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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 4, Ch. XI–Confederate Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER XI.
OPERATIONS IN TEXAS, NEW MEXICO, AND ARIZONA.
June 11, 1861-February 1, 1862.
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CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE.

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INSPECTOR-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., June 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. EARL VAN DORN, Comdg., &c., San Antonio, Tex.:

GENERAL: Herewith you will receive a requisition for twenty companies of infantry, to be raised within the State of Texas, made by authority of the President of the Confederate States. The recent law of Congress, passed at Montgomery, empowers the President to receive into the service of the Confederate States for the war, unless sooner discharged, companies of men from the several States, to be organized by him into battalions, squadrons, or regiments. But this organization will not take place until the arrival of such companies at any point which may be designated by the Executive. It will therefore be understood that the first enrollment will be by companies, the officers of such companies to be elected by the men.

To carry into effect this requisition, you will, when requested by the governor of the State of Texas, order an officer of the Army of the Confederate States to act as mustering officer at such points as may be designated by the governor (not expected to be more than two), by whom the several companies, with their organizations, will be mustered into service. It is the order of the President that the companies coming from Texas shall be fully armed, four of them with rifles, if practicable.

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Orders for the supply of arms, ammunition, camp and garrison equipage, clothing, transportation to the points of embarkment, and quartermaster and commissary stores, are to be issued to the proper officers in Texas. Such as cannot be there supplied will be provided at this place or at such other point as may be deemed important.

The organization of a company of infantry is, one captain, one first and two second lieutenants, four sergeants, four corporals, two musicians, and not more than 100 nor less than 64 privates. The field and staff officers are to be appointed by the President, after the companies shall have been embodied into regiments, on their arrival at the point designated by him.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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RICHMOND, June 12, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, President Confederate States:

SIR: In accordance with your direction I have the honor to submit the following memoir for defense of the coast of Texas:

For the month of the Sabine River, two 24-pounders and one company. For Galveston Island, four or five 8-inch columbiads, in addition to their present supply, and, relying upon the volunteers of the city, three companies would suffice. I would, however, recommend five if they could be granted. At the mouth of the Brazos River, one 24-pounder siege carriage and one company. At Pass Cavallo, three 32-pounders and two companies. At Aransas, two 24-pounders and one company.

At Sabine the town amounts to very little, but a railroad runs up the river connecting with the road from Houston to New Orleans. Sabine and Houston are now connected by rail. A battery on Texas Point, at the mouth of the river, would keep off anything that could enter unresisted and resist a boat landing successfully, as, except on the Texas Point, the ground is so soft no landing on the flanks of a battery could be made. A small party once established at Sabine City could break up all the railroad communication from Houston to New Orleans (now not complete, but expected to be soon finished).

At Galveston an enemy could have no object in coming into the harbor as a means of injury to the town. He could lay off the Gulf beach in gunboats, shell and burn the city, unless kept at a distance by heavy guns, or might use the roadstead inside the bar for a harbor of refuge unless driven away. The number of guns proposed, with what I suppose are already in Galveston, will suffice. I would suggest that a part of the force at Galveston should be mounted.

The Brazos River is 42 miles from Galveston; is connected by canal with Galveston Bay. A large quantity of cotton and sugar is transported by that route. One 24-pounder siege carriage is all I think necessary.

Pass Cavallo, entrance to Matagorda Bay, from whence the principal roads to Austin and San Antonio start, seven to ten feet on the bar. Three 32-pounders, one on Decrow’s Point and two at the light-house, will do well.

Aranzas.-The bar has seven to ten feet water. From the mainland a good road to San Antonio and Western Texas via Goliad.

Brazos Santiago, I understand from Major Marshall, is already provided for.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. H. STEVENS, Captain Engineers, C. S. Army.

{p.93}

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, July 8, 1861.

Brig. Gen. H. H. SIBLEY, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: In view of your recent service in New Mexico and knowledge of that country and the people, the President has intrusted you with the important duty of driving the Federal troops from that department, at the same time securing all the arms, supplies, and materials of war. You are authorized to take into the Confederate States service all disaffected officers and soldiers on the original commissions of the former and enlistments of the latter.

You will proceed without delay to Texas, and in concert with Brigadier-General Van Dorn organize, in the speediest manner possible, from the Texas troops, two full regiments of cavalry and one battery of howitzers, and such other forces as you may deem necessary. If successful in accomplishing the object herein indicated, the President directs that you will, in the exercise of a sound discretion, proceed to organize a military government within the Territory, the detail of which you will submit to him at the earliest possible moment. The instructions being of a general nature, it is not deemed necessary to confine you to matters of detail which may from time to time arise. In this respect you will be guided by circumstances and your own good judgment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, July 8, 1861.

His Excellency Governor CLARK, Austin, Tex.:

SIR: General H. H. Sibley has instructions from the President to proceed to Texas, there to organize a brigade of mounted troops for certain purposes. It is respectfully requested that you will extend to General Sibley such facilities in your power as will best insure his early success in raising this force.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Richmond, July 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. EARL VAN DORN, Comdg., &c., San Antonio, Tex.:

GENERAL: General Sibley, under instructions from the President, is to proceed to Texas, there to carry out, in concert with yourself, certain measures of which he will advise you upon his arrival at San Antonio. It is desired that you will extend every facility to General Sibley in successfully carrying out his instructions, supplying as far as possible the material for the armament and equipment of his command, and such needful supplies as he may require from the different depots under your control.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT No. 1, C. S. ARMY, New Orleans, La., July 24, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have been credibly informed by gentlemen just from Galveston that the commander of the blockading ship before that place has demanded that he shall have free communication with the Union men ashore, and if denied he will shell the town. There are no heavy guns at Galveston; consequently it is at the mercy of the enemy. My aide-de-camp, Capt. E. Higgins, late of the U. S. Navy, a most energetic and accomplished officer, volunteers to take to Galveston, via Berwick Bay, one or more 9-inch guns. By placing them in battery on the island he is confident that he can drive the ship off or sink her in twenty-four hours.

I have great confidence in Captain Higgins, and but for the exigency of the case would not consent to his leaving the city. Indeed, I have so high an opinion of his experience and skill, that I would gladly see him placed in charge of the naval defenses of this coast.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Major-General, Commanding.

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STATE OF TEXAS, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Austin, Texas, July 27, 1861.

Capt. T. A. WASHINGTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose to you a copy of a communication received to-day from the War Department, by the governor of the State, who wishes it to be brought to the knowledge of General Van Dorn.* The call is not explicit as to the nature of the arm required by the President. Considering the slowness of the mails between Texas and Richmond, the governor cannot refer the matter to the War Department, and wishes to receive on the subject the opinion of the general, who may have received fuller instructions. Cavalry could be raised at once; it will be more difficult to raise infantry. Will one or two companies of artillery be received?

Do the words “These camps will be under the control of this department” mean that the troops are to be supplied and paid by the Confederate States? In view of the condition of our public treasury, the State could not bear such a burden for any length of time.

The Secretary of War leaves to the governor the selection of two camp grounds for the concentration of the companies. His excellency, feeling the necessity of a harmonious action between the civil and military authorities in Texas, and considering that the general is the best judge as to the accessibility of the places and their relative advantages under the strategic point of view, desires to receive his suggestions on the subject.

I have also the honor to inclose to you a copy of Special Orders, No. 18, from this department, relative to the organization of a force under the authority of the State of Texas, to be kept in readiness to meet any emergencies on the frontiers of Missouri and Arkansas. These orders have been communicated to nobody except the officers concerned in the organization. The governor believes that they ought to be kept secret {p.95} as long as possible to avoid giving too early information to the enemy. These troops have been organized in such a manner as to come within the provisions of the act of Congress of March 6, 1861, “For public defense,” except the brigadier-generals, who could not preserve their commissions under the authorities of the Confederate States.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

X. B. DEBRAY, Aide-de-camp and Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Reference is to requisition of June 30, 1861, upon the several governors, the call upon Texas being for 2,000 men. Sec Vol. I, Series IV, pp. 260, 261.

[Inclosure.]

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HDQRS. TEX. STATE TROOPS, A. G. O., Austin, Tex., July 25, 1861.

The governor of the State, taking into consideration the gloomy aspect of affairs in Missouri, the dangers threatening the State of Arkansas and the friendly Indian nations in the territory, being firmly convinced that the integrity of our own territory depends upon the success of Southern arms in Missouri, and apprehending that this success cannot be secured without the assistance of Texas, and in the absence of any legislative enactments making provisions for or even anticipating the actual emergencies, has taken upon himself the responsibility of calling into the active service of the State an adequate force to place Texas in a proper military attitude on her northern frontier: Therefore-

I. The regiment already raised by Col. W. C. Young, in the seventh and eighth military districts of the State, and stationed in the Indian Territory, is accepted into the service of the State. The sixth military district, composed of the counties of Kaufman, Van Zandt, Wood, Upshur, Harrison, Henderson, Smith, Rusk, and Panola, shall furnish one regiment of mounted troops, to be organized under the superintendence of Col. M. F. Locke, of Upshur, aide-de-camp to the governor. The seventh military district, composed of the counties of Lamar, Red River, Bowie, Hopkins, Titus, Cass, and Marion, shall furnish five companies of mounted troops, under the superintendence of Col. W. C. Batte, of Titus, aide-de-camp to the governor. The eighth military district, composed of the counties of Fannin, Hunt, Grayson, Collin, Dallas, Denton, Tarrant, and Cooke, shall furnish five companies of mounted troops, to be organized under the supervision of Col. W. C. Young, aide-de-camp to the governor. The ninth military district, composed of the counties of Ellis, Hill, Navarro, McLennan, Limestone, Freestone, Bell, Falls, Johnson, and Williamson, shall furnish one regiment of mounted troops, to be organized under the supervision of Col. W. H. Parsons, aide-de-camp to the governor.

II. The whole force thus organized shall constitute a division, to be known as the First Texas Division.

III. The division shall be divided into two brigades. The First Brigade, composed of the First Regiment (Colonel Young’s) and the Second Regiment, raised in the seventh and eighth military districts; the Second Brigade, composed of the Third Regiment, raised in the sixth military district, and the Fourth Regiment, raised in the ninth military district. The command of the division shall be intrusted by the governor to one of the brigadier-generals, elected as follows:*

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XIV. The troops of the division shall be governed in all points by the Regulations of the Army of the Confederate States, and by such orders {p.96} and instructions as they may from time to time receive from the adjutant-general of the State.

The governor, in making an appeal to the citizens of the State to take arms for the protection of our territory and liberties, assures them that every exertion shall be made to secure their comfort, so far as is compatible with the resources of the country. They may have to endure the hardships and privations incident to a campaign in a sparsely-settled country; they will meet them with the patriotic abnegation which has always inspired the Texan soldier. The credit of the State will be pledged for procuring supplies until the necessary appropriations are made. There is not at present one single dollar in the treasury to pay the troops; but the governor will press the subject upon the next legislature, and knows that our chivalric soldiers will bear cheerfully with the delay in remunerating them for their services. They are not hirelings; they rush to arms for the defense of their families, friends, and liberties.

By order of the governor:

WM. BYRD, Adjutant-General.

* Details of organization omitted.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A, Richmond, August 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. BEN. MCCULLOCH:

SIR: I am directed by the Secretary of War to invite your attention to the following suggestions contained in a letter written to the President by Chief Justice M. H. McWillie, La Mesilla, Ariz., and dated 30th of June, 1861, to wit:

Lincoln has recently ordered the organization in New Mexico of at least two full regiments of mounted volunteers, chiefly for service in Arizona and on the Texas frontier. One of the officers, as I am informed, is none other than the infamous Salazer, of the Santa Fe prisoners notoriety in 1839. These regiments, under the command of Fred. P. Stanton, of Kansas, are to be in readiness by the 1st of August. There will be about 2,000 United States regulars. As nearly as I can learn, it is intended to concentrate all the regular forces and one regiment of volunteers at Fort Fillmore, 15 miles from the Texas border, early in the same month. As soon as the volunteers are ready the two regiments United States infantry will leave this department for the States. Two regiments of rifles and dragoons will remain. The infantry, before leaving, will concentrate near Santa Fe, then take up the line of march by way of the Independence road to Fort Leavenworth. A convoy with $250,000 recently left the last-named post destined for this depot, to pay off the troops before they leave.

Now, might it not be well, secretly of course and at an early moment, to fit out an expedition to New Mexico, under command of General McCulloch, by way of the Canadian, before Lincoln’s troops are put in motion for the States? The stores, supplies, and munitions of war within New Mexico and Arizona are immense, and I am decidedly of opinion that the game is well worth the ammunition. This movement, if undertaken soon enough, would undoubtedly have the effect to overawe and intimidate the Mexican element, which comprises at least nineteen-twentieths of our entire population.

It is furthermore my impression it is intended to make a descent upon Fort Bliss, in Texas, less than 50 miles distant, garrisoned by 160 infantry, Captain Teel’s company artillery, and two companies Texas cavalry. The expedition, I suggest, would relieve Texas, open communication to the Pacific, and break the line of operations, which, with Lane and Montgomery in Kansas, Stanton in our Territory, Corwine in Mexico, the blockade of our ports and complete possession of our northern frontier is designed to circumvallate the South. One regiment of Cherokees or Choctaws, well mounted, would inspire more wholesome terror in the Mexican population than an army of Americans. Such an expedition would prove a strategic movement of importance to the South.

These interests are communicated for your information.

Respectfully,

A. T. BLEDSOE, Chief of Bureau of War.

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SAN ANTONIO, TEX., August 10, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have called upon the governor of Texas for ten companies of infantry, to be stationed at Galveston, for the defense of that island and city, and that I have appointed, subject to the approval of the President, the following field officers: Capt. J. C. Moore, C. S. Army, colonel; Mr. J. T. Ward, lieutenant-colonel; Maj. X. B. Debray, major. Colonel Moore is now in command of the defenses of Galveston and captain in the Army. Mr. J. T. Ward has been connected with the U. S. Army for six or eight years, and is well qualified for the position I have assigned him. Major Debray will hand you this letter, and you may judge for yourself of his qualifications. I hope you will be pleased to approve of these appointments, as well as of my calling upon the governor for the regiment. I am so isolated from the headquarters of the Army that I am compelled to act a little independent of the usual authorities, and to assume responsibilities not given me by the Regulations of the Army.

I expect in a day or two to receive a reply to my dispatch sent to you by Mr. Sweet, of this city. If I do not, I shall call upon the governor for ten more companies, to be stationed at Fort Brown. The troops now there will not muster into the service of the Confederate States for the war, and I will be compelled to replace them by others who will. It is advisable, without doubt, to have at least a regiment there. I respectfully recommend the following gentlemen to the command as field officers: Col. P. N. Luckett, now quartermaster-general of this State, appointed by the Convention, and a “West Pointer,” as colonel; for lieutenant-colonel, A. Buchel, of Indianola, formerly of the army in Mexico; served under General Davis at Buena Vista; as major, E. F. Gray, formerly of the Navy, of Houston. These gentlemen I shall appoint subject to your approval.

It will be gratifying to you to learn of the complete success of Colonel Baylor’s expedition against the U. S. troops in New Mexico; 700 prisoners of war were taken, with their arms, &c. I have not as yet received the official report, but have some of the facts from eye-witnesses of the surrender.

I hear from headquarters but seldom, and am inclined to believe that my letters are intercepted. The governor of the State has received important dispatches from you in regard to the raising of troops for the Confederate service. I have received nothing.

An interchange of several shots between our batteries and the blockading vessels took place at Galveston the other day. One man, a citizen, was killed by a shell from the South Carolina. The vessels were driven off.

Very respectfully, sir, I am, your obedient servant,

EARL VAN DORN, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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RICHMOND, August 14, 1861.

General P. O. HUBERT, New Orleans, La.:

You are appointed a brigadier-general in the Provisional Army, and assigned to the Department of Texas. Your attention is specially directed to the coast defenses of Texas. General Van Dorn has been ordered here for duty. You will proceed at once to Galveston, where {p.98} your orders will follow you, and communicate to General Van Dorn the order for him to report here for duty. The mails are so irregular that its transmission in that way would probably delay it.

L. P. WALKER.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 123.}

ADJT. AND INSP. GEN.’S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., August 14, 1861.

I. Commander W. W. Hunter, C. S. Navy, will proceed to Galveston and report to General Earl Van Dorn for duty as superintendent in charge of the works for the defense of the coast of Texas.

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XVII. Gen. Earl Van Dorn will turn over the command of the Department of Texas to the officer next in rank in the State, and will repair immediately to this city and report to the Adjutant-General.

XVIII. The command of the Department of Texas is assigned to Brig. Gen. Paul O. Hébert, Provisional Army. He will immediately repair to San Antonio, Tex., and assume the command.

...

By command of the Secretary of War:

JNO. WITHERS, Assistant Adjutant-General,

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RICHMOND, VA., August 28, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to report to you that I have been instructed by the governor of Texas, as his aide-de-camp, to proceed to this city for the purpose of conferring with your honor on subjects connected with the military standing and defense of Texas, and which are now respectfully laid before you:

The governor of Texas being convinced that the integrity of the soil of Texas greatly depends upon the success of the Southern cause in Missouri, and moved by an appeal to the people of Arkansas and Texas (published at the beginning of July by General Ben. McCulloch) ordered on the 25th ultimo the raising and concentration on Red River of 3,000 mounted men besides the regiment commanded by Col. W. C. Young, which has been occupying for several months Forts Arbuckle, Cobb, and Washita, under the authority of Texas, and at the request of the Chickasaw Indians. These troops were to have completed their organization into regiments on the 20th instant, the men supplying their own horses and arms, and taking service for twelve months, unless sooner discharged. The success of our arms in Missouri, the friendly feelings of the Territory Indians, except, however, the Cherokees, and also the approach of the winter season, seem to remove any plausible contingency of an immediate attack on the northern frontier of Texas, but it is probable that in fall or winter one or perhaps several simultaneous attacks will be attempted on our coast, which extends over several hundred miles, and is very sparsely inhabited, except the vicinity of Galveston Island. We must therefore prepare to meet any contingency in that quarter, and considering the vast extent of the territory of Texas, the slowness of mail communications, and the want of railroad transportation, these preparations cannot be made too soon.

To meet these exigencies the governor charged me to respectfully request that the force above referred to be accepted into the service of {p.99} the Confederate States. Texas cannot support them for a longer term than one month. Should the acceptance of their services be declined, it will become necessary to disband them.

The State of Texas raised in March last a force of five companies to take possession of and occupy Fort Brown and Ringgold Barracks, on the Rio Grande. The men who compose it enlisted for six months, and their period of service expires on the 9th of September. They refuse to re-enlist unless they are relieved for more active service from these stations, in which they have labored very hard to restore the old fort and to give a greater extension to its works. If some steps are not taken at once to garrison these two points, that frontier will be unprotected at a time when the probable complication of political affairs in Mexico and the presence of a blockading force render urgent the presence of an efficient force on the Rio Grande.

The governor received on the 29th of July a requisition from your honor, dated June 30, for 2,000 men, to be kept in camps of instruction on two accessible points. The governor communicated with General Van Dorn to ask his opinion as to the location of these camps. The general, having received no orders on the subject from your Department, could give no answer. The governor would wish to know whether these troops are to receive their subsistence from the Confederate States or the State, and whether the camps must be accessible to some particular point or points of defense or merely to subsistence and stores.

General Van Dorn made a requisition on the governor for ten companies of infantry to garrison Galveston Island. These troops are now raised. Their term of service is for the war, unless sooner discharged. They are now awaiting their organization into a regiment.

In compliance with a communication from your honor, delivered to the governor by an officer of General Sibley’s staff; the raising of his brigade was progressing when I left Texas, and its organization must have been completed by this time. The men are to serve for the war, and to supply their own horses and arms.

Sixteen companies are now on the march from Texas to Virginia. Their first column, composed of five companies, was at Niblett’s Bluff; La., on the 16th instant. Two other detachments were to follow at two days’ interval each. The twenty companies for which a requisition had been made from your Department were complete, but six of them were carried out of the State by Colonel Greer without the knowledge of the governor, who, so soon as he was apprised of the fact, took steps to supply the deficiency.

In conclusion, I would beg to state that the people of Texas are now fully impressed with the earnestness of the struggle brought upon us, and will answer with alacrity any call from the President of the Confederate States. The imperfection of the militia law of the State has been a source of difficulty for the executive. However, upon his suggestions the people are organizing, and about four hundred militia companies were reported to the adjutant-general’s office on the 9th instant, the organization still progressing.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

X. B. DEBRAY, Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Texas.

The governor of Texas tenders to the Confederate States the services of four mounted regiments, fully armed and equipped. One of these regiments has been for several months occupying Forts Cobb, Arbuckle, {p.100} and Washita, under the authority of the State of Texas and with the consent of the Chickasaw Indians. The term of service of these troops is one year, if not sooner discharged. They are now stationed on Red River and Trinity River, awaiting further orders.

X. B. DEBRAY, Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Texas.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, August 31, 1861.

Col. X. B. DEBRAY, Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of Texas:

SIR: Your report on the military standing and defense of Texas, made to this Department under instructions from the governor of that State, has been received and attentively considered. I acknowledge with profound pleasure the zeal of the people and the energies of the government of Texas in behalf of the general cause, and it gratifies me to give assurance to your authorities of the disposition and earnestness of this Department to co-operate with them to the fullest extent within the limits of its powers. Those troops which have been called into service under the requisition of this Department will be paid and subsisted by the Confederate Government. It is desired that they shall be placed in camps of instruction, to be designated by the governor of Texas. Drill officers will be assigned to them, if possible, when this Department comes to be informed that they have been mustered into service. When arms are procured they will be armed and receive marching orders. With regard also to the troops called out by General Van Dorn, they will be accepted by this Department, and be also paid and subsisted by this Government; but in reference to the troops called out on the mere motion of the governor of Texas, this Department must first be advised concerning the necessity for their services before they can be accepted, and as to this it awaits to hear from the commanding general in the Department of Texas. It will at once occur to you that the Government could not preserve its integrity and assume the responsibility of paying and subsisting the troops that each and every State of the Confederacy might choose to draw into the field. The general commanding in Texas has been instructed not to permit the public welfare to suffer in that State, either upon the borders or in the interior, and the Department has great confidence in his ability, sagacity, and patriotism. It is hoped this officer and the governor of Texas will freely communicate with each other, and that they co-operate in all measures best calculated to secure peace and safety at every point.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 17.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, Tex., September 4, 1861.

By orders from the War Department the undersigned has been relieved in command of the Department of Texas, and is directed to report at the headquarters of the Army, at Richmond. He takes leave of the troops and of the people of Texas with unfeigned regret. From them he has, as military commander, received at all times their most hearty {p.101} co-operation and assistance, and as a private citizen such uniform kindness and attention, that he would do injustice to himself did he not here, on the eve of his departure from among them, express both his thanks for their kindness and his regret that he has to leave them.

The command, until the arrival of General Hébert, is turned over to Col. Henry E. McCulloch, than whom there is not a more reliable soldier and pure gentleman in the Army of the Confederacy.

Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, to whom the command ultimately falls, was the most distinguished graduate of his class at West Point; afterwards an officer in the Engineer Corps (Corps de Genie); then the lieutenant-colonel of a regiment of infantry during the war between the United States and Mexico, and subsequently the governor of the State of Louisiana. He is an able general and a high-toned gentleman. The troops of Texas will find no cause to complain of the change of commanders.

The undersigned further returns his special thanks to the staff officers at these headquarters for their valuable assistance: Maj. Sackfield Maclin, chief quartermaster; Capt. T. A. Washington, assistant adjutant-general; Capt. J. F. Minter, assistant quartermaster and commissary; Surgeon Langworthy, and Lieutenant Haskell, ordnance officer. Their energy, skill, and devoted hard labor, in the discharge of their duties in their respective departments, relieved him from painful anxiety, and gave such harmony to the working of the affairs of the department, that there has been no confusion and no deficiency, except where material was wanting and where time and distance were incompatible.

The command of the Department of Texas is here given up by the undersigned to Col. Henry E. McCulloch, and “he bids you farewell.”

EARL VAN DORN, Brigadier-General, Provisional Army.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., September 7, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: Immediately upon the receipt of your communication of the 7th ultimo, upon the subject of providing clothing for our soldiers, the accompanying addresses were issued to the people of Texas. I have no fear that our people will fail to comply promptly with this call upon their patriotism. Indeed, they had in many places anticipated the views and wishes of Government, and gone to work in the holy cause. The greatest difficulty apprehended is the adoption of a plan of operations which will render our contributions speedily available. I trust the one proposed will prove so.

Allow me to suggest that a large amount of wool can be purchased in Texas for Confederate bonds or notes, which could be converted into cloth at our penitentiary, capable of turning out 1,000 yards per day, and rapidly made into clothing in sections of the country contiguous to the penitentiary. This would, of course, require an agent or agents to purchase the wool and to provide for its manufacture into the articles desired. It would also be expected that the State be saved from loss on account of the appropriation of the time and labor of the penitentiary to the above purpose, unless for the support and success of our cause it becomes necessary for her to perform this service gratuitously.

Any suggestions which you can make to improve or expedite the plan proposed to accomplish the object desired will be gladly received.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

{p.102}

[Inclosures.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., August 31, 1861.

To the People of Texas:

The war in which we are now engaged will in all probability be prolonged for many months to come, and our soldiers exposed to the rigors of a winter’s campaign, and it becomes the demand of patriotism and of duty that the people should supply them with those things which are essential to their comfort. This can be effected at but little inconvenience and trifling expense to the people, and it will result in very material aid to the Government. Accordingly I wish to advise the formation in every county of a committee or society, whose duty it shall be to solicit and receive from every family in the county a blanket or comfortable. The articles thus contributed will be of little or no inconvenience to the family contributing, yet, when aggregated together, they will afford an immense supply for our sick and wounded soldiers. The committee or society should box up the contributions it may receive, and have them transported to Houston, Marshall, Sherman, Dallas, Austin, or San Antonio, from which points they can be sent forth wherever they may be needed. It is particularly requested that all supplies of this character which can be sent to Houston be forwarded thither without delay, and from that point they can readily be conveyed to our army in Virginia. In those instances where it is impossible to send contributions to either of the points designated, they should be taken in charge by the local committee, and held subject to the order of the governor of Texas.

In addition to these voluntary contributions for the sick and wounded, our soldiers will require clothing; and I further suggest that all articles of heavy clothing which can be made in the different communities be at once put into shape. This clothing will be paid for in the bonds of the Confederate States, and thus its manufacture may become the means of giving occupation to many persons throughout the State who would otherwise be unemployed. Of course the committee or society should also take the management and control of this business into its hands.

I will presume to offer no further suggestions. It is believed that Southern aid societies will be formed in every community, and they will judge best of the immediate means to be employed in accomplishing the end proposed.

EDWARD CLARK.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Austin, Tex., September 4, 1861.

To the People of Texas:

The Secretary of War of the Confederate States has requested the State executive to have made up, at an early day, a large quantity of woolen clothing, to supply the wants of the Army, to be charged to the Confederate Government. The medical purveyor has also asked aid from the executive to a plan to procure blankets for the sick and wounded of the Army. He suggests, very wisely, that almost every family, with little or no inconvenience to itself, can contribute a blanket or comfortable to his Department.

Warmly approving these suggestions, the executive issued his address, of the 31st ultimo, inviting the formation in every county in the State of {p.103} a society or committee to solicit and receive heavy clothing, blankets, comfortables, and other articles, which will be needed by our Army during the coming winter. The military stores thus furnished will be paid for in the bonds of the Confederate States.

To effectuate this plan depots will be established at central points, under the superintendence of the following agents, viz: At Jefferson, W. P. Sauffley; at Henderson, J. H. Parsons; at Palestine, A. E. McLure; at Dallas, Dr. Samuel Pryor; at Sherman, W. E. Sanders; at Waco, J. W. Speight; at Austin, W. H. D. Carrington; at San Antonio, Vance & Bro.; at Victoria, William S. Glass; at Houston, E. W. Taylor; at Beaumont, John J. Herring.

They will receive and forward to the proper destination the contributions of the county associations and of the citizens generally, and, whenever necessary, may furnish transportation and incur other expenses growing properly out of the discharge of their duties, on the faith and credit of the Confederate States. The State itself will sustain that credit to the utmost limit of its resources. All valid accounts for military stores thus furnished, or otherwise contracted by each agent in the discharge of his duties, will be certified by him to this office, where the same will be examined, approved, and registered. The county societies will forward their contributions to the agents at the most convenient or accessible depots.

Each of the agents at Henderson, Palestine, Dallas, Sherman, Waco, Austin, San Antonio, and Victoria will forward his collections to the most accessible depot, either at Jefferson, Houston, or Beaumont, and directed to the agent at that point. General depots will be established at the latter points, from which the military stores thus accumulated will be transported or distributed, under the directions of the President of the Confederate States. The agents designated for these purposes will also receive contributions from the county associations, private individuals, or any other quarter.

The State executive has received assurances from the managers of the different railroad companies in Texas that “they will transport troops and military stores intended for the defense of the country free of charge.”

To give vigor, efficiency, and life to this plan, the great body of our citizens must lend to it their persevering and active labors. No appeal can be necessary to arouse them to early and efficient action to prevent a frequent recurrence among the brave youth whom we have sent from our mild climate to Virginia and Missouri of the horrors of Valley Forge. No time should be lost. Winter will soon be upon them.

WM. BYRD, Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, STATE OF TEXAS, Austin, Tex., September 9, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Prov. Army C. S., Comdg. Dep’t San Antonio, Tex.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 6th instant to the governor; also, in the same mail, one of the 5th instant, of Capt. D. C. Stith, C. S. Army, assistant adjutant-general, in reply to mine of the 29th ultimo, addressed to General Van Dorn*

{p.104}

The following is a recapitulation of the several requisitions made by General Van Dorn upon the governor for coast defense, viz: Ten companies of infantry for Fort Brown, or the Lower Rio Grande; ten companies of infantry for Galveston; two companies of artillery for Matagorda or San Luis; one company of artillery for Indianola; one company of artillery for Sabine Pass; three companies of artillery for Fort Brown (one of them a light battery): making in all seven companies of artillery. One company of cavalry for the coast between Sabine Pass and Bolivar Point; three companies of cavalry for Galveston Island; one company of cavalry for the coast between Matagorda and Indianola: making in all five companies of cavalry. In addition to the foregoing requisition, General Van Dorn called upon the governor for an armed regiment of infantry for the vicinity of Victoria. Under this latter requisition I have ordered four armed companies to San Antonio, to be mustered into the service of the Confederate States. In addition to these requisitions the President has called upon the governor for 2,000 men, to be stationed in two camps of instruction. I presume General Van Dorn intended his requisitions as exclusive and additional to this requisition of the President. We are bending all our energies to the work of filling these calls. It may perhaps be difficult to organize efficient artillery companies. They may, however, become so from subsequent instruction. The President, in his call, designed two camps of instruction. The governor authorizes me to say that he will, in accordance with your suggestion, designate Victoria as a point for one of the camps. It will, of course, have to be located by one of your officers. Companies will be ordered there immediately to be mustered into the Confederate service.

In his communication of the 22d ultimo, addressed to the governor, General Van Dorn stated that the troops for Galveston would report to Colonel Moore. Those for the small posts would go to their stations and report to the general, to be mustered into service. Those for Victoria and the Lower Rio Grande were to go to San Antonio. I quote very nearly his own language. It will be impracticable to send ten armed companies to San Antonio for Victoria under General Van Dorn’s requisition. Shall we send the whole ten, including armed and unarmed companies? It is likely the general designed ten companies, at all events, for Victoria.

I have ordered Captain Reuss, commanding an artillery company at Indianola, and who was recommended by Captain Buchel, to report to you under the requisition for an artillery company for Indianola. I suppose the general intended to station it at Sabine.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. BYRD, Adjutant-General.

* None of these found.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., September 14, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 19th ultimo, to the effect that the regiment of cavalry which went from Texas and joined Brigadier-General McCulloch at Fort Smith, about the 30th of July, “were denied arms by the authorities of Texas upon his (McCulloch’s) requisition therefor.”

In reply it will be sufficient to state the following facts:

1st. No requisition was made upon the authorities of Texas for arms for the above-mentioned regiment.

{p.105}

2d. Had such a requisition been made, it were entirely beyond the power of Texas to comply with its demands, from the fact that the State was, and continues to be, destitute of arms, those arms seized by Texas from United States troops having been transferred to the Government of the Confederate States on or about the 10th of April.

3d. The authorities of Texas did not receive a word of official information in reference to this regiment, either from the Secretary of War, General McCulloch, or from Colonel Greer, commanding the regiment. It was authorized, organized, and removed from the State independent of State authorities, and without their official knowledge.

The only thing approximating a requisition which has been received is a letter from General McCulloch, with the following reference to arms for the troops which he had been appointed to command:

“Two thousand of the arms at San Antonio are ordered to Dallas; also one battery of artillery.”

The communication containing this extract was dated April 14, at which time, as you are aware, the arms in Texas had been transferred to the agents of the Confederate States. Dallas is the point in this State where the regiment of Colonel Greer made its rendezvous. Hence the only conclusion was that the agents of the Confederate States had been ordered to send arms thither for the purpose of arming this regiment. The above quotation from General McCulloch’s letter is the only information in respect to this regiment from any one of the authorities interested which has ever reached this department.

From the foregoing facts you will perceive that no blame can attach to the authorities of Texas. They have faithfully endeavored, and will continue their efforts, to meet every requisition which has been or may hereafter be made upon them by the authorities of the Government of the Confederate States.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

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RICHMOND, VA., September 14, 1861.

J. F. MINTER, Assistant Quartermaster, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: I have received your letter of August 19 ultimo, reporting a reduction and probable scarcity in the quartermaster’s supplies in Texas. I have not been unmindful of such a contingency, but at the same time I have not been able to fall upon any plan of resupplying you. The country is nearly bare of every needful article. It only remains for you to do your best in the country and depend in a large measure upon your neighbor, Mexico. Blankets and socks and some sort of a substitute for shoes you can get, and you may have to make clothes of buckskins. It will be of no avail to make requisitions on New Orleans. If a supply of clothing, &c., comes in despite the blockade, I will remember your condition.

A. C. MYERS, Assistant Quartermaster-General.

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GALVESTON, TEX., September 16, 1861.

His Excellency EDWARD CLARK, Governor of Texas:

SIR: I have the honor to report to your excellency that I have, under orders from the War Department, assumed the command of the Military {p.106} Department of Texas. It will be both my duty and pleasure to co-operate with your excellency in all matters concerning the defenses and safety of the State. I am now on an examination of Galveston harbor, and will extend the examination to other points on the coast. I will, if agreeable to your excellency, avail myself of an early opportunity of a personal interview. In the mean time I would respectfully ask for authority to receive and muster into the service of the Confederate States, for duty in this department, such companies as may offer with the full complement of men, thus not to interfere with the requisitions already made by my predecessor in command, and to form part of such requisitions as I may in future have the honor to make.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your excellency’s obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

GALVESTON, TEX., September 18, 1861.

I. In virtue of Special Orders, No. 123, from General Headquarters, dated Richmond, August 14, 1861, Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, Provisional Army, assumes command of the Department of Texas.

II. The orders issued by Col. H. E. McCulloch, as commander of the department, are approved.

III. Col. H. E. McCulloch, First Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, is relieved from duty at San Antonio, and will join his regiment.

IV. Colonel McCulloch will order the removal of the prisoners of war from Camp Verde, and place them for safety in detachments at the different posts of his command.

V. Transportation will be furnished by the Quartermaster’s Department. The Commissary Department will issue subsistence in kind to the prisoners.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, commanding Military Department of Texas.

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., September 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT, Commanding Department of Texas:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 16th instant, which was handed me this morning. I will answer by the mail which goes to-day to Galveston and by the first mail to San Antonio. I am happy to know that you have arrived in Texas for the purpose of taking charge of her military defenses, and take pleasure in assuring to you my prompt and cheerful co-operation in every instance where it may be in my power to assist you in the accomplishment of your duties. It will gratify me very much to meet you in person as soon as your convenience will permit. Your request to be allowed to receive such full companies as may tender their services to you is willingly complied with. I would be pleased, however, when companies are received by you, that the adjutant-general at this place be informed of the fact. I may here mention that Captain Ballue, {p.107} of Brazoria County, is said to have a full company of infantry, and desires to get into service. It may be convenient for you to accept this company at once.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, Tex., September 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT:

SIR: By request of your aide, Lieutenant Wilson. I make the following report of troops, arms, &c., as I understand them to be, in this department:

General Van Dorn made requisitions on the governor for three regiments of infantry, one each for Galveston, Victoria, and Fort Brown; also for seven companies of artillery (one to be light), for Fort Brown, Saluria, San Luis, Galveston, and Sabine Pass; but I do not understand exactly how he intended to place them all. Also five companies of cavalry, one for Sabine Pass and the coast to Bolivar Point; three for Galveston, and one for the coast west of that place. I have directed the troops intended for Galveston and Sabine Pass to report to Colonel Moore, for muster and orders; those for Victoria to report at that place to Maj. A. M. Haskell, for the same purpose; those for Saluria, to Capt. D. D. Shea, for the same purpose. At Saluria there are, or soon will be, two companies of artillery. The troops for Fort Brown are to be mustered into service here. One company of artillery (Captain Marmion) has been mustered, and will be sent on in a few days. Captain Kampmann’s company of infantry was mustered in yesterday (19th), and will be sent in a few days to Camp Verde, and Captain Buquor’s company, now at that place, sent to Fort Brown. The governor has selected Victoria and Millican as the points for the two camps of instruction for the twenty companies of the reserve army. Major Haskell has been ordered to Victoria to establish that depot, muster in and supply the troops, and command them. Lieutenant Dinkins has been ordered there to assist him. He wants Lieut. J. Sparks (now at Houston on duty) also, but I do not see how I can let him have him, as there is no other officer that I know of that I can send to muster in the troops at Millican. There is no quartermaster or commissary that can be sent to Millican at present to establish that depot and supply the troops; but Major Maclin, chief quartermaster, &c., Department of Texas, will send an agent there for that purpose. I have designated no officer to command that camp. I know of no one at all suitable, but shall instruct Lieutenant Sparks to put them to drilling, under their captains, until a commander be sent them. Colonel Forshey is in command at San Luis, at the mouth of the Brazos, but I do not know what troops or arms he has there. Several companies are now waiting at Victoria to be mustered in, so I learn. I have directed that one of the cavalry companies be mustered in at that place. General Sibley’s brigade is filling up rather slowly; twelve or thirteen companies are here and mustered in; others are expected daily. He talks of taking three regiments with him from this point, under instructions from the adjutant-general and an agreement between him and General Van Dorn. To aid him, this department will be entirely stripped of every tent, all the clothing of every kind, and nearly all other quartermasters’ stores. His transportation will have to be done by contract, or there would be none left in the department. Col. John S. Ford is at Fort Brown, where he has three or four companies of his own regiment (Second Texas Mounted Rifles), and {p.108} the other six companies are under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor, and scattered from Fort Clark to Fort Bliss, and probably much farther up into Arizona and New Mexico. I regret to say that there is considerable confusion throughout this regiment, and there is nothing in the office here by which I can learn or know where all the companies are or know what they are doing; but I have directed Colonel Ford and Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor to inform me of their localities as early as possible. One company of regular cavalry, under Lieutenant Ingraham, C. S. Army, is at Fort Inge. My own regiment (First Texas Mounted Rifles) is stationed on the north and northwestern frontiers, from Fort McKavett to Red River; but the camp of three companies on Red River will be broken up and the troops removed in a short time to Fort Belknap, as General Pike desires them to be withdrawn from their present proximity to the Indian Territory, and they cannot very well winter where they are. Col. R. R. Garland, late of the Seventh U. S. Infantry, has been sent to Northern Texas (Dallas), to muster into the service the regiments of Colonels Stone and Johnson. Colonel Stone’s regiment has been, I have no doubt, mustered by this time, and will be gone in a few days to join the troops in Western Missouri. I have heard nothing of Colonel Johnson’s movements, and cannot tell what his prospects are for getting off. Colonel Gregg, of the same section, has called on me for arms, &c. (by order of the Secretary of War), for his regiment, and, as they are not on hand, I of course could not comply with the order. Captain Mechling’s company of light artillery has been ordered to Galveston, and is only waiting the completion of his caissons, which will be ready in two or three weeks. There is not more than enough (if enough) small-arms in the depot here to arm one regiment. There are some arms at Harrisburg, left there by Lieutenant Haskell, and there are some small-arms at Fort Brown; but I am unable to give you a correct idea of the quantity or quality at either place. The companies coming into service at Victoria and Fort Brown are poorly armed at best, and some of them have none at all; and if you do not need them at Harrisburg or Galveston, they had better be sent to this place or Victoria at once. Lieut. James Baltzell, C. S. Army, has been directed to remain here and muster such troops as may be reported here into service for Fort Brown. The prisoners of war, except the officers, numbering about 325, are at Camp Verde. The officers throughout the Department are remarkably slow in making their reports (my own regiment among them), when they make them at all, and, until this is remedied, no commanding officer can do justice to the troops or the service in this department.

I had hoped to see you here before this time, and regret to learn that you will not be here for some days yet; but, if it is your desire that I remain here and attend to the vast amount of business coming in here every day, I will do so until it will suit you to relieve me. But since the position is a perplexing one to me, it would gratify me much to be relieved as soon as convenient to you.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. E. MCCULLOCH, Colonel, Commanding Department.

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GALVESTON, TEX., September 20, 1861.

His Excellency EDWARD CLARK, Governor of Texas:

SIR: I have the honor to apply to your excellency for authority to muster into the service of the Confederate States, to serve during the {p.109} war, such volunteer forces from the State of Texas as may be deemed necessary for its defense.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General, Commanding Department of Texas.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Austin, Tex., September 22, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Prov. Army C. S., Comdg. Dep’t of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

COLONEL: In my communication to you of the 15th instant I stated that all the State arms at the disposal of the executive are tendered to you or to your successor, to be used in arming the forces designed for the protection of Texas. I referred specially to requisitions made for that purpose by the officer commanding this military department. Texas has been, to a great extent, drained of the private arms of citizens by the independent regiments which have been armed and equipped in the State. The executive therefore turns over the State arms to your department in the confidence that they will be used solely in arming the forces designed for the protection of Texas.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. BYRD, Ordnance Officer State of Texas.

* Details omitted.

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FORT BLISS, TEX., September 24, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to report that Mr. Barnes, the agent sent by me to transport the prisoners to New Mexico, has returned, and brings what I consider reliable information.

The order for moving the United States troops out of New Mexico has been countermanded, and the colonel commanding that department is raising two additional regiments of volunteers, two being already raised. Fort Union is abandoned, and the enemy have taken up a position 2 miles from the fort, which they are fortifying. They have there twenty-five pieces of artillery of various sizes. There are at this time at Union seven companies of regulars and three of volunteers; at Santa Fe, four companies; Albuquerque, four, and at Craig, five.

Barnes conversed freely with Judge Beard and many other prominent Americans, all of whom (Governor Connelly excepted) are for the South. There us some division among the natives, who are resisting the levy of their men as soldiers.

I shall watch closely their movements, and act as circumstances may direct. I would again urge the necessity of forwarding with haste re-enforcements. The Indians are exceedingly troublesome, and the Sonora Mexicans are threatening to rob Tucson, and have robbed Tubac. As I have before stated, I cannot, with the limited force under my command, keep the enemy in check and afford any protection to the citizens. My opinion is that troops are on the way from California to this Territory; but I shall do all in my power to hold the country against all odds. I will make no move against the enemy until the arrival of General Sibley. New Mexico can now be easily taken.

{p.110}

I shall send an agent to treat with the Pima and other friendly Indians in Western Arizona, as I deem it important to secure their aid and good-will.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Texas Mounted Rifles.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., September 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT:

SIR: This will be handed you by my private secretary, Mr. L. R. Evans, whom I take pleasure in introducing to you. Mr. Evans is dispatched to you upon business of importance, and which he will fully explain in all particulars not mentioned in this communication.

I am pleased to find, by a communication of date August 31, from the Secretary of War to Major Debray, that you are clothed with full power to protect the military interests and welfare of the State of Texas.

There are now organized in Northern and Northeastern Texas four regiments of mounted men. These troops were called out by me at a time when danger threatened in the direction of Missouri, and with the view of meeting that danger in advance of the limits of the State. They were ordered out for twelve months, unless sooner discharged. They are fine troops, splendidly mounted, and, I am informed, very well armed. These men should be received into service by the Confederate Government. They volunteered readily. They have mounted and equipped themselves at great expense, and are anxious for service. It is not a greater cavalry force than may be needed in Texas. Whether or not, let them not be disbanded. If they should be, it may be difficult to meet future requisitions. If you should accept these regiments, as Major Debray says you have consented to do, you will. I presume, send a mustering officer immediately to them to muster them into service, and he should be instructed to take Austin in his route.

I regret that I cannot meet you in personal interview, and you will receive this letter in the way of suggestion, prompted by aim earnest desire to promote the cause in which we are engaged, for which you may at all times rely upon my most hearty co-operation.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Austin, Tex., September 25, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT:

SIR: I have the pleasure of acknowledging the visit of the Hon. Mr. Bryan, and of receiving at his hands your communication of the 20th instant.

The substance of your letter is a repetition of the request contained in your communication of the 16th instant, in reply to which I fully accorded the authority desired, asking only that when companies were accepted we might be advised of it.

I believe I have anticipated your views and wishes, as made known to me by Mr. Bryan, in almost every instance, and to the extent of my power. It will be my pleasure and aim to do so in the future.

{p.111}

By a special messenger, dispatched to you yesterday, you will learn that I have some 4,000 troops now ready for service, and offered for your acceptance. These men, for the term of their enlistment, are willing to go where ordered. They are mounted troops. Will not some two or three regiments of mounted men be needed on our coast? They are as fine troops and as well mounted and armed as any that can be procured in the State. I earnestly desire that you receive them. If, however, you esteem it essential to raise a regiment in the vicinity of the coast for service near Brazoria (as Mr. Bryan tells me has been proposed), you have my consent. As I have heretofore said, you may rely upon my ready co-operation in anything necessary for the defense of Texas or the Confederacy.

If it be possible, I would be pleased, indeed, to see you at Austin. If my presence was not at all times required here, I would not impose upon you the necessity of a visit to this city.

You will please excuse my brevity and seeming familiarity, as I am much pressed with business, and without my private secretary.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c.,

EDWARD CLARK.

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RICHMOND, September 25, 1861.

General H. H. SIBLEY, San Antonio, Tex.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War, in reply to yours upon the subject of additional regiments, authorizes your acceptance of the tender of all armed regiments made to you by the governor of Texas.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDERS, No. 8.}

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., September 26, 1861.

You are appointed colonel of the Fourth Regiment of Texas Volunteers, subject to the approval of the President. You will signify your acceptance to these headquarters. The regiment is to be stationed on or near the coast, from San Luis to the Caney, but must serve at any point in the State, if required. It is to be composed of two companies, to serve as artillerists; two mounted companies, to serve as scouts and vedettes, and six of infantry. It is desirable that the companies should present themselves for muster with such arms and ammunition as the men possess or can procure in their respective counties, these arms to do until the department is enabled to supply the deficiency.

Musket and cannon powder, in a limited quantity, can be sent to Columbia, or to some other convenient point, subject to your order. The two 6-pounders at Columbia should be finished and mounted as soon as possible, and I would suggest that they be placed in charge of Capt. W. G. Mosely. Captain Mosely was formerly in the service, and informs me that he has a company partially drilled, and will be ready in a few days to be mustered into service.

The department has no funds at its disposal, and but limited supplies of any description. You must make the best arrangements you can to supply your command with provisions and quarters. The Confederate {p.112} Government will no doubt pay all reasonable obligations incurred for the service and protection of the State.

You will take immediate steps to fill your regiment according to the above conditions, and are hereby authorized to appoint a competent mustering officer. Companies must be mustered for the war. You are requested to recommend suitable persons for the positions of lieutenant-colonel and major. You will make your reports in duplicate, addressing them to Galveston and San Antonio.

Maj. C. G. Forshey is assigned to engineer duty on the coast with your command. The object of your command is to afford such protection as can be given to that portion of the coast. You will therefore use your own judgment, as events may occur, in stationing your companies.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

GEO. R. WILSON, Aide-de-Camp.

Col. J. BATES, Brazoria, Tex.

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MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, September 27, 1861.

The Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that since my arrival in this department I have, in compliance with orders, directed my attention to the Gulf coast of Texas. I regret to say that I find this coast in almost a defenseless state, and in the almost total want of proper works and armaments; the task of defending successfully any point against an attack of any magnitude amounts to a military impossibility. The port of Galveston is partially defended by a few open sand works, mounted with guns of calibers ranging from 18-pounders to 32-pounders, and of course totally inadequate to resist a bombardment with heavy guns. The few large guns now on the way, should they not arrive too late, will in some measure increase the efficiency of the harbor defenses. On a coast like this, however, where in calm weather a landing can be effected at any point, and the bays in the rear and flank of Galveston Island reached in that manner or by the pass at the west end, the problem of defense, considering the means available to that effect, is certainly one of very difficult, if not impossible, solution.

I am sorry to add that I also found this department entirely destitute of funds, either of State or General Government, and that, in consequence, all my efforts have thus far been completely paralyzed. I am mu hopes that funds or credit will soon be in the hands of the proper disbursing officers. As matters now stand it is a difficult matter, to purchase supplies on credit for the support of the few volunteer troops now in service. I meet with the best disposition to aid in any manner both from the people and authorities of the State, but the people are poor, and the State without money or apparent credit. Men are ready to volunteer for defense in companies and regiments; but arms, ammunition, provisions, and equipments are wanting.

Not to make too long the list of wants and difficulties, of which the Department at headquarters is probably already but too well aware, I have, in conclusion, the honor to assure the honorable Secretary of War that, although the difficulties surrounding my command now seem almost insurmountable, I will do all in my power to overcome them. In view of the distance of this department from General Headquarters, the {p.113} tardiness and uncertainty of mail communication, and the necessity often of prompt action, I may occasionally assume and exercise authority not delegated to me or in strict compliance with the regulations. In all such cases, however, the action shall be subject to the approval of the President.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General P. A., Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

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ORDERS, No. 19.}

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., October 2, 1861.

Col. John C. Moore, First Regiment of Texas Volunteers, C. S. Army, is assigned to the immediate command of Galveston Island and its defenses, Virginia Point, and of the troops stationed on Bolivar Point and Peninsula.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

GEO. R. WILSON, Aide-de-Camp.

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ORDERS, No. 20.}

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., October 2, 1861.

Galveston Island, Virginia Point, adjacent bay coast, and the peninsula of Bolivar shall constitute one command, and be styled the Military District of Galveston, Department of Texas.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

GEO. R. WILSON, Aide-de-Camp.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., October 3, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge, through this morning’s mail, a copy of your letter of the 30th ultimo,* handed my private secretary in Galveston.

I shall transmit immediately to Colonels Young and Parsons orders based upon your acceptance of their regiments. I would have been pleased to be able to state to them the service in which you will engage them, as I know it is a subject upon which they are much interested. I presume, however, that you design employing them in the State.

I regret exceedingly that you could not receive the other two regiments, now ready for service in Northeastern Texas. They are organized and anxiously desire service. They are mounted troops, and yet I think might be willing to take service as infantry in preference to being disbanded. Regretting to disappoint them, and fearing the result of a disappointment upon any future necessity that may come upon us for volunteers, I regret very much indeed to have to discharge them. If you think you will need more infantry, I believe these men would enter that arm of the service, and better soldiers, I know, cannot be obtained in the State. {p.114}

I regret to hear that you have been so embarrassed by the condition in which you found this military department. I supposed the coast had been as well prepared for defense as the ability of the Confederate and State Governments would permit. Since the 1st of June last, or thereabouts, the coast defense, and especially that of Galveston, has been confided to the Confederate authorities. I sincerely trust that you may in season make preparation for the reception of our enemy, should he conclude to make us a visit upon our coast. With a view to this end I have authorized the making of cannon at Galveston, and have agreed to purchase some already made at Lavaca, if suitable and worthy. I have also recently tendered to Colonel McCulloch such State arms as we have, and have already sent him 170 Colt’s improved revolving pistols, and have, subject to your order and acceptance, a few muskets and four 12-pounder howitzers, with carriages, but without caissons. These might be made available perhaps upon the coast. In offering these arms I impose the restriction of their being retained in the State for the defense of the State.

The regiments of Colonels Young and Parsons are clamorous for service, and fret under their confinement in camp; and I would therefore respectfully suggest that they be mustered into service and given active employment at the earliest possible moment.

Assuring you of my hearty co-operation in all things necessary for the speedy accomplishment of your wishes, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, Tex., October 4, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: I have been very much disappointed that no mail brings me any direct tidings of you. I had supposed you would write to me if delayed long on the coast, and inform me what you desired me to do; but, hearing nothing from you, I must still be guided by my own judgment and do the best I can for the country.

I have ordered Lieutenant Sparks to Millican, to provide for and establish a camp of instruction there for ten companies of the reserve army and to muster them into the service, and I suppose he has gone to that point before this time. If he has not, the troops may suffer or disband for want of proper attention.

In my first letter to you I overlooked the fact that General Van Dorn had called for two companies of artillery for Corpus Christi, and had ordered two 24-pounder guns from Fort Brown to that point. I have received notice that two companies (infantry) are ready to be mustered into service at that point. I have ordered Captain Littleton, Second Regiment Texas Mounted Riflemen, to muster them in, and direct them to report to these headquarters, and remain at Corpus Christi until further orders. I rather incline to the opinion that these were intended for the artillery companies. If so, they can be put on that duty. Captain Parker, of Brownsville, reports a company of infantry ready for muster at that point, which I have ordered to be mustered in at once. Captain Brewin’s company of cavalry has been mustered into service by Colonel Ford for the war, under no particular call, and ordered to Ringgold Barracks; and, as there seems to be great probability that the troops will be needed along the Rio Grande and about its mouth, I approved the muster and directed them to be supplied.

{p.115}

I have given directions to have five months’ supplies sent up to the troops on the line from this place to Fort Bliss; five months’ supplies to those on the Lower Rio Grande, and three months’ supplies sent to my own regiment on the northern frontier of the State, and supplies are now being sent forward for General Sibley’s brigade, expecting it to move soon. We will not be able to supply him full rations of coffee or sugar, but will give him all we can possibly spare, putting his troops at the least on an equal footing with those of the department. He has seventeen companies mustered into service and expects others daily, and I hope will soon be full and on his march. I have made an appeal to the people of the State to turn out and fill up the regiments called for by General Van Dorn and the Secretary of War, hoping by that to show them that their services are needed now, if at all, and to get them to act at once.

Commissions for the Second and Third Regiments of Infantry have reached here, and I forwarded them at once to the persons for whom they were intended. I have no doubt that those appointed for the Fourth, or Victoria, Regiment by General Van Dorn will also be approved, and hence shall direct the officers appointed to go on duty at Victoria.

I have arrested a gentleman of distinction (Col. Charles Anderson, brother of Anderson, of Sumter), who had sold out all his property, and was going, he said, to Kentucky, via Mexico and New York, considering him as an alien enemy, and held as a prisoner of war, subject to the action of the Confederate States courts (if he sees proper to take it before them) or the order of the Secretary of War. He is a very intelligent man, and has been the leader of the opposition here, and was leaving the Confederate States, to connect himself with our enemies, after the expiration of the forty days given by the President in his proclamation, and I felt that I would not have been doing my duty to my country to have let him depart; consequently I interposed military power to prevent it, of which I shall inform the President as early as possible.

No important orders or communications have been received at this office from the Department at Richmond since your arrival in the State.

If you can possibly do without the small-arms sent from this place to Lieutenant Haskell at Harrisburg (a portion of them I suppose are still there), it might be well to send them to this place or Victoria, the latter probably being the proper place for them now.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. E. MCCULLOCH, Colonel, C. S. Prov. Army, Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

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GALVESTON, October 7, 1861.

To the Men of Texas:

TEXANS: It is more than probable that your State will soon be invaded by the sea-coast. The enemy’s resources for such an attack would seem to be formidable. Yours to meet and defeat it lie almost entirely in your own strong arms, brave hearts, and trusty rifles.

Our infant Government has achieved wonders; but yet it must largely rely upon the States that created it and which have so gallantly sustained it to strain every nerve for their own individual protection. Look not to Richmond, then, for all your military inspiration and guidance. Remember the days of yore, when your own red right hands achieved your independence; and while some of your hardy sons are {p.116} prepared to share the glory to be won in Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri, and others to guard the highway to the Pacific which they have won against superior arms and numbers, be it your portion of the duty which you owe to them and yourselves to keep your soil free from the enemy’s touch and to preserve unsullied the fame of the Texas ranger. Let every man, then, clean his old musket, shot-gun, or rifle, run his bullets, fill his powder-horn, sharpen his knife, and see that his revolver is ready to his hand, as in the trying but glorious days when Mexico was your foe.

Organize at once into companies, if possible into battalions, and report to me promptly at Galveston and San Antonio your locality, your number, your arms, ammunition, and equipments, and your distance by day’s travel, by railroad or otherwise, from the principal points on the coast.

Be ready to march at a moment’s notice, and wait for orders. Rely upon it that I shall not fail to call you when needed; and when I call, I know that you will come. I am too near to San Jacinto’s field to doubt for a moment that even against overwhelming numbers you will gladly rally to the defense of your homes, your families, and your liberties.

Our enemy may succeed, from his superior armaments, in ravaging your sea coast; but, God willing and you aiding, he will never hold a foot of your soil-never!

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General, Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, Tex., October 11, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT:

SIR: I ask you in advance to excuse me for seeming to interfere with you in your arrangements for the defense of the coast, which is under your immediate observation; but, hearing that you had not yet visited Pass Cavallo, and supposing that you have not been able to learn as much of the condition of things at that point as might be necessary to enable you to give such directions as would be advisable, hence I requested Lieutenant-Colonel Buchel, when here a few days since, to submit a written report concerning the defenses of that post, which I herewith inclose for your consideration, with the remark that it seems to me that it may be very necessary for you to send some competent officer to that point to examine the condition of the fortifications, arms, troops, &c., and put them in a proper condition for defense. I am not acquainted with Captain Shea (the officer in command there), and do not know whether he is sufficiently conversant with all the important duties of his position to enable him to do full justice to the service intrusted to him. The order to Captain Shea to desist from the further prosecution of the work alluded to by Colonel Buchel must have been given by General Van Dorn; but no record of it is on file in this office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. E. MCCULLOCH, Colonel First Reg’t Texas Mounted Rifles, Comdg., &c.

[Inclosure.]

SAN ANTONIO, TEX., October 10, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, San Antonio, Tex.:

COLONEL: In consequence of your request to furnish you with some information relative to the present condition of the defenses at Pass {p.117} Cavallo, I have the honor to state that Captain Shea’s battery of four 24-pounder guns is very much exposed, and is at present almost in a defenseless condition from any combined attack by land and sea or from any considerable force by land alone. The intention of Captain Shea was to erect a closed work (redoubt), but after commencing the work he was ordered from headquarters to desist from the further prosecution of the same until some officer detailed for the purpose should inspect the Pass and report upon the location and plan of the work. This officer has not yet arrived there. Captain Shea’s battery is at present situated near the light-house on Matagorda Island, and can only defend the principal entrance or ship channel into Matagorda Bay. The nearest point from which re-enforcements could be expected in case of an attack would be Indianola, distant about 15 miles from the Pass, and between these two points two large bayous exist, over which no sufficient means for crossing are provided. The East Pass or channel has no defenses whatever. From these facts you can perceive, colonel, the urgent necessity that exists for the placing of these points in a proper state of defense, or that the troops and guns already there be withdrawn from so exposed a position.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BUCHEL, Lieutenant-Colonel Third Regiment Texas Infantry.

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ORDERS, No. 34.}

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., October 11, 1861.

I. Batteries shall be established at Virginia Point and at the Galveston head of the Railroad Bridge. Capt. J. Kellersberg is charged with the construction of the works, as directed by the general commanding, and Major Cook with the armaments.

II. All necessary preparatory measures shall be taken for the mounting of the large guns expected as soon after their arrival as practicable, and arrangements made for the transportation of guns, material, &c., to the batteries.

III. The number of heavy guns being limited in number, it will be necessary to distribute them to the best advantage. The first two heavy guns received will be placed at Pelican Spit, commanding the channel, with a battery of 32-pounders commanding the channel, Bolivar Point, and East Bay. When replaced by other guns, the 18-pounder at the Spit will be put in battery at the Galveston head of the bridge. Two of the heavy guns will be placed in battery at Fort Point, and two on the beach near the front of Fremont street.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

GEO. R. WILSON, Aide-de-Camp.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., October 12, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, Galveston, Tex.:

DEAR SIR: I did not hear from you to-day, as I hoped I should. You are doubtless too busily employed to write. I was anxious to hear at what time you would probably dispatch an officer to Northern Texas to muster the regiments of Colonels Parsons and Young.

{p.118}

I wrote to you by the last mail, informing you of the acceptance of the four cavalry regiments offered you by the Secretary of War, and desiring to know whether you still wished the two you had accepted. On the same day I dispatched a messenger, with the intelligence of their acceptance by the Secretary of War, to these regiments, and that I had communicated with you and him. This leaves them in doubt as to the ultimate result of their present condition, and for this reason I would be pleased to hear as early as your convenience will permit.

I see that you are energetically at work for the defense of our coast. I am pleased to be able to say that several brigades of militia are ready for service, if needed, and will be placed at your command if you need them.

I am gratified at the news from the seat of war. I sincerely trust it may prove true.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD CLARK.

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GOLIAD, TEX., October 12, 1861.

To the Hon. SECRETARY. OF WAR, Richmond:

SIR: Having been at Brownsville, on the Rio Grande, for several weeks, on a mission of importance for the State of Texas, I take the liberty of inclosing a memorandum of my observations while there, with the hope that it may serve in attracting the attention of the Government to the importance of that point. As the only brother of the rate General B. E. Bee, my name will not be unknown to you, and I can with pleasure refer you to Colonel Wigfall, Colonel Waul, and Judge Hemphill as to the great interest I have at stake, both politically and personally, in the success of our cause.

With great respect,

HAMILTON P. BEE.

[Inclosure.]

Brownsville is 30 miles from the Gulf-Brazos Island is its port; depth of water 6 feet. The mouth of the Rio Grande has still less water on its bar.

Fort Brown was built by General Taylor for attack on Matamoras, and is of but little use for defense of Brownsville, as an enemy could without difficulty take possession of it without coming under fire from the fort, whose guns could destroy it in an hour. The fort has been repaired by Colonel Ford and is unfinished, but could in a short time be made as strong as earthworks generally are. There are twenty-five pieces of cannon of different caliber there, including a light battery, complete, with its caissons loaded, harness in good order, and ready for service in thirty minutes. The battery horses are poor and unserviceable, but in improving condition. About 300 rounds of ammunition for each piece, of the best description, and a good supply of powder and ball cartridges constitute the supply of ammunition. Lead can be bought in any quantity at 4 1/2 cents per pound. There is one 10-inch mortar, and no piece larger than a 24-pounder. There are now at Fort Brown four companies of cavalry (Texans), say 400 men in all.

Brownsville is the depot of the Mexican trade. In 1860 $12,000,000 in specie passed through the custom-house en route for the United States. The imports of goods, principally dry goods, is proportionately heavy. All that trade is now suspended. No direct shipments have arrived at Matamoras from foreign ports. Two vessels arrived there from New York while I was on the Rio Grande, both loaded with provisions and {p.119} necessary supplies. One of them was wrecked. The foreign merchants at Matamoras are English and German, and are friendly to our cause. No arrangements for direct importation have been made, owing to the unsettled state of opinion concerning the raising of the blockade. If it should not be raised, direct importation will follow.

The Mexicans are neutral. The officers, civil and military, profess and exhibit every desire to co-operate with us in maintaining peace and good order on the line, and have aided essentially in stopping the forays of Cortinas into Texas. The Mexican population on this side of the Rio Grande are quiet, but not to be relied on in case of invasion.

It is known that Lieutenant Langdon (artillery) and two cavalry officers, who were previously on this line and familiar with the country, are now at Fort Pickens. Two cavalry companies are said to be on Santa Rosa Island. They have all the information, and we may suppose the desire, to repossess themselves of that point.

The following reasons occur to my mind why the enemy will seek to reoccupy Fort Brown: The hope of recapturing the cannon and material of war; the opening of the Mexican trade to New York, which will throw millions of dollars into the industry of the North. The fact, beyond a question, that the reoccupation of that point will convert the neutrality of the Mexicans into hostility, then hatred and bitterness, is against us, not against the North. By virtue of commissions from the Lincoln authorities two or three thousand Mexican mounted guerrillas would be mustered into the service of the United States, to depredate and destroy the settlements even to the San Antonio River, thus destroying the stock interest of Western Texas.

My conclusions are that it is of the utmost importance to the Confederacy that Brownsville and the line of the Rio Grande should be held by them. Shut up and encompassed around as we are, it is the only point through which we can communicate with the nations of Europe. By proper encouragement every necessary supply, either for our Government or people, can be brought to Matamoras from abroad, and we have no other outlet so long as the supremacy of the seas is against us. It will keep quiet and neutral a large and in some respects an efficient force of a race embittered against us by real or imaginary wrongs dating back twenty years. By means of the steamboats now at Brownsville the enemy could transport a force to Ringgold Barracks, and thence, by forced marches over a good road, be at San Antonio in twelve days-leaving no enemy in their rear, but; on the contrary, a willing and useful ally, to keep up their line of communication. It is the most feasible way to invade Texas. Brownsville should be defended or given up at once, and the cannon withdrawn while yet there is time. It will be too late when the enemy lands. A few men thousand men-cannot defend it; they will only be caught in a trap; there will be no way of retreat. The gloomy desert of sand between the Rio Grande and Nueces will lose us the cannon. The enemy will hardly land with less than 10,000 men. The material of war there is worth its weight in gold to our cause. It will be lost within two months unless a strong force is sent there for its protection. An officer who speaks the Mexican language and understands the people should be appointed to the command. If he is wise and watchful, he will keep the peace with Mexico and make her people useful friends. Supplies of all sorts for the troops can be got in Brownsville except bacon or pork.

HAMILTON P. BEE.

P. S.-I omitted to say that the above points were submitted to General Van Dorn some months since in a more detailed form by Col. J. S. Ford, commanding at Fort Brown.

{p.120}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, October 13, 1861.

Gov. EDWARD CLARK Austin, Tex.:

SIR: The very great pressure on my time and the absorption of all my energies in the attempt suddenly to direct the operations of this Department on the resignation of General Walker will furnish an apology that I trust you find satisfactory for my delay in replying to your two favors of 7th and 14th ultimo. I appreciate to the fullest extent the zealous and hearty co-operation of yourself and your generous fellow-citizens in the effort fully to supply clothing for our troops in the field.

After maturely considering the various modes suggested, it occurs to me that the simplest and best plan is for the State of Texas to clothe her own troops, under rules and regulations to be executed by her own officers, and to receive the commutation of $25 for every six months’ clothing furnished to each man, according to the act of Congress of 30th August last, and which cannot have reached you at the date of your letters. I have prepared regulations on this subject, now in press, and in a day or two, when I get them from the printers, will furnish you a copy. If your State will, under these regulations, furnish her own troops, in whole or in part, it will greatly relieve our labors, that are now taxing with the utmost severity all our energies.

Please inform me as soon as you get my printed circular whether you will do this. If not, could you not have the wool manufactured at your penitentiary and sell it to us at a fair value, which we will cheerfully pay? State agency in all these matters is much more effective than our own, and I desire, as far as I possibly can, to avoid the multiplication of Confederate officers and agencies.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS, Doña Aña, Ariz., October 14, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH:

SIR: Please find inclosed a copy of a letter received at my headquarters to-day. It embraces a correct account of the present critical condition of the citizens and miners in that region of the Territory which includes the locality of the Pinos Altos and other important mines of Arizona. The most important and available to the Confederacy are under the sway of Indians. I am at present unable to render the necessary assistance, although I have ordered Maj. E. Waller to proceed thither and render what aid he could with a detachment of 100 men. He left for the Pinos Altos mines on the 10th instant.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieut. Col. Comdg. Second Reg’t T. M. R., P. C. S. Army.

[Inclosure.]

PINOS ALTOS, October 8, 1861.

To the COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF Of the Confederate Troops in Arizona Territory:

DEAR SIR: A few days since the majority of the citizens of this place addressed you a petition. However, many of those that gave {p.121} their signature promising to remain here, in order to keep up the place, deserted us cowardly by a train that left yesterday for Mesilla.

The undersigned having been elected captain of the Minute Company organized amongst our citizens to defend our diggings against the Indians (conjointly with the Arizona Guards, stationed here) yesterday held a meeting, and found that about 70 miners remained here, only half of which are armed. We are determined to defend this place to the last, and could easily do so if we could stay in one body; but the diggings are such that only a few men can work at one place, and as the miners now left occupy merely a narrow space of ground, but running about 1 mile up Bear Creek, the other gulches having been abandoned for the want of a sufficient number of miners, therefore the Indians are liable to attack the dispersed miners at any time, and, until we can rally our small number of armed men to meet the enemy, they may murder our miners again before we can save them; and as we are not numerous enough to pursue the Indians, they may resume their attacks almost every day with impunity, and annoy our miners to such an extent that they will have to stop working, and consequently, not being able to earn our living, necessity would make us leave here, even against our will.

If it is in your power to send a sufficient number of mounted men here that would pursue the Indians to their hiding places and make our roads safe again, this place would soon have a large population again, and you would save a place from desertion which at no distant day will become the most important of Arizona, as soon as our rich diggings, gold and silver mines, can be worked with safety for capital. Should you not be able to send more troops at present, you would help us greatly by sending thirty or forty muskets to the commander of the Arizona Guards here, who would distribute them to our unarmed miners with good security for their return when recalled, and thereby we will defend ourselves until you can give us more protection and commence your operations against the savages. I am confident that you will do all in your power for our safety and protection in our dangerous position.

I remain, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. MARKT, Captain Minute Men.

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RICHMOND, October 15, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Comdg., &c., San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: In answer to the recommendations of Major Maclin, of the 17th ultimo, forwarded by you with indorsement, you are respectfully informed that the Quartermaster-General reports that orders were given a month ago to the officers of that department in Texas to procure the necessary clothing for the troops in that State.

Very respectfully,

R. H. CHILTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., October 16, 1861.

His Excellency EDWARD CLARK, Governor of Texas:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the reception of your excellency’s communications of the 10th* and 12th instant, both of which reached me yesterday.

{p.122}

Col. W. H. Parsons, Fourth Regiment Texas Volunteer Cavalry, having by letter and through the major of his regiment this day expressed a strong preference for service in the State, I have ordered his regiment to be mustered into service at Spring Creek, near Hempstead. In regard to the other regiments, it is, perhaps, advisable, in view of the position of General McCulloch and the urgency of his call, that they should be mustered into service under the authority granted to Colonel Young. Any other divisions of those regiments might perhaps seriously interfere with the plans of the War Department, of which, however, I am not advised, and under the authority I could not well entirely countermand orders emanating from the headquarters of the Army.

The heavy guns intended for Galveston are reported on the way, strung along the road from Alexandria to Niblett’s Bluff. Two or three of them are expected by the end of this or the beginning of next week. I have ordered them to be placed in battery as they arrive, and, as the number is limited, distributed to the best advantage. Owing, however, to the vast superiority of the naval armaments of the enemy and the almost defenseless state of the coast, the problem of defending it successfully with the means at our disposal is one of difficult, if not of impossible, solution. The enemy having complete possession of the seas, as in the days of our first revolution, we must fight this war as our forefathers did, and, I have full faith, as successfully.

With respectful salutations, I have the honor to be, your excellency’s very obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General, Provisional Army.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, October 17, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General:

SIR: From the time I came to this place (2d September) cotton has been passing through it to Mexico. The quantity has been considerable, though not very great, but it has been increasing for the last three weeks, and I have just been informed by reliable persons that a much greater quantity has been and is still passing from Texas into Mexico by wagons on the route below this and by light-draught vessels that go through the bays and bayous along the coast to the mouth of the Rio Grande. Cotton is now worth twenty-two and twenty-three cents at New York, and I am satisfied that a large proportion of the cotton going into Mexico passes on to that and other Northern ports.

The policy of our Government is no doubt to prevent our cotton being shipped to the United States to sustain the manufacturing interests of our enemies. Under these circumstances how is it to be done, and can the military authority here do anything in it?

There is a large number of beef cattle now being purchased by persons for the market in Mexico. Such a thing has not been known in Texas for many years, and I think there is good reason to suppose that these cattle are for the benefit of the U. S. Army that are expected to come through Mexico either from California or by sea, and for the support of that portion of the Army in New Mexico. It seems to me that a proper regard for the safety of the country would justify the suspension of this trade for the present, or that those engaged in it should be {p.123} required to show that time produce is intended for the use of the people of Mexico only.

I am of the opinion that there are no custom-house officers of our Government on the Rio Grande. There should be officers at several points from El Paso to Brazos Santiago-say El Paso, Presidio del Norte, Eagle Pass or Fort Duncan, Laredo, Roma, Rio Grande City, Brownsville, and Point Isabel.

The subject of our trade and intercourse with Mexico is one of great importance to our Government, especially during this war, and no step should be hastily taken without proper consideration, and it is greatly to our interest that nothing should be done to interrupt the most liberal trade and intercourse with the people of that country, as far as it can be permitted with safety to our interests. I mention these articles and this manner of trade now progressing in order to inform the Government that the proper direction may be given respecting them.

It may seem strange that I am still writing as the commanding officer of this department at these headquarters, when it must be known to the Secretary of War that General Hébert is within the Department of Texas (at Galveston, where he has been for some weeks), but he has not published any order assuming command, or relieved me in any manner by which I could feel justified in leaving the office, to which, in consequence of my senior rank, I was assigned by order of the Secretary of War (Special Orders, No. 123), and the orders of General Van Dorn, copies of which I herewith inclose.* I mention this matter that I may not appear ridiculous in the eyes of the officers at the seat of Government.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. E. MCCULLOCH, Colonel, C. S. Prov. Army, Comdg. Department of Texas.

* See August 14 and September 4 and 18, pp. 98, 101, 106, for orders in question.

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INDIANOLA, TEX., October 17, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, Comdg. Texas Division, Confederate Army, Galveston, Tex.:

DEAR SIR: There are two artillery companies, numbering about 180 men, stationed at Pass Cavallo, as a defense to the entrance into Matagorda Bay. Their armaments consist of four 24-pounders, two 12-pounders, and one 6-pounder cannon, with a supply of small-arms, but a limited supply of ammunition. They have thrown up temporary embankments of sand at a point some 200 or 300 yards southeast from the Pass Cavallo light-house, and placed their guns in battery. The approach inland from Lavaca and Indianola to this point is by water, there being two large bayous intervening on the land route-bayous over a hundred yards in width and from 10 to 15 feet in depth, and without ferries. In case of an attack on this point, for immediate assistance there could be mustered of the militia in Indianola and Lavaca one company each. It would require from six hours to two days for those companies to reach the post, depending entirely upon wind, tide, and the supply of boats that might be on hand, there being only small sail-boats now plying in the bay.

The Confederate forces now organizing at Victoria, together with the militia at that place, numbering in all at this time not exceeding 800 to 1,000 men, could not be transported on the railroad to Lavaca in {p.124} less than twelve hours, and thence to Saluria or this post in such time as favorable or unfavorable winds and tides might determine. Other re-enforcements would of course soon follow; but is it not prudent to suppose that if an attack be made upon this point of our coast it will be with a large and an invading force (a force susceptible of division), a portion landing below on the island and attacking us in the rear, while with their main body the enemy could pass up the channel, overwhelming our position with their superior numbers, and this, too, before re-enforcements could reach us. In view of these facts and suggestions, would it not be advisable to construct a good military road from Indianola to the Pass, providing ample and well-attended ferries on the large bayous (boats for this purpose can be had already built), and to construct bridges over the smaller ones? Would it not be prudent, as a measure of safety against surprise, to have Captain Beaumont’s cavalry company, which is now stationed at Victoria, removed to the island, to range as scouts down the coast, to cut off detached parties, should any land, and to give information of the movements of the enemy if he made his appearance below? In addition to the foregoing measures of prudence and safety, would it not render our defenses certain, or our retreat entirely safe, to have five companies of infantry, now in camp at Victoria, removed to the island? There they could drill as well as at Victoria. It is a healthy position, and provisions, fuel, and water can be had at slight advances on the present prices. In case of an attack, they could render immediate and efficient service, and, I apprehend, could reach as promptly any other point of attack on our coast as from Victoria. I think that Captain Pearson’s company, from Matagorda, and Captain Phillips’, from Lavaca, at least, should be required to return immediately to the coast whence they were taken. It does occur to me that the post should not only be strengthened, but that means of supplying it with re-enforcements should be provided, or that the position should be abandoned, and the guns, together with the forces, removed to Indianola or some other point, where assistance could with certainty reach them. The men we now have there will fight until there are none left to tell the story. But why imperil the lives of our brave men? Why place our armament of defense within reach of the enemy? Why keep up a mere show of defense when we really have none, the effect being only to cause the public mind to sleep in its insecurity? Captain Shea, commanding the post, I understand, has no authority to take action in the premises. Colonel McCulloch, I learn, declines making any changes until your arrival. Our people have been anxiously awaiting your presence at this point, and hence there is nothing being done. There is a heavy responsibility resting somewhere. Our lives and property are in danger. I realize the fact with painful anxiety. Hence I venture these suggestions, and, although we have no personal acquaintance, yet I apprehend that your position in the State, and the interest which I feel in the welfare of this particular section of our country, will render an apology for this communication unnecessary.

In conclusion, I have only to add that the suggestions which I have made are intended only to call your attention to the military condition of this section of country, and to urge you, if your whole time is occupied at Galveston and adjacent points, to appoint some person competent to the command, and with full authority to give directions to our defenses.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. M. STAPP, [Brigadier-General, Texas Militia.]

{p.125}

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GALVESTON, Tex., October 19, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, C. S. A., Comdg. Department of Texas:

GENERAL: I have the honor to state that, upon a critical investigation as to the most suitable points to station 10,000 troops, in view of subsisting them, as well as for the defense of this city, there should be in Galveston and Virginia Point, 5,000; at Magnolia, Clear Creek, and near the railroad, 2,000; at Spring Creek, near Millican, 2,000; at the State camp, near Harrisburg, 1,000. These troops, thus stationed, could protect the city, as well as the mouth of the Brazos, if necessary. I have already ordered Harrisburg to be made a depot for subsistence supplies, as well as forage for the quartermaster’s department. From the most reliable information I can obtain I have no doubt the troops can be subsisted without difficulty. There can be subsisted on the lower Rio Grande 5,000 troops-3,000 at Fort Brown and its vicinity; 1,000 at Ringgold Barracks; 500 at Fort McIntosh and vicinity, and 500 near Edinburg, 55 miles from Fort Brown. I propose making Ringgold Barracks, 120 miles from Fort Brown, a depot for the support of these troops.

With the view of making the different departments efficient, I propose Francis I. Lynch assistant quartermaster, Thomas N. Minter and James H. French commissaries, with the rank of captain, to be located at Harrisburg and Ringgold Barracks, whose duties shall be to keep the depots supplied. These officers, in addition to those already in the department, with suitable details from the line, will be sufficient.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SACKFIELD MACLIN, Major, Confederate States Army, Acting Chief Q. M. and Com. of Sub., Dep’t of Texas.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., October 22, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT:

SIR: Your communication of the 16th instant was duly received. I am gratified that you have ordered Colonel Parsons, with his regiment, south. He was anxious to obtain service in Texas.

One object of my writing at this time is to procure, if possible, the acceptance of Colonel Locke’s regiment. From information just received I fear that he has taken up the line of march in the direction of the coast. If so, it has been done without orders from me, and I presume in consequence of advices given him by Colonel Parsons. Though the duty of the soldier is to await and obey orders, I am disposed to excuse his non-observance of this obligation, for the reason that they have promptly responded to my call for their services and are exceedingly anxious for service. This regiment would have gone to Missouri without hesitation, but are now of the opinion that Texas may need them; and, if so, they prefer to stay at home. I am aware that you do not desire a very large cavalry force, not more perhaps than you now have. It may occur, however, that you may need additional cavalry troops; and, indeed, I see through the papers that you are in some instances authorizing the raising of cavalry companies. Would it not suit your views to receive this regiment now, in expectancy of future contingencies? Might it not be well employed at Brownsville until the forces desired for that post be obtained? We have an extended seaboard, and, if invaded in that quarter, I should think a considerable cavalry force would be needed. It is now very {p.126} late, too, to send men to Missouri; and, for this reason and the probable necessity that comes upon us for our volunteers at home, I would be greatly gratified if you would accept this regiment, and request, if consistent with your opinions of duty and propriety, that you do so. In addition to the impracticability of their now going to Missouri I will state that they have been some time organized, and equipped themselves at considerable expense. Many of them have abandoned their employment to engage in their country’s service, and, if disappointed or disbanded, the consequences would be ruinous to them. Colonel Young’s regiment, as also that of Colonel Sims, I feel satisfied, from advices received, have been started to Missouri. While I do not wish to embarrass you, and by no means to control your operations, I sincerely desire and request that you have this regiment immediately put to service in Texas, if you can.

The impression has obtained, I find, that you have authorized the enlistment of men for six months. Within the last few days I have been repeatedly asked if such is the case. If you have done so, I suppose it results from your opinion of the necessities of our coast country. It is, however, having a bad effect upon any efforts to raise the required forces for Fort Brown and other points. Our people, though willing to serve as long as needed, desire the shortest term that can be obtained; and hence will not volunteer for the war while there is a chance to enlist for six or twelve months. You will not understand me as complaining of this course, for, if you have authorized it, I doubt not you have good reasons for it.

It is reported here that there is an intention of withdrawing the regiment of Colonel McCulloch from its position upon the frontier. While I attach very little consequence to this impression, I feel called upon, in justice to our frontier citizens, to request that it may not be done. I feel apprehensive that we may in the future have more trouble from Indians than we have had for several months, and I should therefore feel very unwilling to see this regiment taken away. It has been upon that line of frontier for nearly one year, and is, or should be, better suited for its protection than any new forces that could be placed there. I trust that the opinion of your intention to withdraw it is incorrect, and that that border may not be deprived of its presence and protection.

I trust that you have by this time received the cannon expected from Richmond, and that they are, or will soon be, ready for service. Should you be attacked at Galveston, which I hope will not be the case, I greatly desire to have it in my power to be present.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, &c.,

EDWARD CLARK.

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MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., October 24, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: My duties have been of so pressing a nature at this post and on the Gulf coast that I have not as yet been able to repair to San Antonio, the headquarters of the department.

In a former communication I had the honor to advise the Department of the difficulties under which I labored, for want of funds, guns, and ammunition, in endeavoring to place this post and other points on the seaboard in a respectable state of defense. The guns available are limited in number and of inferior caliber to those likely to be brought against us by the enemy. The few heavy guns ordered from Richmond {p.127} are now on the route between Alexandria and the Sabine River. Much difficulty has been experienced in the transportation of these guns across the country-so much so, that the time of their reaching this point is very indefinite. I have dispatched an efficient person, with the necessary appliances, to assist the agent of the quartermaster’s department of New Orleans in the transportation.

In view of the fact that, owing to the superior naval armaments of the enemy and his entire possession of the sea, it will be almost impossible to prevent a landing at some point upon this extensive and unprotected coast, I have settled upon it as a military necessity that he must be fought on shore or in the interior. To do this an army must be raised, organized, and armed with such weapons as can be procured. I have in consequence already authorized and called into service several volunteer regiments, for the war when practicable, and for twelve months when necessary. The State having already been pretty well exhausted of the young material willing to engage for the war, there is a necessity of resorting to twelve-months’ enlistments.

After mature deliberation I consider that a volunteer force of about 15,000 men should without delay be called into service, and of this the Rio Grande frontier will need some 3,000 or 4,000. Time pressing, and the means of communication with the headquarters of the Government being slow and uncertain, I shall proceed, until further orders from the War Department, to raise and organize this force, if possible, from the State, arming and equipping it as efficiently as the means available will permit, trusting that the Government will appreciate the motives by which I am prompted and will sanction my acts.

I shall appoint provisionally such field and staff officers as may be necessary, subject to the approval of the President. I am encouraged to take this action, as the precedent established by my predecessor seems to have met with the sanction of the Government by the confirmation of the provisional appointments made by him.

Upon my arrival here I found the department without a single regiment full, armed and equipped. I have now, or will have in a few days, over 5,000 men in the field, stationed here and at other points-not well armed and equipped, it is true, but as efficiently as circumstances permit.

The department is wofully deficient in powder, lead, and ammunition of all kinds. I have directed the chief quartermaster to make arrangements with individuals to obtain, if possible, arms and ammunition from Mexico, giving cotton in exchange.

I have the honor to inclose copy of a proclamation issued on the 7th instant.*

Again expressing the hope that the Department will sanction my acts in the execution of the purpose of defending this State, if possible, against invasion, I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General, Prov. Army, Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

* See p. 115.

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DOÑA AÑA, October 24, 1861.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER C. S. TROOPS, en route for Fort Bliss:

SIR: I am in receipt of reliable information that 2,500 of the enemy, with one battery of artillery, are now on the road for this place, and I {p.128} would urge that re-enforcements hurry up as fast as possible. I shall have to fall back on Quitman, and maybe Davis. I am sending my supplies ahead, and will keep the enemy in check, if possible; but send up men as soon as possible, for they will be needed. It is reported to me that General Sumner is on the way from Guaymas with 2,000 regular troops to meet the forces from above at Mesilla. Hurry up if you want a fight.

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Second Reg’t Mounted Rifles.

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DOÑA AÑA, October 24, 1861.

[Judge S. HART:]

DEAR JUDGE: I write a few lines to say we are all quiet and busy forwarding our supplies. No news from above. My spies are down from Thorn. No sign of the enemy so far. I will have them watched, and let you know in time all the news. Cannot you send pony to Chihuahua to ascertain if Sumner is coming across? I learn he is coming, and think it should be seen to by all means. Keep cool, for we have time. They will get no re-enforcements from Kansas, and if Sumner does not come we will bag the whole party before spring. So far they have no re-enforcements, and are depending on Mexicans who have been pressed into service. I shall just keep out of the way and let them fall to pieces of their own weight. The money Price took at Lexington was to pay the New Mexican troops off, but won’t be used for that purpose now, and how long the Mexicans will serve without pay will be seen; not long, I imagine.

Kind regards to madam and boys.

Yours,

JOHN R. BAYLOR.

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DOÑA AÑA, October 24, 1861.

[Judge S. HART:]

DEAR JUDGE: My spy returned yesterday, bringing me news that Colonel Canby was at Craig with 2,500 men, and would move against me by the 1st of November. Last night an express from Santa Fe arrived, bringing me the same news, and confirming all the particulars stated by my spy.

I want you to get all the transportation possible to move the stores at Fort Bliss to Quitman or Davis, as I shall direct. I shall send all from here, and make my arrangements for an orderly retreat, as it is folly for me to attempt resistance against such odds; and, besides, it only amounts to the inconvenience of moving, for when General Sibley gets with me we will return and get pay. I send you an extra which was brought by express from Santa Fe. This is a damper on the enemy, for it was the very funds intended to pay off the very troops in New Mexico, who have had no pay for eighteen months. There is great dissatisfaction up there for want of pay among the regulars and the force used to get the natives in the ranks. With three more companies I would fight them, but don’t think it prudent now. Tom has deserted and gone to Kentucky. Don’t be alarmed. I can get out of the way, and you must all look out and remove your effects across the river. Tell Crosby and Magoffin to be calm, and do not create a panic. All will turn out right. A little time is all we want. You will hear of some tall guerrilla work before long.

{p.129}

I have only to add that I leave to your good sense and judgment to do as you think best. Don’t fail to send corn at once to Quitman and a large supply for Davis. This must be done at once. I will keep you advised of all movements.

Yours, in haste,

JOHN R. BAYLOR.

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HEADQUARTERS, Doña Aña, Ariz., October 25, 1861.

COMMANDER DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS:

SIR: I hasten to inform you that my spies have returned from New Mexico, bringing the intelligence that Colonel Canby, with 2,300 men and a battery of flying artillery, are en route to this place. I shall be compelled to fall back, as my force is too weak to meet them. I have petitioned time and again for re-enforcements to prevent this disaster, to all of which a deaf ear has been turned. I have only to add that the abandonment of the country will necessarily be attended with a great sacrifice of property, and subject the friends of our cause to persecution and ruin. If it is the wish of the colonel commanding the department that Arizona should be abandoned, and I presume it is, he can congratulate himself upon the consummation of that event.

The colonel commanding the department informs me in his last orders to me that in case of invasion I can make such disposition as I think proper of the troops on my line, &c. This is liberal, when it is remembered that the troops of the enemy are but little over 100 miles from me and my re-enforcements scattered for 500 miles.

It is unnecessary to ask for re-enforcements, as I presume they are not to be had. I shall therefore fall back, and await the arrival of Brigadier-General Sibley.

Respectfully, &c.,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Arizona.

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STATE OF TEXAS, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Austin, Tex., October 28, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, C. S. A., Commanding Department of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose you extracts from a letter addressed to me by Brig. Gen. D. M. Stapp, of the Texas militia, respecting the defenses of the important pass leading into Matagorda Bay. He is the collector of the port of Indianola; was a member of the late State Convention, and is an old citizen of intelligence and respectability.

Trusting that you will pardon any violation of military rule in my addressing you this communication directly, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

WM. BYRD, Adjutant-General of Texas.

[Inclosure.]

Col. WM. BYRD, Adjutant-General, Austin, Tex.:

There are two companies (Captains Shea’s and Reuss’), say 180 men, at the Pass, with four 24-pounders, furnished by the Government, and two {p.130} 12-pounders and one 6-pounder, turned over by the citizens or military board of Indianola. This constitutes our defense. Suppose an invasion be attempted through this point. Those men, with their armaments, would fall an easy prey to the enemy, and before assistance could reach them from Victoria the enemy would be prepared to meet us with our own guns. Captain Pearson’s company, from Matagorda, and Captain Phillips’, from Lavaca, should have been ordered to the Pass, instead of farther back into the country. You are aware, from personal experience, of the uncertainty of transportation from Indianola, or Lavaca, or Matgorda to the Pass, depending, as it does, upon the wind and tide. It is clear to my mind that the post should be strengthened or abandoned. Captain Beaumont’s company of cavalry, it was thought, was to be stationed on the island, and many joined from here with that belief. It seems to me that they could do much good as scouts on the island below the fort. They could cut off detachments if the enemy attempted a landing, and give information if they made their appearance below. They do no good stationed at Victoria. I do not know whose duty it is to see to the military condition of this particular section of the coast, but I assure you there is immense responsibility resting somewhere. No officer or engineer, with authority to control or direct the military defenses of this bay, has ever been ordered here. Captain Shea, who does not profess to be an engineer, was ordered to select a place at or near the Pass, and to put his guns in. This he has done, and done well, no doubt, and he and Captain Reuss, with their companies, will die defending them; but he has no authority to increase his force or abandon the post.

These suggestions are hastily summed up to call your attention to the facts, that you may see the importance of action in the premises. If we are in danger, immediate action alone can save us.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. M. STAPP, Brigadier-General, Texas Militia.

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GALVESTON, TEX., October 31, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Richmond, Va.:

MY DEAR SIR: I had the honor a few days since of addressing an official communication to the War Department, stating as my opinion that an army of some 15,000 men would be necessary to resist an invasion of this State and to protect its frontiers, and to ask for authority to call out that number of volunteers. From my intercourse and correspondence with the authorities and people of this State, I know that they look for protection at the hands of the Confederate Government, and expect me, its representative, to act in the matter. It is a difficult task under the circumstances. All I can do is to call out volunteers, and place in their hands such weapons as can be found in the country. Of lead, powder, and caps the supply is almost nothing at all. I have called upon the people to collect and preserve all they have. Arrangements have been, by my direction, made with firms here to procure munitions of war from Mexico, giving cotton in exchange, and with some hopes of success.

To tell you how totally unprepared, confused, and defenseless I found this department, and to describe fully the difficulties under which I have labored, and do still, from lack of means, guns, arms, ammunition, and a proper military organization, would be tedious, and employ too {p.131} much of your valuable time. As an engineer, I can but too well appreciate the defenseless state of the sea-coast, see plainly what is needed generally, but of course can only deplore my inability to remedy the evil. I much fear that I have brought my little military reputation to an early grave. At all events, I will endeavor to justify the confidence of the President in charging me with this difficult command, and trust to your knowledge of the correctness of my motives and your friendship for me to set me right in all matters where I may seem to transcend the authority usually vested in commanders of departments.

Very respectfully and truly, yours,

P. O. HEBERT.

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MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 4, 1861.

Col. J. C. MOORE, Comdg. Military District of Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: Commander Hunter, C. S. Navy, was ordered to report to the general commanding the Department of Texas. He has been placed on special duty, and assigned to the immediate command of the naval defenses of the port of Galveston and the vessels in the employ of the Government. Commander Hunter, as any other subordinate officer, is subject to the orders of military superiors in this military district. The right of the general commanding, when present in person, to communicate directly with the blockading squadron on the coast it is taken for granted that Colonel Moore did not intend to question.

By order of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, commanding Military Department of Texas:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

HDQRS. MIL. DEP’T OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 6, 1861.

From and after this date no authority shall be given to raise troops for a less period than the war. Enlistments shall be made for the war, unless sooner discharged.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, commanding Military Department of Texas:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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RINGGOLD BARRACKS, TEX., November 7, 1861.

Col. JOHN S. FORD, Comdg. Second Regiment Mounted Rifles, Fort Brown Tex.:

SIR: On the 29th ultimo we received information that the detachment of Captain Benavides’ company had been withdrawn from Carrizo, and that a party of Mexicans from the other side of the Rio Grande had threatened to attack the place. Immediately I started for that point, and arrived there on the following day, but too late to prevent the stealing of several horses from the rancho. They confined their depredations to stock alone, avoiding the rancho and persons therein. The party engaged in this affair were inhabitants of this State, but, when Texas seceded, they refused to bear allegiance to the Confederacy, and openly declared their intention of supporting no government except {p.132} that of the United States. About that time Captain Nolan attacked and killed several of the rebels, whereupon the remainder of them ran to the opposite side of the river, where they have remained ever since at a rancho opposite Carrizo. Their ranches on this side of the river are mostly deserted. Occasionally you will find servants in some of the ranches, attending to their stock. Is not this property subject to confiscation? If so, am I the proper person to take the matter in hand? Please inform me as to the way to proceed. I have the names of the refugees, furnished me by the chief justice of the county. I find it necessary to leave a detachment of men at Carrizo, as it is unsafe for the citizens to remain there without protection as long as these marauders remain at the rancho just across the river.

I learned at Carrizo that the majority of the Mexican citizens of Zapata County had never taken the oath of allegiance to the Confederate States, whereupon I issued an order for them all to come forward and fulfill that duty. The time being somewhat short, only twenty came forward; but, on election day, all will be required to do so before voting? In a few days I expect to report to you that all of the Mexicans in that county have become citizens. My command are all well, and fast improving in the drill.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

W. H. BREWIN, Captain, Commanding Ringgold Barracks.

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HEADQUARTERS SIBLEY’S BRIGADE, A. T. V., San Antonio, Tex., November 8, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. Army:

GENERAL: I have the honor to forward herewith for your information certain letters from Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor, Judge Crosby, and Judge Hart, relative to military movements on both sides in the Territory of New Mexico. I regard the probable advance of the Federal forces there as a movement decidedly to be desired by us, and that so soon as my force shall reach the field of action it must result in the destruction or capture of the enemy’s forces. It is no doubt induced by the threatened attack of Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor on Fort Craig, made by my orders. Colonel Reily’s regiment of my brigade is by this time some 250 miles en route. Colonel Green’s broke camp yesterday, and my third regiment (Colonel Steele’s) will follow very soon. Not an hour shall be lost in pushing forward the whole force. The delays heretofore encountered have been unavoidable. Messrs. Crosby and Hart are engaged under my authority in procuring supplies for my command, which I state here as explanatory of their letters.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY, Brigadier-General, P. C. S. A.

[Inclosures.]

HEADQUARTERS, Doña Aña, Ariz., October 25, 1861.

Brigadier-General SIBLEY:

SIR: The enemy, about 2,500 strong, are on the march for this place-eleven companies of U. S. regulars and thirteen companies of New Mexican volunteers. They have a battery of artillery. I shall be forced {p.133} to fall back, as my force is too weak to meet the enemy. I am forwarding my supplies to Quitman, and will send them, if necessary, to Davis. I would respectfully urge that re-enforcements be sent at once, as the supplies of this valley are of the utmost importance to us, and will be consumed or destroyed by the enemy if they are allowed to remain. There is now a fine supply of corn in the valley-enough to furnish two or three regiments. I have on hand no corn and but little hay. I would not accumulate supplies for fear of an invasion. I can save most of my commissary and hospital supplies. I have ordered corn thrown into Davis in large quantities, for your use as well as mine, should I be forced there.

I get my intelligence from Santa Fe by three gentlemen well known as men of veracity. Messrs. Phillips and Battle are two of them. Battle says the officers told him that General Sumner was coming across from Guaymas, and was expected to meet Colonel Canby at Mesilla. I have spies now on the road to ascertain if this is so, and will know soon.

The Mexican population are decidedly Northern in sentiment, and will avail themselves of the first opportunity to rob us or join the enemy. Nothing but a strong force will keep them quiet. I would again urge that re-enforcements cannot be too soon sent up.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel Comdg. Second Reg’t T. M. R.

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EL PASO, October 27, 1861.

General H. H. SIBLEY, Commanding Sibley Brigade, &c.:

SIR: The mail has just arrived here from San Antonio, and I am advised by Captain Walker, in command of Fort Bliss, that he will cause it to return forthwith. Colonel Baylor’s dispatches will no doubt advise you of the condition of affairs here at this time. We are looking for Colonel Baylor with his entire force at any moment. The merchants and most of the families of this part of the country have “pulled up stakes” and gone to the Mexican side. Colonel Canby’s force is said to be 2,700 strong, and that he will approach us in three columns, one via the river, one via El Jornada, and another by Stanton-the latter intended to cut off Baylor’s retreat. This seems to me rather a hazardous enterprise for a prudent man like Canby to embark in. You can imagine what an unsettled state the country hereabout is in. I for one shall stand my ground until the last moment, and will not cease to do all that can be done in the way of providing for your command, at least so long as I may have it in my power to remain. I have made arrangements with a responsible party to proceed at once and buy up a quantity of corn, beans, &c., in Mexico for your use. None of these supplies, as a matter of course, will be brought on this side of the river until such time as they would be safe from the enemy. The party who will make these purchases is not known as a contractor for the Confederate States, and will therefore run no risk in his purchases.

I regret not having received additional instructions per last mail. I shall engage all the arms and munitions possible to be had. I am sending an express to Sonora with a view, among other things, of watching the California route. It may be that there is some intelligence between Canby and Sumner, and that it is desirable to get Baylor out of the way to enable them to form a junction at Mesilla. This is, however, purely conjectural on my part.

In very great haste, your obedient servant,

J. F. CROSBY.

{p.134}

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EL PASO, October 27, 1861.

General H. H. SIBLEY, C. S. A., Commanding Brigade for Arizona and New Mexico, en route or at San Antonio:

MY DEAR GENERAL: A week since Judge Crosby called on me in reference to supplies for your brigade. I immediately took steps to secure supplies of breadstuffs, the greater part of which must come from Sonora, as there is great scarcity in the State of Chihuahua. I sent for my Sonora agent to come to me here a month since, to meet and see what would be required of me to furnish the Confederacy. This agent was to have left about this time with a proper escort from Colonel Baylor, and some thirty to forty wagons, to commence hauling supplies from the Sonora border to the Rio Grande, which would have commenced to arrive at Fillmore by the middle of December. In the mean time my mills will furnish from the limited supplies of grain here. I have now some 40,000 to 50,000 pounds of flour, and will have 40,000 to 50,000 pounds more if the New Mexican troops do not succeed in forcing Colonel Baylor to fall back beyond this place.

The flour I have here, and may make till I am interrupted, I am now placing in a place of safety in El Paso, Mexico, as recommended by Colonel Baylor in his letters, which I inclose. I shall do everything in my power, and all that is possible for a man to do in my circumstances and situation, to further the public service. This you well know, and I need not assure you of the fact. You must especially heed Judge Crosby’s and Mr. Richardson’s suggestions as to things here, and what you and the commanding officers of the department must do to facilitate Mr. Richardson and myself to furnish supplies by procuring some cash funds. I can command here now from $40,000 to $50,000, all or most of which must go into Sonora immediately to pay for flour, &c. As suggested by Colonel Baylor, I have engaged an express to go into Sonora to learn if Sumner is actually coming from California via Guaymas or Fort Union. By the same express I will order the purchase of more flour, beans, salt, beef, soap, corn, &c. I have there already some 10,000 pounds of corn and 300,000 pounds of flour, all for your brigade, and waiting your movement. I inclose herewith my last letters from Colonel Baylor.* His command is in peril. I hope God in His goodness will so order things as not to make his retreat necessary from Arizona.

Our express from Sonora, with intelligence from Forts Yuma and Guaymas, will be back in twenty days, when you and Colonel Baylor will be fully posted up as to Sumner and his movements, if he is making any, towards Arizona from California. Be easy about your supplies; we shall get all we want from Sonora-what this valley cannot furnish-until such time as you may be in full possession of New Mexico, and can avail of its resources or such part as the hungry Federals may leave for your command.

Truly and sincerely, yours,

S. HART.

* Probably those of October 24, p. 128.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 9, 1861.

Maj. J. B. LIKENS, Commanding Battalion, Sabine Pass Tex.:

SIR: The commanding general has directed me to instruct you to be extremely vigilant at Sabine Pass, in order to foil any attempt on the {p.135} part of the enemy to surprise your post, with a view of destroying the guns now on their way to this place. On yesterday morning, between the hours of 2 and 3 o’clock, they were successful in surprising and capturing the crew of the schooner Royal Yacht, then in Bolivar Channel.

Special Orders, No. 105, instructs you to make a daily report to this office of all information obtained through your scouts or otherwise, the dispatches being carried by your scouts to the point where they will meet the scouts from Bolivar Point. You will indorse on the envelope: “To be forwarded instantly on its receipt, day or night,” and be particular in your instructions to the bearer of dispatches, in case your information should be of moment to the commanding general. Your scouting parties should be of sufficient strength to scout during the whole night, and be strung along the beach from Sabine to the point where you will meet the scouts from this end.

You will inform this office of your success in filling your battalion, and state how many companies you have now mustered into the service, and the progress of those in process of formation.

I inclose a paragraph from one of our papers, containing the particulars of the surprise on board the Yacht.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, La Mesilla, Ariz., November 10, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH Comdg. Dep’t of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: I have nothing new to report as to the movements of the enemy. My spies report that there are sixteen companies at Fort Craig and three within 30 miles of the fort, and that every effort is being made to enlist the Mexicans, who are much divided on the subject of making war upon Texans or of taking any part in the war at all. There exists, too, disaffection among the regular troops, who have not been paid, many of them for one year and a half. There is a large train at Craig and quantities of supplies are being hauled there. All this would indicate that the enemy intend to make a move of some sort. I shall have them watched closely, and, should they come down, I have my supplies at Bliss, and transportation ready to move it down to Quitman or Davis, if necessary. I shall, with my mounted force, push for Santa Fe, and hold the country until the arrival of General Sibley.

A party of citizens from California, who have joined my forces, report great excitement in Southern California. They know of no troops marching for Arizona, but say that Fort Yuma is being strongly re-enforced. I am convinced that a strong force stationed in Western Arizona would enable us to get hundreds of good Southern men, well armed and mounted, who are anxious to join our cause, and this would enable us to watch Sonora, and prevent United States troops from crossing that State, and, what is of importance, open communication with Guaymas and other ports on the Pacific, where we must, of necessity, get most of our supplies.

I will keep you advised of all matters here, and act as circumstances may direct.

I have the honor to be, respectfully,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel Comdg. Texas Mounted Rifles, P. A. C. S.

{p.136}

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SAN ANTONIO, TEX., November 11, 1861.

General HEBERT, Commanding Department of Texas:

SIR: I have a commission to raise for the Confederate service an infantry company, to rendezvous at or near Victoria, and drill until spring, unless the coast is invaded, and wish to raise a company for the above-mentioned service, but find it hard to get Texans to go into infantry companies. They say they will go mounted, but no other way; that is, a majority say so. I can get a good company among the Federal prisoners that are now at Camp Verde, provided they could get certificates from the mustering officer, or some other officer properly authorized, that the Confederate States would pay what is due them by the old Government. They would nearly all to a man join the Southern Army, and there are about 350 of them. If they can get certificates from the Southern Government for their back pay, you will oblige me much by letting me know, and to authorize the mustering officer, or some one, to give them their certificates after they shall have been mustered into the Confederate service.

Yours, &c.,

S. W. MCALLISTER.

[Indorsements.]

Will Major Maclin please give the general commanding such information as he may possess in regard to the writer, and whether what he proposes is advisable?

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General.

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CHIEF QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Galveston, Tex., November 16, 1861.

Respectfully returned to the general commanding for his consideration. The prisoners now at Camp Verde have from $150 to $300 due each. The Adjutant and Inspector General of the Army was consulted upon the subject of paying the prisoners what was done them by the United States. He replied that no appropriation had been made for such purpose, and that they could not be paid. But he was inclined to the belief that the Government would pay them after the war, provided they enlisted and served faithfully. No one, therefore, can give the pledge demanded by the prisoners. My opinion is that the large sums due the prisoners of war at Camp Verde ought not to be paid; that their services would not justify it. They have been solicited frequently to enter our service, and have declined. They have manifested much bitterness against our cause.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

SACKFIELD MACLIN, Major, C. S. A., Act. Chief Quartermaster Dep’t of Texas.

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HDQRS. SECOND REGIMENT TEXAS MOUNTED RIFLES, Fort Brown, Tex., November 11, 1861.

Capt. D. C. STITH, Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. A., San Antonio, Tex.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that, having received information from my spies of the presence of some escaped prisoners of war near the mouth of the Rio Grande, I dispatched Captain Nolan and Lieutenant Lively, with twenty-three men, to that point, with orders to {p.137} retake them. They discharged the duty with prudence and propriety. A copy of Captain Nolan’s report is inclosed. I shall send the prisoners to San Antonio with the train, which will return within a few days.

I have strong hopes of being able to recapture Colonel Anderson. A Lieutenant Williams, Second U. S. Cavalry, is reported to have been in Matamoras two days ago. I have spies on his track.

The Mexicans of Zapata County, who refused allegiance to the Confederate Government, are likely to give trouble. They are backed by a strong party in Guerrero, who avow the intention to take service with the North, should Mr. Lincoln send an invading force to the Rio Grande. They are waiting an opportunity to make a descent upon the loyal citizens living on this bank of The river, and, should the mounted force be removed, they will do much mischief. The recent attempt is an evidence of their hostility. The prompt action of Captain Brewin checked them. For further particulars you are respectfully referred to his report. In regard to the property mentioned, I shall call the attention of the Confederate authorities to the fact, and let them take the proper steps in the matter.

I have endeavored to avoid all chances of collision with the Mexican authorities, to prevent giving them offense, and to preserve neutrality between the contending parties. To effect these objects I issued an order, and forwarded the portion concerning Mexican affairs to Colonel Capistrom. I forward a copy of the order, of the note, and of Colonel Capistrom’s answer; also a copy of the order placing Lieutenant Lively on duty as post adjutant.*

The companies of Captains Wilkie and Creuzbar will arrive to-morrow. The mounted companies are encamped at Rancho Viejo, 7 miles distant. They are in one camp, for the purpose of exercising them in the battalion drill.

The work is progressing on the fort. I understand Lieutenant-Colonel Buchel, Major Gray, and Captain Settle arrived this evening.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JOHN S. FORD, Colonel, Commanding.

* Not found.

[Inclosure.]

FORT BROWN, TEX., November 9, 1861.

Col. JOHN S. FORD, Comdg, Rio Grande Military District, Fort Brown, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that in accordance with your instructions I left this post on the 6th inst., accompanied by Lieutenant Lively, of Captain Buquor’s company, and twenty-three men of my command, and proceeded to the mouth of the Rio Grande. I arrested and brought to this post Charles Douglass and John Brown, escaped prisoners of war, who were trying to make their way to the United States, and also John Murphy, who was likewise trying to get a passage north. The man Murphy is supposed to be the person who some time since committed a murder at or near Austin; and, although I did not know Murphy yet, as he appeared so anxious to leave the country, I thought it my duty to arrest him. I am much indebted to Lieutenant Lively for his valuable assistance; without it I should probably not have succeeded in making the arrests. I turned the prisoners over to Lieutenant Williams, officer of the guard.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

MAT. NOLAN Captain, Comdg. Co., Second Reg’t Texas Mounted Rifles.

{p.138}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 12.}

HDQRS. MIL. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 11, 1861.

I. The forces stationed in the military district of Galveston shall compose and be styled the First Brigade Texas Volunteers, Department of Texas.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, commanding Military Department of Texas:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 119.}

HDQRS. MIL. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 12, 1861.

Commander W. W. Hunter, C. S. Navy, will take measures to guard against any surprise by the enemy in the harbor and bay of Galveston. His attention is directed to the Railroad Bridge. He will report to the commander of the military district, for the purpose of establishing a system of alarm signals with the forces on the island and at Virginia Point.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert, commanding Military Department of Texas:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Velasco, Tex., November 13, 1861.

General HEBERT:

I have not ordered another company to San Luis Fort, and the reason of the delay is I have not been able to place at the disposal of the troops that I may station there any safe mode of retreat, should it become necessary to do so. I have it in contemplation to place a small steamer there in a very few days, which will enable me to afford all necessary means to the troops in case a retreat should become necessary. This is a matter of munch importance to Galveston, as well as the county of Brazoria, and you may rely upon my constant efforts until I shall have two companies on the island ready for active service.

Very respectfully,

J. BATES, Colonel Fourth Regiment Texas Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 15, 1861.

Major MACLIN, Chief Q. M., Com. of Sub., and Acting Chief of Ordnance, Department of Texas:

SIR: I have been directed by the commanding general to furnish you with the following memorandum of troops to be called into service, if possible, for the defense of the Department of Texas, with their respective rendezvous: First, Sabine Pass, one battalion, to consist of one company of artillery, one mounted, and three infantry companies; second, Galveston Island, Bolivar Point, and Virginia Point, not less than 4,000 {p.139} men, to consist of eight mounted companies, one regiment of artillery, and the balance infantry; third, at or near Harrisburg, 2,000 men, of which one regiment should be mounted; fourth, at Spring Creek, near Hempstead, 2,000; fifth, at Victoria, 2,000; sixth, on coast from San Luis to head of Matagorda Bay, four mounted companies, six companies of infantry; seventh, on Rio Grande, not less than 3,000, of which one regiment should be mounted; eighth, at Pass Cavallo, three companies; and Aransas, two or more companies. The relative number of rendezvous or stations of these troops may be changed, as circumstances may require, and will be provided for by the proper departments, upon the above basis, until further orders.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, November 15, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Richmond, Pa.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that under the apprehension of an invasion by the enemy at any time, and owing to the great distance of this department from General Headquarters, I have taken the responsibility of calling into service troops for the defense of the State. I have experienced great difficulty in regard to arms and ammunition, although the troops now in service form hardly one-half of the number I think necessary to act simply on the defensive. Men also, I am sorry to say, are now more difficult to get, especially for the war. There are now over 5,000 troops in service.

I have taken the liberty, it being a matter of absolute necessity, of appointing, subject to time approval of the President, the field officers to the regiments mustered into service and such staff officers as were necessary. I was also compelled to give temporary appointments to persons to secure their services on engineer and special duty, all of which is, of course, subject to the approval or disapproval of the President; the commissions subject to being canceled at any time, and troops disbanded by his order. I have the honor to inclose a list of officers appointed as above for the approval of the President.

Commander W. W. Hunter, C. S. Navy, ordered to report to the general commanding this department, I assigned to the immediate command of the naval defenses, such as they are, of the port and bay of Galveston. Upon his application and representation of an urgent necessity, I authorized him to employ such boats, propelled by steam or otherwise, as the service in his judgment rendered necessary. I am aware that the chartering of boats for this kind of service is rather expensive, but when it is considered that this city is on an island, connected with the mainland by only one railroad bridge, and that it is subject to a disaster similar to that of Fort Hatteras, it seems that prudence would dictate that all proper precautions should be taken to get the troops off in the event of a necessity of abandoning or being driven from the island. There is no doubt but that the defense of Galveston, or any other point on this coast, in the event of a formidable attack, is a very difficult if not an impossible matter-yet an effort must be made in that direction, and this place held as long as possible. It is a cotton port, and if in the possession of the enemy would be a nucleus for the disaffected, of which there are, I am sorry to say, many in this State.

{p.140}

Some time since, being without means whatever, there being none in the department, I was compelled to apply to the citizens for an advance of money to commence certain field works and for purposes of absolute and immediate necessity to the service. This sum ($5,000) I shall direct the chief quartermaster to refund, and charge to the fortifications of Galveston. The proper vouchers will be forwarded to General Headquarters.

As a matter of necessity connected with the defense and possession of the island, I have directed the planking of the railroad bridge connecting with the mainland, so as to admit of the passage of troops.

The heavy guns, so long on the way, have not yet reached this place. I have directed every exertion to be made to forward them to their destination.

I respectfully submit to the consideration of the Department and of the President the expediency of giving me one or two general officers in this department. My presence at the headquarters of the department, where, owing to the numerous posts in the command, business accumulates very rapidly and continually, is a matter of necessity; yet my duties have been so pressing and important on the coast, that I have not yet been able to find the time or opportunity to repair to San Antonio. A general officer I would assign, and the command fully justifies it, to the command of the troops on or near the sea-coast and another on the Rio Grande frontier, so soon as forces can be organized and sent to that part of the State.

I have the honor to transmit, for the information of the Department, copies of communications addressed by Lieutenant-Colonel Baylor, mu command in Arizona, to Colonel McCulloch, copies of which I have also transmitted to Brigadier General Sibley, at San Antonio. *

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier. General, Prov. Army, Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

* Not identified.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 143.}

HDQRS. MILITARY DEP’T OF TEXAS, Galveston, flex., November 15, 1861.

Isaac N. Dennis, esq., volunteer aide to the commanding general of the department, will proceed without delay into the interior of this State, for the purpose of inducing the planters and citizens generally to assist in the erection of fortifications for the defense of the coast, in loaning their negroes for that purpose. He will inform them that the hands employed will have quarters and rations furnished, the hands to be sent under the charge of a competent overseer, with the spades, shovels, &c., and their necessary clothing and cooking utensils.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Austin, Tex., November 15 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT, Comdg. Hdqrs. Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the governor respectfully to express to you his lively apprehensions for the security of the country of the Lower {p.141} Rio Grande, arising from what he understands to be the present insufficiency of the garrison at Fort Brown for its protection. Colonel Luckett, at present at this place, who has been traversing the country, using his utmost endeavors to recruit for that service, finds them rendered abortive by the very numerous authorizations to raise troops, issued from the War Department at Richmond, for different periods of service, and, as conjectured, for more exciting fields of action. Under these circumstances, passing en route through Austin, Colonel Luckett has appealed to his excellency for that aid which he was well aware that, to the full extent of the ability of his excellency, the immense importance of the successful defense of Fort Brown would command from him.

Among the various means proposed for the accomplishment of this object, it has been suggested to his excellency, as the one most probably conducive to a satisfactory result, should you concur in its expediency, would be for the Confederate Government to decline to receive into its service any more troops from that portion of the State lying west of the Colorado River other than those joining Luckett’s, Garland’s and Terrell’s regiments, and such companies as shall be stationed in that district of country for its defense. His excellency is ever ready to place at the disposal of the Confederate Government all the resources of the State for the preservation of its soil from the polluting tread of a ruthless invader, and his ardent desire to witness the timeous concentration of an adequate force for the protection of the Lower Rio Grande, a region of country now of vital interest, has induced him to communicate to you the views that have been submitted to him.

Should you, general, deem these suggestions inexpedient, I am directed by his excellency to inquire whether, in carrying out your matured plans for the defense of Fort Brown, his co-operation can be rendered available to the furtherance of their success.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. Y. DASHIELL, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SIBLEY BRIGADE, San Antonio, Tex., November 16, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector-General, C. S. Army:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that on Monday next, the 18th instant, I shall move with my headquarters to assume in person the command of our forces in the Territory of Arizona, and to conduct the military operations there and in New Mexico.

Before proceeding on this distant field of duty it appears proper that I should briefly communicate to you such facts concerning my official transactions here and touching the present condition of my forces as may be necessary for the information of your office. On my arrival here, about the middle of August last, I confidently expected to be able to raise and organize my brigade within a very brief space of time, and to have been enabled by this date to have it actively employed in the accomplish uncut of the objects for which it was raised. Many unexpected circumstances, however, have occurred to defeat this expectation. In the first place, I was disappointed in not receiving from the executive of this State as efficient a co-operation as was desirable. This arose from no want of disposition or zeal on the part of Governor Clark to render every facility in his power for the rapid organization of the force called for. It was the consequence simply of the very inefficient {p.142} system of the State military organization to which the governor had recourse to supply the troops. He ordered a sufficient number of companies which had reported to him as organized to report to me for the service of this brigade, but the most of these companies had, as it appeared, either entirely disbanded, or their numbers had become diminished below the minimum of the Confederate service. The reliance, therefore, which was placed in this mode of raising the men caused the first serious delay.

In the second place, the designation by the governor of companies organized under the State law operated to deter other companies not so organized from offering their services to me, which many would have done at once but for the opinion, very generally prevalent, that the brigade would be filled by the companies ordered out by the governor. Although at the very earliest day that it became apparent that the companies ordered out by the governor could not be relied on, I at once resorted direct to the people themselves, yet it required some time to counteract the effects of the misplaced reliance upon the State system.

Another source of delay arose from the competition for men which grew out of the calls for the several regiments required for the service east of the Mississippi.

I enumerate these sources of delay simply to explain the unexpected detentions which I have encountered, and not as implying any imputations upon any one whatever.

Although I am advancing to the field of duty assigned me with the confident hope of being able to accomplish everything designed there by his excellency the President, yet it is proper that I should state that very great deficiencies still exist in the arms of my troops, notwithstanding every effort on my part to obviate them. Every company reported itself short of arms, and gave the sufficient reason that they were not to be procured in their respective sections, partly in consequence of the great reluctance of the people to allow the serviceable arms to be removed from the State, for the defense of whose coast it was generally believed they would shortly be required. The difficulty thus arising had to be surmounted in some manner. Wherefore, in virtue of the authority delegated to me in the written instructions of his excellency the President, I directed the purchase of serviceable fire-arms and the construction of lances. There not being a dollar in the hands of any of the disbursing officers of my command, I was necessitated to resort to the credit of the Government for these purchases. These liabilities are outstanding, and on the 13th of the present month I inclosed to the Chief of Ordnance the estimates of the funds necessary for their liquidation.

To another matter I desire to invite your attention. Shortly after my arrival here General Van Dorn was relieved from duty as commander of this department, and Col. Henry E. McCulloch was left in that position. Brigadier-General Hébert came within the limits of this department, but did not come on to its headquarters and assume the command, but up to very recently left Colonel McCulloch to act in that capacity, so far at least as the depots and military affairs of this place and section were concerned. Major Maclin, assistant quartermaster and acting ordnance officer of this department, left this place to meet General Hébert at Galveston, and still remains there. Colonel McCulloch shortly afterwards also left for the same purpose, and the intelligence was soon returned that he had been relieved of the command of the department by the general. The general has not yet come on here. The consequence of all this is that there is, and for the last two or three {p.143} weeks has been, no officer within my reach to whom I could apply for the issues of ordnance stores absolutely necessary for my command. In this situation I assumed the responsibility of ordering and requiring from the subordinates in charge of the ordnance stores here the issuance of such ordnance stores as were indispensable to my command and as could be spared from the service of the department itself. On assuming this responsibility I immediately communicated the fact to General Hébert, at Galveston, with the reasons and motives for my actions, but have as yet received no reply from him. Not to have taken this responsibility would have been to incur another and an indefinite delay, which would have probably paralyzed my command for the winter, and would certainly have disabled me from arriving at El Paso, as I hope to do, in time to succor the small force there under Colonel Baylor, whose communication regarding an immediate attack by a greatly superior force I forwarded to you on the 8th instant.*

These facts will, I trust, vindicate me from any imputation of unwarrantable intrusion upon the powers of the department commander, which I have been scrupulous to avoid.

The Fourth Regiment (Colonel Reily’s), being the first of this brigade, took up the line of march on the 22d of last month, and at last advices was making rapid progress. The Fifth Regiment (Colonel Green’s), being my second, took up the march on the 2d instant, and will make all possible dispatch. I hope to arrive at El Paso in time to overtake my advance corps. Colonel Steele’s regiment is just now completely organized, and will probably be able to march by the 20th instant.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY, Brigadier-General, P. A. C. S.

* See p. 132.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 9.}

HDQRS. SIBLEY BRIGADE, A. G. O., San Antonio, Tex., November 16, 1861.

I. The headquarters of this brigade will take up the line of march for El Paso on Monday next, the 18th instant.

...

III. On the advance of headquarters, Col. William Steele commanding Third Regiment, will assume the command in chief of all troops belonging to this brigade, remaining in or about this place, until he shall rejoin headquarters.

IV. Colonel Steele will take up his line of march with his command to rejoin headquarters at the earliest day practicable.

By order of Brig. Gen. H. H. Sibley:

A. M. JACKSON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of New Mexico.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., November 16, 1861.

W. H. WOODWARD, Esq., and others, Indianola, Tex.:

SIR: Your letter dated November 13, 1861, addressed to the commanding general of the department, has been received, and in answer I {p.144} am directed to state that the general commanding is fully aware of the position of Pass Cavallo and other passes on the coast in a like defenseless situation. The guns and material do not exist in the department to put the whole coast in a state of defense against a formidable attack. Everything that can will be done with the means available.

There are no engineer officers in the department under the control of the general commanding. He appointed and sent Major Slum to Pass Cavallo especially to do the things the letter calls for-to do all that could be accomplished with the forces and guns at that point, and dispose of them to the best advantage. Major Slum has some experience as an engineer officer, and the general commanding had no idea that the appointment would be unacceptable. He has no competent officer to send there as engineer. Can the citizens signing that communication recommend a competent officer? Colonel Garland is instructed to visit Pass Cavallo, and report to headquarters if any favorable disposition of the forces under his command can be made in regard to its defenses. The general commanding would cheerfully visit Pass Cavallo in person, but it would only be to inform himself of matters which he already knows.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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POST-OFFICE DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond November 16, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: I inclose herewith a communication from Col. William C. Young, of Texas, to you, as requested by him; and, being advised of its contents, I respectfully request your attention to so munch of it as refers to the unoccupied condition of Forts Washita Arbuckle and Cobb. A very small garrison at each would protect the public property, but a more imposing force will be necessary to keep the reserve and other neighboring Indians under wholesome restraint, and to keep the peace between the reserve Indians on the one side and the Comanche and Kiowa Indians on the other, which is important to the security of property and peace of the northern frontier of Texas.

With much respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN H. REAGAN.

[Inclosure.]

JEFFERSON, MARION COUNTY, TEX., November 3, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, Confederate States, Richmond:

DEAR SIR: On the 29th of October ultimo I furnished the transportation and muster of Col. William B. Sims’ regiment of cavalry, who were mustered for a year from the 14th October ultimo. They (the regiment) commenced moving on the 28th, and on the 30th the entire regiment was en route for General McCulloch’s command, my regiment having left for the same destination on the 16th October ultimo.

Immediately after furnishing the transportation of Colonel Sims’ regiment I left for this place, at the urgent request of Maj. R. P. Crump, to muster his battalion of cavalry, raised by the order of Secretary Walker, for Missouri. By Wednesday next I shall be able to complete his muster, and they (the battalion) will march immediately to join General {p.145} McCulloch, after which I will repair with all dispatch to Col. S. B. Maxey’s rendezvous, in the southwest corner of Lamar County. When I have finished the muster of his regiment I shall move directly to join my own regiment, which is ere this with General McCulloch, under the command of my lieutenant-colonel, J. J. Diamond, unless I shall receive different orders. Two of the regiments tendered the Confederate States by his excellency Governor Clark, of the State of Texas, to wit, Col. M. F. Locke’s and W. H. Parsons’, I learn, have marched in the direction of the coast, which service, I learn, has been tendered them by General Hébert, commanding the Department of Texas. I notified Locke and Parsons that I was ordered by your excellency to muster all troops tendered by his excellency the governor of the State of Texas into the service of the Confederate States, and to march them without delay to the command of Gen. Ben. McCulloch, in Missouri. I received no reply, but heard they (Locke and Parsons) marched on toward Galveston, disregarding the information I gave them.

I would ask leave to call the attention of your department to Forts Washita, Arbuckle, and Cobb. These posts are at the present unoccupied. Washita and Arbuckle are posts of considerable value, whilst Cobb is but a temporary affair, yet at that immediate place are some 2,500 or 3,000 Indians, known as the Reserve Indians, the most of whom have been principally raised in Texas, know our country better than any one, and are susceptible of being made the most disagreeable and destructive enemies to our northwestern frontier-I mean Texas. These Indians are at Fort Cobb, and are unable to protect themselves against the depredations of the combined Comanches and Kiowas, with whom they (the reserve Indians) are and have been for a long time at war. Besides this you have no doubt been officially informed of the rupture between the Creek Indians. Though I learn that matters have been compromised and settled with the disaffected Creeks, yet I learn there are still some disaffected Indians of various tribes still hanging about the Cherokee Nation, and give to the Chickasaw Indians and the people of the northern portion of Texas a good deal of uneasiness, from their proximity to the Chickasaws and our people immediately on Red River. I learned the day before I left Red River, Grayson County, that there were at one place in the Cherokee Nation, on the Canadian River, 200 runaway and free negroes in regular drill, whose object is supposed to be hostile to the Confederates. If this be so, would not the circumstances justify a force being placed in these posts to keep down hostilities and protect the reserve Indians, and prevent them (the reserve Indians) from being trifled with by the Federals? It has been said that some 500 of the jayhawkers were in camps with the disaffected Creeks-whether true or not I cannot say, though it is believed from the northern part of the State of Texas proper there have left for the Confederate Army several thousand troops, leaving but few, except those who have families.

There is a very considerable dread amongst our people on Red River on this account, as it might be justly said that we are now without any power intervening between Texas and the Creek Nation, and none between us and the wild Comanches except the reserve Indians, who will stampede at the first approach of the enemy. I desire in this to ask your determination, and, as you think proper, act in the premises.

With sentiments of high regard, I am, your obedient servant and friend,

WM. C. YOUNG, Colonel, Comdg. Reg’t Texas Vol. Cav., C. S. Army. {p.146}

GALVESTON, TEX., November 17, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

In obedience to an order from the commanding general, I proceeded to make an examination of the Rollover, and the practicability of the launches being transported across it, and the necessity of defending that point, and the best means of effecting this.

With the chartered steamer John F. Carr, drawing 2 1/2 feet of water (about that of a frigate’s launch), at a condition of the tide above the medium mark, I examined the water of East Bay, from Bolivar Point to the nearest approachable shore of the Rollover in that direction, which I found to be about 2 miles. The Carr there grounded in 2 1/2 feet of water, bottom soft mud. From my own observation and the best information I could obtain from persons well acquainted with that locality, I learn that nothing drawing over 2 1/2 feet of water can approach the Rollover at East Bay sufficiently-near to command it.

There are but two passes from the Rollover by water into Galveston Bay; one at Hanna’s Reef, and one near Smith’s Point. These have 2 1/2 feet of water at mean tide, and are so intricate that none but persons well acquainted with the locality, such as oystermen, &c., can find their way through. The Carr grounded three times, with the best pilot I could obtain. The persons reported to be best acquainted with these passes are residents of Bolivar, viz: Captain Atkinson and sons, Englishmen, both being residents of Texas; Mr. John Hamshire and sons, Americans and Texans. The pilots who are best acquainted with these passes are James Reese and John Webster, who reside at Galveston. One of the passes alluded to can be defended by musketry at Smith’s Point. The other pass, at Hanna’s Reef can be approached from Galveston Bay by a steamer drawing 5 feet of water. The extensive shoal adjacent to the Rollover at East Bay and the intricate navigation from thence to Galveston Bay render the passage of ships’ launches, or any boats not especially constructed for shoal waters, a very difficult matter.

I learn from persons said to be best acquainted with the waters adjacent to and seaward of the Rollover that there is deepest water off the Rollover nearest to the shore of any part of the coast from the Sabine to Galveston. A vessel drawing 11 feet of water can anchor within 300 or 400 yards, and ships’ launches, at mean tide, in a smooth sea, can come within 75 yards of the beach. There is a sand reef, extending from Bolivar Point along the coast beyond the Rollover, distant about 1 mile from the shore, on which there is at mean tide from 6 to 7 feet of water, in side of which, by Bolivar Point, there is a channel of 8 or 9 feet of water. The distance from Bolivar Point to the Rollover is about 18 miles. From Bolivar Point to the passage at Hanna’s Reef is about 7 miles. The highest point of land above the sea at the Rollover is said to be about 10 to 12 feet. The land is highest near the sea, and declines gradually towards East Bay for about 200 or 300 yards; then a sudden fall and gradual slope to East Bay. The distance from the beach to East Bay is said to be about 650 yards. Water for ordinary use can be procured by a slight excavation; but good water cannot be procured nearer than 8 or 10 miles.

I am, very respectfully,

WM. W. HUNTER, Commander, C. S. Navy.

{p.147}

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Richmond, November 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. O. HEBERT, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: I have had the honor to receive your letter of October 31 marked private, in regard to the condition of affairs in Texas. I thank you for this information, and assure you that the defense of the coast and frontiers of Texas, whenever they may be threatened, shall not be disregarded by the Government. You may confidently rely upon assistance and support whenever they may be needed. So much of your letter as referred to the deficiency of arms, ammunition, &c., I have submitted to the Chief of Ordnance for consultation, with directions that your wants should be as far as possible supplied. The want of arms is one which, unfortunately, we are not just now able to relieve, but I hope that supplies may be on hand in time to meet all the exigencies of your department. In regard to ammunition, the Chief of Ordnance informs me that the supply at the arsenal at San Antonio ought to be ample to supply all your immediate wants (for at least 15,000 men). You are therefore instructed to direct your requisitions to the ordinance officer there in charge. In the mean time it is well to continue to encourage the people to collect and preserve all their arms and ammunition and to rely as far as possible upon their own means of defense in case of attack. You may assure them, however, that their confidence in the Confederate Government shall not be disappointed, and that if threatened or invaded they shall not be left without assistance.

I am, respectfully, yours,

J. P. BENJAMIN, Acting Secretary of War.

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FORT DAVIS, TEX., November 21, 1861.

General SIBLEY, Commanding Brigade of Troops in the State of Texas:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith a letter received by me this morning from a gentleman in Chihuahua. The author of this letter is in every respect reliable. He is known to most of the merchants in Western Texas and many persons of Louisiana. I, however, send it to you just as he sent it to me, in order that you may act upon it as you see proper.

I am, your obedient servant,

W. C. ADAMS, Commanding Post.

[Inclosure.]

CHIHUAHUA, November 6, 1861.

To the COMMANDER OF FORT DAVIS, Texas:

DEAR SIR: There is a rumor in town, said by persons that pretend to know to be official, that 7,000 Federal troops had landed at Guaymas from California, destine to operate against Texas. It is also said that the governor has received official orders from the city of Mexico not to obstruct in any way whatever the passage of Federal troops over the territory of this State. I inform you of these rumors, fearing lest you may not have any advice of it, and also that you may convey to General Sibley the intelligence, that he may act in the matter as his judgment may dictate.

I remain, yours, most respectfully,

GEO. L. MACMANUS.

{p.148}

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GALVESTON, TEX., November 22, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, C. S. A.:

In obedience to your verbal order of this day, directing me to state in writing the practicability of gunboats of the class represented to be in the enemy’s fleet being able to reach a position in Galveston Bay to command the bridge from Galveston Island to the mainland, I would respectfully state that a vessel drawing eight feet of water cannot get within 3 miles of the bridge, and one drawing seven feet of water cannot get within 2 1/2 miles of the bridge, by the way of either the Pelican or Galveston channel. Six feet of water in high tide can be taken to the bridge. The enemy’s gunboats are reported to draw from eight to nine feet of water. He is however represented to have lighter-draught steamers, on which guns may be mounted. Any vessel capable of crossing Galveston Bar can pass at very long gun-shot range, by both Fort Point and Pelican Spit, to about 4 miles above Pelican Spit. The enemy’s gunboats may therefore pass both Fort Point and Pelican Spit with the battery at present mounted thereon. Although all the marks indicating the channel-way into Galveston Bay have been re moved, the channel is well known to many persons who have been trading to this place, and doubtless the enemy may have the services of some of these.

I am, very respectfully,

WM. W. HUNTER, Commander, C. S. Navy.

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ORDNANCE OFFICE, DISTRICT OF GALVESTON, November 22, 1861.

[Maj. S. B. DAVIS:]

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, in accordance to instructions received from department headquarters, dated November 20, 1861, I have visited the battery referred to, at Virginia Point, and find that it consists of a substantial earth wall, of some 12 feet at the crown and 20 feet at the base, extending about 70 yards on both sides of the railroad, and commanding the bridge at all approachable points by water. The armament consists of three 24-pounder guns and one 8-inch howitzer, all mounted on siege carriages, the platforms giving an angle of fire of 90 degrees. Two of the 24-pounders are now in position, and the remaining 24-pounders and the howitzer will be in position to day. The amount of ammunition on hand at the time is as follows: One hundred and seventy-three rounds of powder, 113 rounds of shot, and 18 shells, fixed. The powder magazine is situated 40 yards behind the parapet, 15 feet square by 7 high. It is well built, with a bomb-proof roof, and is not exposed to a fire of round shot, as it has the same height as the parapet.

In conclusion, I would state that I have consulted with Capt. J. Kellersburg, and we are of the opinion that the battery will be ready by Monday to do good and effective service; but at the same time would suggest that at least two guns of a longer range than those there at present be placed at this point as soon as practicable.

Very Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. SPALDING GOOD, First Lieutenant, Acting Ordnance Officer.

{p.149}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, November 25, 1861.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector-General C. S. A., Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose herewith, for the information of the Secretary of War, a communication from Lieut. Col. John R. Baylor, First Regiment Texas Mounted Rifles, informing that California is on the eve of a revolution, and recommending that the Southerners in that State be induced to join the Confederate States Army.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. O. HEBERT, Brigadier-General, P. A., Comdg. Dep’t of Texas.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, Doña Aña, Ariz., November 2, 1861.

[Maj. S. B. DAVIS:]

SIR: I beg to call your attention to some matter of information that may be of service to the Government at this time. California is on the eve of a revolution. There are many Southern men there who would cheerfully join us if they could get to us, and they could come well armed and mounted. I would ask permission to get all such men as choose to join us, and would further ask that some arrangement for the purchase of horses in California be made. I could now buy the best of horses there for less than $50 per head, and there are many Southern men who would sell them for Confederate bonds. Another thing I take the liberty of suggesting is, that a force be placed in Western Arizona, to watch the landing of United States troops at Guaymas, that they may not pass through Sonora to invade us. A party of Californians have just arrived, and report that there are no troops on the road at this time, but that the United States Government was trying to raise them for the purpose of invasion, and I am reliably informed that the Government of Mexico has sent orders to the governor of Sonora to allow the passage of United States troops through that State, and agents are in Sonora buying corn and supplies for the United States troops. I have thought proper to furnish you with this information and leave you to act upon it.

Respectfully,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. T. M. R.

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HDQRS. THIRD REG’T TEXAS INF., PROV. ARMY, Fort Brown, Tex., November 30, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: Information has been given me by Col. Charles Livenskiold, the Texas State commissioner, that a company of infantry, commanded by Capt. Morgan, was mustered into the Confederate service for the war, as one of the companies designed for this regiment (the Third Texas Infantry, Colonel Luckett), at Corpus Christi. This company, I understand, has received no orders to report at this post, but still remains at Corpus Christi. There is also at that point another company (artillery), both of them well armed. As I conceive that one company {p.150} at that point is equally as capable of defending it as two (both not being sufficient against a superior force), I would respectfully request that orders may be sent to Captain Morgan to join his regiment at this post immediately. He is, I understand, amply provided with transportation and camp and garrison equipage. We have at this post but two infantry companies (one of them composed entirely of Mexicans), which are so wholly inadequate to the necessities of the post as scarcely to need attention being drawn to the fact; yet, sir, I deem it my duty to urge, in the strongest terms, the necessity for the completion of the regiments and their assembly at this post in the shortest space of time. With the full force destined, or intended, for this point, I cannot but feel that in their raw and unorganized condition they are insufficient-how much the more so this is the case with the force now here you can well judge. Sir, I am so deeply impressed with the urgent necessity of the full force intended for this post being assembled and organized, that I feel at a loss to convey my impressions to you. In connection with this subject it will readily occur to your mind that means are requisite to provide for the force. Even with the small force now here, it is with no little difficulty that arrangements are made to obtain absolute necessaries, and even of these there are many things of which the troops are wholly destitute. Nearly everything which has been furnished the troops on this frontier in the past has been purchased on credit, and the hope of means being provided at any early day has been so often repeated as almost to produce a smile when expressed. Sir, the credit of the Government has been seriously endangered, and unless money can be had in a short time will be utterly ruined. Almost everything needed could be had here now, were we provided with the means of paying for purchases. Without money it is with the greatest difficulty that anything can be had; besides, everything purchased upon credit is at a cost outrageously high. Arms and other munitions can now be had in Mexico, but if not purchased soon (and money is needed to do so), the difficulties expected with Spain will utterly preclude the possibility of accomplishing it.

In my last report to headquarters I informed you that General J. M. I. Carvajal was in close proximity to Matamoras, and that an attack was anticipated. I now have to inform you that on the morning of the 20th instant General Carvajal, with a force of 1,800 or 2,000 men, commenced an attack on Matamoras, defended by General Guadaloupe Garcia, with a force of about 1,600 men. The contest has continued up to the present time, with the exception of two armistices, the first of twenty-four hours, to permit the withdrawal of foreign consuls, women, children, and non-combatants; the second, of forty-eight hours, terminating at 2 p. m. to-day, for a conference, having for its object a settlement of the difficulties. It has resulted, I understand, in no favorable adjustment, and hostilities have been resumed. Much valuable property has been destroyed, the principal portion of which, so far as I can learn, belonging to foreigners. I have endeavored to preserve as strict neutrality as practicable, though I have extended several favors, which I deemed dictated and demanded by feelings of humanity. The best possible feeling exists at the present hour between both of the belligerent powers and myself, and they are equally gratified, or so express themselves, at the neutral position I have assumed and the measures taken to preserve it.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BUCHEL, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

{p.151}

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HDQRS. SECOND REG’T TEXAS MOUNTED RIFLES, La Mesilla, Ariz., December 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General HEBERT Commanding Department of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that my spies have returned from the immediate vicinity of Fort Craig, and report the enemy fortifying that place strongly, and also extending their camps and fortifications down the river as far as Alamosa, 30 miles below the fort. General Sibley’s troops have not arrived yet, but I learn are within a short distance of Fort Bliss. I shall continue to watch the movements of the enemy until the arrival of General Sibley, when he will have command and act as he thinks proper.

I have no fears now of an invasion from above, and am happy to state that my regiment is in fine health and ready for any service demanded of them. The small-pox has abated, and will, I hope, entirely disappear in a few days more. I regret to report the loss of several men by that disease. Since putting my men in quarters the health of the command has greatly improved.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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GALVESTON, TEX., December 2, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, C. S. A.:

In obedience to your verbal order of this day, I have obtained the best information in my power touching the means of defense of the mouth of the Trinity River.

There are three passes in the Trinity River; two of them will not admit the passage of anything but small boats, drawing from 2 to 2 1/2 feet of water, and these are much obstructed by logs and shoals. The third and main pass is through a canal, the entrance to which would be under the guns of a battery, placed at Chambersia, or the same place, called Anahuac. Through this canal there is about 4 1/2 feet of water at mean tide. Anahuac is on the mainland, on the east side of the bay, and there is a good road to Liberty and Beaumont. A battery at Anahuac, supported by 500 infantry, would seem to be a sufficient force to command the entrance to Trinity River. A steamer suited to the navigation of the Trinity River would be able to communicate with Liberty, distant about 25 miles by land and from 30 to 40 miles by water. Navigation above Liberty is practicable only in high stages of water, which is usually from about the middle of January. The condition of water will admit of navigation to Magnolia, 125 miles from the town of Sabine, which is distant about 40 miles from Natchitoches, en Red River.

I am, very respectfully,

WM. W. HUNTER, Commander, C. S. Navy.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 206.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., December 3, 1861.

I. Col. H. E. McCulloch, First Regiment Texas Mounted Rides, is, until further orders, assigned to the immediate command of the military {p.152} posts northwest, west, and south of San Antonio, including the posts at Victoria and Saluria.

...

By order of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., December 3, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Comdg. First Reg’t. Texas Mounted Rifles:

SIR: I have been directed by the commanding general to furnish you with the following memorandum of troops to be called into service, if possible, for the defense of the Department of Texas, with their respective rendezvous.

First, Sabine Pass, one battalion, to consist of one company of artillery, one mounted, and three infantry companies; second, Galveston Island, Bolivar Point, and Virginia Point, not less than 4,000 men, to consist of eight companies mounted, one regiment of artillery, the balance infantry; third, at or near Harrisburg, 2,000 men, of which one regiment should be mounted; fourth, at Spring Creek, near Hempstead, 2,000; fifth, at Victoria, 2,000; sixth, on coast from San Luis to head of Matagorda Bay, four mounted companies, six infantry; seventh, on Rio Grande, not less than 3,000, of which one regiment should be mounted; eighth, at Pass Cavallo, three companies; Aranzas, two or more companies.

The relative number, rendezvous, or stations of these troops may be changed as circumstances may require, and will be provided for by the proper departments upon the above basis until further orders.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HDQRS. THIRD REG’T TEXAS INFANTRY, PROV. ARMY, Fort Brown, Tex., December 5, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Asst. Adj. Gen., Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: It is with regret that I have to notify the commanding general of the lamentable condition of the forces at this post. There are but two companies of infantry here. One (Captain Parker’s) is composed wholly of Mexicans, and, like all their countrymen, are susceptible to bribes and corruption, and cannot be depended upon. No less than 14 men from this company alone have deserted and passed over the river into Mexico, taking part in the difficulties now unhappily existing in Tamaulipas. The other company (Captain Buquor’s) and Captain Marmion’s artillery company are composed partly of Mexicans, but chiefly of foreigners, who are old soldiers and deserters from the old Federal Army. With few exceptions they are a class of men in whom no dependence whatever can be placed. A few dollars and a little whisky is quite sufficient to corrupt and entice them away. Five of these men (belonging to Captain Marmion’s artillery company) have {p.153} also deserted and crossed into Mexico, notwithstanding I have taken every precaution in my power to prevent it.

I make this statement not only from a sense of duty, but for the purpose of requesting that the other companies raised to complete this regiment may be selected and composed of an entirely different class of men; that, if enough companies cannot be found to volunteer for this service (the Rio Grande), the commanding general may be induced to send down some of the companies stationed in the reserve camps. We need men of character and intelligence, who have an interest in the success of our cause and country, and who cannot be bribed or enticed to desert.

I have strong hopes of being able to arrest some of those who have deserted. Indeed, I now have one, against whom charges will be preferred and forwarded without delay.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BUCHEL, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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INDIANOLA, TEX., December 6, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: In compliance with Special Orders, No. 146, dated Headquarters Department of Texas, Galveston, November 16, 1861, which was received at Camp Henry McCulloch, November 28, 1861, I have the honor to report that, upon a thorough reconnaissance of this place as well as the coast between this and Pass Cavallo, in my judgment no disposition can be made of the forces under my command in their present state of organization and appointment, so as to defend any portion of the immediate coast or afford any material aid in preventing vessels from entering this bay. This place is pretty much abandoned, and I believe such is the case with most all the towns and villages adjacent to the coast. The point selected by Captain Shea to establish his battery is, in my opinion, the proper position to command the entrance to the bay, and, if properly constructed, under the supervision of an experienced engineer officer and suitably appointed, could be made to accomplish that object; but in its present condition it is totally inadequate for this purpose, and should be immediately withdrawn, or put in a condition, not only to command the Pass, but to be capable of defending itself from attack by sea or land. On account of its isolated position it is totally cut off from any support from any quarter whatever, and, if attacked with heavy metal or a superior force, either by sea or land (and it is open to attack either way or both at the same time), it must inevitably fall into the hands of the enemy, as I can conceive of no possible way of withdrawing them in the presence of an enemy, on account of several impassable bayous.

I also inclose a report of ordnance and ordnance stores pertaining to Captain Shea’s command. The captain appears to be an energetic and industrious officer and his command is in a fair state of discipline and instruction.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. R. GARLAND, Colonel, Provisional Army.

{p.154}

[Inclosure.]

List of ammunition on hand at Fort Washington, Pass Cavallo, Tex., December 5, 1861.

Fifty-four rounds spherical case shot, for 24-pounder; 24 rounds shell, for 24-pounder; 156 rounds round shot, for 24-pounder; 64 rounds grape shot, for 24-pounder; 24 rounds canister shot, for 24-pounder; 150 pounds cannon powder, for 24-pounder; 10 kegs cartridges, for 24-pounder (18 in each keg); 8,860 B. and B. cartridges; 2,500 rifle cartridges; 4 24-pounder siege guns; 2 12-pounder siege guns; 1 6-pounder field gun, no fixed ammunition or equipments and badly mounted; 98 rifle muskets; 33 common muskets; 36 cavalry musketoons, equipment complete. The above is a correct statement of arms and ammunition at this post.

D. D. SHEA, Captain, C. S. Provisional Army, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS MILITARY DISTRICT OF GALVESTON, Galveston, Tex., December 6, 1861.

Capt. E. B. H. SCHNEIDER, Commanding at South Battery:

SIR: It is evident, from the movements of the enemy, that they are preparing for an attack on this place. Should a night attack be attempted, it will most likely be made on Fort Point, Pelican Spit, and South Battery. You will therefore take such precautions as to prevent surprise, by doubling your guards and throwing out pickets in various directions to the water’s edge. It is confidently expected that you will successfully defend yourself against any attack by boats. But should numbers overwhelm you, you will destroy your guns by spiking, or otherwise blow up your ammunition, set fire to your buildings, and retreat in an orderly manner towards the headquarters of Nichols’ regiment, on the strand. Additional vedettes are thrown out to protect the telegraph line-to keep it intact, Should appearances indicate attack, you will immediately telegraph to me at the office of E. B. Nichols & Co., where my quarters are established.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. B. NICHOLS, Colonel, Commanding District.

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HDQRS. THIRD REG’T TEXAS INFANTRY, PROV. ARMY, Fort Brown, Tex., December 7, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: Inclosed you will find a copy of a communication received this morning from Capt. John A. Settle, assistant commissary of subsistence and acting assistant quartermaster, Provisional Army, C. S.

I have personally investigated the circumstances attending the subject-matter of his communication, and I feel compelled to report our situation as a truly deplorable one. Flour and corn cannot be had at all on this side of the Rio Grande. All that we can get comes from the other side (Mexico), and, under the most favorable condition of circumstances the supply is limited and precarious. Both of these articles have to be brought from the interior of Mexico and from great distances. During the present disturbed state of the country the risk of {p.155} transportation is so great that it is with the utmost difficulty the common carriers can be prevailed upon to incur it, nor will they do so at all for paper money nor upon credit. They must be paid cash in specie. The quartermaster and commissary departments are wholly out of the articles mentioned; besides, many other small things necessary to the health, comfort, and subsistence of the troops, which can only be had for cash, and at best in but small quantities. There are now in the command to be provided for about 700 men and over 400 horses, and other troops expected every hour. The quartermaster and commissary departments are without a dollar and without credit. The officer in charge of these departments is not even authorized to draw a draft by means of which money can be obtained, nor can money be borrowed. Representations of the most urgent character have repeatedly been made, both orally and by letter, of the great necessity existing that this post should be supplied with funds sufficient to meet the requirements of the troops, and of the utter impossibility of accomplishing anything without them. Still we are unsupplied.

The credit of the Government here is almost wholly lost. The statement that money is soon expected elicits a smile of incredulity, if not a sneer of contempt.

The enemy has already made his appearance, as there is a steamer of war lying off Brazos Santiago (she arrived on the afternoon of the 5th instant), and others daily expected. I may be required to move the whole command at any moment to meet the enemy, if a landing cannot be prevented. Under these circumstances, and feeling deeply impressed by the necessities of the case, I have taken the responsibility of ordering Capt. John A. Settle, assistant commissary of subsistence and acting assistant quartermaster, Provisional Army, C. S., to draw a draft for $10,000 on the assistant treasurer at New Orleans, or upon any other Government agent at that place holding public funds, and negotiate the same forthwith, if possible. I have therefore to request that the commanding general will give the requisite orders to the chiefs of the departments, in order that the draft may be properly met. I have no hesitation in stating that, if protested, not another dollar or one pound of any article can hereafter be procured here without the money is paid in hand; hence the necessity for immediate action.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. BUCHEL, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 227.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., December 7, 1861.

I. Col. John C. Moore, of Moore’s regiment, is relieved from the command of the Military District of Galveston, and will join his regiment.

II. Col. E. B. Nichols, of Nichols’ regiment, is assigned to the command of the Military District of Galveston.

By order of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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FORT WASHINGTON, Near Saluria, Tex., December 9, 1861.

MAJOR: I have the honor to state that on the 7th instant, about 1 p. m., a vessel (sloop-of-war rig) hove in sight. She sailed to the west {p.156} of the bar and about 5 miles off. She made several short tacks off the bar and steered back to the east. At about 5 o’clock she came to anchor off the East, or Decrow’s, Channel, and 2 miles from shore. On the 8th, at noon, she made sail and steered westward, running close to the bar. When nearly opposite our position, and 3 miles distant, I caused my four 24-pounder battery to open on her. She was struck two or three times by our shot. She put about after the first round of the battery and steered seaward. She showed no colors up to this time. She is standing off and on, in sight.

I trust the commanding general will give me instructions relative to the present position of our battery, property, &c. I only have sufficient mules here to carry one piece to the rear. We fired sixteen shots.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. D. SHEA, Captain, Commanding at Pass Cavallo, Texas.

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HEADQUARTERS, CAMP HENRY MCCULLOCH, December 14, 1861.

Maj. SAMUEL BOYER DAVIS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dep’t of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the commanding general of the department, that I have just returned from Captain Shea’s camp, at Pass Cavallo. The captain is making every arrangement in his power to secure a retreat, if it should become necessary. He is establishing ferries across the principal bayous for this purpose. Upon a second reconnaissance I suggested to the captain the propriety of taking up a position some 2 miles farther up the Pass, as, in my judgment, he would have the same, if not a better, command of the channel, as well as being out of the range of guns from the sea. The vessel reported was still there up to the time I left. She lies off and on, and moves up and down the coast, never getting entirely out of sight of the entrance to the bay, and it is my impression she is looking out for two vessels that left that port for Mexico some time since with cotton, and are expected to return about this time laden with coffee. While I was at Captain Shea’s camp she fired some eight or ten guns, but we were unable to ascertain the object of her firing, but judge she was merely practicing. At the time of firing she was lying off the coast, some 10 or 12 miles above Decrow’s Point. With a good glass, from the top of the light-house, we could distinctly see the flashes, as well as hear the reports, of the guns. The night I spent at Captain Shea’s camp a Mexican or Spaniard was shot under very suspicions circumstances. He was taken by a party of mounted volunteer patrols while in the act of launching a pilot’s yawl near one of the pilot stations, a short distance above camp. He was brought in and turned over to the guards, and in attempting to escape was shot, but was alive up to the time of my departure.

I directed Captain Rupley’s company to take position at Saluria, to guard the ferry across the main bayou and to afford any other assistance in his power. The other three companies, under Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson, took position at Indianola. I have ordered a detachment of mounted men (1 commissioned, with 2 non-commissioned officers and 15 privates) from Captain Beaumont’s company to report to Captain Shea for duty. I did not order a large detachment down, on account of the difficulty of procuring forage and water; and, as I do {p.157} not apprehend an immediate attack, I have ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson to return to this place with his command.

I also beg leave respectfully to call the attention of the commanding general to the fact that there are two assistant quartermasters on duty with this command, which, in my judgment, is an unnecessary expense. Captain Wolfe, quartermaster, appointed for the Sixth Regiment of Texas Infantry, having received his commission and given his bonds, is competent to perform all the duties required in that department.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. R. GARLAND, Colonel, Provisional Army.

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HDQRS. SECOND REG’T TEXAS MOUNTED RIFLES, Mesilla, December 14, 1861.

Hon. J. P. BENJAMIN, Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

SIR: I have the honor to forward you a statement of the disposition of the “Federal drafts” captured, at the surrender of Fort Fillmore, amounting in all to $9,500, $5,500 of which were on the assistant treasurer of New York. The other $4,000 were drawn on the assistant treasurer at Saint Louis, Mo. I sent the drafts by Mr. William McGrorty to New York for collection, which resulted as follows: $4,500 were paid by the assistant treasurer, New York; the other $1,000 draft was not paid, Mr. Cisco, the assistant treasurer, stating that the drawer had no funds in the Treasury to his credit. The $4,000 draft on assistant treasurer Saint Louis were left by Mr. McGrorty in New York for collection. Saint Louis being under martial law Mr. McGrorty felt it unsafe to go there in person. I, have since received no information if the drafts have been collected or not. I have paid out of the above amount the following sums, viz: $500 was claimed by Lieutenant Plummer, acting assistant quartermaster, U. S. Army, as private funds, which I refunded him. Four hundred and eleven dollars paid Samuel J. Jones, sutler at Fort Fillmore, for corn delivered the quartermaster, U. S. Army, and not paid for by the United States. The corn was in store at Fort Fillmore when the post was abandoned, and Lieutenant Plummer, acting assistant quartermaster, certified to Mr. Jones’ claim after the capture of the Federal troops at San Augustine Springs. Three hundred dollars I have paid Mr. McGrorty for part of his expenses to New York in prosecuting the collection of said drafts. The balance $3,289. I send you herewith the quartermaster’s receipts for that amount. The drafts on Saint Louis, left in New York for collection I will duly account for when informed of the payment thereof.

I have the honor to be, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN R. BAYLOR, Colonel, Comdg. Second Reg’t Texas Mounted Rifles, C. S. Army.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 10.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, Fort Bliss, Tex., December 14, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. H. H. Sibley assumes from this date the command of all the forces of the Confederate States on the Rio Grande at and above Fort Quitman and all in the Territory of New Mexico and Arizona.

II. The forces under the orders of Brigadier-General Sibley will hereafter be known and designated as the “Army of New Mexico.”

{p.158}

III. Headquarters of this army are temporarily fixed at Fort Bliss, whither communications will be forwarded until further orders.

By order of Brig. Gen. H. H. Sibley:

A. M. JACKSON, Acting Adjutant-General, Army of New Mexico.

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OFFICE TEXAS AND NEW ORLEANS R. R. Co., Houston, Tex., December 16, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, Commanding Department of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to report that, on receipt of your telegram and order on Maj. J. B. Likens, commanding at Sabine Pass, received on the 8th instant, p. m., I at once proceeded to Beaumont with a sufficient force of engineers, machinists, laborers, &c., to accomplish the object. The agents of the company there were loth to give any assistance, as they deemed the town (Sabine Pass) and the railroad perfectly safe from any foray of the enemy. Major Likens promptly co-operated with me in removing the rolling stock up to a point of temporary safety and within reach of protection. The company have so neglected and abused their engines that they are comparatively useless until in the hands of skillful mechanics for a day or two. The rolling stock in working order, or which I put in rolling order, consists of seven platform cars and three house cars. I also found eighty-four wheels and axles, and all the furnishings to put them up, sufficient for twenty-one cars, which would give capacity in order for the transportation of from 1,000 to 1,500 men. I removed these wheels and axles 21 miles north of Beaumont. I also towed one engine out of order to a distance of 6 or 7 miles north of Beaumont and the other engine I removed north of Taylor’s Bayou (a draw-bridge), at which point it broke down or failed to operate. On each engine I left a detail of two men, with a sergeant in charge, as a guard, furnished by Major Likens, and to report to him. On my return here yesterday I dispatched my master machinist, with some men, to put one engine in order and fix up a train, so that either the Eastern Texas Railroad Company or the military authorities could have some transportation facilities in case of emergency. I am sorry to report that the employés of the road, although they volunteered to assist in the accomplishment of the end desired, evinced a disposition to try and so injure the only engine they had in order to move as to defeat the seeming of the rolling stock, and, by carelessness or malignity, partly succeeded; but by this time it is all rectified by my men. Should a more detailed report be desired, I will furnish it cheerfully.

I beg to make two suggestions in the matter. First, that a train be put in order on the road, either to be at the order of the commanding officer at Sabine Pass or the railroad company, subject to his protection and control. Second, that a sufficient amount of rails be shipped from Galveston to Liberty (which the company have in Galveston), to enable them to lay their track up to the junction with the Texas and New Orleans Railroad at Beaumont, which will give you rail connection from Galveston and this place to Sabine Pass. It will only require about two hundred tons of rails, and the connection can be made in five or six days after the arrival of iron at Liberty.

I remain, yours, with much respect,

A. M. GENTRY, President, &c.

{p.159}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 267.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., December 16, 1861.

Col. H. E. McCulloch, First Texas Mounted Rifles, is authorized to receive, for special service on the Rio Grande, troops for twelve months, armed and equipped with such arms as can be procured.

By order of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 283.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, Tex., December 17, 1861.

For special and immediate service on the Rio Grande, troops will be received and mustered in for six months.

By command of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 12.}

HDQRS. ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, A. G. O., Fort Bliss, Tex., December 20, 1861.

The general command of the forces of the Confederate States, assumed by Brig. Gen. H. H. Sibley, in General Orders, No. 10, from these headquarters, and the proclamation of martial law promulgated by him, not being intended to abrogate or supersede the powers of Col. John R. Baylor, as civil and military governor of Arizona, he will continue the full exercise of the functions of that office.

By order of Brig. Gen. H. H. Sibley:

A. M. JACKSON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Army of New Mexico.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., December 24, 1861.

General P. O. HEBERT, Commanding Department of Texas, Galveston, Tex.:

DEAR SIR: Your highly esteemed favor of the 17th instant came to my hands on the 21st. Contents duly noted. I also had the honor of seeing your communication made to the adjutant-general, under date of the 21st ultimo. Owing to an error, it did not receive my attention until after the receipt of your last.

I have had, in addition to your letters, the pleasure of a communication from Col. H. E. McCulloch, of 21st instant, in relation to the same subject-matter, which I answer to-day and direct to Galveston.

It is my earnest desire to co-operate with you in the most efficient and speedy mode to concentrate troops under your orders, so that an adequate force may be thrown in the face of the enemy and his assaults beaten back, no matter in what quarter made.

As you justly remark, the irregular manner in which individuals have been authorized to raise troops has created the greatest confusion throughout the State. It is beyond the power of the State authorities to control its military force, and just when we so much need a perfect {p.160} system in moving the State troops we find ourselves almost helpless, unless the masses will come forward and voluntarily enroll themselves at the call of their country. Every exertion should, and I feel fully satisfied will, be made by you to successfully defend the State against every effort of the enemy.

Permit me here to suggest to you that I am possessed of unofficial information that the regiments of Colonels Locke and Maxcy are yet within the State in Upshur County, and preparing to go into winter quarters. These troops are beyond my control. Can you subject them to your orders? The winter can be very profitably spent by them on the coast; much more so than on Red River. I confess my ignorance on this subject, and only suggest it, that you, with your superior knowledge, may take such action as is deemed appropriate. If however, the power rests in you, I would urge that they be ordered to the coast.

While I am fully aware that it has been the policy of the Government to receive troops only when they enlist “for the war,” yet this policy has been in some instances varied from so far as to receive men for twelve months. And I now approach you, sir, for the purpose of obtaining your consent to encroach still further on that policy. If it were not for the peculiar circumstances which surround us, I should not for a moment entertain the idea of placing men in the field on other terms of enlistment than those originally desired by the Government; but, from various causes, it is now very evident that the requisite number of men cannot be obtained to defend the country during the winter, if enlistments for the war are required, or even if men for twelve months are demanded.

The legislature, following the recommendations of the executive, has enacted a stringent law on the subject of the military, and, as soon as an organization can be effected, every able-bodied man in the State will be forced to discharge his duty, if unwilling to do so. But, sir, I am compelled to say that this organization cannot be completed before the danger of an invasion has passed for the present winter.

In view of all the facts and circumstances before me, I suggest, sir, that you receive into the service of the Confederate States, for the term of six months, a sufficient number of men to successfully defend the State; and for the accomplishment of this purpose, I would further suggest that you make a requisition on the executive for such number of six-months’ volunteers as will, in your opinion, be amply able to sustain you in your plans and measures. So far as I am concerned I would much prefer that your requisition should call for more than are necessary than not enough. With such a requisition made on me, stating the number of troops wanted, the arm of service to which they will belong, the term of enlistment, and the places of rendezvous, I feel every confidence that the requisition can be speedily filled with volunteers.

I do not wish to be under the necessity of calling out the State troops as State troops, independent of the military of the Confederate States, which must be my excuse for being urgent in my insisting that you receive six-months’ volunteers for the defense of the State. I am fully convinced that one of the two courses must be pursued, either to receive six-months’ volunteers into the service for the defense of the State, or else the necessity will devolve on me to call out State troops for that purpose. In the latter case the troops would be in a great measure inefficient for the want of arms, ammunition, and drill, and militia defeats might be the consequence, in addition to the conflicts and want {p.161} of harmony between the State and Confederate service. These, among other reasons, induce me to insist that, for the present, you receive the six-months’ volunteers, and control them entirely independent of the State, as you do those now under your command.

I entertain the hope, sir, that when we succeed in organizing the State troops under the late enacted law, enlistments will go on with alacrity and rapidity for the terms the exigencies of the service may demand; for I do not believe that the Texan people will so far forget themselves as to wait to be drafted. But, sir, I am firmly convinced that for the present, you must rely on volunteers for the term of six months.

The great importance of this matter induces me to expect an early reply.

I have the honor, sir, to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

By order of the governor:

WM. M. WALTON, Private Sec’y.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., December 27, 1861.

Hon. JOHN H. REAGAN, Richmond, Va.:

DEAR SIR: Your position as one of the Cabinet induces me to request that you will (in addition to what you may be called upon to do under the letter herein inclosed, a copy of which has been sent to each of the delegation from Texas) hand one of the copies of the “frontier law” to the Secretary of War, and use your influence to have action on it at the earliest possible day.

This law has been framed in exact accordance with the wishes of the frontier people, as expressed through their representatives, and I feel well convinced that it will be beneficial in its workings, and will give full and ample protection to a much suffering portion of our country.

The force now on the frontier does not give protection, nor is it believed that any other system than that of daily patrolling a line from Red River to the Rio Grande will accomplish the object. Experience has demonstrated that this will do so.

There will be no heavier charge on the Confederacy by placing this particular regiment in the field than by permitting the one there now to remain. The McCulloch regiment can be drawn away and placed on the coast or sent to do service anywhere necessity demands it.

It is particularly desired that action should be taken immediately, so that movements may be made here to correspond with the necessities of the frontier.

As fast as companies are organized under this law they should take their place on the “patrol line,” and a corresponding number of the rangers now on the frontier drawn off into other service.

Your energetic action in this matter will be greatly advantageous to the frontier of Texas.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. R. LUBBOCK.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., December 27, 1861.

Hon. JOHN H. REAGAN, Richmond, Va.:

DEAR SIR: I take pleasure in inclosing to you “An act to provide for the protection of the frontier of the State of Texas,” passed by the {p.162} legislature now in session, and approved by the governor on the 21st of the present month.

In calling your attention to the act my duty under the law would be discharged, and at the same time would as fully elicit your energetic co-operation in seeking to have the regiment accepted by the Confederate Government as I would be able to do by any argument I may make; but, sir, you must excuse me for urging you to the promptest action in the direction of moving the Government to a favorable consideration of the matter. Our frontier demands a peculiar force for its defense, and nothing less than the measures set on foot by this act will secure protection to the people in that region; besides, if this regiment is placed on the frontier, as is desired, one of the regiments now there can be safely withdrawn and ordered into other service; and the settlers all through that section, being thus secured against Indian depredations, will flock to the coast service, where they are much needed at this time.

The simple effect of the reception of this regiment will be to give great confidence to the people and secure protection to the property on the frontier, and at the same time be the means of throwing into the service of the Confederacy many men from that section who are now forced to remain at home because of the daily insecurity in which they live. Your intimate knowledge of that people will fortify you in urging with the utmost zeal the reception of this regiment, knowing that by so doing you will be attempting to advantage and benefit a large and meritorious portion of your fellow-citizens.

Hoping, sir, that you will at short date from this time be able to advise this department that this regiment has been received by the Government of the Confederate States, I have, sir, the honor to remain, with the greatest respect, your very obedient servant,

F. R. LUBBOCK.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

AN ACT to provide for the protection of the frontier of the State of Texas.

SECTION 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Texas, That there shall be raised a regiment of rangers for the protection of the northern and western frontier of the State of Texas, to consist of ten companies, to be raised as hereinafter prescribed, to be officered according to the rules and regulations of the Confederate States Army; and the number of officers and privates, their pay and emoluments, shall be the same as in similar service in the Confederate States Army.

SEC. 2. Said men shall furnish themselves with arms, horses, and accouterments, and shall be enrolled for a term not less than twelve months, unless sooner discharged, and at the expiration of their term of service others shall be enrolled to supply their places.

SEC. 3. The requisite number of men for said regiment shall be raised in the frontier counties, to wit: One company shall be raised in the counties of Clay, Montague, Cooke, and Wise; one company shall be raised in the counties of Young, Jack, Palo Pinto, and Parker; one company from the counties of Stephens, Eastland, Erath, and Bosque; one company from the counties of Coryell, Hamiltomi, Lampasas, Comanche, and Brown-one company from the counties of San Saba, Mason, Llano, and Burnet; one company from the counties of Gillespie, Hays, and Kerr; one company from the counties of Blanco, Bandera, Medina, and Uvalde; one company from the counties of Frio, Atascosa, Live {p.163} Oak, Karnes, and Bee; one company from the counties of El Paso and Presidio; one company may be raised in any section of the State the governor may direct: and provided that the unorganized counties shall furnish men with the counties to which they are attached for judicial purposes, and every county named in this section shall have the privilege to furnish its proportion of men in preference to all other applications; and when any company cannot be furnished with the requisite number of men from the counties named in this act, then the deficiency may be supplied from the nearest adjoining counties not named in this act.

SEC. 4. Said troops shall be stationed in detachments of not less than twenty-five men. When the requisite number of men shall have entered this service, and shall take their stations on the outside settlements of the frontier, as nearly as practicable in a direct line from a point on Red River to a point on the Rio Grande River, and thence down said river to its mouth, to be selected by the commanding officer; and the commanding officer shall select the posts at the directions of the governor, in accordance with this act; and such stations shall be, if practicable, about twenty-five miles distant from each other, or so near each other that scouts shall pass over the ground between any two stations once every day. And, further, that the companies, or parts of companies, shall be stationed on that part of the frontier in which they have been enrolled, and that the posts on Red River shall be supplied with additional force of not less than twenty-five men; and the company designated in the third section of this act, to be raised in any part of the State, shall be in readiness to report to any part of the line the governor or commanding officer may think necessary.

SEC. 5. That the governor is required, immediately after the passage of this act, to commission competent persons, one for every company and district, as set forth in this act, to enroll the number of men for a company, and when at least sixty-four men shall have been enrolled, they shall organize by holding elections for company officers, and the captain elected shall return a muster roll, and make such other reports as may be required by the governor to the adjutant-general’s department, and shall, as soon as ordered by the governor, repair to the frontier and perform duty on the plan laid down in this act until otherwise directed by the governor or superior officers.

SEC. 6. The governor shall have power to appoint the field officers, as well as all other disbursing officers, pertaining to said regiment.

SEC. 7. The troops raised under and by virtue of this act shall be subject to the Rules and Regulations of the Confederate States Army, but shall always be subject to the authorities of the State of Texas for frontier service, and shall not be removed beyond the limits of the State of Texas; and that it shall be the duty of the governor to inclose a copy of this act to the Secretary of War and to each of our Representatives in Congress, urging the acceptance of said regiment in the service of the Confederate States as in lieu of one of the regiments now upon said frontier, and as the most efficient and economical mode of frontier protection.

SEC. 8. That no portion of said troops shall become a charge against the State until organized as required by the fifth section of this act and placed under orders.

SEC. 9. That an act to provide for the protection of the frontier of the State of Texas, passed February 7, 1861, be, and the same is hereby, repealed, from and after the 1st day of March next.

SEC. 10. The governor shall have power to disband said regiment {p.164} whenever, in his judgment, the services shall no longer be necessary for frontier protection, should the same not be accepted by the Confederate Government, under the provisions of this act.

SEC. 11. That this act take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

Approved December 21, 1861.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN MILITARY DISTRICT, San Antonio, Tex., December 31, 1861.

Col. H. E. MCCULLOCH, Commanding Western Military District of Texas:

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit for your information a note from Colonel Steele, of General Sibley’s brigade. You will readily perceive that the commands of yourself and General Sibley somewhat clash, as General Sibley assumes the command of all the troops on the Rio Grande above Fort Quitman, making his headquarters at Fort Bliss, and styling his command the Army of New Mexico.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

B. E. BENTON, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Western Military District of Texas.

[Inclosure.]

SAN ANTONIO, TEX., December 31, 1861.

B. E. BENTON, Aide and Acting Adjutant-General:

SIR: General Sibley’s order, which you have asked a copy of, is packed in my regimental desk, and has gone forward. Its purport is, assuming command of all the troops on the Rio Grande above Fort Quitman, and designating his command as the Army of New Mexico.

Your obedient servant,

WM. STEELE, Colonel Seventh Texas Mounted Militia.

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HDQRS. THIRD REG’T TEXAS INFANTRY, PROV. ARMY, Fort Brown, Tex., December 31, 1861.

Lieut. WM. O. YAGER, A. A. A. G. West. Mil. Dist. of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: Since my last I have had more time to investigate the state of affairs on this frontier and to examine into the condition of the command assigned me for its defense, and I regret to inform you that they are deplorable enough. The difficulties now existing in the neighboring Mexican State of Tamaulipas have so wholly changed the commercial condition of affairs from what they were but a few mouths since, as to deprive us of many facilities upon which we could then, with a reasonable certainty, calculate and depend. The civil war extends over almost the entire State, and renders intercourse and transportation precarious and unsafe; so much so, that it is with extreme difficulty that the usual public carriers can be prevailed upon to incur the risk of bringing even the necessary supplies for subsistence, and when they do so, it is at large rates and in but small quantities. The presence of {p.165} large hostile forces in such immediate proximity to this post increases our embarrassment in this respect tenfold, as they seize, confiscate, and consume nearly everything.

The quartermaster and commissary of subsistence has used every exertion to procure forage and subsistence; but to obtain more than enough for a few days at a time has been impossible. There is no certainty at any time that a sufficient supply will be on hand for the ensuing issue. To-day we have not a single barrel of flour on hand and not more than a few days’ forage, nor can I now see any probability of obtaining more. I have therefore directed him to make a requisition on San Antonio for such stores. These difficulties further embarrass us by paralyzing the efforts of such friendly merchants as are disposed to aid and assist us, much of their means and nearly the whole of their usual facilities being for the time completely deranged. The want of money has, too, been most discouraging and nearly fatal to our interest, the credit of the Government being wholly gone; and, although now supplied with Confederate notes for the quartermaster and commissary departments, they are almost wholly useless, as but few are willing to take them, and those who do invariably charge from 25 to 30 per cent. higher prices for what we purchase than would be the case had we gold and silver; besides, no other currency is at all available in Mexico, from whence we must procure the principal articles needed. Many things needed by us might possibly be procured were we supplied with specie, but those who possess them will not incur the risks attendant upon their delivery when they know we have only paper to give in exchange. These facts, I find from the correspondence of Lieutenant-Colonel Buchel, have been so forcibly urged upon the attention of the commanding general, that it would seem to be almost useless to reiterate them; but I feel so deeply impressed with the certainty that, should an enemy land, these circumstances will so militate against us as to almost compel a withdrawal to the interior.

The hope of a final adjustment of the difficulties in and about Matamoras seems now as distant as ever. For several days they have had but little or no firing, but to-day, I understand, Carvajal has received re-enforcements and a new supply of ammunition. We shall therefore for the next few days be annoyed by their fusillade, which will, as heretofore, result only in noise and smoke.

The desertions from the command have been repeatedly reported by Lieutenant-Colonel Buchel, and since my arrival several have occurred. The condition of the troops is such, that I must candidly confess I am not greatly surprised at their yielding to the inducements offered by the parties on the other side of the river. The most of them are but scantily clothed, and have received no pay; they know the state of the Government’s credit quite as well as I do myself, and also the difficulties attendant upon procuring supplies. They are fully aware of the inadequacy of the force now here to resist a force such as the enemy are likely to land with, of the unpopularity of the Rio Grande service, and of the difficulty heretofore experienced in raising additional troops. You cannot therefore, considering all these circumstances, avoid the conclusion at which I have arrived, that cause enough exists to discourage and dishearten them.

Permit me again to urge upon you the absolute necessity of sending forward as rapidly as possible additional infantry companies. We now have here three infantry and three artillery companies, but one of which (Captain Kampmann’s) is filled to the minimum established by law, and I see no probability of their being filled up unless recruits can be sent down from the interior.

{p.166}

It is also imperatively necessary that funds to pay off the troops should be furnished the quartermaster at as early a day as practicable. Until this is done, I fear it will be impossible to maintain a desirable degree of discipline and subordination, and to imbue them with an esprit de corps, so very essential to a successful and satisfactory performance of our duty.

The report of a board of officers now investigating the condition and amount of ordnance stores on hand at thins post will be forwarded as soon as prepared; I hope by the next express.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. N. LUCKETT, Colonel, Commanding.

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Abstract from the several returns of troops stationed in Texas at the places and dates indicated.*

CommandingOfficer.Present for dutyAggregate present.Aggregate present and absent.Artillery.Horses servicable.Horses unservicable.
Officers.Men.Heavy.Field.
Col. Jno. C. Moore, commanding Military District of Galveston, October, 18611302,2743,04913,189
Col. E. B. Nichols, commanding First Brigade, Military District of Galveston, December, 18611291,9482,7293,0028679815
Col. E. B. Nichols, commanding First Brigade, Military District of Galveston, January, 18621362,3113,0713,436131094627
Lieut. Col. A. Buchel, commanding on the Lower Rio Grande November, 18613649758564590
Col. P. N. Luckett, commanding on the Lower Rio Grande December, 1861466027318052482
Col. P. N. Luckett commanding on the Lower Rio Grande January, 1862.50709878967181

* No complete returns on file for 1861.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD REGIMENT TEXAS INFANTRY, Fort Brown, Tex., January 1, 1862.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose the written opinions of Lieutenant-Colonel Buchel, Major Gray, and all the captains composing the immediate command at this post, in reference to our ability to hold Fort Brown with the present command and its resources. These opinions have been taken separately, and without any previous or subsequent conference among officers. No one knows my own convictions, intentions, or final resolves in the premises up to the present time. I shall not attempt to hold the fort unless you give me positive orders to that effect. I will immediately make my arrangements for the removal of everything not necessary for the defense of this immediate section and without any regard whatever to the holding of Fort Brown. I desire the commanding colonel to send me positive instructions on this subject, as I anxiously await his determination in this matter. In the mean time, should the enemy present himself in force, I will send then to the Ringgold Barracks, the point I design sending them, unless instructed by you not to do so. Press of business prevents my having retained copies of these opinions. Please have them copied and forwarded to me.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. N. LUCKETT, Colonel, Commanding.

{p.167}

[Inclosure.]

Brief of opinions as to tenableness of Fort Brown, near Brownsville, Tex.

Capt. H. Wilke, Provisional Army, Confederate States, describes the fort as a field work of six bastion fronts, its line of defense 950 yards, requiring a garrison of 2,000 men. It is in a very dilapidated condition. Present armament is five iron siege 24-pounders; two iron ship 18-pounders; six brass 12-pounders; two iron 6-pounders (not mounted); four iron 8-inch siege howitzers; one 24-pounder brass howitzer; one 10-inch iron siege mortar, and is not deemed sufficient for defense. Estimated work to be done, to put the place in a state of defense, 500 laborers for three months. Capt. F. J. Parker, Third Infantry, C. S. Army, gives it as his opinion that the fort is untenable, on account of location. Col. P. N. Luckett does not agree with Captain Wilke as to the amount of labor required, but does not consider its defense advisable. Captains Marmion, Kampmann, and Buquor do not consider the fort tenable. Captain Creuzbar considers the fort tenable for fifteen or twenty days against five times the garrison, provided 5 days’ labor of said garrison is bestowed upon it.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, A. G. O., Fort Bliss, Tex., January 3, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. A.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that in view of the importance of establishing satisfactory relations with the adjacent Mexican States of Chihuahua and Sonora, I have ordered Col. James Reily, Fourth Regiment Texas Mounted Volunteers, to proceed to the capitals of those States, for the purpose of delivering to their respective governors the communications which I have addressed to them, and of conferring with those officials in person upon the subjects of those communications.

On the 21st day of December I forwarded to you copies of the principal communication above alluded to. I have now the honor of inclosing copies of my letters accrediting Colonel Reily to those functionaries, and also of my instructions to him in regard to the duties assigned him in this mission.

Colonel Reily left these headquarters for the city of Chihuahua on yesterday, the 2d instant. The result of this mission, when known, will be promptly communicated to you.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY, Brigadier-General, P. A. C. S., Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, A. G. O., Fort Bliss, Tex., December 31, 1861.

Col. JAMES REILY, Fourth Regiment T. M. V.:

COLONEL: The general commanding directs me to communicate to you the objects he has in view and which he purposes to effect through the mission for which you have been selected.

Your first duty will be to proceed to the city of Chihuahua and deliver {p.168} in person to the governor of that State the communication addressed to him by the general, of the contents of which you have already been apprised. In that communication it has of course only been practicable to explain to the governor the general outline of the policy and general nature of the objects which are at present in contemplation. To unfold that policy and to explain those objects in detail, to further their accomplishment, to counteract any adverse influence, and to obviate any possible objections are the chief and primary duties devolved upon you. The mode and manner of discharging this duty is of course left to your own judgment and discretion.

You will also call to the attention of the governor the exaction of duties by the custom-house officer at El Paso from citizens of this place, removing their goods, &c., there for temporary security a few weeks since, and ask that such duties be remitted to the parties who paid them.

You will be accompanied by the volunteer aide-de-camp of the general, Capt. G. Dwyer, of whose zeal, intelligence, and accomplishments you can avail yourself in your intercourse with the officials with whom you will be brought in contact. This assistance you will find valuable in many respects, and his association, the general hopes, will prove an agreeable one to each.

Should a safe opportunity offer, you will report as early as possible the nature of the reception given you and the prospects of a favorable adjustment of the matters intrusted to your charge.

Should you, after discharging your mission at Chihuahua, arrive at the conclusion, from such information as you can there obtain, that it is expedient and promotive of the public interest for you to proceed to Sonora, you will do so. Otherwise you will arrange for the transmission to the governor of that State of the official communication of the general.

Upon the completion of your mission you will report in person to the general commanding.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

A. M. JACKSON, A. A. G., Army of New Mexico.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, A. G. O., Fort Bliss, Tex., December 27, 1861.

To His Excellency GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF CHIHUAHUA:

SIR: I have the honor hereby to accredit to your excellency Col. James Reily, of the Army of the Confederate States, who is charged with the duty of delivering to your excellency a communication of importance, and of further explaining the views entertained and objects contemplated by me.

Colonel Reily is the next officer to myself in rank and command present on this frontier with the forces of the Confederate States, and your excellency will recognize in his selection for this duty the desire I have of manifesting to you my high respect and appreciation.

I commend to your consideration the representations which he shall make to you, and bespeak for him your highest confidence and esteem, as well in his private as in his official capacity.

With great respect and the highest consideration, I am, your excellency’s most obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY, Brig. Gen., P. A. C. S., Comdg. Army of New Mexico.

{p.169}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 8.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Galveston, January 3, 1862.

I. Houston, Harrisburg, and Sims’ Bayou shall constitute one command, and be styled the Military District of Houston.

II. Col. John C. Moore, Second Regiment Texas Volunteers, is assigned to the command of the Military District of Houston.

By order of P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, Houston, January 18, 1862.

Maj. S. MACLIN, Acting Chief Commissary of Subsistence, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: Col. P. N. Luckett, commanding at Fort Brown, informs that the difficulties now existing in the neighboring State of Tamaulipas, Mexico, have so wholly changed the condition of affairs from what they were a short time since as to deprive the command of the many facilities upon which they could with a reasonable certainty calculate. The civil war existing in the Mexican States renders intercourse and transportation precarious and unsafe. So much so, that the public carriers are prevailed upon with extreme difficulty to undertake the risk of bringing the necessary supplies for subsistence, and when they do, it is at a high price, and the supplies but small in quantity, and are frequently confiscated by the opposing forces in Mexico.

In consequence of this state of affairs the quartermaster and commissary of subsistence at Fort Brown has been unable to procure the necessary supplies for the troops. At the time Colonel Luckett wrote there was no flour on hand and no prospect of being supplied from day to day. He therefore directed that requisitions be made on San Antonio for the supply of his command.

Colonel Luckett further informs that the credit of the Government has suffered, and that Confederate notes are almost wholly useless, but few being willing to take them, and when they do, requiring an advance upon their usual prices of 25 and 30 per cent.; and, under the circumstances, it becomes necessary to supply the command at Fort Brown and other points on the Lower Rio Grande from the “general depot” at San Antonio; and the general commanding orders that this be done accordingly.

By order of Brig. Gen. P. O. Hébert:

SAML. BOYER DAVIS, Major, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF NEW MEXICO, A. G. O., Fort Thorn, Ariz., January 27, 1862.

General S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General C. S. A.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that I am in receipt of a report from Col. James Reily of his mission to the governor of Chihuahua, of which you have been heretofore advised. For your information I inclose the original documents, consisting of the report {p.170} of Colonel Reily and-the communications to him and to myself of the governor of that State, touching the various matters brought by me to the attention of that official by communications of which copies were duly forwarded to you.

The governor’s communications will, I think, be considered important and highly satisfactory.

By orders of this date, Colonel Reily is directed to proceed to the State of Sonora on a similar mission, which I hope will prove equally successful.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

H. H. SIBLEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.-With a view to the protection of the important and growing interest, chiefly mineral, in Western Arizona, and for the further purpose of opening communications with Southern California, whose people are favorably inclined to our Government, I have ordered one company (Captain Hunter’s) of Colonel Baylor’s command to take post at Tucson.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

IN CAMP NEAR CARISAL, CHIHUAHUA, January 20, 1862.

General H. H. SIBLEY, C. S. A., Commanding Army of New Mexico, Fort Thorn:

GENERAL: Herewith I have the honor to place in your hands, with this brief report of my mission to Chihuahua, the accompanying documents:

No. 1. Note to Governor Don Luis Terrazas, dated January 8, 1862, advising him of my arrival at Chihuahua, describing my official position, and asking an interview.*

No. 2. Answer of His Excellency Don Luis Terrazas, dated January 11, 1862.

No. 3 and 4. Instructions to the authorities of El Paso to remit certain duties, dated January 10, 1862.*

No. 5. Communication from the governor to General H. H. Sibley, of the Army of the Confederate States of America, dated January 11, 1862.

No. 6. Letter of credence from governor of the State of Chihuahua to Col. James Reily, C. S. A., to General H. H. Sibley, dated January 11, 1862.**

I have also a letter of introduction and recommendation from Governor Terrazas, of Chihuahua, to Governor Ignacio Pesqueeras, of Sonora.

The report in detail which accompanies this, containing extracts of conversation with the governor upon the points you presented, in addition to the communication No. 5 from the governor, renders my mission, I trust, satisfactory.

I have the pleasure to inform you that my reception by the governor and officials of state was of the most kind and agreeable nature, and not only by the State officials, both civil and military, but by many leading citizens. The best feeling exists in Chihuahua. My sudden departure prevented me, as your envoy, from receiving a public testimonial {p.171} of the kind feelings of the Chihuahuans which they were about to tender me.

Permit me to congratulate you, general, in having obtained the first official recognition of the Government of the Confederate States by any foreign power.

Under your instructions I went to Chihuahua as an officer in the Army of the Confederate States of America, as such and wearing the uniform of a colonel of cavalry of that army I presented myself to the governor of Chihuahua, as such I was accredited by you, as such I signed my name, as such was recognized, received, entertained, addressed, and recredited to you by the governor. I made it a point never to pay a visit of etiquette or ceremony but as an officer of the A. C. S. A., and ordered there by you as general in the Army of Confederate States of America.

May all due honor and credit attach to you for this point gained for our country.

General, I have the honor to be, with sentiments of highest respect, truly, yours,

JAMES REILY, Colonel First Reg’t, Sibley Brig., Army of New Mexico.

* See quotation in Reily’s second letter, p. 173.

** Not found.

[Inclosure No. 2.-Translation.]

JANUARY 11, 1862.

It is with the greatest pleasure, general, I reply to your second communication, of the 27th December,* which was handed to me by your second in command, Col. Santiago Reily, recommending him to me in his official character as your special envoy as well as personally.

I sincerely approve your choice, for Colonel Reily is certainly a prudent man and a most accomplished gentleman, whose manner and appearance alone would secure for him a most distinguished position. He has discharged with fidelity and intelligence the mission that you confided to him for my Government, making such explanations as were necessary on various matters which he was authorized to arrange, and of which I spoke to you in my note of that date.

I understand he is fully convinced of the loyalty of my sentiments towards the respectable general-in-chief of the Army of the Confederate States, to all its citizens, and of the same Mr. Reily, who, until now, has never asked any service from me. He will always find me disposed to lend him any assistance in my power. I give you most sincere thanks for the honor you have conferred upon me by the acquaintance of Colonel Reily, who leaves in this city the warmest sympathies, and I renew to you the assurances of my appreciation and my highest consideration.

God, liberty, and reform.

Chihuahua, January 11, 1862.

LOUIS TERRAZAS.

Brig. Gen. H. H. SIBLEY, General-in-Chief of the Army of the C. S. A., Fort Bliss.

* See p. 168.

[Inclosure No. 5.-Translation.]

JANUARY 11, 1862.

I have the honor of replying to your letter of the 15th December, directed from Fort Bliss, Tex., and handed me by Col. Santiago Reily.

{p.172}

Before noticing the principal points, allow me to perform the pleasant duty of reciprocating your cordial expressions of friendship and goodwill, and your desire to establish friendly relations between the Mexican States and those of the Southern Confederacy contiguous, and which you serve as general-in-chief of the army. Let me assure you that you will meet on my part, as governor of the State of Chihuahua, the most sincere and earnest disposition to cultivate these relations as far as lies in my power, as I am convinced that it is one of the most important duties that my position and the reciprocal interests of our respective countries impose upon me, and I do not fail to credit you with similar sentiments, of which I have succeeded in convincing Colonel Reily, and with which I am pleased to think he is perfectly satisfied.

As to the questions indicated in your communication already cited, I have the satisfaction of informing you relative to the one whether the Supreme Government of Mexico has within the past few months conceded to the United Stater the right of transit subject to the first order, and secondly to put in motion the troops and munitions of war against the Confederate States, whose forces you command, on the border of Texas, that nothing of this kind has come to my notice, nor would my Government respect it, except on the terms and with the conditions established in the general constitution of the United States of Mexico-to whom the Congress of the Union exclusively grants the privilege of permitting or denying the entrance of foreign troops in the territory of the Confederation and of consenting to the stationing of squadrons of other powers for more than one month in the waters of the republic. (Portion 16 of Article 72.)

By that constitutional principle, which it is not lawful to violate in any way nor for any consideration whatever, I find myself prevented from acceding to your proposition relative to the persecution of the savage Indians by your forces and mine. Yet when it may be necessary to draw the lines of demarcation between the States of Texas and Chihuahua, by the alternate introduction to the territory of one and the other, while the Indians make their depredations and retreats, if I am convinced of the advantage that such immunity will bring, I will take the steps necessary to act upon it before the Congress of the Union.

The third and last point referred to in your note has, in my opinion, the solution that you desire, by the means established of agents and contractors, who may make on the frontier purchases and storing of provisions which shall be necessary for your army, and that it may offer facilities to the population from which it draws of a commercial nature without any official intervention whatever, that may be interpreted as an act contrary to the absolute neutrality which Mexico and all the States of its Confederation must observe in the unfortunate struggle between the States of the North and South of the American Union. This is all I can lay before you, general, relative to your communication of the 16th December, and in the secure confidence that you will accept it as the most frank expression of the reasons and sentiments that must regulate my conduct as governor of the State of Chihuahua, and as your sincere friend and that of the Confederate States, I conclude by offering you renewed assurances of my highest and most cordial esteem and respect.

God, liberty, and reform.

Chihuahua, January 11, 1862.

LOUIS TERRAZAS.

Brig. Gen. H. H. SIBLEY, General-in-Chief of the Army of the C. S. A., Fort Bliss.

{p.173}

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IN CAMP NEAR CARISAL, CHIHUAHUA, January 20, 1862.

General H. H. SIBLEY, C. S. A., Commanding Army of New Mexico, Fort Thorn:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I left Fort Bliss at 11 a. m. on the 8th of January, and, in accordance with your orders of 31st ultimo, proceeded to the city of Chihuahua, Mexico, arriving there at 2 p. m. on the 8th instant. At 3 p. m. I dispatched the note referred to as No. 1 in brief report of this same date, and a copy of which note is now made:

RIDDELL’S HOTEL, Chihuahua, January 5, 1862.

To His Excellency Don Luis TERRAZAS, Governor of the State of Chihuahua, Republic of Mexico:

SIR: The undersigned has the honor to inform your excellency that he bears to you a communication from General H. H. Sibley, C. S. A., and commanding the Army of New Mexico, touching matters of importance to the Governments of the Confederate States of America and to the Republic of Mexico, and especially to that military department he now commands and to this State.

The undersigned trusts it will suit your excellency to designate an hour when he can have the honor to present to you in person his letter of credence from General Sibley and the communication with which be is intrusted.

I have the honor to be, with sentiments of highest consideration and respect, most truly, yours,

JAMES REILY, Colonel, A. C. S. A.

Early the next morning I received from the governor a reply (being document No. 2), in which his excellency designated 12 m. of that day for an interview at the governor’s palace. A few moments before the hour of 12 m. I was called upon by Don Carlos Moyo, brother-in-law to the governor, who accompanied me to the palace, and by whom I was introduced to the governor. After a brief speech, interpreted by Don Carlos Moyo, and as brief a one from the governor, also translated to me, I presented to the governor your letter of credence. I was then formally introduced to the secretary of state and other high officials.

My reception by the governor and all others present was most gracious and cordial. I beg leave here to state that I had myself announced to the governor as colonel of the Confederate States Army, and was dressed as such, being in the uniform of a cavalry officer C. S. Army, and wearing my sword.

His excellency remarked that, as the communication was in English, a language he neither spoke nor read, he must request to have it translated, so that he might be able to give it due and intelligible consideration. I then informed him, if he pleased, I would call at 12 m. the next day.

At the request of the governor I resumed my seat, when many inquiries were made about the war between the South and North, about yourself, and the number and character of your troops; to all of which I trust I gave satisfactory answers.

Upon taking leave of the governor, I was escorted back to the hotel by Don Carlos Moyo. He remained with me some time, and I found him quite a friend of the South. To him I am indebted for much civility and many kindnesses.

The next day, at 12, Don Carlos again called for me, and, arriving at the palace, found no one with the governor but the secretary of state and one of the judges of the supreme court. In a short time we were joined by Don Joaquin Durand, whose acquaintance I had previously made, and, although a Mexican, yet writing and speaking the English language with great fluency, having been educated in England. He came there at my request, and I was glad to avail myself of his intelligence. {p.174} We almost immediately took up your communication, and you have, general, in the letter No. 5, and of date 11th instant, the result of that interview.

In addition to the concessions here made by the governor, he informed me that “if even the assent of the President had come to him, sanctioned by the act of Congress, he did not think he would permit Federal troops to pass through the territory of Chihuahua to invade Texas.”

In regard to the second point, that he would not give his official sanction to the occupancy of the territory of his State by foreign troops, but hoped the Apaches on the frontier would be kept quiet. This was after I referred him to the law of nations in regard to the rights of “hot pursuit,” instanced the invasion of Shreveport, La., in November, 1838, by Texas troops, when in “hot pursuit” of the Caddoes, and stated to him that such invasion was not deemed or treated as a wrongful one by the Government of the United States. The right to pursue Indians, even into the city of Chihuahua itself, had been granted by Don Revella, when governor, to Judge Simeon Hart. Upon that point, if ever rendered necessary, your troops will have no trouble. [Judge Hart made this application in 1858 to Governor Revella, under the instructions of General Garland, then commanding in New Mexico.]

As to the right to purchase supplies in Chihuahua, embraced in third point, the governor assured me no steps would be taken to prevent it, and, although the presence of your command would increase the price which the people of Chihuahua would have to pay, yet that, independent of this, we should not be excluded.

I spent an evening by invitation with the governor at his private residence, and where I met many persons, and dined with him at his brother-in-law’s (Moyo) next day.

The governor appeared anxious to have the best relations established and continued between his State and the Confederate States, and I took leave of him, satisfied in my own mind that he would not break or cause to be broken the relations that now exist.

I found Chihuahua in a delicious climate, in the midst of mines of untold wealth, with rich agricultural and grazing lands near by, and yet the city becoming smaller in population and more and more reduced to poverty every year. These mines and their soil need the inducement of capital, energy, and enterprise, which can only be induced thither by a stable and enlightened and constitutional government.

I have the pleasure to report that the custom-house dues I was by you instructed to have remitted were ordered by the governor to be remitted, and the governor paid me the compliment to put in my hand the order to the collector at El Paso to have the duties remitted and the bondsman released, he stated that at all times whenever necessary he would be pleased to afford protection to the persons and property of the citizens of the Southern Confederacy.

It becomes my agreeable duty to report that I took letters from no one else in Texas to Chihuahua but from Hon. Simeon Hart, and that through his introduction and his influence I received the most marked and attentive consideration. He is well known, and commands high respect and great credit in Chihuahua.

Permit me here again to congratulate you on having been instrumental in obtaining the first official recognition by a foreign government of the Confederate States of America. All the credit due such an achievement I trust will be awarded you.

I remain now, as ever, most truly, with great respect, your friend,

JAMES REILY, Colonel First Regiment, Sibley’s Brigade, Army of New Mexico.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6