel Turchin.
  • OWENSBOROUGH OR HENDERSON, KY.
    • Thirty-first Indiana, Colonel Cruft.

NOTE-The designations of some of these regiments, as given in the original, have been changed to conform to those officially recognized by the Government.

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CAMP HOSKINS, PULASKI COUNTY, KY., November 4, 1861. (Received November 6.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, Crab Orchard:

GENERAL: On yesterday Colonel Wolford left to make a reconnaissance of the rebel force below this, and with the general understanding that, should he find the enemy too strong, he was either to return or send back for re-enforcements, when Colonel Bramlette and myself are to move forward with all our available force, which we think will reach 1,200.

We learned this evening that there was a rebel force of cavalry of 350 at Travisville, and, if true, I have no doubt that Colonel Wolford has proceeded to that point with a view of giving them battle.

On Friday night the same party were at Monticello, distant 20 miles from this place; that infantry force, numbering 3,200, made but a short stay at Albany on their return to their encampment at Old Monroe {p.335} from Burkesville, though it is said they ravaged the country in their passage, driving off horses, cattle, and hogs. They also found a brother of Captain Frogg sick in bed, whom they murdered.

My boys are quite eager to meet the rebels in combat, and should any more troops move in that direction I could not, if 1 were disposed, prevent their joining in the march.

I have improved our position at this place by the erection of some rude breastworks along the face of the hill and parallel with the roads. I have also blockaded a number of roads to prevent a flank movement of the enemy. They, I learn, had determined to force a passage by this route with a view of forming a junction with Zollicoffer at Crab Orchard, not doubting but that he would reach that point. Their whole force at Travisville and Old Monroe from the best information will reach near 4,000, though all assert that they are but insufficiently and poorly armed. I have not learned that they certainly have any artillery.

Recruits are coming in rapidly the past few days, and I hope to have the minimum number by the 10th instant and a full regiment in a few weeks.

I hope soon to see matters sufficiently quieted in this section to allow me time to return and dispose of my old quartermaster’s business.

Most respectfully, your friend and obedient servant,

W. A. HOSKINS.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 5, 1861. (Received Nov. 7.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Crab Orchard:

SIR: Yours of November 3 is received. I had previously ordered money to be sent you for disbursement in all the departments, but you know the forms through which all such things must pass. I coincide with you that money should be disbursed liberally wherever our armies move, but my power is limited by law, and I am unable to overcome the obstacles. The commissary (Captain Symonds) assures me that he pays promptly all certified accounts, and that he has sent to Captain Kniffin $4,000 for small bills, and inasmuch as rations are hauled to you he insists that but little money is needed. I take it that, though your letter is indefinite on this point, the quartermaster is the one that needs money; Colonel Swords will send by Capt. A. J. Mackay the sum of $20,000, and if in my power will continue to cause to be transmitted you more.

In the present aspect of affairs it is impossible to say how or where we shall winter. This will depend on our enemies. They will not allow us to choose. I have done all in my power to provide men and materials adequate to the importance of this crisis, but all things come disjointed-regiments without overcoats, or wagons, or horses, or those essentials to movements. McCook has a good body of men, but the force of the enemy far exceeds him, and the railroad on which he depends is in such a country that it requires large guards. All of these in case of attack would be terribly exposed. I can hardly sleep to think what would be your fate in case the Kentucky River Bridge is destroyed or the railroad to your rear, and I demanded again and again a force adequate to all these necessities-a very large force, beyond the ability of the State to furnish. Nelson and you ought simply to guard those avenues of approach to the interior; but from this point we should have made a bold forward movement, but I have never had a force anything approximating the magnitude of the occasion.

{p.336}

I wish I could make your communications perfectly safe, and the cost would be nothing. There should be at least ten good regiments to your rear, capable of sustaining the head of your column at London, but I am unable to provide; and hereabouts the army should be such as to prevent all idea of attack; but Buckner and Hardee have across Green River a very large force and may advance at their pleasure.

In this state of the case I can only repeat my former orders, for you to hold in check the force of Zollicoffer and await events. The road by Richmond depending on the ferry appears to me less safe to you than the one crossing Kentucky River by-the bridge.

I have nothing from Nelson for some days.

Truly, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 5, 1861.

General J. T. BOYLE, Lebanon, Ky.:

SIR: Your two letters are received.* My information is that Buckner has drawn back his forces from Munfordville and Glasgow and is farther down the river. His designs are either on some point of the river below or to get up between McCook and the mouth of Salt River.

I don’t think your command will be threatened for some time; therefore push your organization, and don’t allow any of the regiments to engage in marauding expeditions; it would be better for then to be united in one body, but I suppose enlistments would be delayed by concentration.

General Ward is here and exhibits an appointment as brigadier-general, and calls my attention to the fact that in his absence Colonel Hobson is entitled to command.

The great importance of forming your Kentucky regiments will force me to allow General Ward to resume his command, and I beg you will push the formation of your regiments. The force under Harlan, Ward, and Grider should be sufficient to prevent any movement from Green River towards Thomas, and that is all I design during the process of formation; and as soon as the organization is made under the authority of the State board, then 1 must consolidate you on some efficient force. The scattered condition of the Kentucky volunteers makes them a source of weakness instead of strength. We depend on them, that is, the General Government does, and yet they are not in a shape to act efficiently, not even to defend themselves. The giving of commissions by the President and by General Anderson has embarrassed me much, but I suppose it was inevitable. I am forced therefore to allow General Ward to resume his office, to construct, if possible, his brigade, and await the consolidation of the board before I can presume to count on them for military service.

The sketches you have made of the passes on Muldraugh’s Hill correspond with several I have received, and were we purely on the defensive they might be occupied, but to place regiments of Northern troops there would tie them down, and prevent their use for other service. This is one of the purposes of your Kentucky regiments when they come to be ready.

{p.337}

I must therefore request that you push your efforts to raise and organize as many men as you can in the neighborhood of Columbia for the service and to abide events.

Truly,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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CAMP NEVIN, KY., November 5, 1861.

General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Deportment of Cumberland:

GENERAL: The subject of contraband negroes is one that is looked to by the citizens of Kentucky of vital importance. Ten have come into my camp within as many hours, and from what they say there will be a general stampede of slaves from the other side of Green River. They have already become a source of annoyance to me, and I have great reason to believe that this annoyance will increase the longer we stay. They state the reasons of their running away their masters are rank secessionists, in some cases are in the rebel army, and that slaves of Union men are pressed into service to drive teams, &c.

I would respectfully suggest that if they be allowed to remain here our cause in Kentucky may be injured. I have no faith in Kentucky’s loyalty, therefore have no great desire to protect her pet institution, slavery. As a matter of policy, how would it do for me to send for their masters and deliver the negroes to them on the outside of our lines, or send them to the other side of Green River and deliver them up? What effect would it have on our cause south of the river? I am satisfied they bolster themselves up by making the uninformed believe that this is a war upon African slavery. I merely make these suggestions, for I am very far from wishing these recreant masters in possession of any of their property, for I think slaves no better than horses in that respect.

I have put the negroes to work. They will be handy with teams and generally useful. I consider the subject embarrassing, and must defer to your better judgment.

The ammunition we have for our guns is not serviceable. I have been trying it to-day. The powder is old; lost its strength by exposure and frequent transportation. The fuses in the spherical case are not made properly or else the graduation is very imperfect. You have been telegraphed to on the subject.

All quiet below. Miller came back from Green River to-day. He states that he has it from reliable sources that there never has been more than 8,000 armed infantry in all of Buckner’s army. They have without doubt pressed the wagons into service. Where they are going time will determine. The negroes that came to me to-day state that their masters had notified them to be ready to go South with them on Monday morning, and they left Sunday night.

My command is improving each day, and you need have no fears for us. I will be timely apprised of their movements, and will move to please you. Bear in mind also that they cannot insult a force of 12,000 with impunity, particularly when my movements can be more rapid than theirs.

Please send the First Ohio to me at your earliest convenience, and very much oblige your obedient servant,

A. MCD. MCCOOK, Brigadier-General, Commanding. {p.338}

HEADQUARTERS, Grab Orchard, November 5, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I received this morning your two communications of the 31st ultimo and 1st instant.

General Schoepf writes me, under date of the 3d instant, that he has just received reliable information that the enemy had withdrawn to a point beyond Cumberland Ford, two of his regiments having been disbanded and returned home, mu consequence of expiration of service. Colonel Bramlette writes me from Somerset that the forces of the enemy southwest of Somerset had also retired, but he could not yet tell but that they might attempt a flank movement on his position near Somerset from Burkesville. He is prepared for him, however, and can meet them in a very strong position and drive them back. He further reports that there is no possible chance for them to attack him in front successfully.

I inclose copies of two communications I have just received from Mr. William B. Carter, the brother of Lieutenant Carter, U. S. Navy.* If we could possibly get the arms and the four regiments of disciplined and reliable men, we could seize the railroad yet. Cannot General McClellan be induced to send me the regiments? He can spare them easily, I should think.

...

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

* Of October 22 and 27. See pp. 317, 320.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, Grab Orchard, November 5, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: ... I have ordered five companies to work the road from here to Rockcastle River, to enable our wagons to reach London with tolerable loads. The officer I sent to examine the Richmond and London road has returned, and reports the road good and practicable all winter. It is nearer from Lexington to London than from Nicholasville to London, besides being a much better road. Transportation for any amount can be hired at all times either in Lexington or along the road. A depot at Lexington could therefore easily supply London. The troops at Somerset, Columbia, and Burkesville could easily be supplied from a depot at Lebanon, and thus obviate the necessity of guarding the bridge over Kentucky River. I have ascertained certainly that it is nearer from Lebanon to Somerset than from Nicholasville to Somerset. The road is equally as good, if not better, and there are no bridges to guard. Ample transportation can also be hired between Lebanon and Somerset. Supplies may also be forwarded from Lexington to Somerset through Nicholasville, if necessary, after a depot is established at Lebanon, without any risk, as our enemies, seeing we have a sure means of transportation through Lebanon, would abandon the idea of burning the bridge over the Kentucky River, as the destruction would be more inconvenient to them than to us. Therefore with two depots we shall have three sources of supply. This place can then {p.339} be abandoned, and I can remove my headquarters either to London or Somerset, as circumstances may require; the distance between these two villages is about the same as between this and London, 30 miles.

With my headquarters at Somerset I can easily seize the most favorable time for invading East Tennessee, which ought to be done this winter. I shall not need for that purpose more than four additional regiments, but they should be well organized and drilled, and prepared to take the field on their arrival.

...

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., November 6, 1861.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The telegram of the Major-General Commanding the Army, dated at 7 p.m. on the 2d instant, directing a report on the number and position of troops, &c., was not received until this morning. We have telegraphic communication with Cairo, put up at my instigation, by order of Major-General Frémont. A cable is laid over the river at this point. The wire is in my quarters. I answered the General’s telegram by telegraph to-day. A copy is inclosed.*

There are four companies of the Second Illinois Cavalry in camp at Old Fort Massac, badly armed with old carbines. The whole of this regiment was under my orders, but, at the request of Brigadier-General Grant, I detached six companies to him at Cairo. I forwarded a requisition for arms for the regiment-sabers and pistols; no carbines-to the headquarters of the Department of the West many weeks since, which, I understand, was sent to Washington. The Chief of the Ordnance Department, in answer to a telegram of mine on the subject, said he could not furnish them. I want very much the services of these four companies here, but have not brought them for want of their proper arms. They are doing good service where they are, by guarding the line of telegraph and stopping the passage of contrabands across the river; at least I hope so. By direction of General Frémont I have occupied Smithland, the mouth of the Cumberland, with 300 men. They have erected two respectable earthworks, which are protected with two 32-pounders and one 8-inch columbiad. Two field guns (a 6 and 12 pounder howitzer) are needed there, but I cannot spare them, and I see no probability of getting them from Saint Louis. I made a recent inspection of Smithland. The works are well constructed and although they will not be completed for a fortnight or so, can make a respectable defense. My orders are to hold Paducah and Smithland at all hazards.

I inclose herewith a sketch of Paducah and its vicinity,* pointing out the defenses and stations of troops. It is a flat, wooded, country, not much susceptible of defense at first, but by an unsparing use of the ax a very sufficient abatis, several hundred yards in width, renders all approach, except by the roads, which are guarded by the earthworks, very difficult, if not impracticable. The sketch, however, sufficiently explains itself. The line of defense is long, say 2 miles from the redoubt {p.340} (Marine Hospital) to the bridge over Island Creek. The redoubt around the Marine Hospital, intended for a garrison of 1,000 men, in a great state of forwardness, with an 8-inch columbiad in position, is intended as the main defense should the principal part of this force be withdrawn, in which case all the outworks must be abandoned.

The number and position of the enemy is to some extent conjectured, but may be stated approximately as follows: At Columbus and its immediate vicinity, 10,000, General Pillow in command of the post; on the opposite shore, 2,000. The whole force in and around Columbus commanded by General Polk. At Feliciana (Camp Beauregard), south of Mayfield, towards the State line, is a battery of artillery, three companies of cavalry, and four regiments of infantry; in all probably 2,500 men, who are in a very sickly condition, the measles prevailing to a great extent and many deaths daily. At Trenton, on the State line, or a little south of it, a camp of instruction is being formed. At Memphis is a camp of instruction, under the State authorities, of, say, 3,000 men. Generals A. S. Johnston and Hardee are at Bowling Green. The force there is 40,000. This I was assured of yesterday by a Northern gentleman who recently left there. The enemy can concentrate probably 30,000 troops at Columbus in a very short time, they controlling the railways from Louisville and Columbus to Memphis.

I inclose a copy of the last order received by me within a few days from General Frémont. In the execution of these orders one-half this force will move to-day to make a demonstration on Columbus. In connection with this see also General Grant’s letter and telegram of this date inclosed. I inclose herewith a field return of the troops at this post and its dependencies.** The sick list is large, as will be perceived, but the medical director considers the general health improving. The men have plenty of food and are well clad. They are tolerably well instructed and the discipline is reasonably good. We have some wants which I will specify more at my leisure. It would aid the administration of justice if I had the authority to appoint general courts-martial. This I can only do by this force being considered an army in the field, always, of course, subordinate to the commander of the department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

** No inclosures found. For Frémont’s order of November 1, see p. 300, Vol. III, of this series.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 6, 1861.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

SIR: General McClellan telegraphs me to report to him daily the situation of affairs here.

The country is so large that it is impossible to give clear and definite views. Our enemies have a terrible advantage in the fact that in our midst, in our camps, and along our avenues of travel they have active partisans, farmers and business men, who seemingly pursue their usual calling, but are, in fact, spies. They report all our movements and strength, while we can procure information only by circuitous and unreliable means. I inclose you the copy of an intercepted letter, which is but the type of others.* Many men from every part of the State are {p.341} now enrolled under Buckner, have gone to him, while ours have to be raised in the neighborhood, and cannot be called together except at long notice. These volunteers are being organized under the laws of the State, and the 10th of November is fixed as the time for consolidating them into companies and regiments. Many of them are armed by the United States as Home Guards, and many of them by General Anderson and myself because of the necessity of being armed to guard their camps against internal enemies. Should we be overwhelmed these would scatter and their arms and clothing will go to the enemy, furnishing the very material they so much need.

We should have here a very large force, sufficient to give confidence to the Union men of the ability to do what should be done-possess ourselves of all the State; but all see we are brought to a stand-still, and this produces doubt and alarm. With our present force it would be simple madness to cross Green River, and yet hesitation may be as fatal. In like manner other columns are in peril; not so much in front as rear. The railroad over which our stores must pass being much exposed, I have the Nashville Railroad guarded by three regiments; yet it is far from being safe, and the moment actual hostilities commence these roads will be interrupted, and we will be in a dilemma. To meet this in part I have put a cargo of provisions at the mouth of Salt River, guarded by two regiments. All these detachments weaken the main force and endanger the whole.

Do not conclude, as before, that I exaggerate the facts. They are as stated and the future looks as dark as possible. It would be better if some more sanguine mind were here, for I am forced to order according to my convictions.

Yours, truly,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP CALVERT, London, Ky., November 6, 1861.

Capt. GEORGE E. FLYNT, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: The instructions from General Thomas relative to repairs of the road hence to Rockcastle River have been complied with. Things are quiet about London and the men in good spirits. Clothing for the needy has arrived in part, much to their relief.

I learned two days since that parties of the enemy’s cavalry were in the habit of coming to within 12 miles of our camp for the purpose of getting their horses shod. I sent out a strong reconnaissance to a point near Barboursville two days since, but they returned without making any discovery of importance. It is evident that the enemy has retired to the vicinity of Cumberland Gap.

Having reason to believe that some of the officers of the Third Kentucky Regiment are wholly incompetent, I would respectfully ask for authority to cause such officers to be brought before a board of examination, and a report made of the result.

The Home Guard report to have had a skirmish with the enemy’s scouts yesterday, getting advantage in several respects.

Very respectfully,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

{p.342}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, November 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL:

GENERAL: In giving you instructions for your guidance in command of the Department of the Ohio, I do not design to fetter you. I merely wish to express plainly the general ideas which occur to me in relation to the conduct of operations there. That portion of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River is by its position so closely related to the States of Illinois and Missouri that it has seemed best to attach it to the Department of the Missouri. Your operations, then (in Kentucky), will be confined to that portion of the State east of the Cumberland River. I trust I need not repeat to you that I regard the importance of the territory committed to your care as second only to that occupied by the army under my immediate command. It is absolutely necessary that we shall hold all the State of Kentucky. Not only that, but that the majority of its inhabitants shall be warmly in favor of our cause, it being that which best subserves their interests. It is possible that the conduct of our political affairs in Kentucky is more important than that of our military operations. I certainly cannot overestimate the importance of the former. You will please constantly bear ill mind the precise issue for which we are fighting. That issue is the preservation of the Union and the restoration of the full authority of the General Government over all portions of our territory. We shall most readily suppress this rebellion and restore the authority of the Government by religiously respecting the constitutional rights of all. I know that I express the feelings and opinions of the President when I say that we are fighting only to preserve the integrity of the Union and the constitutional authority of the General Government.

The inhabitants of Kentucky may rely upon it that their domestic institutions will in no manner be interfered with, and-that they will receive at our hands every constitutional protection. I have only to repeat that you will in all respects carefully regard the local institutions of the region in which you command, allowing nothing but the dictates of military necessity to cause you to depart from the spirit of these instructions.

So much in regard to political considerations. The military problem would be a simple one could it be entirely separated from political influences. Such is not the case. Were the population among which you are to operate wholly or generally hostile, it is probable that Nashville should be your first and principal objective point. It so happens that a large majority of the inhabitants of Eastern Tennessee are in favor of the Union. It therefore seems proper that you should remain on the defensive on the line from Louisville to Nashville, while you throw the mass of your forces by rapid marches, by Cumberland Gap or Walker’s Gap, on Knoxville, in order to occupy the railroad at that point, and thus enable the loyal citizens of Eastern Tennessee to rise, while you at the same time cut off the railway communication between Eastern Virginia and the Mississippi. It will be prudent to fortify the pass before leaving it in your rear:

[GEO. B. MCCLELLAN.]

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, November 7, 1861.

Gov. ANDREW JOHNSON, London, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: Your favor of the 6th instant is at hand.* I have done all in my power to get troops and transportation and means to advance {p.343} into Tennessee. I believe General Sherman has done the same. Up to this time we have been unsuccessful.

Have you heard by authority that the troops at London were to fall back? Because I have not, and shall not move any of them back unless ordered; because, if not interfered with, I can have them subsisted there as well as here. I am inclined to think that the rumor has grown out of the feverish excitement which seems to exist in the minds of some of the regiments that if we stop for a day that no further advance is contemplated. I can only say I am doing the best I can. Our commanding general is doing the same, and using all his influence to equip a force for the rescue of Tennessee.

If the Tennesseeans are not content and must go, then the risk of disaster will remain with them. Some of our troops are not yet clothed, and it seems impossible to get clothing.

For information respecting the organization of regiments, I inclose you General Orders, No. 70, from the War Department.

If the gentlemen you name can raise regiments agreeably to the conditions and instructions contained in said order, the Government will accept them, and I hope will have arms to place in their hands in the course of two or three months.

In conclusion I will add that I am here ready to obey orders, and earnestly hope that the troops at London will see the necessity of doing the same.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, Ky., November 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General SCHOEPF, Commanding Camp Calvert, London, Ky.:

GENERAL: I find it necessary to reply to Governor Johnson’s letter in the manner of the foregoing, which I send to you for your information. It is time that discontented persons should be silenced both in and out of the service. I sympathize most deeply with the Tennesseens on account of their natural anxiety to relieve their friends and families from the terrible oppression which they are now suffering; but to make the attempt to rescue them when we are not half prepared ins culpable, especially when our enemies are as anxious that we should make the move as the Tennesseeans themselves; for it ins well known by our commanding general that Buckner has an overwhelming force within striking distance whenever he can get us at a disadvantage. I hope you will therefore see the necessity of dealing decidedly with such people, and you have my authority and orders for doing so. We must learn to abide our time, or we shall never be successful.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, November 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Colonel Bramlette writes me again that the enemy have returned to Monticello. I had ordered back a section of artillery belonging {p.344} to Captain Hewett’s battery, which I suppose is the cause of the reappearance of the enemy. I have directed the section to return to him, and directed him to ascertain positively whether the enemy is anywhere near, and send me more reliable information. I hope to hear from him in two days from this.

General Schoepf writes me that Zollicoffer has retired beyond the Cumberland Ford, and that it is reported he is retiring to Cumberland Gap. He does not place much confidence in the report, however. I hear also from Colonel Barnes that Nelson is at Prestonburg, the enemy having retired towards Virginia.

A man by the name of Wilson has been to see me, who offers his services as a spy; but, having no need for him, I have suggested to him to go to see you. He is vouched for by several persons of standing in Lexington, and no doubt you can make use or him if you desire his services. He says he is well acquainted with the country between Louisville and Nashville, and can go anywhere you may desire to send him.

Respectfully, &c.,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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CAMP CALVERT, LONDON, KY., November 7, 1861. (Received November 9.)

GENERAL: Without wishing to do aught of injustice to the cavalry now under my command, I am compelled, in justice to myself and the service, to say that they are not the material for the occasion. I speak from experience. A cavalry force of from two companies to a regiment is absolutely necessary and indispensable with this command.

I learn that Doubleday has a regiment of very superior men at Cleveland. Could you not secure this regiment for this brigade and allow me at least four companies of it?

I spent a portion of the day yesterday in artillery practice. With a full sense of the advantages of rifled cannon, I must express my fears that we are depending on them to the exclusion of other and (under certain circumstances) more appropriate guns. If each of the batteries under my command could exchange two of the rifled for two smooth-bored guns or 12-pounder howitzers, I am certain the efficiency of that valuable arm [would] be much enhanced. I make the suggestion.

Very respectfully, yours,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP OWENS, PULASKI COUNTY, KENTUCKY, (Received November 7, 1861.)

General THOMAS:

DEAR SIR: I have just returned to this place from Monticello, in Wayne County, Ky., where I went with 400 men and one cannon.

I found no enemy in Wayne, but satisfied myself that about 2,000 of them are in Albany, badly armed and terribly frightened. We calm whip them and break up their camp if permitted to advance as far as Old Monroe, a distance of 65 miles from this place.

Yours,

FRANK WOLFORD.

{p.345}

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HEADQUARTERS, CAMP AT PRESTONBURG, November 7, 1861.

Captain GREENE, Assistant Adjutant-General, Louisville, Ky.:

SIR: For the information of the commanding general I inclose herewith a copy of a proclamation which I have thought proper to publish.

The reason why I have done so is owing to the peculiar law of this State, which permits the bar to elect a circuit judge if that officer should not be present at the stated time of holding court. Now, the judge of this district is an open and active secessionist and has gone off with the rebel army. I have therefore the opportunity under the law of causing the election of a Union man to act in his stead.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

W. NELSON, Brigadier-General.

[Inclosure.]

PROCLAMATION.

HEADQUARTERS AT PRESTONBURG, November 5, 1861.

Having this day occupied the town of Prestonburg with the force under my command, I declare to all whom it may concern that the jurisdiction of the State of Kentucky is restored in this section of the State, and that the regular fall terms of the courts will be held in those counties in which the time for holding the same has not passed; and all civil officers are ordered to attend at the regular times and places of holding said courts and attend to the duties of their respective offices.

Given under my hand this 5th day of November, 1861.

W. NELSON.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., November 8, 1861.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: In my report of the 6th instant, in relation to the forces of the enemy, I accidentally overlooked in my notes the works on the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers.

The more important is Fort Henry, 71 miles up the Tennessee, just at the State line. It is a strong earthwork, on the water front, but not nearly so strong on the land side. It has three 24 or 32 pounders, one or two 8-inch columbiads, and the remainder of field guns, in all from 14 to 16; its garrison was two weeks since about 1,200. They have been under apprehension of attack from here for the past two weeks.

Some 8 miles above Fort Henry the enemy has been for many weeks endeavoring to convert river steamers into iron-plated gunboats. This fort is an obstacle to our gunboats proceeding to look after such work.

I sent an intelligent person to see what progress had been made on these gunboats, but he was captured. It is my only weak point (this river), made so by the use of gunboats.

The Conestoga gunboat, admirably commanded by Lieutenant Phelps, of the Navy, is my only security in this quarter. He is constantly moving his vessel up and down the Tennessee and Cumberland. From the latter river he came in this morning, having gone into the State of Tennessee as far as Dover, where the enemy have a work called Fort Gavock, {p.346} or Fort MacGavock, or something else, usually called Fort Gavock [Fort Donelson]. He could not give me an idea of its armament.

I mention these things because it is a favorite idea announced on the other side that Paducah is to be attacked from three quarters at once, one quarter being by one or both rivers.

I inclose General Grant’s telegram to me of his affair at Belmont yesterday.

Nothing yet heard from my commands sent in the direction of Columbus.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

CAIRO [November 7].

General SMITH:

Attacked the rebels this morning at 9 o’clock; drove them out of Belmont and destroyed their encampment; loss heavy on both sides. They had eleven regiments against our 3,000 men. If you have an opportunity communicate with General Paine our arrival here this evening.

U. S. GRANT.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Paducah, Ky., November 8, 1861.

The ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: My report of to-day has nothing of interest so far as this place is concerned. I have not heard from the force sent out by me on the 6th instant to aid in the demonstration on Columbus. I expect it in this evening. I inclose General Grant’s telegram to me of his affair at Belmont with reference to this demonstration.

In answer to the general’s request to enumerate my wants, I beg to say that my chief want is an efficient quartermaster. In this connection I beg the general will send for an extra-official letter I addressed to the Quartermaster-General of the Army on this subject. I have officially asked of the headquarters of the Department of the West to send me an efficient officer to replace Capt. R. N. Lamb, the present incumbent.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

CAIRO, November 8, 1861.

General SMITH:

We drove the rebels completely from Belmont, burned their tents, and carried off their artillery. For want of horses to draw them we had to leave all but two pieces on the field. The victory was complete. Our loss is not far from 250 killed, wounded, and missing. The rebel loss must have been from 500 to 600, including 130 prisoners brought from the field.

U. S. GRANT.

{p.347}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General MCCOOK, Camp Nevin:

SIR: I have no instructions from Government on the subject of negroes. My opinion is that the laws of the State of Kentucky are in full force, and that negroes must be surrendered on application of their masters or agents or delivered over to the sheriff of the county. We have nothing to do with them at all, and you should not let them take refuge in camp. It forms a source of misrepresentation, by which Union men are estranged from our cause. I know it is almost impossible for you to ascertain in any case the owner of the negro. But so it is; his word is not taken in evidence, and you will send them away.

I am, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, KY., November 8, 1861. (Received November 9.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding, Crab Orchard:

SIR: Yours of November 6 is received. At present I think the Turnpike Company must be satisfied with a promise to pay.

As soon as the Kentucky volunteers organize in such a way as to enable me to estimate for them, I will order the establishment of a depot at Lebanon. I have been impressed of its importance from the first.

You know how impossible it is for me to obtain good, well-drilled regiments. I could not possibly send you three or four. There are three regiments in Ohio nearly ready to come, but of course they are fresh troops. Mr. Maynard still presses the East Tennessee expedition. I do not doubt its importance, but I know we have not force enough and transportation to undertake it. Instead of dispersing our efforts we should concentrate; and as soon as possible our forces must be brought nearer together. In the mean time do the best you can.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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LONDON, KY., November 8, 1861. (Received November 9.)

[General THOMAS:]

GENERAL: Yours of the 7th instant, with copy of letter to Governor Andrew Johnson, is before me, and it is with extreme satisfaction that I note the decided manner in which the case is laid down to Governor Johnson.

This outside pressure has become intolerable and must be met with firmness, or the Army may as well be disbanded.

With importunate citizens on one side and meddlesome reporters for papers on the other, I can scarce find time to attend to the appropriate duties of my position. By the way, cannot something be done to rid our camps of this latter class? I have really reached that point that I am afraid to address my staff officer above a whisper in my own tent. My most trivial remarks to my officers are caught up, magnified, and embellished, and appear in print as my “expressed opinions,” much to the surprise of myself and those to whom my remarks were addressed, {p.348} thus keeping me continually in a false position with my superior officers and the country.

So far as a forward movement is concerned, I have never urged it; do not now urge it; but on the contrary believe that in the present condition of my command (having a large sick list) it would be most decidedly imprudent. I am nevertheless ready to obey your order to advance, come when it may. That is a question for my superiors, and not for me, to determine.

After eight days of labor on the part of Captain Everett, he has returned the regimental monthly returns to the respective commanders, to be forwarded direct to your headquarters; Captain Everett having declared his inability to obtain from any one regiment anything like a passable document, or even the data upon which he could frame one.

My consolidated morning reports will be commenced on the 10th and promptly continued as per orders every ten days, and forwarded upon the days upon which they are made.

Please furnish the regimental commanders with blanks in time for the close of the present month, when, perhaps, by “line upon line and precept upon precept,” they may be brought to produce a more businesslike sheet in future.

Very respectfully, yours,

A. SCHOEPF, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS KENTUCKY MILITIA, Frankfort, November 9, 1861. (Received November 11.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Crab Orchard:

SIR: Information has reached this department that Captain Munday and a body of men (Kentucky volunteer cavalry) presented themselves to you a few days since, and were sworn into the service of the United States.

By the terms of General Orders, No. 78, of the War Department U. S., all the volunteers in the loyal States are placed under the command of the governors of those States (I send a copy of order), and General Sherman’s orders Nos. 10 and 13 direct that all persons raising recruits in the State are directed to report to the adjutant-general of the State, &c.

I beg to suggest, with great deference, that the exercise of authority in mustering in detached companies by the Federal authorities at the same time the military board is striving to compel a consolidation of fractional companies and regiments must produce great confusion, and may operate prejudicially to the public service.

There are now in the various camps in Kentucky, in fractional companies and regiments, a large number of men. The purpose of the board is to organize them into regiments as quickly as possible.

Many persons raising regiments under permit from War Department and General Anderson are disinclined to consent to a consolidation because they may lose their places.

It will be seen, therefore, if a consolidation is desirable, it can only be effected by a rigid adherence to the order giving the board exclusive control over the recruits.

Truly, yours,

JNO. W. FINNELL, Adjutant-General Kentucky Militia.

{p.349}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 97.}

HDQRS. OF THE ARMY, A. G. O., Washington, November 9, 1861.

The following departments are formed from the present Departments of the West, Cumberland, and Ohio:

...

4. The Department of the Ohio-to consist of the States of Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, that portion of Kentucky east of the Cumberland River, and Tennessee-to be commanded by Brig. Gen. D. C. Buell; headquarters at Louisville.

...

By order:

JULIUS P. GARESCHE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, November 10, 1861.

Hon. JAMES GUTHRIE, Louisville, Ky.:

DEAR SIR: Your favor, dated November 4, to the Secretary of War, was received this morning, and contents carefully noted. The Secretary being absent allow me to assure you that no effort shall be spared to concentrate a powerful army in Kentucky. The forces in Western Virginia cannot be withdrawn at present, their co-operation being necessary to important movements contemplated by the Commander-in-Chief. In a few days a thorough reorganization of military departments will be effected, and the forces so arranged as to move in concert. We shall procure men, arms, and munitions for Kentucky as rapidly as possible, and, with the co-operation of our Union friends in your State, will speedily drive the rebels into Tennessee. The President and his Cabinet are doing all they can to meet the pressing wants of the several departments.

Very respectfully, yours,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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Abstract from consolidated report of the Department of the Cumberland, Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman commanding, for November 10, 1861.

Commands. Present for duty.Aggregate present and absent.Remarks.
Officers.Men.
First (McCook’s) Division44211,11013, 995Camp Nevin, Ky.
Second (Thomas’) Division2704,9409,110Camp Dick Robinson, Ky.
Bardstown Ky.32780 996
Colesburg, Ky.16602 822
Elizabethtown, Ky.1192,3053,093
Jeffersonville, Ind.318201,007
Lebanon Junction, Ky.338111,007
Paris, Ky. 35714 896
Total from returns97822,14330,926
Nelson’s brigade (estimated)3,500Hazel Green, Ky.
Ward’s brigade (estimated)1,800
Elizabethtown, Ky. (estimated)950In addition to above.
Jeffersonville, Ind. (estimated)1,000In addition to above.
Mouth of Salt River, Ky. (estimated)950
Regiments forming (estimated)9,560
Approximate total49, 586
{p.350}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 11, 1861. (Received Nov. 12.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Crab Orchard, Ky.:

SIR: Yours of the 7th, reporting the reappearance of the enemy at Monticello, is received.

The intention is doubtless so to occupy the attention of Bramlette and Wolford as to divide them from the forces in the direction of the Gap. The fact that two roads enter the fertile part of Kentucky at London makes that an important point, and must be held.

Whether the force of General Schoepf is sufficient I am unable to judge, but it is impossible to re-enforce you by any except the new Kentucky levies, that are yet incomplete. Barnes’ regiment at Estill Springs might be called for, and Nelson’s force if it can be reached.

It is not alone the armies in the field that we have to watch, but the disunionists all over the State, who may at any moment be assembled in sufficient force to intercept trains and break up railroads.

The Kentucky volunteers will to-day be consolidated into regiments and mustered into service, and then, for the first time, be subject to orders; but, as you well know, without wagons or sufficient arms and clothing, they will not be of much use this year.

I have daily and constantly increased evidence of a vast force in our front, and that they are assembling wagons preparing for a move; and it is probable an advance on their part from Cumberland Gap along the whole line will be concentric and simultaneous. It was my judgment of the case when Secretary Cameron was here, and I begged him to prepare for it, but they never have attached the importance to Kentucky in this struggle that it merits.

My expression of dissatisfaction at the publication of Thomas’ report and request to be relieved from this charge has led to the assignment of General Buell, of whom I have not yet heard.

You should have at least 10,000 more men, and could I give them they should be there, but I cannot get them.

The new regiments arrive without notice and perfectly raw.

All that I can now do is to say that I will approve of your course, let the result be what it may.

If you can hold in cheek the enemy in that direction, is all that can be attempted; or if you must fall back, your line is toward Lexington; or if outnumbered, you are not bound to sacrifice the lives of your command.

I was in hopes McClellan, in assuming the command, would send on adequate re-enforcements, but he has not done so. Indeed, it may he out of his power to do it.

I am, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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LOUISVILLE, November 11, 1861. (Received November 12.)

General THOMAS:

I am just in receipt of a telegraphic dispatch from McCook, at Camp Nolin, that the forces in his front along Green River have disappeared, and that there is a rumor that Buckner is moving in force toward Lexington between us. If not engaged in front, at once withdraw your force back of Kentucky River, and act according to the state of facts then.

{p.351}

If it be true that the force at the Gap has been increased, as represented, to 20,000, it would be madness to contend. My information is positive as to the state of affairs along Green River, but conjectural as to the other, and I send a special messenger to convey it to you.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding.

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CAMP WOLFORD, November 11, 1861.

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Since writing to you this morning, I have ascertained that there are above this, in process of construction, 80 coal boats, 44 nearly complete, the others temporarily suspended. These boats are usually 80 to 90 feet long by 25 to 30 in width. Any number within reason could be constructed above this in the course of six to eight weeks, capable of transporting a large force, with all necessary equipments. They are a heavy boat, open top, made to bear up the immense burden of 80,000 to 100,000 bushels of coal.

I made inquiry of an old boatman as to the number of boats building, and what preparations were making for the shipment of coal and thus learned the state of preparations. Boats might be built without exciting suspicion and a descent upon Nashville accomplished, if in the plan of operations such movement were desirable. I communicate these facts for consideration.

...

I will send the section of Captain Hewett’s battery back so soon as I can determine whether it is necessary to make a descent upon the cavalry at Camp McGinnis. If I do that, I wish to do so with the cavalry; two companies of skirmishers to go with the artillery, and shall accompany them and command myself. If they are back at McGinnis, I can so arrange those forces as to cut them off and bag them. But the uncertainty of all the reports, even of avowed eye-witnesses, readers it necessary that I get information through means of my own that can be relied on.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry Kentucky Vols.

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SEVEN O’CLOCK P. M.

General THOMAS:

I open this letter, having just received the inclosed from Major Brents. I have ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Letcher forward immediately with three companies, with direction to maintain the position, unless superior force move upon them; if so, to fall back upon the main body, which I will throw across the river and move forward with in the morning. I will take five days’ rations and all the effective forces of my Command and Colonel Hoskins’ regiment, except sufficient to guard our stores, and try the metal of these rebels. They shall fight or run, and that soon.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry Kentucky Vols.

{p.352}

[Inclosure.]

MONTICELLO, KY., November 11, 1861-12 m.

Lieut. Col. JOHN W. LETCHER:

SIR: We have just arrived at this place-total about 230 men. Some 25 or 30 rebels were in some nine or ten miles of this place yesterday. There are some 1,200 rebels in Fentress County, Tenn., some 25 miles from here. There are some 500 near Old Monroe, Tenn., and some 600 below Livingston. Of this number there are about 1,000 cavalry.

We do not apprehend any danger here at present, but they might see proper to attack us. We could not conveniently make arrangements for our men any other place. We will stay here to-night and aware further orders. Send us word as to your movements; whether we will be re-enforced and when.

Send this to Colonel Bramlette.

We must be re-enforced soon or we will have to fall back, as the rebels will receive information of our condition.

Yours, respectfully,

J. A. BRENTS, Major First Kentucky Cavalry, Commanding Forces.

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CAMP WOLFORD NEAR SOMERSET, November 11, 1861. (Received November 12.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

I have been enabled to ascertain pretty full and accurate information of the enemy recently in Cumberland, Clinton, and Wayne Counties.

The opinion heretofore expressed by me to you in a former communication is fully sustained.

The forces consisted of two regiments infantry and about 650 to 700 cavalry, the same that had heretofore been stationed at Camp McGinnis, in Fentress County (the cavalry), and at Camp Myers, in Overton County, near the old town of Monroe, two regiments infantry, under Colonels Stanton and Murray.

They became alarmed upon a report reaching them that I was moving upon their with a large force, and the infantry regiments fled precipitately until they reached Camp Zollicoffer, 3 miles south of Livingston, the county seat of Overton County, and about 38 miles south of the State line.

The cavalry fled from Monticello very hastily upon the report that Colonel Wolford and myself were near at hand and moving upon them, and did not halt until they made Jamestown, Tenn. In a day or two they found that they were not pursued, and returned to their old camp at Camp McGinnis, where they now are, having obstructed the road with abatis.

I am quietly waiting for them to recover from their fright and venture to peep out this side of their brush, and will, if they do so, make a dash at them and cut them off and to pieces. I know their hiding place, and how to surround it, when they get sufficient confidence to think themselves safe.

From a man whom I know well, and have from his infancy, and who has been a prisoner with them for three weeks, until they reached Camp Zollicoffer, I have learned their movements.

Mr. Huff is my informant. He got to camp Saturday night just from their camp, and is perfectly reliable. He says they talked very boldly {p.353} until they heard of my approach (which was really at the time a false report, as it was started about the time you ordered me forward); they were then suddenly overtaken with alarm, and left as before stated. Huff says they are armed with stolen Home Guard muskets, with pistols, shot-guns, common rifles, &c., just what they can lay their hands upon; that most of the men are very much dissatisfied with their condition, and swear if they could get away they would, never to be drawn in again. The cavalry are generally well mounted, having seized all the fine horses they could lay hands upon, but badly armed. They had no artillery. At Camp Zollicoffer Huff says he overheard the colonels talking the day before he got off that they were to remain there ten or twelve days, till they got orders. There is a report that the rebels have at Jamestown, just in the rear of the cavalry, 180 wagons. I have set on foot an investigation, and if I find this to be certain, it will be an incentive to capture which I can’t resist, but will do it cautiously and with entire safety to my men, as we should have nothing to do but to frighten the cavalry again and go forward and take them. There is some plausible grounds for belief that those wagons are there for the purpose of hauling the hogs they expected to steal and carry off from along the border as soon as fattened.

And this suggests the propriety of my forming a camp forward at Monticello, and having Colonel Haggard to resume his camp at Burkesville. At Burkesville the whole Upper Cumberland can be controlled, ascent and descent of the river be regulated, and with sufficient cavalry force to keep up a regular line of pickets between the two posts at Monticello and Burkesville the entire central border can be assured protection against these marauding wretches or they intercepted and cut off.

At Monticello I can, when you desire it, either move forward or turn to Whitley County, join any movement made via Huntsville, or on toward Barboursville or in a descent of the river; it is 5 miles from the Cumberland at one of the shipping points. It is a rich agricultural country about Monticello, abounding in subsistence and forage.

I make these latter suggestions for your consideration and instruction. I do so only because of my thorough knowledge of the geography and topography of the country, without any purpose of obtruding my opinions, but simply to give you the facts, and then rigidly to conform to your directions.

Respectfully,

THO. E. BRAMLETTE, Colonel First Regiment Infantry Kentucky Volunteers.

–––

LOUISVILLE, November 12, 1861. (Received November 13.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Crab Orchard:

SIR: I sent a special dispatch to you last night, intimating the necessity of withdrawing your forces farther back.

I am convinced from many facts that A. Sidney Johnston is making herculean efforts to strike a great blow in Kentucky; that he designs to move from Bowling Green on Lexington, Louisville, and Cincinnati. I may be in error, but he has pressed into service some 1,500 wagons at and near Bowling Green, and his force is not far short of 45,000 men, with a large proportion of artillery.

The movement may depend on new circumstances, but I think the {p.354} best disposition of your force is to leave the Tennesseeans and Colonel Garrard in a kind of ambush near Rockcastle River and draw back of Danville the balance. Establish communication with Bramlette and Wolford and with the other Kentucky regiments such as Bruce’s and Barnes’.

Have all these things planned, and defer the execution of them till you know from the direction of Greenville and Campbellsville and Lebanon that my conjecture is right.

Nelson has succeeded in breaking up Williams’ party, and I will direct him to return as rapidly as possible towards Paris and Lexington.

I have furnished arms and saddles to the cavalry company attached to Barnes’ regiment because you will need them. Wolford’s cavalry has been supplied, but I have not kept memoranda of the issues, and can’t say if they are completely armed or not.

There is one incomplete Kentucky regiment (Harlan’s) at Lebanon; one at New Haven, with a good Indiana regiment.

The bulk of our force here is under McCook, with a brigade on the Ohio at its nearest point under Colonel Hazzard.

The railroad is so exposed that I am compelled to guard it with a strong force, and even then am hourly apprehensive of some devilish destruction.

If the movement be made in force, our effort should be to concentrate before they reach the neighborhood of Danville.

We cannot trust the telegraph, but when I telegraph to Nicholasville, “Your application by letter is granted,” you will understand that my conjectures are correct. When I telegraph it is denied, then my inference is wrong.

We find it impossible to penetrate their designs, except I know their force is very large and they have pressed in all the wagons from several counties, for which they could have no other use than what I name.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

–––

HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, November 14, 1861. (Received at 4.20 p.m.)

To General THOMAS, Crab Orchard:

Your application [by letter] is granted.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General.

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CRAB ORCHARD, KY., November 12, 1861.

General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Your dispatch received. I will give orders at once for a retrograde move, but I am sure the enemy are not moving between us. All my information indicates that they are moving south.

I send this by Lieutenant Jones, Second Regiment Kentucky Volunteers, who will take back any orders you may have for me.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

{p.355}

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, Ky., November 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. A. SCHOEPF, Commanding Camp Calvert, London, Ky.:

GENERAL: General Sherman has just dispatched me that General McCook sends him word that the enemy have disappeared from Green River, and that there is a rumor that Buckner is moving in force towards Lexington, between us, and orders me, “if not engaged in front, to withdraw my force back to Kentucky River, and act according to the state of facts then.”

As soon as you receive this, break up camp at London and join me here or at Nicholasville with all your troops. Hire transportation enough to bring your ammunition, and bring your camp equipage and three days’ rations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

–––

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY. Washington, November 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Ohio:

GENERAL: Upon assuming command of the department, I will be glad to have you make as soon as possible a careful report of the condition and situation of your troops and of the military and political condition of your command. The main point to which I desire to call your attention is the necessity of entering Eastern Tennessee as soon as it can be done with reasonable chances of success, and I hope that you will, with the least possible delay, organize a column for that purpose, sufficiently guarding at the same time the main avenues by which the rebels may invade Kentucky. Our conversations on the subject of military operations have been so full, and my confidence in your judgment is so great, that I will not dwell further upon the subject, except to urge upon you the necessity of keeping me fully informed as to the state of affairs, both military and political, and your movements. In regard to political matters, bear in mind that we are fighting only to preserve the integrity of the Union and to uphold the power of the General Government. As far as military necessity will permit, religiously respect the constitutional rights of all. Preserve the strictest discipline among the troops, and while employing the utmost energy in military movements, be careful so to treat the unarmed inhabitants as to contract, not widen, the breach existing between us and the rebels.

I mean by this that it is the desire of the Government to avoid unnecessary irritation by causeless arrests and persecution of individuals. Where there is good reason to believe that persons are actually giving aid, comfort, or information to the enemy, it is of course necessary to arrest them, but I have always found that it is the tendency of subordinates to make vexatious arrests on mere suspicion. You will find it well to direct that no arrest shall be made except by your order or that of your generals, unless in extraordinary cases, always holding the party making the arrest responsible for the propriety of his course. It should be our constant aim to make it apparent to all that their property, their comfort, and their personal safety will be best preserved by adhering to the cause of the Union.

{p.356}

If the military suggestions I have made in this letter prove to have been founded on erroneous data, you are, of course, perfectly free to change the plans of operations.

MCCLELLAN.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 12, 1861. (Received November 13.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A.:

DEAR GENERAL: This afternoon I received a message from Captain Ryan (formerly of Second Regiment), who is on Elk Fork, in edge of Tennessee, through one represented to me as a trusty person, telling me that Zollicoffer left Jacksborough on Thursday night of last week, with five regiments, and went in direction of Knoxville. Before his command marched they were ordered to prepare two days’ rations, and all the wagons in the neighborhood were pressed into service by them. The messenger further stated that all the rebels about Big Creek Gap, Wilson’s Gap, Chitwood’s, Wheeler’s, and Childers’ Gaps had left after filling them up as well as they could with timber and rocks. I advised Brigadier-General Schoepf of above information.

Late this afternoon Captain Myers, of First East Tennessee Regiment, has returned from the vicinity of Big Creek Gap, and confirms the intelligence sent me by Captain Ryan, and says further that it was understood that only one regiment and part of another remained at Cumberland Gap, and the report was they were to follow Zollicoffer. When at Jacksborough, I am informed, Zollicoffer had seven pieces of artillery and all his cavalry. I forward this evening requisition for arms and ammunition for same.

Yesterday I sent 45 pounds rifle powder, 50 pounds lead, and 20 boxes rifle caps into East Tennessee for the Union men. I borrowed the whole from Colonel Garrard. Will you have the kindness to have rifle powder forwarded to me, not only to return that borrowed, but also for further distribution among the mountain men. The ammunition sent yesterday was to be delivered to the men mentioned by my brother in his letter to you. Lead and caps are also needed.

We thank you, general, for your assurance that as soon as you can you will move towards East Tennessee. Our men and officers have entire confidence in you and shall be most happy to see you in our midst. If the reports made to me to-day are true-and they seem to be reliable-we might get possession of the mountain passes without loss or even opposition. Do you not think so?

I am persuaded you will do what is right and proper.

With respect,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Comdg. East Tennessee Brigade.

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NOVEMBER 13, 1861.

General W. T. SHERMAN:

I send the foregoing copy of a communication just received from Acting Brigadier-General Carter, and I will add that this is confirmed from other sources which I have heretofore found to be reliable.

Should it not be necessary for me to move back of Kentucky River under the present circumstances, I think it would be as well to concentrate at Somerset, the importance of Cumberland Ford not now being {p.357} so great as when held by the enemy. The troops at London cannot reach here before Saturday or Sunday, and I will move towards Nicholasville as soon as they reach here unless I receive further orders from you not to do so.

Very respectfully,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, November 13, 1861.

General W. T. SHERMAN, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Colonel Bramlette writes me from Somerset on the 11th, but does not think the enemy have any intention of advancing.

From General Schoepf’s camp the report is that Zollicoffer has retired beyond Cumberland Gap, leaving some cavalry pickets on the Tennessee side of the Cumberland Ford. I will send you copies of Colonel Bramlette’s report to-night by mail.

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 13, 1861. (Received Nov. 14.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding, Crab Orchard:

SIR: I have just telegraphed you to await further orders.

I think that the enemy in your front will reduce rather than increase, and the difficulty of hauling supplies will warrant the reduction of your force at London and moving a portion back in the direction of the Kentucky River. The enemy across Green River has impressed a large number of wagons, and cannot remain idle much longer.

I am deficient in transportation and tied to a railroad which must be strongly guarded. The route of approach will most likely be from Glasgow to Columbia, Liberty, Stanford, and Danville. I have not yet detected any signs of such an advance, and infer it from the fact I have stated and the current belief among secessionists. You may therefore arrange for a good person to watch that line and give you timely notice. Colonels Grider and Haggard are at Columbia, and are acquainted with all the country as far as Bowling Green. And in addition to the person you may rely on, I will instruct them to send you word of any signs they may observe.

I am, yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 14, 1861. (Received Nov. 16.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Crab Orchard:

SIR: I have just received information that a force of about 2,700 men, three pieces of artillery, and 400 horses were at Tompkinsville on Tuesday last, marching towards Columbia, and probably the design being {p.358} to reach Lexington. If you can anticipate them at the Kentucky River Bridge they will be defeated. I have two accounts of the same party as having passed Scottsville and Tompkinsville. There are about 1 000 Kentucky volunteers at Columbia and as many more at Campbellsville. And will send word to Burbridge at Somerset by way of Lebanon; but on you I depend to intercept their march.

I am, &c.,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, Louisville, Ky., November 14, 1861. (Received Nov. 16.)

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Commanding, Crab Orchard:

SIR: The report you make of the abandonment of Cumberland Ford and Cumberland Gap in part confirms me in the opinion hitherto expressed, that the efforts to penetrate Kentucky by the three passes have been abandoned and all will be brought toward Louisville.

It may be that Zollicoffer may make his appearance at the Cumberland in front of Somerset, and you may hold your command at Crab Orchard ready to move to Somerset or Danville, according to circumstances.

Please make me a report of the number and condition of your command, that I may know what dispositions to make. Telegraph me via Nicholasville when your command is at Crab Orchard.

Yours,

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., November 15, 1861.

GENERAL ORDERS, No.1.}

I. In pursuance of General Orders, No. 97, of the 9th instant, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, Brig. Gen. D. C. Buell hereby assumes command of the Department of the Ohio.

...

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, November 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, U. S. A., Commanding Department of the Ohio, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that orders have been this day dispatched by telegraph to Generals J. J. Reynolds and Cox, in Western Virginia, to put en route immediately for Covington, Ky., one more Indiana and three more Ohio regiments; the former to be detached from the division at Cheat Mountain the latter three from that at Kanawha. With these, superadded to the re-enforcements of which {p.359} you were advised by telegraph on the 14th instant, the major-general commanding instructs me to say that he expects you will be able to organize a proper force for immediate operations in the direction of Cumberland Gap,

I am, general, &c.,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAMP NOLIN, November 16, 1861.

General BUELL:

I have complete plans of General Johnston’s intrenchments; know their position. Hardee started toward Nashville, it was thought to re-enforce Columbus, but I am well satisfied that he commands that force that passed through Scottsville and are now in the vicinity of Tompkinsville. We are ready for any emergency. The First Ohio reached us this evening. Hazzard with thee regiments at Elizabethtown.

MCCOOK.

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HEADQUARTERS, Louisville, November 16, 1861. (Received at 2.20 p.m., November 17.)

General GEORGE H. THOMAS, Crab Orchard:

General Buell has arrived and assumed command. He will send you full orders.

In the mean time remain at Crab Orchard.

W. T. SHERMAN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 16, 1861. (Received November 17.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Crab Orchard, Ky.:

GENERAL: My brother William has just arrived from East Tennessee, and the news he brings I think of so much importance, that I will dispatch a special messenger to convey it to you. My brother left Roane County, near Kingston, on Monday night last. He reports that on Friday night, 8th instant, of last week, he succeeded in having burned at least six, and perhaps eight, bridges on the railroad, viz: Union Bridge, in Sullivan County, near the Virginia line; Lick Creek Bridge, in Greene County; Strawberry Plains, in Jefferson County, 15 miles east of Knoxville, partially destroyed; Hiawassee Bridge, 70 miles southwest of Knoxville, and on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad; two bridges over the Chickamauga between Cleveland and Chattanooga, and between Chattanooga and Dalton, Georgia. These bridges are certainly destroyed. The Long Island Bridge, at Bridgeport, on Tennessee River, and a bridge below Dalton, on the Western Atlantic road, are probably destroyed.

The consternation among the secessionists of East Tennessee is very great. The Union men are waiting with longing and anxiety for the appearance of Federal forces on the Cumberland Mountains, and are {p.360} all ready to rise up in defense of the Federal Government. My brother states that he has it from reliable sources that the rebels have but 15,000 men at Bowling Green, many of them badly armed and poorly organized. The other 15,000 men are distributed at two other points in Southwestern Kentucky.

The above information was obtained from Union members of Tennessee legislature who were at Bowling Green on last Monday was a week ago.

On last Monday, as nearly as could be ascertained, Zollicoffer had in East Tennessee 8,000 men, about 1,000 of whom were unarmed, and about 1,500 on sick list, most of them badly clothed, and many poorly armed. About 6,000 of the above were at different points on Cumberland Mountains; at Jacksborough there were some troops, but the exact number could not be accurately ascertained. There were 1,400 at Knoxville, but only 600 of them able to bear arms. There were 60 at London, 60 at Carter’s Depot, and 300 at Jamestown.

The only troops that have passed through East Tennessee in last six weeks was an Alabama regiment, 800 strong, which went to Virginia; they were without arms.

I send you a Nashville paper, brought by my brother, containing some account of the attack on Port Royal.

I to-day moved Colonel Garrard’s regiment to the ground which was occupied by the Thirty-third Indiana, and the First and Second Regiments East Tennessee to the heights where the artillery and Thirty-eighth Ohio were encamped. I have heard nothing definite since yesterday from Cumberland Gap, but I have reason to believe that the reported loss of the Union men at Cumberland Ford was not correct. If possible, general, send me some artillery, for if I am attacked with artillery I cannot resist with any hope of success. Some cavalry are also necessary to our security.

General, if it be possible, do urge the commanding general to give us some additional force and let us advance into East Tennessee; now is the time. And such a people as are those who live in East Tennessee deserve and should be relieved and protected. You know the importance of this move, and will, I hope, use all your influence to effect it. Our men will go forward with a shout to relieve their native land.

The brigade commissary has not yet handed in his report of the amount of provisions on hand; but I think we have already nearly, if not quite, a month’s supply on hand.

With much respect, I am, dear general, yours, very truly,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Comdg. East Tennessee Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST KENTUCKY BRIGADE, Crab Orchard, November 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. D. C. BUELL, Commanding Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Ky.:

GENERAL: Capt. T. S. Everett, assistant adjutant-general, arrived to-day at 5 p.m. He informs me that your verbal orders are to move my command in the direction of Columbia. Some of the wagons belonging to the regiments just arrived have not yet reached this place, the roads between this and London being in such wretched condition. The regiments will not be ready to move before Tuesday. If the road from here to London remains in the same condition as now, it will not {p.361} be possible to subsist the troops there through the winter, and I would respectfully recommend that they be withdrawn. They now have on hand nearly one month’s supply of provisions and 40 rounds of ammunition. The troops in London are the First and Second East Tennessee Regiments and the Third Kentucky Volunteers, under command of Lieut. S. P. Carter, U. S. N., acting brigadier-general. Please telegraph me as soon as possible whether this depot will be abandoned or not.

To supply the troops in London by this road, it will be necessary to have a depot here; but I have but one commissary and shall need his services with my command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Crab Orchard, Ky., November 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. P. CARTER Commanding Camp Calvert, near London:

GENERAL: General Buell has arrived in Louisville and assumed command of the department. He has ordered me to move with the troops here in the direction of Columbia, and that the regiments under your command remain at London for the present.

I would recommend you to write to him immediately for instructions, stating also at the same time the condition and strength of your command, and what is needed to equip the regiment. If this depot is broken up, you will have to draw your supplies from Camp Dick Robinson or Nicholasville, and it would therefore be far better to move from London to Somerset.

You will continue to send the reports and returns of your regiment to me until further orders, also all requisitions for supplies.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. H. THOMAS, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding

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HEADQUARTERS EAST TENNESSEE BRIGADE, Camp Calvert, November 17, 1861. (Received November 21.)

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, U. S. A., Commanding, &c., Crab Orchard, Ky.:

GENERAL: My brother, who will hand you this, can give you all the news we have received since my letter of yesterday from Knox County, Kentucky.

With your approbation, and for the purpose not only of keeping the rebels at a distance, but also to gain reliable information, I wish to send, possibly to-morrow night, a party in the direction of Cumberland Ford. I think I can cut off some of their cavalry, who are still committing depredations below the ford.

Requisitions were forwarded to your headquarters some days ago for shoes, among other things, which I shall be obliged to you if you will direct the quartermaster to forward by some of the returning wagons as soon as can be done; 15 pairs of No. 12 are needed.

May I request you to have forwarded the stands of colors belonging to First and Second Tennessee Regiments if they have arrived? If possible, will you send me some artillery, if it be but part of a battery?

{p.362}

I am glad to say our loss of men on the march to Mount Vernon was not so great as I supposed. Most of them have and will return. We may lose 20 to 25.

With much respect, yours, very truly,

S. P. CARTER, Acting Brigadier-General, Comdg. East Tennessee Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Louisville, Ky., November 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS, Commanding Division, Crab Orchard, Ky.:

SIR: General Buell directs me to say that the orders he has given you in reference to the movement of your command contemplates the whole of it, and it will, in consequence, not be necessary to continue the depot from which you are now supplied. You will come upon a line of which Louisville and not Cincinnati will be the main depot.

The general desires to be informed in due season of the time at which you will probably arrive at Liberty, as he intends to have further instructions ready to reach you when you get to that point.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES B. FRY, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff.

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Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6