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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 3, Ch. X–Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER X.
OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS, KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY.*
May 10-November 19, 1861.
(Wilson’s Creek, Lexington, Belmont)
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UNION CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.369}

FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS., May 10, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, A. A. G., Hdqrs. Army, Washington City:

COLONEL: I deem it of sufficient importance to report for the information of the Lieutenant-General Commander-in-Chief that I am credibly informed the governor of Missouri has established at Saint Joseph a permanent camp of State troops. The force now embodied and encamped and drilling consists of eight companies-one as light artillery, having two iron guns, taken from Liberty Arsenal; three companies of dragoons, and four of infantry. This force, by order of the governor, is to be increased from the interior. Should Missouri secede, not a doubt but offensive operations against this post will be attempted. At present I have troops sufficient to repel any force now at Saint Joseph. If informed of additional ones arriving I shall, without hesitation, call on the governor of the State of Kansas for one or two regiments of infantry, to assist in the defense of this place and the towns on the right bank of the Missouri River. It is known there are stored at Fort Kearney large quantities of ordnance, ordnance stores, subsistence, and clothing, and it has been reported to me that the mustering of the State of Missouri troops at Saint Joseph is to make a sudden foray on Fort Kearney, to capture its stores, particularly the park of 12-pounder howitzers. Should I learn that Missouri troops have crossed the river for this or any other object aggressive to the rights of the citizens of this State or interest of the United States Government, I shall, with my disposable force, immediately attack them.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. S. MILES, Colonel Second Infantry, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 10.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 11, 1861.

In compliance with instructions which have been received from the Adjutant-General’s Office the undersigned resumes command of the Department of the West.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 13, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report for the information of the General-in-Chief that, in obedience to the instructions of the honorable Secretary of War, communicated to me through the Adjutant-General of the {p.370} Army, I resumed command of the Department of the West the 11th instant. On my arrival at Saint Louis I found very great excitement prevailing throughout the community in consequence of the capture, on the 10th instant, of the brigade of Missouri militia, under the command of Brig. Gen. D. M. Frost, while in camp near this city, by the United States forces, under the command of Capt. N. Lyon, Second Infantry. I am informed that a detailed report of that affair was forwarded previous to my resuming command of the department, but I deem it proper to state that the conduct of Captain Lyon on the occasion meets with my entire approval.

As serious apprehensions were entertained yesterday morning that the excitement existing in the city would result in an outbreak in the course of a few hours unless allayed, I deemed it necessary to issue a proclamation, of which the inclosed is a copy, and which, I am assured, was well received and had the effect to tranquilize the public mind. I also ordered up from the arsenal some 250 regular troops, with four pieces of artillery, to aid the civil authorities in the preservation of the public peace. I am happy to add that all indications of the threatened disturbance have disappeared.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

PROCLAMATION.

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 12, 1861.

I have just returned to this post, and have assumed the military command of this department. No one can more deeply regret the deplorable state of things existing here than myself. The past cannot be recalled. I can only deal with the present and the future. I most anxiously desire to discharge the delicate and onerous duties devolved upon me so as to preserve the public peace. I shall carefully abstain from the exercise of any unnecessary powers and from all interference with the proper functions of the public officers of the State and city. I therefore call upon the public authorities and the people to aid me in preserving the public peace.

The military force stationed in this department by authority of the Government, and now under my command, will only be used in the last resort to preserve the peace. I trust I may be spared the necessity of resorting to martial law, but the public peace must be preserved, and the lives and property of the people protected. Upon a careful review of my instructions I find I have no authority to change the location of the Home Guards. To avoid all cause of irritation and excitement, if called upon to aid the local authorities in preserving the public peace, I shall in preference make use of the Regular Army.

I ask the people to pursue their peaceful avocations, and to observe the laws and orders of their local authorities, and to abstain from the excitements of public meetings and heated discussions. My appeal I trust may not be in vain, and I pledge the faith of a soldier to the earnest discharge of my duty.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

{p.371}

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 14, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for the information of the General-in-Chief, a copy of a proclamation I deemed it necessary, in view of the existing condition of affairs in this quarter, to address to the people of Missouri.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, May 14, 1861.

To the People of the State of Missouri:

On my return to the duties of the command of this department I find, greatly to my astonishment and mortification, a most extraordinary state of things existing in this State, deeply affecting the stability of the Government of the United States as well as the governmental and other interests of Missouri itself.

As a citizen of Missouri, owing allegiance to the United States, and having interests in common with you, I feel it my duty as well as privilege to extend a warning voice to my fellow-citizens against the common dangers that threaten us, and to appeal to your patriotism and sense of justice to exert all your moral power to avert them.

It is with regret that I feel it my duty to call your attention to the recent act of the general assembly of Missouri known as the “military bill,” which is the result, no doubt, of the temporary excitement that now pervades the public mind. This bill cannot be regarded in any other light than an indirect secession ordinance, ignoring even the forms resorted to by other States. Manifestly, its most material provisions are in conflict with the Constitution and laws of the United States. To this extent it is a nullity, and cannot and ought not to be upheld or regarded by the good citizens of Missouri. There are obligations and duties resting upon the people of Missouri under the Constitution and laws of the United States which are paramount, and which I trust you will carefully consider and weigh well before you will allow yourselves to be carried out of the Union under the form of yielding obedience to this military bill, which is clearly in violation of your duties as citizens of the United States.

It must be apparent to every one who has taken a proper and unbiased view of the subject that, whatever may be the termination of the unfortunate condition of things in respect to the so-called Cotton States, Missouri must share the destiny of the Union. Her geographical position, her soil, productions, and, in short, all her material interests, point to this result. We cannot shut our eyes against this controlling fact. It is seen and its force is felt throughout the nation. So important is this regarded to the great interests of the country, that I venture to express the opinion that the whole power of the Government of the United States, if necessary, will be exerted to maintain Missouri in her present position in the Union. I express to you, in all frankness and sincerity, my own deliberate convictions, without assuming to speak for the Government of the United States, whose authority here and elsewhere I shall at all times and under all circumstances endeavor faithfully to uphold. I desire above all things most earnestly to invite {p.372} my fellow-citizens dispassionately to consider their true interests as well as their true relation to the Government under which we live and to which we owe so much.

In this connection I desire to direct attention to one subject which, no doubt, will be made the pretext for more or less popular excitement. I allude to the recent transactions at Camp Jackson, near Saint Louis. It is not proper for me to comment upon the official conduct of my predecessor in command of this department, but it is right and proper for the people of Missouri to know that the main avenue of Camp Jackson, recently under command of General Frost, had the name of Davis, and a principal street of the same camp that of Beauregard, and that a body of men had been received into that camp by its commander which had been notoriously organized in the interests of the secessionists the men openly wearing the dress and badge distinguishing the Army of the so-called Southern Confederacy. It is also a notorious fact that a quantity of arms had been received into the camp which were unlawfully taken from the United States Arsenal at Baton Rouge, and surreptitiously passed up the river in boxes marked “Marble.”

Upon facts like these, and having in view what occurred at Liberty, the people can draw their own inferences, and it cannot be difficult for any one to arrive at a correct conclusion as to the character and ultimate purpose of that encampment. No Government in the world would be entitled to respect that would tolerate for a moment such openly treasonable preparations. It is but simple justice, however, that I should state the fact that there were many good and loyal men in the camp who were in no manner responsible for its treasonable character.

Disclaiming as I do all desire or intention to interfere in any way with the prerogatives of the State of Missouri or with the functions of its executive or other authorities, yet I regard it as my plain path of duty to express to the people, in respectful but at the same time decided language, that within the field and scope of my command and authority the “supreme law” of the land must and shall be maintained, and no subterfuges, whether in the forms of legislative acts or otherwise, can be permitted to harass or oppress the good and law-abiding people of Missouri. I shall exert my authority to protect their persons and property from violations of every kind, and I shall deem it my duty to suppress all unlawful combinations of men, whether formed under pretext of military organizations or otherwise.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 14, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. S. HARNEY, Commanding the Military Department of the West:

SIR: In common with thousands who have perused your admirable proclamation of this morning, I return you the thanks of a citizen of Missouri for its patriotic tone and tranquilizing assurances. There is nothing in this paper which in my opinion needs explanation, yet I wish to be able to answer, with the authority of your name, a question which I have already replied to on my own judgment.

Last evening a gentleman of the highest respectability and intelligence, from Greene County, Missouri, asked me whether I supposed it {p.373} was the intention of the United States Government to interfere with the institution of negro slavery in Missouri or any slave State, or impair the security of that description of property. Of course my answer was most unqualifiedly and almost indignantly in the negative. I told him that I had no means of forming an opinion which was not open to every other private citizen, but that I felt certain that the force of the United States would, if necessary, be diverted for the protection of this as well as any other kind of property. Will you be good enough to spare from your engrossing military duties so much time as may be required to say whether I answered correctly?

I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, your most obedient servant,

THOMAS T. GANTT.

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MAY 14, 1861.

THOMAS T. GANTT, Esq., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have just received your note of this date, inquiring whether, in my opinion, you were correct in replying to a citizen of Southwestern Missouri as to the purpose of the United States Government respecting the protection of negro property. I must premise by saying that I have no special instructions on this head from the War Department, but I should as soon expect to hear that the orders of the Government were directed towards the overthrow of any other kind of property as of this in negro slaves.

I entertain no doubt whatever that you answered the question you mentioned correctly. I should certainly have answered it in the same manner, and I think with the very feelings you describe. I am not a little astonished that such a question could be seriously put. Already, since the commencement of these unhappy disturbances, slaves have escaped from their owners, and have sought refuge in the camps of United States troops from Northern States, and commanded by a Northern general. They were carefully sent back to their owners. An insurrection of slaves was reported to have taken place in Maryland. A Northern general offered to the executive of that State the aid of Northern troops, under his own command, to suppress it. Incendiaries have asked of the President permission to invade the Southern States, and have been warned that any attempt to do this will be punished as a crime. I repeat it, I have no special means of knowledge on this subject; but what I have cited, and my general acquaintance with the statesmanlike views of the President, makes me confident in expressing the opinion above given.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brig. Gen., Commanding Military Department of the West.

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EAST SAINT LOUIS, ILL., May 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I think it of the utmost importance that an additional regiment, consisting exclusively of Irishmen, should be raised in Saint Louis. It will at once settle matters in Saint Louis, and do away with the prejudice against the Government troops, which consist almost exclusively of Germans.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.374}

I concur in the importance and policy of General Harney’s recommendations, and believe that it will end our troubles here and enable our troops to do service elsewhere.

FRANK P. BLAIR, JR., Colonel First Regiment Missouri Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 135.}

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, May 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. S. Harney is relieved from command of the Department of the West, and is granted leave of absence until further orders.

...

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 17, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I deem it of the highest importance that 10,000 stand of arms be placed at my disposal at the earliest moment possible for issue to reliable Union men in Missouri. Loyal men are now being driven from the State by the secessionists. Calls are constantly made upon me by Union men for arms, that they may be enabled to defend themselves.

I also earnestly advise that Iowa be called upon to furnish at least 6,000 men for the war and Minnesota 3,000, and that this force be placed at my disposal for operations in Missouri, should it be required for the purpose.

Please answer by telegraph.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 22, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith for the information of the General-in-Chief and the Secretary of War a copy of a proclamation addressed by me to the people of Missouri in connection with the agreement entered into between Maj. Gen. Sterling Price and myself, May 21, 1861, a copy of which was forwarded at its date.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

To the People of the State of Missouri:

I take great pleasure in submitting to you the following paper, signed by General Price, commanding the forces of the State, and by myself, on the part of the Government of the United States. It will be seen {p.375} that the united forces of both Governments are pledged to the maintenance of the peace of the State, and the defense of the rights and property of all persons, without distinction of party. This pledge, which both parties are fully authorized and empowered to give by the Governments which they represent, will be by both most religiously and sacredly kept, and, if necessary to put down evil-disposed persons, the military powers of both Governments will be called out to enforce the terms of the honorable and amicable agreement which has been made. I therefore call upon all persons in this State to observe good order and respect the rights of their fellow citizens, and give them the assurance of protection and security in the most ample manner.

WM. S. HARNEY. Brigadier-General Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 21, 1861.

[Subinclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, May 21, 1861.

The undersigned, officers of the United States Government and of the government of the State of Missouri, for the purpose of removing misapprehensions and allaying public excitement, deem it proper to declare publicly that they have this day had a personal interview in this city, in which it has been mutually understood, without the semblance of dissent on either part, that each of them has no other than a common object equally interesting and important to every citizen of Missouri-that of restoring peace and good order to the people of the State in subordination to the laws of the General and State Governments. It being thus understood, there seems no reason why every citizen should not confide in the proper officers of the General and State Governments to restore quiet, and, as among the best means of offering no counter-influences, we mutually recommend to all persons to respect each other’s rights throughout the State, making no attempt to exercise unauthorized powers, as it is the determination of the proper authorities to suppress all unlawful proceedings, which can only disturb the public peace.

General Price, having by commission full authority over the militia of the State of Missouri, undertakes, with the sanction of the governor of the State, already declared, to direct the whole power of the State officers to maintain order within the State among the people thereof and General Harney publicly declares that, this object being thus assured, he can have no occasion, as he has no wish, to make military movements, which might otherwise create excitements and jealousies which he most earnestly desires to avoid.

We, the undersigned, do therefore mutually enjoin upon the people of the State to attend to their civil business of whatsoever sort it may be, and it is to be hoped that the unquiet elements which have threatened so seriously to disturb the public peace may soon subside and be remembered only to be deplored.

STERLING PRICE, Major-General Missouri State Guard. WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 24, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

The four regiments assigned to Missouri for three years’ service can easily be raised; but the order requiring two-thirds of the officers to be {p.376} appointed by the governor of the State will not be complied with, and the Government could not accept officers appointed by a traitor under any circumstances.

As the brigade will be under command of General Lyon, will it not be best to allow him to nominate the officers, subject to the approval of the President Send him the order by telegraph immediately.

The agreement between Harney and General Price gives me great disgust and dissatisfaction to the Union men; but I am in hopes we can get along with it, and think that Harney will insist on its execution to the fullest extent, in which case it will be satisfactory.

F. P. BLAIR, JR.

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WASHINGTON, May 27, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. S. HARNEY, Commanding Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: The President observes with concern that, notwithstanding the pledge of the State authorities to co-operate in preserving peace in Missouri, loyal citizens in great numbers continue to be driven from their homes. It is immaterial whether these outrages continue from inability or indisposition on the part of the State authorities to prevent them. It is enough that they continue to devolve on you the duty of putting a stop to them summarily by the force under your command, to be aided by such troops as you may require from Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois. The professions of loyalty to the Union by the State authorities of Missouri are not to be relied upon. They have already falsified their professions too often, and are too far committed to secession to be entitled to your confidence, and you can only be sure of their desisting from their wicked purposes when it is out of their power to prosecute them. You will therefore be unceasingly watchful of their movements, and not permit the clamors of their partisans and opponents of the wise measures already taken to prevent you from checking every movement against the Government, however disguised, under the pretended State authority. The authority of the United States is paramount, and whenever it is apparent that a movement, whether by color of State authority or not, is hostile, you will not hesitate to put it down.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 28, 1861.

General GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, U. S. A., Comdg. Department of the Ohio, Cincinnati, Ohio:

GENERAL: In compliance with the request contained in your communication of the 26th instant, I have ordered a regiment of Missouri volunteers to report to Brigadier-General Prentiss, commanding at Cairo, for service at Bird’s Point, and it will leave Saint Louis Arsenal to-day for its destination. It has not been practicable to dispatch this command from here at an earlier moment. I regret to state that the regiment is not thoroughly equipped for field service. Knapsacks, haversacks, canteens, cartridge-boxes, belts, and bayonet scabbards are {p.377} required to complete its outfit, but it is hoped that these articles will soon be furnished.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 29, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the General-in-Chief, that I have ordered two of the four companies of the First Cavalry, now at Fort Wise, to proceed with as little delay as practicable to Fort Kearney. In view of the large amount of public property at Fort Kearney, and for the purpose of effectually holding in check the Indians in its vicinity, it has seemed to me very important that its garrison, which consists at present of a single company of dragoons, should be re-enforced as soon as possible.

I have also directed Lieutenant-Colonel Sedgwick, Second Cavalry, now at Fort Wise, to repair to Fort Leavenworth and there await further orders, presuming that before he can reach Leavenworth instructions will have been issued requiring his presence with the regiment to which he has recently been promoted.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 29, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that by the course pursued in this State, under the instructions from the War Department, Missouri is rapidly becoming tranquilized, and I am convinced that by pursuing the course I have thus far, which is fully indicated in my former communications to you, peace and confidence in the ability of the Government to maintain its authority will be fully and permanently restored. Interference by unauthorized parties as to the course I shall pursue can alone prevent the realization of these hopes, and although the policy they might inaugurate might be more brilliant in a military point of view, and far more expensive to carry out, it could not secure the results the Government seeks, viz: The maintenance of the loyalty now fully aroused in the State and her firm security in the Union.

I entertain the conviction that the agreement between myself and General Price will be carried out in good faith, but while entertaining this belief I shall watch carefully the movements of the State authorities. I have reliable means of obtaining information of their movements, and any violation of their pledge and any attempt at rebellion will be promptly met and put down.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.378}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 30, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: On the 21st instant I had the honor to transmit to you a copy of an agreement entered into by me with Major-General Price, Missouri militia, having for its object the preservation of the public peace in Missouri, and I now inclose, for the information of the General-in-Chief and the Secretary of War, copies of the correspondence which has taken place between General Price and myself in reference to the condition of affairs in this State.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosures.]

SPRINGFIELD, MO., May 21, 1861.

[Extract.]

0. D. FILLEY:

Secessionists have seized fifteen thousand pounds of lead at Lebanon, in transit to Linn Creek, last night. Seventeen kegs of powder came up by South West Branch mail. It was deposited with prominent secessionists before reaching town. Inform S. H. Boyd immediately, who is in your city.

{Unknown.}

SAINT JOSEPH, MO., May 22, 1861.

[Extract.]

Col. F. P. BLAIR:

The American flag floating over the post-office was to-day taken down by a mob, headed by Jeff. Thompson and others, and the States rights flag hoisted in its place. The flag was torn in shreds. The post-office is threatened. We are not frightened, but have no arms to resist. Cannot these leaders be arrested?

{Unknown.}

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 23, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, MO. S. G., Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am directed by Brigadier-General Harney to transmit to you the inclosed [next preceding] telegraphic dispatches, which have been received in this city from Springfield and Saint Joseph, Mo., under dates of May 21 and May 22.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 24, 1861.

General STERLING PRICE, Jefferson City, Mo.:

I am informed that troops and arms are coming into Missouri from Arkansas. Is such the case? Would it not be well for me to station a regiment in the southern frontier of Missouri? Please answer by telegraph.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.379}

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., May 24, 1861.

General W. S. HARNEY, U. S. A.:

I am satisfied your information is incorrect. It cannot be that arms or men are coming into Missouri from any quarter without the knowledge of the governor or myself. We have no such information. I advise that you do not send a regiment into the southwest; it will exasperate our own people. I have attended to dispatches inclosed me by you from Springfield and Saint Joseph. I am dismissing my troops, and I will carry out our agreement faithfully.

STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding Missouri State Guard.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Commanding Missouri State Guard, Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am just in receipt of a telegraphic dispatch from Springfield, Mo., which seems to be reliable, that a force is either organized or being organized in Arkansas, near the Missouri line, with the avowed purpose of entering this State to disturb its relation with the General Government. I lose no time in communicating this intelligence, in order that you may not be misled by rumors of measures which may be necessary on my part to meet this threatened hostility. In our recent arrangement a contingency like this was not looked for, and in any event it could hardly be expected of you to assume the responsibility of repelling an invasion from Arkansas which, should further information justify an expectation of it, must be met by myself.

I take great pleasure in expressing the belief that our late meeting in this city will result in the good of our common country.

I have the honor to be, general, with high respect, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Jefferson City, Mo.:

I have information by telegraph from Springfield to-day that a reliable citizen of that place saw on Saturday last troops enlisted in Benton County, Arkansas, and marched to Union Springs, 2 miles from the Missouri line, to be encamped there. It is said to be the purpose of those troops to enter Missouri. I write by mail.

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis, Mo., May 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Missouri State Guard:

GENERAL: I am in the receipt of numerous communications setting forth that aggressions continue to be committed upon Union men in different portions of Missouri, more especially at and in the vicinity of Springfield, Hannibal, Saint Joseph, and Kansas City.

These complaints, coming as they do from sources which I regard as reliable, occasion me no little embarrassment, and I have thought it might, perhaps, become my duty to afford protection at the places {p.380} above indicated to the extent of authorizing the organization of Home Guards, unless you can give me assurances that such a measure is unnecessary, and I trust that the raising of a force of this description at any point, for home purposes merely, should occasion seem to me to require it, would not be regarded by you as an infraction of the agreement entered into between us the 21st instant.

I shall be glad to hear from you upon the subject of this communication at your earliest convenience.

I have the honor to be, general, with high respect, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., May 28, 1861.

General W. S. HARNEY:

Your informant must be mistaken; neither the governor nor myself know anything of troops being raised in Arkansas for Missouri. Should any troops enter our borders, I will cause them to return instanter.

STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding Missouri Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE GUARD, Jefferson City, Mo., May 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. S. HARNEY, U. S. A., Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two communications of date 27th instant.

In reply to your propositions to establish or organize Home Guards in certain localities, I have to say, that such a step, in my opinion, would bring about the very state of things we mutually desire to avoid, to wit, hostilities between the Federal and State Governments. In the present state of excitement among the people, the arming of one portion of a community by the Federal Government would very naturally be looked upon by the other in a spirit of jealousy, and, in my opinion, would have a tendency to excite those who now hold conservative peace positions into exactly the contrary attitude, an example of which we have in Saint Louis. It would undoubtedly, in my opinion, lead to neighborhood collision, the forerunner of civil war. Additional reasons might be urged why you should abandon the establishment of these Home Guards, palpable to yourself if the desire is to avoid civil war in Missouri.

With regard to the other point in your letter, relative to complaints of Union men, I have instituted strict inquiry relative to every case within my knowledge, and beg leave to reassure you that in no single instance have these acts been instigated or recognized by meetings or organizations of any kind; but wherever and whenever happening, prove to be the offspring of irresponsible individuals, and no effort has been left undone on my part to prevent even this, and shall be continued in the future. You will observe from published orders that I positively enjoin upon all citizens of the State the scrupulous protection of individual property and rights, irrespective of political opinions. With these views and deductions I feel assured that you will agree with me, that to carry out your proposed plan would be exceedingly injudicious, if not ruinous, to the peace of the State. General, it is my unchanged and honest intention to carry out to the letter the agreement entered into between us, and I can but feel assured, from the high sense {p.381} of honor that has always attended your public acts, that you will, with equal fidelity, observe the same on your part.

On receipt of your telegram of yesterday I immediately dispatched two highly respectable citizens of Springfield, who replied that no troops from Arkansas were expected or desired. The assertion in the Democrat that wagons had been sent from Sedalia to Arkansas for arms is wholly untrue. Should, however, troops enter Missouri from Arkansas or any other State, be assured that I will cause them to return, and thus save you from the taking of a step which I could not, with justice, construe into any other light than a violation of our agreement, and such a violation as would, in my opinion, undoubtedly precipitate civil hostilities.

I have the honor to be, general, with much respect, your obedient servant,

STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., May 31, 1861.

General L. THOMAS, Adjt. Gen. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I received last evening paragraph 1 of Special Orders, No. 135, of May 16, from your office, and instantly relinquished command of the Department of the West. This morning your letter of May 27 reached me, and as other communications have been addressed to me from your office as department commander since May 16, and as I have learned the purport of telegraphic dispatches recently received from Washington by Colonel Blair and Mr. Gantt, of this city, I am led to conclude that it was not the intention of the President I should be relieved. I shall, therefore, at once resume the command of the department, and I beg that the President may be assured that if I am permitted to conduct operations here as my judgment may dictate I anticipate no serious disturbance in the State. I am sure that many of the reports which have reached the President relative to the condition of affairs in Missouri have proceeded from irresponsible sources. Upon investigation here of complaints seemingly aggravated it has appeared in several instances that they were groundless or greatly exaggerated. Matters are progressing as satisfactorily in this State as I could expect considering the very great excitement that has latterly pervaded the community.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis Arsenal, May 31, 1861.

Brig. Gen. W. S. Harney having relinquished command of this department, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 135, of May 16, 1861, from the Adjutant-General’s Office, the undersigned hereby assumes the command thereof, which thus devolves upon him.

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

{p.382}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 4.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Saint Louis Arsenal, June 1, 1861.

I. The undersigned hereby relinquishes his command of this post, which will devolve upon Col. F. P. Blair, First Regiment Missouri Volunteers, who will have in his immediate charge the troops, police, and the defenses thereof.

II. In order to facilitate the transaction of business the First Regiment and the Sixth and Seventh Regiments Missouri Volunteers, now forming, will be considered as one brigade. The Third and Fifth Regiments will constitute a second brigade. The battalion of artillery, the company of sappers and miners, the two rifle companies of the Fourth Regiment, and Captain Bayles’ company of riflemen will form the Third Brigade

...

IV. All estimates for supplies by staff officers will be submitted to the department commander for his approval before purchasing them.

...

N. LYON, Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, June 3, 1861.

Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjt. Gen. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: Authentic information exists of the presence at Memphis of General Beauregard, and of the movement of Ben. McCulloch with troops and light and heavy arms up the Arkansas and White Rivers. Troops from Arkansas have already taken position at Fort Wayne, which is at the northwest corner of Arkansas. Very mysterious and industrious movements of the secessionists of this State towards the southwest indicate an intended co-operation of forces from the South, Arkansas, and this State, to enter it from that quarter with a large armament and force. This I am disposed to believe is contemplated in connection with a movement under Beauregard from the South on Cairo. Cairo should, therefore; receive due attention, while a movement from here towards the southwest should be made. This latter movement I intend to undertake in connection with the troops of Kansas, and in carrying out this project I may need support from the States of Illinois and Iowa, and I have accordingly forwarded to the governors of those States a copy of your letter of May 27, 1861, to General Harney and have asked them to inform me whether they can furnish me with troops, and if so how soon and where, as I may need them to occupy some particular points or to garrison this post.

I would respectfully ask that the orders of the War Department over the troops in this department and calls upon the States indicated may have the above object in view.

I am embarrassed and even distressed for the want of camp equipage and accouterments, but shall do whatever can be done for my relief by getting manufactured at this city as many of these things as can be so supplied. This will, however, prove but a partial relief, and more will be needed from other sources.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Comdg. Department.

{p.383}

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., June 5, 1861.

Bvt. Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th ultimo, containing instructions to put down all attempts to commit outrages on loyal citizens of Missouri.

In reply to that letter I respectfully refer you to my communication of the 29th ultimo, written and mailed before the receipt of yours. I therein informed the Government that I had reliable means of obtaining information of the movements of the State authorities, and that I should promptly punish any violation of agreement and put down any attempt at rebellion. The many complaints of individuals, by letter, setting forth that acts of oppression were committed by the secessionists, have received my careful attention, and an investigation has proved the majority of them to be without foundation. As an instance of the groundlessness of these mischievous rumors I cite the report, which obtained currency, that Ex-Governor Stewart and other loyal citizens had been driven from Saint Joseph, and the ex-governor promptly publishing an unqualified denial that such outrage was perpetrated, clearly proves that there is a disposition on the part of some parties to manufacture excitement where cause does not exist.

My confidence in the honor and integrity of General Price, in the purity of his motives, and in his loyalty to the Government, remains unimpaired. His course as president of the State Convention that voted by a large majority against submitting an ordinance of secession, and his efforts since that time to calm the elements of discord, have served to confirm the high opinion of him I have for many years entertained.

My whole course as commander of the Department of the West has been dictated by a desire to carry out in good faith the instructions of my Government, regardless of the clamor of the conflicting elements surrounding me, and whose advice and dictation could not be followed without involving the State in blood and the Government in the unnecessary expenditure of millions. Under the course I pursued Missouri was secured to the Union, and the triumph of the Government was only the more glorious, being almost a bloodless victory; but those who clamored for blood have not ceased to impugn my motives. Twice within a brief space of time have I been relieved from the command here; the second time in a manner that has inflicted unmerited disgrace upon a true and loyal soldier. During a long life, dedicated to my country, I have seen some service, and more than once I have held her honor in my hands; and during that time my loyalty, I believe, was never questioned; and now, when in the natural course of things I shall, before the lapse of many years, lay aside the sword which has so long served my country, my countrymen will be slow to believe that I have chosen this portion of my career to damn with treason my life, which is so soon to become a record of the past, and which I shall most willingly leave to the unbiased judgment of posterity. I trust that I may yet be spared to do my country some further service that will testify to the love I bear her, and that the vigor of my arm may never relax while there is a blow to be struck in her defense.

I respectfully ask to be assigned to the command of the Department of California, and I doubt not the present commander of that division is even now anxious to serve on the Atlantic frontier.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. S. HARNEY, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

{p.384}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 30.}

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, June 6, 1861.

I. The State of Missouri is added to the Military Department of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and portions of Western Pennsylvania and Virginia. Major-General McClellan will extend his command accordingly.

II. The headquarters of the Department of the West are removed from Saint Louis to Fort Leavenworth, Kans.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, June 11, 1861.

General LYON:

You are authorized to enlist in the service of the United States such loyal citizens of the State of Missouri as you think proper, who shall not receive pay except when called into active service by this Department. Five thousand additional stand of arms have been ordered to be forwarded to you for distribution among them. The disbursing officers in Missouri are instructed to discriminate in their purchases against persons disaffected to the Government.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

SAINT LOUIS, June 13, 1861.

General L. THOMAS: Telegraph lines have been destroyed near Jefferson City by party from there, thus cutting off all direct communication with the West. The governor has caused the Gasconade Bridge to be burned. Telegraph lines from Quincy east, but none between these places.

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, June 17, 1861.

Brigadier-General SWEENY:

DEAR SIR: I inclose you dispatch from Colonel Brown, which he sent me this morning. We should have tents enough to keep our guns dry, at least, and utensils for cooking for the men. It is impossible to march any great distance without. Our men are in fine spirits and anxious for duty. There is a memorandum on the back of the dispatch of the items needed. Colonel Sigel moved on this morning.

Very respectfully, yours,

S. B. SHAW, Major Fourth Regiment U. S. Reserve Corps.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. FOURTH REG’T U. S. R. C., AT ROLLA.

Brig. Gen. T. W. SWEENY, Commanding U. S. Reserve Corps:

SIR: I have to report that, in obedience to orders, I marched with ten companies of my regiment (825 men and officers), leaving Saint Louis {p.385} at 2 o’clock, and reaching this place at 12 o’clock at night. I find here neither provisions, water, tents, cartridge-boxes, nor any other material.

It will be absolutely necessary that they be provided for, and I send back one of my officers to try and urge forward the necessary supplies.

I remain, sir, yours, respectfully,

B. GRATZ BROWN, Colonel Fourth Regiment U. S. Reserve Corps.

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BOONEVILLE, MO., June 18, 1861.

DEAR HARDING: You have heard of us and our leaving Jefferson City on the 16th. We debarked next morning a little above Rockport, and had not proceeded more than 2 miles before we met their advanced pickets, and soon after their whole force. At first the secessionists made a weak effort, which doubtless was intended to lead us on to their stronghold, where they held on with considerable resolution, and gave us a check for a short time and made some havoc. On moving forward, however, a straggling fire from the right and left made it necessary to move on with caution and slowness, and we reached the city about 2 o’clock p. m., where we were met by many people, under consternation from the erroneous impression that great violence would be perpetrated upon persons and property. I have been engaged more or less in removing this impression. I regret much that my proclamation was not published promptly, so that I could have had it here for distribution. I get no news of what is going on around us, but much fear the movement from Texas, and hope the subject will engage the attention of the General Government. Keep McClellan advised upon the matter. I had hoped some of our Iowa troops would have been in this region by this time, but hear nothing of them. My suspense just now is painful.

Yours, truly,

N. LYON, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF OHIO, Cincinnati, June 18, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

Have received order placing Missouri under my command. Will leave for Saint Louis to-morrow. If more troops are needed telegraph me details of case.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, June 21, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

Please telegraph General McClellan as follows:

BOONEVILLE, MO., June 20, 1861.

General MCCLELLAN: I have notice that Missouri is assigned to your command. This (Booneville) is an important point, and should have at least a whole regiment, with an advance post at Warsaw, which is a nest of rebels, who have massacred at Cole Camp Union men. These will permit the Second Missouri Volunteer Regiment to concentrate at Jefferson City. I would have you send a regiment here, with a large supply of stores.

N. LYON.

{p.386}

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BOONEVILLE, June 24, 1861.

Colonel HARDING, Jr.:

Hope to get off on the 26th. Think provisions now coming up will be enough for some time. About four companies more should be here. A force can go to Cape Girardeau, but an expedition to Pocahontas should be made with care; it might be cut off.

N. LYON, Commanding.

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BOONEVILLE, June 26, 1861.-(Received June 27, 1861.)

Colonel HARDING, Jr.:

The interests of the Government require that no boats ply along the river between this and Kansas City for the present, and you will notify the collector that no boats will be allowed to pass above here until further orders. Much confusion attends my train arrangements, and delay is unavoidable. Shall try to get off to-morrow, but am not certain. I want Colonel Stevenson to come here and take command with some of his companies. Schofield arrived this afternoon.

N. LYON, Commanding.

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GRAFTON, VA., June 28, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr.:

Have ordered three Illinois regiments to move to Cairo whenever called for by General Prentiss, who will look out for the southeast, and also telegraphs “No rebels at Bloomfield.” Will not a movement from Bird’s Point do the best?

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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BOONEVILLE, MO., June 29, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: In reply to your communication of the 20th instant, asking for information in regard to the steamer Swan, I have the honor to state as follows the circumstances which led to her seizure:

The Swan contracted with one Colton Green, an agent from Governor Jackson to Jefferson Davis, for the shipment of arms from New Orleans to Saint Louis, and took them on board at Baton Rouge in boxes marked “Marble.” The boat’s register contains a record of these boxes as shipped from Baton Rouge, the words Baton Rouge being stricken out and New Orleans written instead. The captain and clerk of the boat were part owners, and another of the shareholders (Pegram) was on board, and knew the contents of the boxes before the boat reached Cairo, if not at the time of their shipment. Pegram took command of the boat while passing Cairo, the captain secreting himself on the boat, for the purpose of avoiding a vigorous search by the United States officers at that post-the captain being a well-known secessionist, while Pegram passed as a Union man. The arms were delivered at Saint Louis, and the day after captured in Camp Jackson. They consisted of two 24-pounder howitzers, an 8-inch siege-mortar, six Cohorn mortars, {p.387} and 500 muskets, with a considerable supply of ammunition. A part only of the muskets were taken, the rest having been sent to the interior. These were all evidently United States arms, brought from the Baton Rouge Arsenal. The owners of the boat and its agents J considered as deliberately supplying the means of warfare to the troops of Camp Jackson, who as a body were evidently hostile to the United States. The boat is, in my opinion, properly a forfeit to the General Government, and should be held subject to some suitable adjustment before the courts of the country or at the close of the existing difficulties. The well-known proclivities in favor of secession of the district judge of Saint Louis make him an improper person to adjudicate the matter. The boat is now employed in transporting troops and supplies on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.

The statement of facts by General Lyon is known to me to be true. An additional fact, not stated by General Lyon, has some bearing upon the matter, to wit, the original memorandum of the shipment of the arms, showing that it was made at Baton Rouge, and that the change of the boat’s register was a fraud. The original invoice of the arms, signed by the ordnance officer of the Confederate States and shipped to Colton Green on the steamer J. C. Swan, is also in the hands of the Government officers.

FRANK P. BLAIR.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No 1.}

HEADQUARTERS CAMP CAMERON, Booneville, Mo., June 29, 1861.

Col. John D. Stevenson, Seventh Regiment Missouri Volunteers, is assigned to the command of the Missouri River from Kansas City to its mouth and the adjacent country. His headquarters will be at this place. Colonel Stevenson will move as soon as practicable with that portion of his regiment which is now armed to the post assigned, leaving the remainder to join him as soon as it shall be in proper condition. He will establish and maintain at Springton, Booneville, and Jefferson City posts of sufficient strength to hold possession of those places and furnish detachments for operations in the surrounding country. He will keep two armed boats patroling between Sherman and Kansas City, one above and one below Booneville, exercising a strict surveillance over ferry-boats and others navigating the river, and prevent their being used in transporting hostile troops or in other illegitimate traffic; and if in his opinion it shall be necessary for the accomplishment of the above purpose, he will seize and keep possession of such boats.

The armed boats will make frequent landings and send parties to scout the surrounding country, gain information of hostile parties and break them up, concerting measures, if necessary, with the adjacent post for this purpose, and give effectual protection to loyal citizens. Boats passing up and down the river will habitually be required to go in company with the armed boats. Colonel Stevenson will detail intelligent and trustworthy officers to attend to the transportation, preservation, and issue of supplies for the troops under his command, and will give as much as possible of his personal attention to the matter, to the end that the strictest economy may be enforced and the comfort and efficiency {p.388} of the troops secured. The proper garrison for each post will be about six companies, and the force for each boat two companies. Each post should have at least one field piece, and each boat a 24-pounder howitzer.

Col. Chester Harding will designate the troops necessary, in addition to Colonel Stevenson’s regiment, to carry into execution this order.

As soon as Colonel Stevenson shall be prepared to garrison the posts specified above, Col. Henry Boernstein will proceed with his regiment to Saint Louis, and take post at the arsenal or at Jefferson Barracks, as may be determined by Colonel Harding, where the regiment will have an opportunity to reorganize for three years’ service.

By order of General Lyon:

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

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BOONEVILLE, July 1, 1861.

Colonel HARDING, Jr.:

What is going on in the southeast? You sent me word that McClellan would attend to that quarter. He says I may have one regiment from Quincy and one from Caseyville, and Prentiss is authorized to call for four more regiments if he wants them. Cannot all these be put in movement to meet the danger threatened? See what Prentiss says, and send word to McClellan.

N. LYON, Commanding.

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BOONEVILLE, MO., July 2, 1861.

Colonel HARDING, Jr., Saint Louis Arsenal:

DEAR COLONEL: I hope to move to-morrow, and think it more important just now to go to Springfield. My force in moving from here will be about 2,400 men. Major Sturgis will have about 2,200 men, and you know what force has gone to Springfield from Saint Louis, so that you see what amount of provisions we shall want supplied at that point. Plea-se attend to us as effectually as possible. Our line should be kept open by all means. I must be governed by circumstances at Springfield. You will, of course, have due attention to the southeast. The State Journal is outrageous, and must be stopped; you will take such measures as you think best to effect this. Our cause is suffering from too much indulgence, and you must so advise our friends in Saint Louis. Colonel Stevenson must have pretty strong garrisons at the points he occupies on the river, and he must have support from other States as occasion seems to require. Colonel Curtis is, I suppose, on the Hannibal and Saint Joseph road; rigorous measures should be shown the disorderly in that region. Our operations are becoming extensive, and our staff officers must keep up with our emergencies. We need here a regular quartermaster and commissary. Cannot something be done for us from Washington?

Yours, truly,

N. LYON, Commanding.

P. S.-I cannot spare more than 300 stand of arms for Home Guards at Jefferson. I shall not be able to supply other portions of the State with the same proportion.

{p.389}

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CAMP CAMERON, July 2, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr.:

DEAR COLONEL: Please forward to Washington the inclosed return, or incorporate it in a department return to be sent there. Also, it would be well to make a report to the Adjutant-General of movements of troops in the State.

Yours, very truly,

J. M. SCHOFIELD.

[Inclosure.]

ORDERS, No. -.}

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI VOLUNTEERS, Camp Cameron, Mo., July 2, 1861.

The following troops, under command of Brig. Gen. N. Lyon, will take up the line of march for the South at 7 a. m. to-morrow, viz:

Officers.Men.
Brigadier-general and staff4
Company B, second Infantry61
Light Company F, Second Artillery160
Recruits, U. S. Army1134
First Regiment Missouri volunteers29866
Two companies Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers6205
Pioneer detachment146
Artillery113
First Regiment Iowa volunteers34892
Total772,277
Aggregate2,354

The following troops will remain for the present at this place:

Officers.Men.
Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers, four companies10381
Seventh Regiment Missouri Volunteers, four companies13349
Fifth Regiment, Reserve Corps, eight companies30558
Total531,288
Left behind sick441,332

The troops which take the field under General Lyon will be joined by a force of 2,200 regulars and Kansas volunteers, under command of Major Sturgis, U. S. Army, at Osceola, Mo. The united command will then proceed towards Springfield, Mo.

Col. Chester Harding, adjutant-general Missouri volunteers, will forward to Springfield the commissary supplies necessary for this command, in addition to that already in the field in that portion of the State. Colonel Harding is also charged with the duty of forwarding supplies for the troops that remain at this and other points on the river.

Special Orders, No. 1, dated June 29, 1861, from these headquarters, are so far modified as to authorize Col. John D. Stevenson to retain at this post or at Jefferson City such companies of the Second Regiment as may wish to remain in the service for three years, but not necessarily in the regiment to which they now belong. Such companies will be reorganized at once and incorporated into regiments.

By order of General Lyon:

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

{p.390}

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 40.}

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, July 3, 1861.

I. The State of Illinois and the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River and on this side of the Rocky Mountains, including New Mexico, will in future constitute a separate military command, to be known as the Western Department, under the command of Major-General Frémont, of the U. S. Army, headquarters at Saint Louis.

...

By order:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF OHIO, Buckhannon, July 5, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

Communicate freely with Prentiss. If he does not need Wyman, you can lake him. Telegraph to General Pope, at Alton, to give you a regiment and to Hurlbut, at Quincy, to give you another.

Do not lose sight of importance of Cairo, and of its operations in Southeastern Missouri. Write to me fully.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, July 5, 1861.

General THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington:

General Lyon is moving down from Booneville toward Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, with 2,400 troops. Major Sturgis is on the way from Fort Leavenworth with 2,200. There are 3,500 on the Southwest Branch of Pacific Railroad and the line thence to Mount Vernon, beyond Springfield. In a day or two another regiment will be moved down. There is a depot for supplies at Rolla, the terminus of the Southwest Branch another must be established at Springfield. All the supplies for, say, 10,000 troops must take that direction. From Rolla on for 60 miles the country is mountainous and barren. Teams have to take their own forage. It is absolutely necessary that a large amount of wagon transportation should be immediately provided. Will you see that the necessary orders are given by the Quartermaster-General, by telegraph, to Major McKinstry, early in the morning?

General Lyon urges that regular quartermasters and commissaries be sent him at once.

CHESTER HARDING, JR., A. A. G., Missouri Volunteers.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 82.}

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO, Cincinnati, Ohio, July 4, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. John Pope, now at Springfield, Ill., will proceed to Alton, Ill., and assume command of the troops at that place.

II. Brig. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut, now at Belvidere, Ill., will proceed to Quincy, Ill., and assume command of the troops at that place.

By command of Major-General McClellan:

N. H. MCLEAN, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.391}

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, July 6, 1861.

General MCCLELLAN, Buckhannon, Va.:

General Lyon has sent Wyman’s regiment to southwest. This, with the 700 troops now there, will be enough for the present. Colonel Wyman is in command, with instructions to keep open the line of communication, on which all supplies will be sent hereafter. General Lyon has moved down towards Springfield with 2,400 men, and Major Sturgis with 2,200 on the frontier. Sweeny is there and at Mount Vernon, beyond there, with 2,500, besides guards at posts on lines. Marsh’s Alton regiment is here. I will equip them. They will go to Cape Girardeau and be subject to General Prentiss’ call in case of necessity. The Quincy regiment will go to Ironton, and thence to Greenville. I will write particulars to-night. Think the force sufficient, and will not order more unless necessary.

CHESTER HARDING, JR., A. A. G., Missouri Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, July 7, 1861.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington:

SIR: At the suggestion of General Lyon I write to inform you of the movements of troops in this State.

Three columns are in the field, with the design to unite at or near Springfield, Mo., and thence to proceed into Arkansas. General Lyon’s intention was to go to Little Rock, but movements of the enemy in the southeastern portion of the State may change his plans. Besides garrisoning Jefferson City, Booneville, and Lexington, General Lyon has marched southward with 2,400 men, in round numbers. There are at Springfield and Mount Vernon, and on the way there from Rolla, about 3,000 men, under the command of Capt. T. W. Sweeny, Second Infantry, acting (under election and by order from Brigadier-General Harney) as brigadier-general of the U. S. Reserve Corps of Saint Louis. In addition to these there are about 1,000 of the Home Guard and Rifle Battalion protecting the line of communication from Saint Louis to Springfield. As this line has become the most important one in the whole State, and as it is threatened by hostile bands under General McBride and others, it has been deemed best to place it under the command of Colonel Wyman, Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers, who went down to Rolla with his regiment last night. He will establish his headquarters either at Rolla or Lebanon, beyond the crossings of the Gasconade River, as he finds most expedient.

Colonel Marsh’s Twentieth Illinois Volunteers are now at this point to be equipped. After being fitted for field service they will move down to Cape Girardeau, within 50 miles of Cairo, where they will, in case of necessity, be subject to the orders of General Prentiss, but if not called for at that point, will stop the transportation of arms, munitions, and supplies which has been carried on between New Madrid and Cape Girardeau, and break up the rebel camps that have been formed in the vicinity.

General McClellan has placed at the disposal of General Lyon one of the regiments at Quincy. Orders have been sent for it to come here, where it will be equipped, and then sent down the Iron Mountain Railroad to Ironton from whence it will proceed to Greenville, in Wayne County. Five companies of the Sixth Regiment U. S. Volunteers {p.392} are at Ironton, or in the vicinity, and the remainder of the regiment will proceed there as soon as it is fully organized. General McClellan has also placed the remainder of General Pope’s brigade at the disposal of General Lyon. No more troops will be called for at present, but there may hereafter be occasion for a large force, with artillery and cavalry, in the southeastern counties.

As soon as General Lyon’s plan of campaign developed itself the secessionists in the southeast began to organize their forces. They have hitherto been met, as well as possible, by expeditions from Cairo and from this place, and by Home Guards organized and armed under General Lyon’s authority. These expeditions were necessarily confined to temporary visits to disaffected regions, and have accomplished little. The whole of the southeast requires permanent occupancy by our troops, as it contains more enemies than any other portion of the State. Apart from this, information has been and is received here daily from different sources, including the reports of our own scouts, who have gone as far as Pocahontas, Ark., that our disloyal citizens are being armed with Baton Rouge muskets, brought up the White River, and troops from Tennessee and Arkansas are concentrating in the vicinity of the State line. These reports differ as to numbers, but agree in all other important particulars. It is apparent that the enemy design an invasion of the southeastern portion of the State with a considerable force, and rely upon the inhabitants of the swamp counties for active co-operation. The country in the lower part of Scott County and in Stoddard, Dunklin, Mississippi, Pemiscot, New Madrid, and Butler Counties is what is known familiarly as the “earthquake country,” having been turned from prairie into swamp land by the earthquake of 1811. It is a country as difficult to overrun, if held by hostile people, as the Florida Everglades, and the bear-hunters of that region will be hostile the moment that an advancing column of the rebels enters it.

The troops sent to Cape Girardeau and to Greenville are not designed to enter the swamp country, but to hold the approaches by which an advancing enemy must pass, and to overawe and to keep down the organization of hostile bands of our own citizens, as well as to encourage, organize, and distribute arms to those who are loyal. Time will show how much this force will have to be increased. There is no occasion for immediate re-enforcement. I will send a communication upon another subject by this mail.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHESTER HARDING, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General, Missouri Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, MO., July 7, 1861.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I wish to call your attention to a matter which needs speedy action on the part of Congress.

Before the call for the Convention which met in this State on February 28th last, citizens of Saint Louis organized and partially armed themselves with the intent to hold the city and county true to the Government, without regard to the remainder of the State.

In addition to furnishing troops for four regiments of volunteers, who entered the service for three months immediately after the President’s {p.393} first proclamation, five regiments of these citizens, numbering about 4,700 men, were enrolled on May 7, 8, and 11, under the name of the U. S. Reserve Corps, by authority of the President. The condition of their enlistment was that they should not be called upon for service outside of Saint Louis County without their consent.

This corps has accomplished and is accomplishing much good. Half of it is now in the field at Booneville, Jefferson City, Lexington, and in the southwest. The other half is in Saint Louis, anxious for active duty, but retained as a matter of precaution. The time is drawing near when their term of enlistment will expire. It will be necessary that a force be kept in Saint Louis, and at the same time there are defects in the present organization which should be avoided in establishing a more permanent corps. The men have false notions about discipline and subordination, thinking that, as they are privileged soldiers, as well as substantial men of families, they have the right to determine by vote what they will do. In one instance two companies Volunteered to go to Jefferson City at a time when that exact amount of force was required; came to the arsenal, were equipped, provisioned, and quartered for the night. Transportation was provided, and in the morning at reveille the men were ordered to fall in. Seventy of them refused to go, pleading their privilege of not being sent out of the county as their excuse. I disarmed them, took away their equipments, and sent them out of the garrison, but have since restored their arms, in consequence of explanations that their officers had not informed them of the service which they had been called upon to perform. I mention this as one instance, showing that in certain cases these troops cannot be depended upon.

As I was connected with the Reserve Corps organization up to May 11, at which time I came here, I will respectfully offer some suggestions as to a reorganization of that body: I would recommend that Col. John McNeil, senior colonel of the corps, and Lieut. Col. Robert White, of the Fifth Regiment, now at Booneville, be authorized to raise two regiments for the war by enlistment from the Reserve Corps. It is important that Americans should command. These regiments should have no condition attached to their enrollment, except, perhaps, that they will not be ordered out of the State. Even this will not be necessary, if they understand that their chief duty will be to garrison this place, and defend the city. Two regiments will be enough. The remainder of the corps can be disbanded, and their arms returned. These arms are rifled, and of newer pattern than any which the Illinois troops and a portion of ours have.

I would further recommend that these two regiments be kept on duty at all times. At present the men, when not on guard or other duty, attend to their ordinary avocations. I would suggest also that there be a brigade organization of the two regiments, with or without a brigadier, but that the commanding officer have the necessary staff officers to assist him. Colonel Blair and F. A. Dick, esq., may be able to give valuable information.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHESTER HARDING, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General, Missouri Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, MO., July 13, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

With cavalry on our prairies we could crush secession in our State within two months. The want of it has not only embarrassed us, but {p.394} lost us the fruits of hard-earned victories. The rebel General Harris would now be prisoner if we had mounted forces. Two regiments are needed. What may we do. Col. F. P. Blair can explain. We hope to catch Harris in any event.

CHESTER HARDING, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SOUTHWEST EXPEDITION, Springfield, Mo., July 13, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Saint Louis Arsenal:

SIR: I arrived at this place early this evening two or three hours in advance of my troops, who are encamped a few miles back. I have about 5,000 men to be provided for, and have expected to find stores here, as I have ordered. The failure of stores reaching here seems likely to cause serious embarrassment, which must be aggravated by continued delay, and in proportion to the time I am forced to wait for supplies...I shall endeavor to take every due precaution to meet existing emergencies, and hope to be able to sustain the cause of the Government in this part of the State. But there must be no loss of time in furnishing me the resources I have herein mentioned. I have lost in reaching this place about four days’ time by the high waters in Grand and Osage Rivers, which made it necessary to ferry them. The same difficulty prevented Sturgis from co-operating with Sigel in time to afford any aid. Please telegraph to McClellan and to Washington anything in this letter you deem of importance to those headquarters. Shoes, shirts, blouses, &c., are much wanted, and I would have you furnish them, if possible, in considerable quantities.

Yours, truly,

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., July 13, 1861.

To ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. Army:

My effective force will soon be reduced by discharge of three-months’ volunteers to about 4,000 men, including the Illinois regiment now on the march from Rolla. Governor Jackson will soon have in this vicinity not less than 30,000. I must have at once an additional force of 10,000 men, or abandon my position. All must have supplies and clothing.

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, July 15, 1861.

General PRENTISS, Cairo:

Have you received General McClellan’s dispatch of to-day? If so, what’s your plan? Will aid you in any way, but think best aid is to operate as before indicated. Have you official notice that General Frémont is our department commander?

CHESTER HARDING, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General, Missouri Volunteers.

{p.395}

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CAIRO, July 15, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr.:

I have received McClellan’s dispatch. My plan would be to start a strong column across Missouri from this point, leaving it well guarded; at the same time, advance from Cape Girardeau and Greenville, concentrating with Lyon on Missouri forces, and drive them back. It would be better first to break up rebel encampment at Union City, in Tennessee, to prevent their crossing at Hickman or Madrid to get in our rear. All of which I could do if ordered by major-general commanding. I must await orders. I have not been officially informed that Frémont commands us.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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CHICAGO, July 15, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr.:

Have dispatched condition of affairs to General Frémont, and asked authority to take the field in Northern Missouri with five more regiments. Expect answer to-night. Will go down and confer with you as soon as I hear. How did you succeed with Harris?

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, July 15, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Astor House:

The President is going in person to the War Department to arrange matters for you.

M. BLAIR.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 15, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Adjt. Gen. Missouri Vols., Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.:

COLONEL: General Lyon is now here with about 7,000 men. Of these, fully one-half are three-months’ volunteers, whose term of service has nearly expired, the latest expiring on the 14th of August. Governor Jackson is concentrating his forces in the southwestern part of the State, and is receiving large re-enforcements from Arkansas, Tennessee, Louisiana, and Texas. This effective force will soon be certainly not less than 30,000 men-probably much larger. All idea of any further advance movement, or of even maintaining our present position, must soon be abandoned unless the Government furnish us promptly with large re-enforcements and supplies. Our troops are badly clothed, poorly fed, and imperfectly supplied with tents. None of them have as yet been paid, and the three-months’ volunteers have become disheartened to such extent that very few of them are willing to renew their enlistment. The blank pay-rolls are not here, and the long time required to get them here, fill them up, send them to Washington, have the payment ordered, and the paymaster reach us, leaves no hope that our troops can be paid for five or six weeks to come. Under these circumstances there remains no other course but to urgently press upon {p.396} the attention of the Government the absolute necessity of sending us fresh troops at once, with ample supplies for them and for those now here. At least 10,000 men should be sent, that promptly.

You will send the inclosed dispatch* by telegraph to General McClellan and also to the War Department, and forward by mail a copy of this letter. Lose no time in fitting for the field the three-years’ volunteers now at the arsenal, and send them here as soon as possible. Call for Colonel McNeil’s regiment of Home Guards to garrison the arsenal, and allow him to organize it for the regular three-years’ service, if he desires to do so. It is believed that the remaining Home Guards will be sufficient for the city. Should it be necessary, their term of service can be renewed for a short period for the purposes of a city garrison.

The general is not aware whether Colonel Smith’s regiment has yet taken the field. If not, he presumes that both his and Colonel Bland’s regiments may be sent here without delay. You may doubtless leave the southeast part of the State to General Prentiss. Should Saint Louis be in danger from that direction, troops could be easily called from Illinois and Indiana for its defense. Moreover, a force moving on Saint Louis from the south would be exposed to attack in rear from Cairo. Hence there seems to be little or no danger from that direction. Unless we are speedily re-enforced here we will soon lose all we have gained. Our troops have made long marches, done much effective service, and suffered no small privations. They have received no pay nor clothing from the Government, and the small stock furnished by private contribution is now exhausted, so that unless the Government gives us relief speedily our thus far successful campaign will prove a failure.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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CHICAGO, July 16, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, New York:

I am again urgently solicited by adjutant-general in Saint Louis to take command in North Missouri. What shall I do? The forces are gradually closing around Harris. I think a vigorous campaign of a week will settle secession in North Missouri, and leave the troops at your disposal for other service. Please answer to Alton. We need arms much.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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CHICAGO, July 17, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, U. S. A., New York:

We need specially, to fit out one or two regiments of cavalry, sabers and revolvers. There are absolutely none in this part of the country.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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QUINCY, July 17, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, New York:

I am ordered to hold the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad. I have three regiments posted along the road, in communication at the {p.397} west with Iowa troops, for detached service and breaking up camps of rebels. I need better arms than the smooth musket. I have one regiment wholly unarmed in camp here, and can get no arms in Saint Louis or Springfield. Can you send me minies and ammunition?

S. A. HURLBUT, Brigadier-General.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., July 17, 1861.

Colonel HARDING, Jr., Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.:

SIR: I inclose you a copy of a letter to Colonel Townsend on the subject of an order from General Scott, which calls for five companies of the Second Infantry to be withdrawn from the West and sent to Washington. A previous order withdraws the mounted troops, as I am informed, and were it not that some of them were en route to this place they would now be in Washington. This order carried out would not now leave at Fort Leavenworth a single company. I have companies B and E, Second Infantry, now under orders for Washington; and if all these troops leave me, I can do nothing and must retire, in the absence of other troops to supply their places. In fact, I am badly enough off at the best, and must utterly fail if my regulars all go. At Washington, troops from all the Northern, Middle, and Eastern States are available for the support of the Army in Virginia, and more are understood to be already there than are wanted; and it seems strange that so many troops must go on from the West and strip us of the means of defense. But if it is the intention to give up the West, let it be so; it can only be the victim of imbecility or malice. Scott will cripple us if he can. Cannot you stir up this matter and secure us relief? See Frémont, if he has arrived. The want of supplies has crippled me so that I cannot move, and I do not know when I can. Everything seems to combine against me at this point. Stir up Blair.

Yours, truly,

N. LYON, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 17, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. D. TOWNSEND Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of Special Orders, No. 112, from headquarters, under date of July 5, directing the removal from the Department of the West of Companies B, E, F, G, and H, Second Infantry, and of Captain Sweeny, now acting as brigadier-general (by election) of volunteers. The communication reached me yesterday at this place.

I have been drawn to this point by the movements of the rebel forces in this State, and have accumulated such troops as I could make available, including those in Kansas. My aggregate is between 7,000 and 8,000 men, more than half of whom are three months’ volunteers, some of whose term of enlistment has just expired; others will claim a discharge within a week or two, and the dissolution of my forces from this necessity, already commenced, will leave me less than 4,000 men, including Companies B and E, involved in your order.

In my immediate vicinity are rebel troops amounting to 30,000 and {p.398} upwards, as is currently reported, which are constantly augmenting and accumulating arms and stock. They are making frequent lawless and hostile demonstrations, and threaten me with attack. The evils consequent upon the withdrawal of any portion of my force will be apparent. Loyal citizens will be unprotected, repressed treason will assume alarming boldness, and possible defeat of my troops in battle will peril the continued ascendency of the Federal power itself; not only in the State, but in the whole West.

If the interests of the Government are to be sustained here, and in fact in the whole valley of the Mississippi, large bodies of troops should be sent forward to this State instead of being withdrawn from it, till by concentration there may be ability to overpower any force that can be gathered in the West against the Government. Troops properly belonging to the valley of the Mississippi-from Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio-have already been drawn to the East. The moral effect of the presence of the few regulars in my command is doubtless the main consideration that holds the enemy in check, and with them I may be able to retain what has already been achieved until I am strengthened, but any diminution will be imminently hazardous. The volunteers with me have yet had no pay for their services, and their duties have been arduous. Their clothing has become dilapidated, and as a body they are dispirited. But for these facts they would probably nearly all have re-enlisted.

I have no regular officer of the Pay Department, nor of the Commissary or the Quartermaster’s Departments, and the affairs of both are consequently indifferently administered. But for the immense interests at stake I could never have undertaken the great work in which I am engaged under such discouraging circumstances. Under this state of affairs, presumed to be unknown at headquarters when the order was issued, I have felt justified in delaying its execution for further instructions from the department, so far as the troops with me are concerned.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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ASTOR HOUSE, NEW YORK, July 18, 1861.

Colonel TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

North Missouri Railroad torn up and obstructed by State forces. Mails cannot be transported. Track torn up behind the United States troops. Some fighting between these and State forces. I have ordered General Pope to take the command in North Missouri with three regiments from Alton. He moves this morning. General Lyon calls for re-enforcements.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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SPRINGFIELD, ILL., July 18, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, New York:

All the Illinois forces are in Missouri, excepting the Irish regiment and three companies of cavalry at Quincy, and three regiments of infantry, {p.399} two companies of cavalry, and battery of artillery at Alton. Shall assume command at once. Moving with the force from Alton to Saint Charles to-night and that at Quincy, will take position on line of Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad to-day, and will put the entire force in North Missouri into action immediately.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 18, 1861.

General FRÉMONT, U. S. Army:

Your letter of l6th* and telegram of 18th received. The General-in-Chief says please proceed to your command without coming here. He has no particular instructions for you at present. He adds, for your information, the term of service of three months’ volunteers began with date of reception and muster into service.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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ORDERS, No. -.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 19, 1861.

The following troops will move to this point at an early hour tomorrow morning and report to Brigadier-General Sweeny, viz: Second Regiment Kansas Volunteers, under Colonel Mitchell; a battalion, about 500 strong, of First Regiment Iowa Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Merritt; two companies of cavalry, to be designated by Major Sturgis, and one section of Captain Totten’s battery. The troops will take one wagon to each company, with the necessary camp equipage. Provisions and the necessary transportation will be furnished from this place.

By order of General Lyon:

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 19, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

It was the design to occupy Southwest Missouri, cutting off all approaches from Arkansas by way of Pocahontas, to occupy Poplar Bluffs, Bloomfield, Greenville, and the line of the Cairo and Fulton Railroad. Accordingly one regiment is at Ironton, ready to advance when re-enforced. Grant was under orders, but his orders were countermanded. Marsh is at Cape Girardeau, instructed to keep open communication with Bloomfield where Grant was to be. General Prentiss has eight regiments at Cairo, and could spare five of them to go into that country. If we once lose possession of the swamps of that region, a large army will be required to clear them, while if we get possession first and hold the causeway, a smaller force will do. General McClellan telegraphed that he had authentic intelligence of a large army gathering at Pocahontas, {p.400} according with what I have advised for weeks. Expecting you here daily, I have not telegraphed before; but if you do not come at once, will you take into consideration the importance to Cairo that the southeast should be held by us?

CHESTER HARDING, JR., Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, July 20, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Thomas authorized me to say that you can accept as many three-years’ regiments as shall offer, until further notice.

F. P. BLAIR, Colonel First Regiment.

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CINCINNATI, July 20, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

In case of attack on Cairo, have none but Illinois troops to re-enforce, and only 11,000 arms in Illinois. Will direct two regiments to be ready at Caseyville, but you will only use them for defense of Saint Louis and in case of absolute necessity. Telegraph me from time to time.

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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SAINT LOUIS ARSENAL, July 21, 1861.

Brigadier-General LYON, Commanding:

GENERAL: Before referring to your recent communications, allow me to explain the state of affairs in other parts of Missouri outside of your line of operations.

Before you left Booneville I had the honor to advise you that large forces were gathering at Pocahontas. In accordance with your instructions, I communicated freely by telegraph with General McClellan, and, as I supposed, succeeded in having placed at your disposal sufficient troops from Illinois to hold the swamp counties of the southeast. Accordingly, I commenced by sending Bland’s regiment to Ironton, with directions to proceed as far as he could, with entire safety, in the direction of Greenville. At the same time Colonel Grant’s regiment was ordered here, to proceed to Bloomfield, and Colonel Marsh to Cape Girardeau, where he could have easy communication with either Cairo or Bloomfield. I armed 800 Home Guards in Cape Girardeau and Scott Counties, to act as skirmishers, scouts, and guides in the marshes, and obtained authority from the Secretary of War to raise a force of mounted scouts. With these forces, and with arms for Home Guards in Wayne, Stoddard, Butler, I expected to keep down local rebellion in that region, encourage Union men, hold the causeway through the swamps, and prevent the approach of an army from Pocahontas until the commanding generals and the authorities at Washington became convinced that it was the design of the enemy to march upon Bird’s Point and Saint Louis as soon as sufficient strength was gathered.

{p.401}

General McClellan countermanded his order to Grant. I could get no answer in regard to equipping Buell’s battery (though now the authority is here and a portion of the battery in service on the Missouri River), and Bland and Marsh are at the points which they were sent to, without the force to accomplish the object named. General McClellan’s reason for countermanding the order to Grant was that Cairo was threatened. Therefore, instead of occupying the country through which the enemy must come, eight regiments are lying in that sickly hole, Cairo, where General Prentiss can see the whole of them at once. He also has cavalry and two light batteries.

A week since General McClellan telegraphed that he had the same definite information of troops crossing from Tennessee and coming up from all parts of Arkansas to Pocahontas, which I had learned from our scouts and spies (one of them a pilot on a Memphis boat which had conveyed some of the troops over), and had sent to him.

Now, in the southeast we stand thus: Two regiments, not in communication with each other; no artillery, and a few Home Guards, against, what they expect to be, 20,000 men (regular troops, well provided), who design marching upon Saint Louis.

I have explained all this to General Frémont, who will be here Tuesday, and who (as does General Pope) understands the threatened movement, and will take vigorous measures to meet it.

So much for the southeast. Meanwhile, your departure from Booneville, and the necessity of having 1,800 troops to garrison Jefferson City, Booneville, and Lexington, encouraged the rebels in Northeast Missouri. Brig. Gen. Tom. Harris gathered a force below Monroe Station, in camp. I took the liberty of ordering Colonel Smith, of Illinois, who was lying 18 miles from him, to break up the camp. He waited a day or two until Harris had got together 1,600 men, proceeded part way, shut himself up in a seminary, and sent back for re-enforcements, as his men had been marched off in such a hurry that they forgot to fill their cartridge boxes and had only four rounds apiece. He was relieved, and Harris marched southwestwardly, on his way through Callaway County, to make a combined attack upon Jefferson City, with forces from Pettis, Osage, and Linn Counties.

To check this, I ordered up Schuettner’s regiment from Cairo. As soon as the boat arrived I gave Colonel Schuettner his marching orders, and immediately went to work to equip his regiment. McKinstry helped, and both of us worked all night. The field officers, except Hammer, and nearly all the company officers went up town, and McKinstry and I were colonels, captains, adjutants, and quartermasters, as occasion required. I finally got them off, to go to Jefferson City, to cross there. As the regiment was in the worst possible state of discipline, and as Hammer is no soldier (Schuettner and the balance I put in arrest as soon as they appeared at the gate at reveille), I couldn’t trust him, and ordered McNeil to take seven of his companies and follow him and take command. Hammer had with him forty-two mounted orderlies. The two commands united were to proceed from Jefferson City, via Fulton, to Mexico, between which two places last named Harris was.

At the same time Col. M. L. Smith, Eighth Regiment, with two companies, and four companies of the Second, under Schaefer, were sent up to Mexico by rail, where it was arranged with Hurlbut that either Palmer’s or Grant’s regiment should join them and scour the country down toward Jefferson. After fully entering into the plan, and after I {p.402} had sent off our forces, Hurlbut sent Palmer on to guard the Chariton Bridge with his entire regiment, and left Smith to do the best he could. I, of course, immediately re-enforced him. Meanwhile the enemy burned the bridge above Mexico.

Hammer telegraphed from Hermann that he concluded to leave the river there, as transportation was easily procured, that he had made arrangements to effect a junction with McNeil. The next I heard of him he was at New Florence, on the railroad, and McNeil, with 460 men, was near Fulton, where I then knew he would meet Harris. You can imagine my anxiety, and afterward my relief, when I heard from that brave fellow McNeil that he had fought and routed the rebels.

The next day after this affair General Pope sent me word that he would go into Northeast Missouri with a large force. He has done so. He expects to have 7,000 men there, two batteries, and four companies of cavalry. McNeil still lies at Fulton. Hammer came down from the railroad, and McNeil has ordered him here. Everything quiet in Call-away. The northeast may be considered secure.

From Jefferson I have had nothing but trouble. It being impossible to supply the places of Boernstein’s six companies, I have left him there, and-but I won’t stop to mention his performances.

At home our friends are alarmed, and the city is uneasy. I receive about five deputations per diem, warning me that I ought not to send away so many troops (2,200 U. S. Reserve Corps left), and sometimes hinting that I will be overhauled by higher powers for doing so. The only danger is in case of an advance from Arkansas. But the first demonstration will result in clearing Saint Louis of its secession element.

As far as your command is concerned, I fear that you think I have been neglectful of my duties, but I cannot admit the fact. Every order that you have sent I have immediately put into execution, and have seen it executed, so far as I could give my personal supervision to it. Mismanagement of transportation at Rolla, to which place 110 wagons had been sent before Brown moved, and probably the inferior kind of transportation furnished, accounts for the delay in getting supplies forward. Arms, ammunition, and provisions were lying for weeks at Rolla, while I supposed they were going forward, and I was not informed of the fact. When I did learn it I telegraphed to Washington, and had instructions sent to McKinstry to buy everything I required. McKinstry has also had sent to Rolla, at my request, one of Van Vliet’s experienced clerk’s, Thomas O’Brien, to whom I have given the entire control of quartermaster’s affairs from Rolla onward. A large number of army wagons, with mules, have been bought and sent down, and I trust that there will be no more trouble there. Two hundred and fifty thousand rations were ordered on the 6th; 4,000 shoes and clothing to match were ordered on receipt of your letter of the 13th, and I presume are all on the way. I know that part have been shipped.

The line of communication from Rolla to Springfield is kept open by Wyman and Bayles. Wyman’s is a splendid regiment, and I am trying to get other troops to supply his place and send him forward; but I am embarrassed by conduct which I scarcely think meets your approval, although I am informed that you gave your consent to it. Lieutenant-Colonel Hassendeubel, who arrived here yesterday, but has not reported himself, brought up with him one of Bayles’ companies (Company L, Rifles, Fourth Regiment formerly, but since organized with others as a battalion), and has ordered Company M up, also, for the purpose of forming a three-years’ regiment, of which he is to take the command.

{p.403}

I have been strengthening Bayles all I could. There are three companies here now, mustered and ready to go down as soon as armed (by Tuesday at furthest), and the other two companies will be ready during the week, in all probability. The ten companies were to be commanded by Saxton. He is said to be on his way here at this time and Saxton would be invaluable, either in command on the line or with you. When Lieutenant-Colonel Hassendeubel reports I shall send that company back, unless I am satisfied that he had good authority for his action.

As to re-enforcements, I shall reorganize the Second and Fourth under their captains, and put the first ten companies formed into one regiment, without regard to the preferences of individuals. This can be done during the week, as Boernstein, Schaefer, and Hammer are all to come here to-morrow.

The surplus can be organized under a temporary battalion organization, sent to the field, and afterwards filled up.

Smith’s Eighth can go down during the week, and a splendid regiment it is.

Last night the adjutant-general gave me authority to accept any regiment that offered. Two are formed in the country. Both will be ready in two weeks. Others will come. I have caused the notice of the authority to be published. Bland can’t be spared; nor can Curtis’ men. Saint Joe and the surrounding country are reported to be ready to rise. In fact, the whole State is.

McNeil can doubtless raise a regiment without difficulty. He is ordered home as soon as Pope relieves him.

The Ninth and Tenth are filling up fast, and can be ready in two weeks, probably. These statements are made upon the supposition that arms and equipments will be here as ordered.

Mulligan’s regiment of Illinois Volunteers, I forgot to say, arrived here yesterday for arms. I sent some companies to Jefferson to-day, and the remainder will go up Tuesday.

But, better than all, General Frémont telegraphed me last night that he would start for Saint Louis immediately, and when I can have the opportunity of going over the map with him I trust that he will use his power to fill this State with troops. A few weeks’ delay would make the whole State a battle-field.

And now, general, I can say that to be relieved of the responsibility which I have had upon me since you left, without the authority, after the change in the department command, to do what I saw was necessary, with my representations to the department generally unnoticed, and without even a competent clerk to aid me in the ordinary routine of business, is truly a relief; and no one can be so glad that Frémont is coming as I am. I have never before had the time to write you fully, and I presume that now the office is full of people, who are waiting upon the same errands with which you were formerly so much annoyed.

I shall always feel proud of the confidence which you have placed in me, and I hope you will think that I have endeavored to justify it.

Very respectfully and truly,

CHESTER HARDING, JR.

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Notice.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI, Saint Charles, July 21, 1861.

An investigation of the circumstances attending the difficulties along the line of the North Missouri Railroad, and the wanton destruction of {p.404} badges, culverts, &c., makes it manifest that the inhabitants of the villages and stations along the road, if not privy to these outrages, at least offered no resistance to them, and gave no information by which they could have been prevented, or merited punishment inflicted upon the criminals.

I desire the people of this section of the State to understand distinctly that their safety and the security of their property will depend upon themselves, and are directly and inseparably connected with the security of the lines of public communication.

It is very certain that the people living along the line of the North Missouri Railroad can very easily protect it from destruction, and it is my purpose to give them strong inducements to do so. I therefore notify the inhabitants of the towns, villages, and stations along the line of this road that they will be held accountable for the destruction of any bridges, culverts, or portions of the railroad track within 5 miles on each side of them. If any outrages of this kind are committed within the distance specified, without conclusive proof of active resistance on the part of the population, and without immediate information to the nearest commanding officer, giving names and details, the settlement will be held responsible, and a levy of money or property sufficient to cover the whole damage done will be at once made and collected.

There seems to be no method of enlisting the active agency of the citizens along the line of this road for the protection of a public work in all respects so beneficial to them, except by making it their very evident personal interest to do so, and I desire them to understand that they will be compelled to pay in full of property or money for any damage done in their vicinity. It has been impossible heretofore even to ascertain the names of the criminals engaged in this kind of work, although they were well known to everybody in the neighborhood. If people who claim to be good citizens choose to indulge their neighbors and acquaintances in committing these wanton acts, and to shield them from punishment, they will hereafter be compelled to pay for it; or if they disapprove, their objections must take more tangible form than mere words. It is not to be expected that the General Government will occupy a large force merely to protect from the people of this part of the State a work built for their own benefit, or to defend from outrages and hostility communities which encourage violations of all law by giving no information and by offering no sort of resistance. I therefore expect all law-abiding citizens at once to take measures to secure the safety of the North Missouri Railroad in their vicinity, and I notify all others that upon the safety of the road depends the security of their own property and person. To carry out the intentions set forth above, divisions and subdivisions of the road will be made as soon as practicable from these headquarters, and superintendents and assistant superintendents appointed by name, without regard to political opinions, who will be held responsible for the safety of the railroad track within their specified limits. They will have authority to call on all persons living within these limits to appear in such numbers and at such times and places as they may deem necessary to secure the object in view. I expect all good citizens who value peace and the safety of their families and property to respond cheerfully to this arrangement, and to assume to themselves the care and protection of their own section.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding North Missouri.

{p.405}

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WYANDOTTE, KANS., July 22, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

DEAR SIR: Owing to the danger on our southeastern frontier Governor Robinson is in that quarter endeavoring to protect our people as best he may. In his absence I feel compelled to lay before you the present condition of our State, hoping that we may obtain relief. We have no State arms; every effort to obtain them has thus far proved a failure. All of our volunteer troops in the United States service have been ordered from the State, and we are left wholly to the mercy of secession Missouri in the east, and an Indian frontier on our south and west, and not an arm or an ounce of ammunition to protect ourselves with. In this vicinity, and in fact all along the eastern border, we are constantly menaced by threatened attacks from Missouri.

Could we be supplied with some State arms, to be properly distributed among our State troops, we should feel perfectly secure. Can we, by any process whatever, obtain these?

Truly yours,

J. P. ROOT, Lieutenant– Governor.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Saint Charles, July 23, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa:

SIR: Your letter to General Hurlbut, with a communication from Colonel Bussey, has been transmitted to me. In reply to it I have to say that I most cordially accept the proffered aid in maintaining peace and quiet in those portions of North Missouri bordering on the Iowa line. In sending your State or other forces into Missouri be pleased to intrust their command to discreet and prudent officers, who should be directed to keep me advised of all their operations, and who should inform me frequently of all matters of interest or importance connected with the condition of that region. It is not my purpose to make arrests for opinion’s sake, but rather to force the people throughout this section to keep the peace among themselves, and to keep open their own lines of public communication. It is impossible that the Federal Government can employ for any length of time so large a force merely to protect public works against destruction by those for whose benefit they were built, and it is my purpose to offer such inducements to the citizens of this State as will be sufficient to secure their own active agency in protecting their lines of railroad and other works of public convenience or necessity. I have published a Notice to the people along the line of the North Missouri Railroad, which I intend also to apply to the Hannibal and Saint Joe Road, based on these views, a copy of which I herewith transmit.* As I shall enforce the penalty to the letter I hope to see good results follow before many days.

Your active interference in North Missouri will, I fear, be very shortly necessary, and in a stronger force than you suggest. The unfortunate repulse of our forces at Manassas has aroused the whole secession element in this State to renewed activity, and intelligence received this morning from Saint Louis has compelled me to suspend, for the present, further movements of the troops from this place in the direction of the Hannibal and Saint Joe Road.

{p.406}

It is by no means improbable that I may be obliged within a few days to move the whole force in North Missouri into Saint Louis to protect that city from civil tumult and bloodshed, and in that case I shall call upon yourself and Governor Yates to replace them by State forces. I will communicate further with you in a day or two, when affairs have assumed somewhat more definite shape.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brig. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding in North Missouri.

* See p. 403.

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CAIRO, July 23, 1861.

CHESTER HARDING, Jr.:

Have but eight regiments here. Six of them are three-months’ men. Their time expires this week; are reorganizing now. I have neither tents nor wagons, and must hold Cairo and Bird’s Point. The latter is threatened. I have but two guns equipped for moving. Thus you see I cannot comply with request. Again, news of this morning changes policy of rebels in Kentucky. They are organizing opposite. Watkins is encamped with 2,000, 7 miles from Bloomfield. He has no cannon, and poorly armed. This may be the force you have heard from.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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ORDERS, No. -.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 24, 1861.

The following brigade organization will take effect from this date, viz:

First Brigade, Maj. S. D. Sturgis, First Cavalry, commanding, will consist of Companies B, C, D, and I, First Cavalry; Company C, Second Dragoons; Light Company F, Second Artillery; Companies B, C, and D, First Infantry, and Lieut. H. C. Wood’s company of recruits.

Second Brigade, Col. F. Sigel, Missouri Volunteers, commanding, will consist of the Third and Fifth Regiments Missouri Volunteers, and Major Backof’s battalion of artillery.

Third Brigade, Lieut. Col. G. L. Andrews, of the First Regiment Missouri Volunteers, commanding, will consist of the First Regiment Missouri Volunteers; Companies B and E, Second Infantry; Lieut. W. L. Lothrop’s and Lieutenant Farrand’s companies of recruits; Lieutenant Du Bois’ light battery, and Major Osterhaus’ battalion, Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers.

Fourth Brigade, Colonel Deitzler, Kansas Volunteers, commanding, will consist of the First and Second Regiments of Kansas Volunteers.

By order of General Lyon:

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No 1.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 25, 1861.

In compliance with General Orders, No. 40, dated War Department, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, July 3, 1861, the undersigned assumes command of the Western Department.

...

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

{p.407}

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CAIRO, July 26, 1861.

Colonel HARDING, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General:

Five steamers were to leave Memphis last night to take troops from Randolph to New Madrid. Union City troops are under orders to cross Mississippi. If they fail to assail us, Ironton and Cape Girardeau will need re-enforcements. Colonel Marsh has no battery. I have none to spare and no transportation to intercept rebels. I am of opinion that Bird’s Point is their destination.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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ORDERS, No.-.}

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 26, 1861.

In consequence of reports of seizures of persons and property not authorized, nor consistent with the purpose and policy of the General Government, the following orders are given:

The persons and property of all law-abiding citizens will not be molested, and it is intended this exemption shall apply to all persons, whatever may be their private opinions, who remain peaceful and quietly pursue their avocations, and who do not take nor excite others to take an attitude of hostility to the General Government. The exception here indicated has reference to such persons as are exciting others to acts of rebellion, and are themselves in arms against the General Government, and any seizure of their property will be made only upon proper authority, and will have reference solely to the means of disarming and depriving them individually of power for mischief, and not to the injury of families or the wanton destruction of property.

In cases of necessities of the service, where private property is seized or pressed into the use of the Army, the sanction of the commander on the spot must be given, and the property either paid for or a certificate of the seizure and a statement of the price due given.

The cases of plundering, wanton destruction of property, and disregard of personal rights, of which the general commanding has heard with pain, have been disgraceful to our troops, a violation of his own orders, and contrary to the purposes of the General Government. In thus expressing his disapproval of such conduct if the unscrupulous members of his command, he declares his determination to use all possible means to suppress it, and calls upon all not subject to this imputation to use all their exertions to this end, and all officers are enjoined to adopt the needful measures of vigilance and rigor to correct this evil.

By order of General Lyon:

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 26, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Adjutant-General Missouri Volunteers, Saint Louis Arsenal:

Your order relative to the State Journal meets with the general’s approbation. The general would like you to join him as soon as you can be spared by General Frémont. No doubt General F. will need you for {p.408} a while, till he becomes familiar with the details of affairs in the State; but he will have a full staff of regular officers, and must be able to spare you soon. You are much needed here, and will be more so soon. It will soon be very necessary for me to be with my regiment, and officers fit for staff duties are very scarce here. We have heard of the defeat of our troops in Virginia, though hardly enough to judge of its extent. I fear this will prevent our getting re-enforcements. If so, the next news will be of our defeat also.

Re-enforcements should be sent on at once. Our men are very much in need of clothing, particularly shoes. Many of the men are entirely barefooted, and hence unable to march. I hope something can be done for us soon.

Yours, very truly,

J. M. SCHOFIELD.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., July 27, 1861.

Col. C. HARDING, Jr., Saint Louis Arsenal, Mo.:

DEAR SIR: I have your notes about matters in Saint Louis, &c., and your proceeding seems to me perfectly correct. Now that matters North seem more quiet, cannot you manage to get a few regiments this way? I am in the deepest concern on this subject, and you must urge this matter upon Frémont, as of vital importance. These three-months’ volunteers would re-enlist if they could be paid, but they are now dissatisfied, and if troops do not replace them, all that is gained may be lost. I have not been able to move for want of supplies, and this delay will exhaust the term of the three-months’ men. Cannot something be done to have our men and officers paid as well as our purchases paid for? If the Government cannot give due attention to the West, her interests must have a corresponding disparagement.

Yours, truly,

N. LYON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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Memorandum by Colonel Phelps, from General Lyon, to General Frémont, July 27.

See General Frémont about troops and stores for the place. Our men have not been paid, and are rather dispirited; they are badly off for clothing, and the want of shoes unfits them for marching. Some staff officers are badly needed, and the interests of the Government suffer for the want of them. The time of the three-months’ volunteers is nearly out, and on returning home, as most of them are disposed to, my command will be reduced too low for effective operations. Troops must at once be forwarded to supply their place. The safety of the State is hazarded; orders from General Scott strip the entire West of regular forces, and increase the chances of sacrificing it. The public press is full of reports that troops from other States are moving toward the northern border of Arkansas for the purpose of invading Missouri.

{p.409}

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STATION GREENFIELD, MO., July 27, 1861.

Brigadier-General LYON, Commanding, Springfield, Mo.:

DEAR GENERAL: Another scout has returned from the southwest, and reports that bodies of the Confederate troops are in the vicinity of Carthage, Sarcoxie, Bowers’ Mills, and some other points, apparently moving north. He learned from some of these men that McCulloch had moved east in the direction of Cassville, and that Rains was moving north, and that the intention was to move on Springfield and attack it on the west and south. He also learned that if any movement was made upon them by your command that they would receive you with masked batteries. My impression is, however, that their movements are more for provisions and forage than anything else at this time. They are sweeping all before them as they advance. Some forty-seven families, driven from the vicinity and below Carthage, passed through this place on yesterday. They give startling accounts of the depredations that are being committed by the rebels as they return. I will start a train of twelve or fifteen wagons with wheat for Springfield to-morrow morning. I shall have to get material for making sacks before I can have it ground. The material is not to be had here, nor in Melville. I will send an order for it to Springfield by the train. We shall be able in a few days to forward considerable quantities. I sent a squad of my men out on yesterday and started a machine. The owner was somewhat contrary, and I concluded to assist him, in my way. All is working smoothly. I learn to-day I can have the sacks made as soon as I get the material. Then, if necessary, I will start one or two secession mills in addition to what will grind willingly. Unless I hear of something important from below to-night, I will look up another machine to thrash wheat to morrow. I have a man in Rains’ camp at this time. When he returns I will report. We are scouting the country as far west as Lamar and south to the rebel camp.

In haste, I have the honor to be your obedient servant, &c.,

CLARK WRIGHT, Captain Dade County Mounted Home Guards, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, July 27, 1861.

JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

What disposition was made by you of the arms which you purchased in Europe? We are without information on that point, which is very desirable. Please answer at once by telegraph and by letter. Send an invoice of the articles.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, July 27 [29?], 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

SIR: I inclose a telegraphic dispatch from General Frémont to Postmaster-General Blair, just received from the Postmaster-General. He says that to save Missouri, now in a critical condition, the public service urgently demands three times the amount of Major McKinstry’s (the quartermaster) last requisition. That requisition was for $353,761. {p.410} Will you request the Secretary of the Treasury to make the needed remittance? I inclose a requisition.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, July 28, 1861.

Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR:

Major McKinstry has made a requisition for funds. Will you see that it is sent on immediately? It ought to be multiplied by three to meet urgent demands of service here. Condition of this State critical and precarious, demanding utmost promptitude.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, July 28, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Washington:

I ordered the arms shipped to New York to my order, expecting to forward on the arrival to my department. I trust you will confirm this disposition of them. The rebels are advancing in force from the South upon these lines. We have plenty of men, but absolutely no arms, and the condition of the State critical.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 28, 1861.

Colonel MCNEIL, Third Regiment U. S. Reserve Corps, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: You are hereby appointed military commandant of Saint Louis. Your duty will be to take necessary measures from time to time for the protection and safety of the city; to prevent disorderly gatherings and disturbances; to dissolve secret associations and meetings; to devise signals to be used in case of alarms; to designate the rallying place of the several regiments in case of alarms, so that they may act in concert, if required; to establish infantry and cavalry patrols throughout the city; to keep yourself in constant communication with the secret police, whose reports are to be made directly to you; to detail orderlies from the different regiments for the headquarters Turners’ Hall and orderlies and the proper guard for those of the general commanding; to collect daily reports concerning the different Home Guard regiments, and to submit daily a general report to the commanding general.

For any needed military assistance you will make requisition upon the commanders of the different Home Guard regiments.

After careful examination and consideration of the peculiar state of affairs, you will prepare and submit to the commanding general a plan for the combined and concentrated action of all our forces in the city to repress insurrection or sudden attack.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.411}

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CAIRO, July 28, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Rebels from Tennessee are concentrating at New Madrid, Mo., with the avowed intention of assaulting Bird’s Point. They may intend going to Cape Girardeau. Colonel Marsh has no battery. I have none to spare. My command is merging from three months’ to three years’ service on half recess. Mustering in yesterday and to-day. I have but two 6-pounders prepared to move. I can hold Cairo and Bird’s Point, but cannot move to intercept a large force going to Cape Girardeau. I suggest that Colonel Marsh, if not re-enforced, be sent to Bird’s Point. Entire force at Cairo and Bird’s Point 6,350.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, July 28, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

On yesterday 3,000 rebels west of Bird’s Point 40 miles, 300 at Madrid, and three regiments from Union City ordered there; also troops from Randolph and Corinth. The number of organized rebels within 50 miles of me will exceed 12,000; that is, including Randolph troops ordered, and not including several companies opposite, in Kentucky.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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JULY 28, 1861-1 a. m.

Brigadier-General LYON, Commanding Forces West, Springfield, Mo.:

SIR: Another scout has just returned, and reports from 1,000 to 2,000 men in the vicinity of Carthage, moving this way; another of 600 at Sarcoxie, and another of 60 at Bowers’ Mills, all moving this way. He learned from the scouts of the party at Carthage that they were going to march on this place. My picket guard, 16 miles out in that direction, assured me, twenty minutes since, that I would have to be re-enforced. I at once sent a dispatch to Major Sturgis, calling for re-enforcements. This is an important point, and I will, without further order, sustain myself until re-enforced, if in my power. I have three picket guards outside the sentinels on each leading road in that direction at a distance of from 15 to 20 miles, and everything inside the camp on the alert. I started this morning a train of 13 wagons, with 348 bushels of wheat, to commissary division. The bearer of this, Mr. Samuel Appleby, has charge of train. I will have to have material from Springfield to make sacks, as it is not to be had here. I can get them made, and will then forward flour.

In haste, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

CLARK WRIGHT, Captain Dade County Mounted Home Guards, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE WEST, Springfield, Mo., July 28, 1861.

Major STURGIS, Commanding Camp McClellan:

MAJOR: The general commanding directs that five companies of Colonel Andrews’ regiment Missouri volunteers, and two cavalry companies {p.412} attached to his brigade, be sent to Greenfield, to the support of Captain Wright. Colonel Deitzler has been directed to send four companies of his regiment at once.

On the arrival of the troops at Greenfield, if the enemy be found in the vicinity, and in too great force to be attacked, information will be sent back at once, and the troops will retire, bringing with them Captain Wright’s command, and whatever supplies he may have accumulated.

If it can be done, the enemy will be attacked with vigor, and broken up, after which the troops will return to camp. The four companies of Colonel Deitzler’s regiment should be allowed to return as soon as practicable, so as to not leave his position too much exposed. If it should be found necessary to retire, it should be done by way of Chesapeake, so as to bring off Colonel Deitzler’s command.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD, Acting Adjutant-General.

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PLEASANT PLAINS, IOWA, July 28, 1861.

Governor S. J. KIRKWOOD:

DEAR SIR: Since my dispatch to you, dated Leon, July 23, communicating a general account of the recent troubles on the border of Ringgold County, I have the honor to report to you further troubles, with my action in the premises, with the hope that it will meet your sanction.

On my return home from Leon, I was met by a messenger from Capt. W. C. Drake, of Corydon, who was at that time stationed at Allenville, on the border of Ringgold County, informing me that Colonel Cranor, of Gentry County, Missouri, had sent to him for assistance and re-enforcements, as the rebels were fortified on Grand River, reported to be from 800 to 1,200 strong, with three pieces of artillery. Colonel Cranor had under his command about 300 Union Missouri men, badly armed, and over 100 Iowans, who had volunteered under him. I dispatched a messenger from Garden Grove to the various armed companies within reach, ordering them to march and concentrate at Allenville immediately, also at Chariton. Communications were sent to Keokuk and Burlington for two pieces of artillery, to be forwarded to me, if they could be obtained. I also sent a messenger to Captain Drake, to ascertain more minutely the facts as to the condition of affairs in his vicinity. I started for Captain Drake’s camp, but was met 25 miles this side by the returning messengers, whom I had sent the day before. These confirmed all the intelligence brought me the day previous.

On reaching Captain Drake’s camp I ascertained that messengers had just arrived from Colonel Cranor’s command, conveying the information that the belligerents, then within 4 miles of each other, had made a treaty of peace. I have seen a copy of it, and it is in substance as follows: Each party was to lay down its arms, return home, and assist each other in enforcing the laws of Missouri against all offenders. This was a decided victory gained by the rebels, as the terms were general, and embraced the obnoxious “military bill” of that State, and such laws as the rebel legislature, then in session in the southern part of the State of Missouri, might thereafter pass, under the auspices of Governor Jackson.

Colonel Cranor resides in the neighborhood of a large body of secessionists, and was no doubt influenced to enter into such a treaty in consequence of intimidation and threats against his life and property. The {p.413} secessionists in that region are more bold than before, and have recommenced mustering under the military laws of the State, which are obnoxious to the Union men, and to which they will not submit. The Union men of that region of the State are indignant and mortified at the terms of the treaty. Many have become disheartened, have abandoned their property and their crops, and are leaving the State. The same feelings have taken hold of many families on the border, in Iowa. I have seen several families who, abandoning everything to the fates, have returned to friends in other States. The loyal men of both States, separated merely by an imaginary line, have the same sympathies in a common cause. Whatever excitement is raised or demonstration made in Missouri tending to injure the property and destroy the lives of Union men of that State appeals for aid to friends and neighbors in Iowa; nor de they appeal in vain. The arming and military parades made by our companies along the border at most points have produced most salutary effects; it strengthens and inspires the Union men of Missouri, and carries over to them the neutrals and a great many terror-stricken secessionists. They voluntarily come forward every day and take the oath of allegiance.

In connection with the subject of my last dispatch to you, I would say that at least 1,500 citizens of Iowa left their harvest fields and families and rushed into Missouri to the relief of the Union men. These citizens were armed in every conceivable manner, without officers, system, or drill. They generally traversed a country broken with timber and undergrowth. Had the rebels displayed sufficient nerve and skill they might have killed and captured them all; or had a general engagement taken place, our citizens, without officers, system, or drill, might have slaughtered each other.

The loyal men of Missouri express their gratitude to the people of Iowa for their timely aid and support on every trying occasion. Everything they possessed was cheerfully offered free of charge to render our citizens as comfortable as possible. I know several gentlemen who not only fed hundreds of Missouri citizens and their horses daily, for over a week at a time, but spent hundreds of dollars, sometimes their last dollar, in this benevolent manner. On account of the excitement and constant alarm along the border our citizens lost much valuable time by frequent hurrying to arms; therefore a vast amount of grain was lost on the fields.

In view of apprehended outbreaks, sooner or later, on the border of Ringgold and Taylor Counties, I have ordered into camp at this place those companies which have received marching orders and are already on the way to the scene of difficulty. For the reasons before stated, coupled with the news of our late reverses at Manassas Junction, the rebels here and elsewhere will be inspired with new vigor. I came into camp last night with three companies; the rest will follow to-day and to-morrow. I have commenced systematizing every department of the service, placing the most competent men in the various positions; the strictest discipline will be adopted, and drill performed as in the United States service. Every arrangement necessary for the comfort and health of the soldiers will be carried out. The most rigid economy will be practiced, and an exact account rendered of every cent of expense incurred. The times are such that the people demand that something be done at once and effectively. We are so situated on the border that when we are called upon to act we must act at once. Heretofore we had no system; if called into action, our men were liable to be cut off by the enemy and by one another. All the companies called {p.414} into camp are armed except the cavalry, decidedly the most effective on the border. For want of better, I shall arm them with muskets us far as I can.

I have ordered into camp on the line between Taylor and Ringgold Counties two companies for thirty days, unless sooner ordered to disband, as you may direct. I will keep out scouts for the next ten days in the vicinity where danger will be most likely to occur. I will be ready to strike at a moment’s notice. If I am convinced that matters are settled, I will in less than two weeks strike camp.

By that time I am of the opinion we shall be able to determine, with some degree of certainty, the shape things will assume at the strong secession holds. There has been a settled understanding among the secessionists through out Missouri to strike a blow simultaneously with Governor Jackson, who is operating in the southern portion of the State. I will report to you as often as I can my proceedings.

The principal design of the secessionists in the northern portion of the State is to keep up the excitement as much as possible, to divert attention from Jackson’s operations, while they will do all in their power to harass the Union men in both States. They will not come to a regular engagement. In Gentry County alone they will number at least 1,000, who are continually on the tramp, day and night, skulking in the bush.

We have derived a great deal of authentic information through our scouts, who have penetrated their camps and councils, coming in upon them from the southeast and passing for secessionists.

The 300 muskets have just arrived.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN EDWARDS, Lieutenant-Colonel and Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Hon. O. P. MORTON, Governor of Indiana, Indianapolis, Ind.:

SIR: The general accepts the six regiments of Indiana troops that you offer. He will order them on as soon as his arrangements for receiving them are perfected.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Hon. RICHARD YATES, Governor of Illinois, Springfield, Ill.:

SIR: The general desires me to inform you that he will accept all the regiments from your State (23 in number), and prefers to equip them himself. They will be ordered to this city, or to a camp of instruction in this State, as soon as arrangements can be made for quartering or encamping them. In the mean time he requests that you will make arrangements for subsisting them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.415}

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 10.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. John Pope is assigned to the command of all the troops in the State of Missouri north of the city of Saint Louis.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, July 29, 1861.

I. By virtue of instructions received from Major-General Frémont, U. S. Army, the undersigned assumes the command of all the forces in North Missouri.

II. Brig. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut is assigned to the command of the forces along the line of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, from Quincy and Hannibal to Saint Joseph. Headquarters at Macon City.

III. Col. U. S. Grant, [Twenty-first] Illinois Volunteers, is assigned to the command at Mexico, Mo.

IV. Colonel Ross, [Seventeenth] Illinois Volunteers, will occupy Warrenton, Mo., with his regiment, and Colonel Palmer will post his regiment at Renick and Sturgeon in such force at each point as he may deem judicious, fixing his headquarters at Renick.

V. Morning reports of the forces under their command will be made to the headquarters of the military district at Mexico regularly, and such other reports as may be necessary to keep the general commanding advised of all matters of consequence in relation to their commands and to the condition of the country in the neighborhood.

The printed notice* transmitted with this order will be circulated as extensively as possible by each commander within the limits hereafter fixed, and each commanding officer will report to the district headquarters as soon as practicable the names and residences of proper persons to be appointed, as specified in the printed notice, dividing for that purpose their respective districts into subdivisions not exceeding 7 miles in extent.

The jurisdiction of the commanding officer at Warrenton will extend as far north as Montgomery City and as far south as the line of Saint Charles County, near Millville; of the commanding officer at Mexico, from Montgomery City on the south to include Centralia on the north; of the commanding officer at Renick, from Centralia to Macon City; of the commanding officer of the forces east and west of Macon City, from Hannibal and Quincy to Saint Joseph, with such subdivisions as he may designate.

Within these limits the commanding officers will comply strictly with the terms of the printed notice herewith inclosed, and will immediately select proper persons, without regard to political opinions (preferring men of property and respectability), to report to the general commanding as fit to be appointed superintendents of the divisions and subdivisions of the railroad specified by the commanders respectively.

VI. All illegal assemblages will be promptly broken up by commanding officers nearest the place where they may be held, and all persons taken in arms against the United States will be immediately sent forward to Mexico, to be disposed of by the general commanding.

{p.416}

VII. Each commanding officer will send out such patrols and scouting parties as may be necessary to keep him informed of all matters pertaining to his jurisdiction, and will be vigilant and prompt in suppressing all combinations against the authority of the United States or the peace of the country.

No arrests will be made for opinion’s sake, unless the parties are engaged in open acts of hostility, or are stimulating others to such acts by inflammatory words or publications.

It is the mission of the forces under my command in North Missouri to restore peace and safety to a region distracted with civil commotion, and to bring to punishment the infamous assassins and incendiaries who have been infesting this country.

All the forces in North Missouri, therefore, are cautioned against excesses of any kind, and especially against any depredations upon the persons or property of any citizen of Missouri.

Discipline and good order are essential to the efficiency and good repute of any military force, and they will be exacted from the forces under my command with all the power vested in me. The honor and reputation of their States depend upon the good conduct of the troops they have sent into the field, and I expect all commanding officers to notice, with the greatest severity possible under the articles of war, all infractions of military discipline and of good order.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See page 403.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, July 30, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

MY DEAR SIR: You were kind enough to say that as occasions of sufficient gravity arose I might send you a private note.

I have found this command in disorder, nearly every county in an insurrectionary condition, and the enemy advancing in force by different points of the southern frontier. Within a circle of 50 miles around General Prentiss there are about 12,000 of the Confederate forces, and 5,000 Tennesseeans and Arkansas men, under Hardee, well armed with rifles, are advancing upon Ironton. Of these 2,000 are cavalry, which yesterday morning were within twenty-four hours’ march of Ironton. Colonel Bland, who had been seduced from this post, is falling back upon it. I have already re-enforced it with one regiment; sent on another this morning and fortified it. I am holding the railroad to Ironton and that to Rolla, so securing our connections with the South. Other measures which I am taking I will not trust to a letter, and I write this only to inform you as to our true condition, and to say that if I can obtain the material aid I am expecting, you may feel secure that the enemy will be driven out and the State reduced to order.

I have ordered General Pope back to North Missouri, of which he is now in command. I am sorely pressed for want of arms. I have arranged with Adams Express Company to bring me everything with speed, and will buy arms to-day in New York. Our troops have not been paid, and some regiments are in a state of mutiny, and the men whose terms of service have expired generally refuse to enlist. I lost a fine regiment last night from inability to pay them a portion of the money due. This regiment had been intended to move on a critical post last night. The Treasurer of the United States has here $300,000 entirely {p.417} unappropriated. I applied to him yesterday for $100,000 for my paymaster, General Andrews, but was refused. We have not an hour for delay. There are three courses open to me: one to let the enemy possess himself of some of the strongest points in the State, and threaten Saint Louis, which is insurrectionary; second, to force a loan from secession banks here; third, to use the money belonging to the Government, which is in the treasury here. Of course, I will neither lose the State nor permit the enemy a foot of advantage. I have infused energy and activity into the department, and there is a thorough good spirit in officers and men. This morning I will order the treasurer to deliver the money in his possession to General Andrews, and will send a force to the treasury to take the money, and will direct such payments as the exigency requires. I will hazard everything for the defense of the department you have confided to me, and I trust to you for support.

With respect and regard, I am, yours, truly,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., July 30, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, U. S. A., Commanding North Missouri District, Mexico, Mo.:

SIR: The general has ordered the Fifth and Sixth Iowa Regiments from Burlington to Keokuk, Iowa. Colonel Worthington is the senior officer, and has been ordered to report to you immediately upon the arrival of the regiments under his command. The general has also authorized a battalion of riflemen, which is now employed along the Southern Iowa line, under the command of Governor Kirkwood’s aide, to move into Missouri, for the protection of citizens, when called upon, reporting any such movement to you.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, July 31, 1861.

The commanding general in North Missouri being about to assemble in one camp, away from the railroad lines, all of the forces under his command, has determined to commit to the people of North Missouri the peace and quietude of their own section, and with these the safety of their property. Certainly the people of the various counties have today the same machinery of government and the same power of self-protection against lawless marauders as they had a year ago, and it only needs the same active agency and the same common interest to bring together for such a purpose all those who have anything at stake. It is demonstrated by sufficient testimony, and by the experience of the past two weeks, that the disturbances in Northern Missouri have been made by small parties of lawless marauders, which at any other time could have been easily suppressed with no more than the usual exertions of the people against breaches of the peace in times past. Certainly quiet and good order are of all things desirable in civilized communities, and should form a common bond of union between citizens of {p.418} every shade of political opinion. When these desirable results are secured, there will no longer be a necessity for the presence of armed forces in North Missouri. It is therefore the purpose of the general commanding in this region of country, before removing the military forces under his command from their present stations, to visit with a considerable force every county seat and considerable town in North Missouri, and in each to appoint a committee of public safety of persons selected from those of all parties who have social, domestic, and pecuniary interests at stake. Each committee shall consist of not more than five persons, and wherever it can consistently be done, the proper county officers shall be selected as members. No one thus appointed shall be permitted to decline or shall fail to perform his duties, under such penalties as the commanding general shall affix. These committees shall be charged with the duty of maintaining peace and order in their respective counties, and shall have power to call out all citizens of the county, to assemble at such times and places, and in such numbers, as may be necessary to secure these objects. Any one who shall refuse to obey such call will be turned over to the military authorities. If the people of the counties respectively are not willing or able to enforce the peace among themselves, and to prevent the organizing of companies to make war upon the United States, the military force will perform the service, but the expenses must be paid by the county in which such service is necessary. To secure their prompt payment, a levy of a sufficient amount of money will be at once made and collected by the officer in command. Upon the call of a majority of the committee of public safety in each county, troops will be sent to keep the peace, but as such expeditions are for the benefit of the people concerned, who have in nearly every case the power to discharge the service themselves, the troops thus sent will be quartered upon them, and subsisted and transported by the county in the manner above specified for the whole period it may be necessary for them to remain. If, in consequence of disturbance not reported by the committee, the general commanding finds it necessary to send a force into any county to restore order, they will be in like manner billeted upon the county, unless the combination against the peace were too powerful to be resisted, or the parties engaged were organized in other counties, and brought on the disturbances by actual invasion. It is not believed that the first case can arise in any county of North Missouri; and, in the second, the forces will be marched into the county or counties where the marauding parties were organized or whence they made the invasion, and will in like manner be quartered upon them. Where peace and good order are preserved, the troops will not be required; where they are disturbed, they will be restored at the expense of the county. To preserve the peace is the duty of all good citizens, and as all will suffer alike from the breach of it, men of every shade of political opinion can act cordially together in the discharge of a duty as full of interest to one as to another. By performing this simple service as in times past, and which it is certainly as much their interest and their duty to discharge to-day, the people of this section of the country will be spared the anxiety, uneasiness, and apprehension which necessarily attend the presence of armed forces in their midst, and will again enjoy that security of person and property which has hitherto been their privilege. All persons who have heretofore been led away to take up arms against the United States are notified that by returning and laying down their arms at the nearest military post, and by performing their duty hereafter as peaceful and law-abiding citizens, they will not be molested by the military forces, nor, so far as {p.419} the general commanding can influence the matter, will they be subjected to punishment unless they have committed murder or some other aggravated offense.

By order of Brigadier-General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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CAIRO, August 1, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis:

The following just received from Colonel Marsh, with request to send to you by telegraph. A scout of his from Pillow’s camp brought the information; also a proclamation of Pillow’s, who says no quarters to be given those in arms against him.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

The following information, just received, is, I believe, reliable: General Pillow was at New Madrid on the morning of the 31st, with 11,000 troops well armed and well drilled; two regiments of cavalry splendidly equipped; one battery of flying artillery, 10-pounders, and ten guns, manned and officered by foreigners; several mountain howitzers, and other artillery, amounting in all to 100; 9,000 more moving to re-enforce. He has promised Governor Jackson to place 20,000 men in Missouri at once. I have a copy of his proclamation and also one of his written passes.

C. C. MARSH, Colonel, Commanding Camp Frémont.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 2, 1861.

General FRÉMONT, Cairo:

General Scott has telegraphed that two batteries of artillery have been sent from Cincinnati. Shall I forward them to you when they arrive? General Lyon wants soldiers-soldiers-soldiers! So says General Hammer, who has just arrived from Springfield.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant General.

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Cairo:

This dispatch was sent yesterday to commanding officer Department Ohio, Cincinnati:

Order two companies Fourth Artillery, with their batteries, under Howard and Kingsbury, to Saint Louis, without delay.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

M. BLAIR, Postmaster-General.

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 1861.

Since ordering the two batteries for you yesterday, it appears one company has no guns and the other is in Western Virginia; neither can be withdrawn. The order is countermanded.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

{p.420}

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WASHINGTON, August 2, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State:

SIR: This Department has this day authorized Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont to give the necessary instructions for forwarding the arms imported by him to his department, as requested in his telegram to you of the 29th ultimo.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Acting Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST, Bird’s Point, August 2, 1861.

Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

GENERAL: Thank you for the batteries. I reached this place with eight transports to-day.

Eleven thousand men, of which 2,000 are cavalry, well appointed, under Pillow, at New Madrid yesterday; further re-enforced to-day; 5,000 men badly armed, under Thompson, at Charleston, 18 miles from this point; 7,000 well armed men, of which 2,000 are cavalry, under Hardee, about 70 miles from Ironton. Force large in front of General Lyon; strength not positively known. Missouri generally insurrectional. I have re-enforced our posts at Ironton and Rolla, and hold the railroads between these points and Saint Louis. Movements on the part of the enemy indicate general and well-conducted attack, and we are just in time. My severest need is want of arms. Will you take into consideration that the exigency requires me to move with the greatest rapidity and silence.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 2, 1861.

In accordance with Special [General] Orders, No. 3, of July 31, 1861, the following movements of troops will immediately be made:

Brigadier-General Hurlbut, with such force as he may consider necessary, upon New London, Palmyra, Shelbyville, Bloomington, Linneus, Chillicothe, Gallatin, Kingston, Maysville, Plattsburg, and Saint Joseph. Col. T. A. Marshall, with two companies of cavalry and one piece of artillery, upon Paris; Captain McNulta, with one company of cavalry, upon Bowling Green and Danville, and Captain Peck, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers, upon Troy and Warrenton. The commanding officer of the Fourteenth Illinois Volunteers, with the four companies of his regiment at Renick, upon Huntsville and Fayette, first removing regimental baggage and stores to Renick, where the regiment will be concentrated at the expiration of this special service.

The commanding officers respectively will carefully examine the instructions contained in Special [General] Orders, No. 3, herewith inclosed, which they will distribute at the various settlements along the march.

They will assemble at each county seat here specified the most respectable citizens of the town and neighborhood, and will read and carefully explain to them the provisions and requirements of the special order.

{p.421}

They will then select from the number at least five of the most responsible persons, taken from all political parties, and appoint them a committee of public safety, charged with preserving peace in their respective counties.

When it can be done consistently with the special order, the existent county officers, or such number of them as may be judicious, will be placed upon these committees. The names of the members of the committee thus selected will be announced to the people by the commanding officers both at the Court-House and on the return march to this place.

All citizens will be warned that the troops stand ready to enforce promptly and vigorously every provision of Special [General] Orders, No. 3, and will be exerted for their safety and good name and for the peace of their counties, to preserve quiet among themselves.

At the termination of these services the troops will rejoin their original posts, except Captain McNulta, who will repair to this place with his company by the most direct route from Bowling Green.

[SPEED BUTLER,] Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 2, 1861.

Col. J. D. STEVENSON, Commanding in Jefferson City:

COLONEL: I inclose herewith a number of printed copies of General Orders, No. 3, from these headquarters:*

You are instructed to move with such force as you deem necessary to the county seats of the counties adjacent to you, and to appoint the committees of public safety specified in the printed order, distributing that order as extensively as possible, and notifying the people that its provisions will be strictly and vigorously enforced.

In selecting members of the committees you appoint be careful to take men of substance and respectability, preferring those of secession proclivities. I desire it to be made known that the safety of person and property in all that region of country will depend upon the preservation of peace and order, and that the best and only protection to family and property will be the presence of every man at home, engaged in his usual pursuits. Upon the secessionists, as well as the Union men, must devolve the duty of maintaining the peace in all sections of North Missouri under my government, and they must understand that however they may escape responsibility by flight, their property will always be at hand, and will be dealt with according to the terms of the special order.

Report to me the names, places of residence, &c., of all you appoint on these committees, and your whole action in the matter.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See under date of July 31, p. 417.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 2, 1861.

To COMMANDING OFFICER Iowa Forces, Keokuk, Iowa:

SIR: Inclosed are instructions for your movement with your command upon Memphis, Waterloo, Monticello, and Edina. I desire this movement {p.422} to be made as rapidly as possible, as it is my purpose to concentrate in one camp the entire force in North Missouri as soon as it can possibly be done. If you have not the means to transport the rations necessary for your command, buy at Memphis, Monticello, Waterloo, and Edina what provisions are needed, and give orders on brigade commissary here.

In selecting members for the committee of public safety you are directed to appoint, be sure to put upon it at least two, or, better still, three of the most worthy and prominent secessionists. It is the service of the secessionists I specially require, and I desire that you will give them plainly to understand that unless peace is preserved, their property will be immediately levied upon, and their contribution collected at once in any kind of property at hand.

When once the secessionists are made to understand that upon peace in their midst depends the safety of their families and property, we shall soon have quiet again in North Missouri. Take care that your men are orderly and commit no excesses.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 2, 1861.

Colonel WORTHINGTON, Comma ding Iowa Troops, Keokuk:

SIR: Immediately upon receipt of this order you will direct Colonel Bussey, with his cavalry, to march forthwith to Memphis, in Scotland County, and having discharged the duty hereafter specified in this order, to effect a junction at Edina with the remainder of the forces under your command. You will please put one of your infantry regiments on march for Edina by the way of Waterloo, and with the other regiment under your immediate command you will take boat for Canton, and proceed to Edina by way of Monticello. When you have effected a junction there with your other forces report to me your operations and all matters of interest. Buy provisions for your troops whenever you need them, and give orders for payment on the chief commissary at these headquarters.

You will disperse all bands of armed secessionists, and if any are captured in arms, send them direct to this place for trial. I send you a printed notice to be distributed along the routes pursued by your respective columns, and direct the commanding officer to appoint committees specified in the printed order, selecting for that purpose the most wealthy and prominent men in the county, preferring mostly the secessionists. The printed orders and accompanying letter will inform you fully of the system I intend to adopt in Northeast Missouri. I wish to give the secessionists such inducements as loss of property and danger to families to aid Union men in keeping the peace. Notify all the population that the forces stand prepared to enforce this printed notice fully and vigorously, and commence it with your forces as soon as you think it desirable. Act promptly and vigorously, and I think peace will result to all parts of North Missouri.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding North Missouri.

{p.423}

NOTE.-The same instructions given to the commanding officer of the Iowa forces were furnished Col. T. A. Marshall for his movement upon Paris; Captain Peck, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers, for movement with his company upon Troy and Warrenton; Captain McNulta for movement with one company of cavalry upon Bowling Green and Danville, and to the commanding officer of Fourteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers for movement with four companies upon Huntsville and Fayette.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 3, 1861.

J. H. STURGEON, Esq., Saint Louis, Mo.:

DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 1st instant is before me.* I will, with great satisfaction, reply to your inquiries, as well from personal regard for yourself as that it gives me the opportunity to explain clearly what few persons in your city seem to comprehend.

When I arrived in North Missouri to assume the command I found the whole country in commotion, bridges and railroad tracks destroyed, or in great danger of being so, and the entire population in a state of excitement and apprehension unwarranted by the facts. My first object has been to restore quiet and secure the safety of public and private property. The only persons in arms, so far as I could learn, were a few reckless and violent men, in parties of 20 or 30, who were wandering about, committing depredations upon all whose sentiments were displeasing, and keeping this whole region in apprehension and uneasiness. I found that those who had been quiet had been no more; had taken no part to prevent the outrages committed by these lawless bands, and had not even been willing to give information by which they could be apprehended or prevented from engaging in hostile and lawless acts against the peace of the country. So soon as these marauders found that troops were approaching, which they easily did, from the very persons who ask for protection, they dispersed, each man going to his home, and, in many cases, that home in the very town occupied by the troops. Parties of these men would leave their houses and families in the immediate vicinity, and engage in forays upon Union men and their property in the immediate neighborhood, being sure that those even most opposed to their lawless conduct would carefully shield them from exposure. The mass of the people stood quietly looking on at a few men in their midst committing all sorts of atrocious acts, and neither attempted to prevent them nor to give any information by which they could have been prevented and punished. This was the actual state of things in a large part of the eastern counties of Northern Missouri. When troops were sent out against these marauders, they found only men quietly working in the field or sitting in their offices, who, as soon as the backs of the Federal soldiers were turned, were again in arms and menacing the peace. To such an extent had this gone that there was no safety of persons or property in North Missouri except to the secessionists, and the Union men were too timid or too much in the minority to offer the least resistance. My first object was to restore peace and safety, so that the forces under my command could be removed from the vicinity of the settlements, and to do this with the least bloodshed, the least distress to quiet persons, and the least exasperation of feeling among the people. Two courses were open to me to effect this desirable result: The {p.424} first was to put in motion in all parts of this region small bodies of troops, to hunt out the parties in arms against the peace, and follow them to their homes or places of retreat, wherever they might be. This course would have led to frequent and bloody encounters, to searching of houses, and arrests in many cases of innocent persons, and would only have resulted in spreading the apprehension of distress over districts hitherto quiet. I was and am satisfied that the people of the counties in North Missouri are abundantly able to keep peace among themselves, and this is all I ask or exact from them. It is certainly their interest that they should do so. To spare effusion of blood, destruction of life or property, and harassing and ofttimes undiscriminating outrage upon the people, I have determined to present to the people, if possible, some common inducement to preserve the peace in their own midst. The common bond is their property, always in my power, though the owner might be beyond my reach. I believed, as I do now, that as soon as it was felt that only by preserving peace and quiet among themselves, and not molesting public or private property, there would result security of person and property and the power to pursue unmolested their several avocations, Union men and secessionists would alike engage in putting a stop to lawless and predatory bands, and that the persons themselves who had joined these armed marauders would soon cease their forays and abandon their organizations when they discovered that they had no sympathizers at home, and that every act they committed hostile to the peace of the country was a blow not only at their own property and safety, but also at that of their own friends and relatives. Certainly, loss of property is not to be weighed for a moment with loss of life or personal liberty, and as I believe firmly that the policy I have adopted will bring peace and quiet to North Missouri with the least destruction of human life, I intend to enforce it promptly and vigorously in all cases. Security of property and the absence of the military depend simply upon the people of North Missouri keeping the peace among themselves as in times past, and if they fail to do so they will be less wise than most of their race. I have not the slightest disposition to play the tyrant to any man on earth. I only ask the people of North Missouri to keep the peace and respect the rights of others in their own midst, and this I mean to exact from them if I have the power. If they will only do this, as they have done in times past and can easily do now, they will neither see me nor my command. I sincerely hope that these views may be satisfactory to you, and remain,

Very truly, yours, &c.,

JNO. POPE.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 3, 1861.

General FRÉMONT, Cairo:

General Lyon has sent a special messenger, Colonel Hammer, to say that he needs re-enforcements; that Jackson’s army is in Jasper and adjacent counties with not less than 20,000 men; that Lyon’s force is not much more than one-fourth; that the inhabitants are moving this way as fast as their teams will carry them, leaving homes and crops desolated; that, to insure a continuous and safe transport of provisions and supplies, the road from Rolla should be well protected. I have referred him to Captain Kelton.

E. M. D. [DAVIS.]

{p.425}

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP FRÉMONT, August 4, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Department of the West, Saint Louis:

SIR: I have just sent a bearer of dispatches to the telegraph office at Jonesborough, Ill., giving you the information that Thompson’s command was 16 miles from me and advancing.

Send, if you can, re-enforcements and ammunition. Am fortifying the Windmill Hill, and will hold out as long as possible.

Very respectfully, yours,

C. C. MARSH, Colonel Twentieth Illinois Vols., Comdg.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 4, 1861.

Capt. W. E. PRINCE, Commanding Fort Leavenworth:

The commanding general directs that Montgomery’s force join General Lyon’s command at Springfield, Mo., immediately. Send him this order by express.

The commanding general directs that the force under Colonel Dodge at Council Bluffs be ordered to Saint Joseph forthwith. On their arrival at that point the commanding officer will report to these headquarters for orders.

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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INDIANAPOLIS, August 4, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Can send five regiments, if leave is granted by the Department, as I am ordered to send them East as fast as ready. They are mostly river-men, and are well adapted to your expedition. They have been promised rifles by the Department, which have not arrived as yet. What kind of guns will you give them, and where are they at? Will telegraph the Department.

O. P. MORTON.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 4, 1861.

Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR, Washington City:

The governor of Indiana, in answer to my urgent request for troops, informed me by telegraph that he has five regiments ready, chiefly made up of river boatmen, but they are under orders for the East. He will ask for them to be kept on Western duty. They cannot be more urgently needed at any place than here, and I ask for them as immediately as the order can be given. Answer by telegraph.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.426}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 4, 1861.

Hon. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Acting Secretary of War, Washington City:

Seeing that the Secretary of War is absent from Washington, I telegraphed to you to ask that the five Indiana regiments, now under orders for the East, may be sent at once to me for immediate duty in this State. Governor Morton joins me in this request. Nowhere can they be more urgently needed, and nowhere can the river boatmen, from whom they are largely recruited, be so useful to the cause.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Mexico, August 4, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report, for the information of the general commanding the department, that by a simultaneous movement I shall to-night or to-morrow morning occupy in force the county seats of the nineteen counties lying east of the North Missouri Railroad and its proposed continuation north to the Iowa line. The three Iowa regiments have been instructed to move as follows: The cavalry regiment to Memphis, the county seat of Scotland County, and thence to Edina, the county seat of Knox, near which it is reported that a camp of 2,500 secessionists has been established; one infantry regiment to march upon Edina direct from Keokuk; the other to come down to Canton, and thence to march upon Edina by way of Monticello. These three regiments will effect a junction to-night or to-morrow morning at that point. Brigadier-General Hurlbut is instructed to occupy Palmyra, Shelbyville, and Bloomington, the county seats of Marion, Shelby, and Macon. He has probably done so to-day. Colonel Marshall, with 500 infantry, 100 cavalry, and two pieces of horse artillery moved from this place day before yesterday with the design of occupying Paris, the county seat of Monroe, and thence upon New London and Hannibal; Captain McNulta, with 100 cavalry, upon Bowling Green, the county seat of Pike County, from Montgomery City, on the line of North Missouri road. Captain Peck, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers, with 300 infantry, from Warrenton, on this road, marched yesterday, and occupies to-day Troy, the county seat of Lincoln. Five companies of infantry, under Major Goddard, occupy Fulton, the county seat of Callaway County. Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson, with 400 hundred men, occupies Huntsville, seat of Randolph County, to-day. Macon City, the junction of Hannibal and Saint Joe road, is held by five companies of Sixteenth Illinois Volunteers; and Sturgeon, on line of North Missouri road, by four companies of the Fourteenth.

If these movements have been made promptly and vigorously, by tomorrow morning the forces will occupy all those points, and as no place of retreat for armed parties of secessionists will be left in all that region without the certainty of encountering some portion of the United States forces, it is expected that they will either be taken or dispersed. The object of these movements was as much to put in operation the policy marked out in General Orders, No. 3,* from these headquarters, copies of {p.427} which are inclosed, as with an expectation of finding any considerable force in arms against the United States. I inclose also copy of instructions issued to officers in command of these various columns,** as also copy of a letter addressed to J. H. Sturgeon, esq.*** These various papers will explain fully the policy I am pursuing and the reasons therefor.

In addition to the reasons thus assigned, I have to say that, by pursuing the system of hunting out these guerrilla parties, the whole force under my command will be as much demoralized and as little fitted for active service in campaign as the marauding parties themselves. I am compelled to pursue some policy, however harsh, which will enable me to assemble my forces in a camp of instruction, that I may establish that discipline and habit of service essential to any efficiency in the field hereafter. Raw troops such as these grow worse every day by this system of small detachments scattered over the country on police duty, and if it be pursued for two months, I shall have a mob and not an army to command.

I have selected a point near Brookfield, on the Hannibal and Saint Joe Railroad, for a camp for all the forces under my command. Water is abundant and good, and the ground fine rolling prairie, with timber at hand on both sides. I shall move to that point as soon as the quartermaster in Saint Louis can send forward transportation. It is my design in moving to that point to occupy in succession Columbia, Fayette, Glasgow, and Keytesville.

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding in North Missouri.

* See p. 417.

* See pp. 421, 422.

** See p. 423.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 6, 1861.

Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

DEAR SIR: By order of the President I yesterday sent a dispatch to General Frémont, asking him to report briefly the situation of affairs in the region of Cairo. The inclosed is his answer, which the President asks me to send you.

Very respectfully,

JNO. G. NICOLAY.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 6, 1861.

JOHN G. NICOLAY, Private Secretary:

Our position in that region good. Enemy very much superior in force. Eighteen thousand between Bird’s Point and New Madrid, under Pillow and Jeff. Thompson. Strong in cavalry and artillery. We are re-enforcing and intrenching Ironton, Cape Girardeau, and Bird’s Point. Night of my arrival at Bird’s Point the enemy burned bridges of Fulton and Cairo Railroad. We are not losing a moment, but distressed by rawness of troops and want of arms. Shall I give detail of relative forces by telegraph?

J. C. FRÉMONT.

{p.428}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 6, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington City:

SIR: I am desirous of placing a force of 3,000 men near the southern part of New Mexico, from which to threaten Arkansas and Texas. In operating in the Indian Territory and Arkansas we will be met and opposed by a large force of Texans, now encamped near to San Antonio, unless we keep them idle by a force threatening them with attack. The northern central portion of Texas is loyal, but at this time is overawed by rangers. A force occupying El Paso, Tex., could be moved either upon San Antonio or into the Indian Territory, and thence into Arkansas. The rebels have a large number of troops scattered along the frontier, which our force would threaten, and we would thus keep idle three times the number of our own troops. The force designed for El Paso should be drawn from the Pacific States, and should be composed largely of artillery and cavalry, and should be moved by steamer to Guaymas, and thence by land to its destination. I would therefore urge upon you the great necessity to the public service of having this brigade placed in motion at once from California to El Paso.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY Washington, August 6, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, U. S. A Commanding Western Department, Cairo:

All the regular troops are ordered out of New Mexico. The first detachment will leave about the 15th instant. Volunteers raised in New Mexico are reported unreliable in defending the large amount of United States property there. These stores cannot be moved East. There is danger of their falling into the hands of the Texans. Nevertheless the regulars must come away as ordered. At least two regiments of volunteers, say from Kansas, should be sent without delay to New Mexico, with a competent officer for the immediate command of all the troops there. Confer with the governor of Kansas, and arrange for the safety of New Mexico as soon as practicable.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 6, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Commanding, Saint Louis:

Orders have been sent Governor Morton to forward five regiments to your department. Hoffmann’s battery of artillery, from Cincinnati, has been ordered to report to you for orders.

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, U. S. A., Commanding North Missouri District, Mexico, Mo.:

SIR: The general directs that you send to this city immediately the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Twenty-first Illinois Regiments; also Colonel {p.429} Marshall’s regiment of Illinois cavalry. Colonel Marshall, with parts of his regiment and others, will be to-day at Hannibal. You are directed to use the utmost possible dispatch in carrying out the above orders. The quartermaster has been directed to furnish transportation.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES, Camp Frémont, Cape Girardeau, August 6, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

SIR: After my dispatches to you yesterday, via Jonesborough, I proceeded rapidly as possible, expecting momentarily to be attacked. Work was prosecuted industriously the entire night, and this morning I could have given them a warm reception. They seem, however, to have changed their minds, as my scouts of to-day report their advance as having fallen back to about 3 miles northwest of Lakeville, near Hickory Ridge. To-day the springs at Benton are being cleaned out, evidently with the intention of forming a camp there. By to-morrow evening, if they will let me alone with the ordnance you are sending, I can hold out against any probable force they may send, and will then proceed with fortifications, as originally designed. Men in good spirits. They labored hard and willingly. Major Kappner, of your staff, assisted by Captain Fladd, were indefatigable in their exertions. The present appearance of the works of itself speaks their capability. Will keep you constantly advised.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. C. MARSH, Col. 20th Ill. Vols., Comdg. U. S. Forces at Cape Girardeau.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 7, 1861.

Hon. SECRETARY OF WAR:

MY DEAR SIR: The within paper, as you see, is by Hon. John S. Phelps and Hon. Frank P. Blair, jr., both members of the present Congress from Missouri. The object is to get up an efficient force of Missourians in the southwestern part of the State. It ought to be done, and Mr. Phelps ought to have general superintendence of it. I see by a private report to me from the Department that eighteen regiments are already accepted from Missouri. Can it not be arranged that part of them (not yet organized, as I understand) may be taken from the locality mentioned and put under the control of Mr. Phelps, and let him have discretion to accept them for a shorter term than three years or the war-understanding, however, that he will get them for the full term if he can’? I hope this can be done, because Mr. Phelps is too zealous and efficient and understands his ground too well for us to lose his service. Of course provision for arming, equipping, &c., must be made. Mr. Phelps is here, and wishes to carry home with him authority for this matter.

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

{p.430}

[Inclosure.]

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, August 6, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT:

SIR: An invasion of the State of Missouri by troops under the command of General McCulloch has taken place. Other invasions of that State are threatened by troops from the State of Arkansas and Tennessee. We recommend you receive into the service of the United States from the State of Missouri troops to serve for six months, to be employed in preserving peace and quiet in that State and to repel the threatened invasions, and also to remove the seat of war from among the people of that State to the southward; to invade Arkansas, and to keep the Indians west of that State in subjection.

If this suggestion shall be adopted, we recommend 5,000 stand of improved arms, in addition to those already sent to Missouri, be forthwith sent, with a proper supply of clothing, camp and tent equipage, ammunition, and means with which to obtain commissary and other quartermaster supplies, and also medical supplies, &c. Arms for cavalry and equipments should also be furnished for a battalion or regiment of mounted men to be raised in Southwest Missouri, in addition to the arms before mentioned. Arms will be needed when Arkansas shall be invaded to arm men of that State who are Union men, and willing to enter the military service of the United States.

The munitions of war we have mentioned we think should be sent to Springfield, Mo., for use at that point and its vicinity.

JOHN S. PHELPS. FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.

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AUGUST 8, 1861-morning.

Brigadier-General GRANT, Charged with the Command of the Ironton Force:

A special train will be sent to take up your regiment to Jefferson Barracks this morning at 9 o’clock. You are directed to proceed with it to Pilot Knob, and take command of the force stationed there under Colonels Brown, Hecker, and Bland. You will find at the post an officer of Engineers, Major Kraut, engaged in laying out intrenchments, which you are requested to push forward with all possible rapidity, employing for this purpose whatever number of men Major Kraut may judge as practicable to use advantageously. It is intended to so strengthen the frontier as to make it tenable against any force likely to be brought against it, and to this end additional men and stores will be immediately sent forward. To aid in the works, two companies of the engineer regiments will be sent forward to-day, together with four heavy barbette guns. No lighter guns are at this moment disposable. No enemy is reported as advancing with the intention of turning your position and breaking up your communication with Saint Louis by destroying the railroads in your rear. You are to scour the country in advance as far as your means will allow, keeping a watchful eye upon the approach by Fredericktown, and informing yourself immediately of intended movements by employing reliable spies, agreeably to the instructions of yesterday’s date addressed to Col. B. Gratz Brown. You are to prepare for the contingency of a sudden movement with the {p.431} force under your command, holding meanwhile your position until further orders, and communicating daily with these headquarters. A locomotive has been placed at Ironton at the orders of the commanding officer of the post. Lieutenant-Colonel Kallmann is holding the road between Ironton and Saint Louis with a sufficient force, and you will direct him to withdraw the rolling stock of the road to this place in the event of an attack by a greatly superior force, and take such other further measures as your judgment may suggest.

By order of Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.}

HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 8, 1861.

In pursuance of instructions from department headquarters, the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Military District of Ironton.

Col. B. Gratz Brown, who is relieved by this order, will hold himself in readiness to move to Saint Louis to-morrow with the portion of his regiment now here. On his arrival at Saint Louis he will report to Major-General Frémont for orders.

By order of U. S. Grant, brigadier-general, commanding:

M. S. HASIE, Post Adjutant.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 9, 1861.

Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR, Washington:

MY DEAR MR. BLAIR: The greater part of the old troops, especially the foreign element, is going out of service. The new levies are literally the rawest ever got together. They are reported by the officers to be entirely unacquainted with the rudiments of military exercise. To bring them before the enemy in their present condition would be to have only an unmanageable mob. I can remedy this if I can be authorized by the President and Secretary of War to collect throughout the States instructed men who have seen service. With them I could make a skeleton-meager enough, but still a frame-work-on which to form the army. This authority ought to be allowed, and the cost of transportation. Don’t lose time, but get it quick. I assure you it will require all we can do, and to do it in the best manner, to meet the enemy.

I ought to be supplied here with four or five millions of dollars, and the disbursing officers allowed to sell them at the ruling discount. All such equipments as I can procure abroad in much less time than I could get them here I ought to be allowed to send for.

These are my suggestions. They are valuable. Pray act upon them; and what you do do quick. It would subserve the public interest if Commander John Rodgers were removed and an officer directed to report to me to have command of the operations on the Mississippi. Show this to the President.

The contest in the Mississippi Valley will be a severe one. We had best meet it in the face at once, and by so doing we can rout them. Who now serves the country quickly serves her twice.

Yours, truly,

J. C. FRÉMONT.

{p.432}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 9, 1861.

MY DEAR MR. BLAIR: I am told that a gentleman, a friend to our side, has gone on to Washington to offer some Kentucky regiments, I understand, to have them serve with me. Have them accepted, if you can, for me. I want to occupy the Mississippi River part of Kentucky, and would prefer to do it with Kentucky men.

Major Hagner telegraphs Captain Callender (ordnance) that all my cavalry equipments and harness, arranged for with him in New York, have been ordered to Washington. I do not think this quite right.

Yours, truly,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Ironton, Mo., August 9, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Inclosed herewith please find consolidated report of the troops at this place as near as can be given at present.* I arrived here yesterday, and assumed command, in pursuance of directions from Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont. Since that time I have studied the nature of the ground it may become necessary for me to defend, the character of the troops, and the means, &c., to do it with. From all that I have yet learned from spies and loyally-disposed citizens, I am led to believe that there is no force within 30 miles of us that entertain the least idea of attacking this position, unless it should be left so weak as to invite an attack. It is fortunate, too, if this is the case, for many of the officers seem to have so little command over their men, and military duty seems to be done so loosely, that I fear at present our resistance would be in the inverse ratio of the number of troops to resist with. In two days more, however, I expect to have a very different state of affairs and to improve it continuously. Spies are said to be seen every day within a few miles of our camp; marauding parties are infesting the country, pillaging Union men, within 10 miles of here. At present I can spare no force; in fact, have not suitable troops to drive these guerrillas out and afford to Union citizens of this place or neighborhood the protection I feel they should have. Artillery and cavalry are much needed, and the quartermaster’s department is yet quite deficient. The number of teams would scarcely suffice for the use of this as a military post without making any forward movement, and the horses of those we have are many of them barefoot and without forage. I have taken steps to remedy those latter defects.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Ironton, Mo., August 10, 1861.

Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Army, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Since my report of yesterday no change has taken plate in the strength or position of this command. No information has been received {p.433} to lead to the supposition that this place is in danger of an immediate attack. The enemy, however, reconnoiters to within a few miles of our picket guards, and I would therefore urgently recommend that cavalry and field artillery be sent here as early as they can be spared. From information received to-day, which I am disposed to think reliable, General Hardee is at Greenville, with 2,000 men and six or eight field pieces, with 1,000 more troops thrown forward to Stoney Battery, near Brunot. Of this force one-third is represented to be cavalry, well mounted and equipped. This being a healthy location, I would recommend that one or two of the newly-organized regiments, say Smith’s, now at Jefferson Barracks, and some other one, be sent here for drill and discipline. This would enable me to use the troops now here for scouting parties without calling upon the new volunteers for much service, that would take them from their drill. If equipments complete for one hundred mounted men could be spared, particularly the carbines and revolvers, they could be efficiently used here. The twenty-four mounted Home Guards now here are destitute of suitable arms, and are almost useless in consequence.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 10, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis:

DEAR SIR: At the present time the counties of Monroe, Ralls, Marion, and Shelby are infested by bands of armed men, encamped in different places, and frequently changing their place of encampment. It is believed that at the present time a large majority of the people of Monroe and Ralls Counties favor secession. In Marion and Shelby the majority is not so large. I think the number in camp in these counties must be between 1,000 and 2,000, and such is the communication kept up between them, that if they desired to concentrate a force at any point, I have no doubt they could bring out over 2,000 at short notice, including those who are usually at home at their work. In addition to the rifles and shot-guns of the country they have sonic muskets with bayonets; these are said to be about 400 in number. They also have two cannon, 6 and 9 pounders, made at Hannibal. It is said they have others, taken from the Liberty Arsenal. I think they have others.

These men are exceedingly bitter in their feelings of hostility, and have been Jed on until many of them are fit for any deed. Usually they are ignorant; they are fed on falsehood, and are encouraged in their course in the strong belief that Jackson is soon to reinstate himself as governor of the State. To this the defeat at Manassas and the invasion of the State from the South, aided by false statements, such as that Bird’s Point has been taken and that Lyon and Sigel have been cut up, give great encouragement.

It must be confessed that there have been many aggravating causes to produce this state of things. You already know the many depredations committed by the soldiery. Perhaps this has not been the worst. Frightful stories as to what the soldiers would do if they came into the State preceded them on their approach to a place. Many were ready to run from fright. It occurred to my knowledge in a good many cases where men thus ran and did not obey the order to halt-which very {p.434} likely they did not understand if they heard-they were fired upon, not single shots, but volleys, in the presence but without the command of officers. Whether any were killed in this way I do not know. It has been reported to me that soldiers have repeatedly fired from trains at quiet, peaceable citizens. I believe this, though I have not seen it. Very many have been arrested without any cause, except that they were reported secessionists, and not only this, but indignities have been put upon them, such as requiring them to “mark time,” dig ditches, and sink-holes for filth. The present week, Mr. McAfee, speaker of the last house of representatives, was arrested and required by General Hurlbut to dig trenches in the hot sun, as I was told, all day. Hurlbut himself told me he set him at it. McAfee is no doubt a very bad and dangerous man; still it was admitted that it was very doubtful if any charge could be maintained against him. If he is now let go for want of cause to hold him, I fear he will be able to do us much more hurt than heretofore.

Now, sir, when these facts, which are bad enough, are greatly exaggerated by crafty men, they have led many, especially young men, into a bad cause from really noble and generous impulses. When once they are in, and have committed the overt act, it is hard to get them out. These things have tended greatly to weaken the Union cause, and in the State where I am acquainted there are far less Union men than two months since.

Many timid Union men, who have seen secessionists grow more numerous, bold, and threatening, have thought they would succeed. Many such, who can, have left the State or are intending to leave it, while perhaps a larger number think it is of no use to struggle against it, and bow to the storm. I have dwelt at length on the condition of things and the causes, that you may know better how to adapt the remedy.

Complaint is made by officers that they cannot get information. It is well known that the wrath of an unscrupulous foe falls on the head of an informer, and there never has been, and is not to-day, any adequate protection for such men. Few are bold enough to take the position.

You no doubt desire to retain all your present friends if possible, and strengthen their hands, while you weaken the enemy, and give them the least possible just occasion to complain. I think if an arrangement could be made to pay for the destruction and loss wantonly and unlawfully done by the soldiery, it would go far to place the Government right before the public mind. The Government is now industriously made responsible for these abuses. Then, if persons should be exempt from arrest for their opinions, for the same reason should not their property be protected also? Yet it is the published purpose of General Pope to hold communities responsible for acts of violence committed among them. This might do in a foreign country, but I do not think it can be done here, without alienating friends and making the feeling still more bitter on the part of the enemies. The present plan of appointing leading secessionists to look after and protect the railroads works in this way: They are authorized to call out who and as many as they please at all times. They use this to order out the Union men, to their great annoyance, intending, no doubt, if they fail fully to respond, to report them, and as far as possible have them held responsible for any damage. It is already creating great dissatisfaction. The principle of holding peaceable, quiet men responsible in a military contribution for damages done by lawless and violent men is one which can never meet with favor in the popular mind. It is said these roving bands cannot {p.435} be reached, but well-informed men in the country think differently. A suitable mounted force would be required, and it can be done. At least their cannon can be taken, and they are a “tower of strength” to them in their moral effect on the community.

You may consider much that I have written impertinent. I can only say I have not so intended it. I have felt that in the multitude of your cares there were many facts of which you were not aware. The work to be done in Missouri I consider far more delicate and difficult to do well than if it were a State in open hostility to the Government. I shall call attention to a few points on our road, and I have done. At Hannibal are all our repair shops and a large part of our engines and rolling stock. If these were destroyed it would greatly cripple the road. The destruction of the South River Bridge, between Hannibal and Palmyra, would cut us off from there and produce nearly the same effect. This bridge is one-fourth of a mile long and sixty feet high. The bridges at Chariton and Grand River are important, and would seriously embarrass the operations of the road if they were destroyed. No other bridge would delay trains more than a few days if destroyed. I think these bridges and Hannibal should be guarded. There are especial reasons for an attack on Hannibal. I am confident the rebels can bring a force of 2,000 men if they choose. There are only between 300 and 400 Home Guards to protect it. If attacked, we are determined to whip the enemy, but it is not prudent, as it is the key to the whole route, and it must be the only reliable route for communication and transportation to all the country west from now until next spring.

Begging pardon for this trespass on your time, I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. T. K. HAYWARD.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Saint Louis, August 10, 1861.

Col. CYRUS BUSSEY, Commanding Regiment Iowa Cavalry:

SIR: I inclose herewith copies of printed order to regulate the policy to be pursued by any forces serving in the District of North Missouri. You will please concentrate your regiment as rapidly as possible, with such arms for their use as you can in any way procure. So soon as they are thus concentrated you will enter the State of Missouri with your whole force, and march slowly through the several counties of Clarke, Lewis, Scotland, Adair, and Shelby, occupying in turn the county seats of each long enough to restore peace and to appoint the committees of public safety specified in the order. These committees will consist of not less than five persons, three if possible to be secessionists and men of property and standing. You will notify each of his appointment by official letter, and receive no excuse from any of them against serving. You will read and carefully explain to them the special order and the responsibilities they as well as their people incur under it, and impress upon them the certainty of the immediate execution of every penalty specified for breach of the peace among them. Make public their names everywhere and report them to me. Distribute the printed order along the line of march, calling the special attention of the people to it.

If armed bodies of men are authentically reported to you, march upon and disperse them, sending all prisoners taken in arms to this place for trial. Assume the command of all the Home Guards or other armed bodies serving in your region on the behalf of the United States or for {p.436} the protection of Union citizens of that section. Furnish me at once with a return of all such forces, showing their number, station, place of enrollment, equipment, and the authority under which they are acting. Leave a confidential person at Keokuk to communicate every day with me by telegraph, giving me all information pertaining to your operations, the state of your command, and of the country you are operating in. Communicate with the commanding officer along the line of Hannibal and Saint Joseph road, and comply with any instructions he may give you for concerted action.

A brigadier-general in the United States service will be sent to that region of country, under whose command you will place yourself and all your forces, as well as the Home Guards. Until his arrival you will yourself exercise this command. I wish you always to bear in mind that it is my purpose to enlist the entire agency of the secessionists in the preservation of peace among themselves and their neighbors, under the severe penalties prescribed. I call your particular attention to Special Orders, No. 9, herewith inclosed.*

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding in North Missouri.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 11, 1861.

To Colonel SCHAEFER, Commanding Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers:

SIR: Information has just reached this department that this morning a force of cavalry about 150 strong took possession of Potosi. A train of cars will be immediately sent to Jefferson Barracks, upon which you will forthwith proceed with your regiment to Mineral Point, on the Iron Mountain Railroad, and from that place you will, either by railroad or on foot, as may seem to you most expedient, but using all possible precaution, advance upon and retake Potosi, and hold it at all hazards, endeavoring, if possible, to take prisoners. Orders have been given to replace immediately the Home Guards under Colonel Kallmann, hitherto stationed on that railroad.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 12, 1861.

Col. J. MCNEIL, U. S. Reserve Corps, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Inasmuch as the term of the several regiments of the U. S. Reserve Corps in Saint Louis has expired, or in a few days will expire, and the men be paid off, and as the present state of political affairs in Missouri, as well as the movements and designs of the enemy, will not permit their being permanently disbanded, I have determined, in order to promote the common welfare and protect public and private property, to have them forthwith reorganized.

The new organization will comprise five regiments of infantry, with a reserve of two companies to each; two squadrons of cavalry; and two batteries of light artillery.

{p.437}

The troops will be required to enlist for the war, unless sooner discharged, and will, except the reserve companies, be subject to the same regulations and receive continuously the same pay as the volunteer regiments. The reserve companies will be required to replace the Home Guard regiments should the latter for any cause be called to other counties of this State, and will receive the regular pay of volunteers for such actual service. When not in service the reserve companies will be under more liberal regulations; they will not be obliged to perform guard duty, and their hours of drilling will, so far as possible, be made to conform to their peculiar public and private position.

In order to accomplish without delay this urgent reorganization of the Home Guard of the city of Saint Louis, you are hereby directed to assemble your regiment at its headquarters, and ascertain from each man under your command whether he would prefer to continue in the regiment or to join the cavalry or artillery, or serve only in the reserve for the above-mentioned peculiar emergencies. After ascertaining in this way the wishes of the men, you will proceed immediately to the reorganization of the infantry regiments. The companies will, in the first place, elect their company officers, who will thereupon nominate their field officers, and submit their names for approval to the general commanding the department. The colonels, when accepted, will nominate a brigadier, and submit his name in like manner for approval. After his appointment a brigade-inspector will be selected by the general commanding. The officers of the regiment having been decided upon, the reorganization of the regiment, and, if possible, also that of the reserve companies, should be immediately completed, and the returns submitted to this department.

You will communicate this order to all the members of your regiment, and proceed with the execution of it until the election and approval of a colonel, who will, immediately after his appointment, report himself, with his officers, to these headquarters, when the regiment will be uniformed, armed, equipped, and provided with everything necessary for actual service, and at the same time with special instructions for drill and discipline.

The rolls of those men who should prefer to join the cavalry or artillery you will also submit as early as possible, with the officers suggested, to these headquarters. Should any deficiency exist, this department will supply all the different companies with efficient officers and complete their organization.

As it is my design to have in each regiment one company of sharpshooters and one company of pioneers, all the best marksmen should be concentrated in one company and all the best mechanics in another, under officers best adapted to the command of those companies.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General GRANT, Commanding at Ironton:

You are hereby directed, for the purpose of keeping both your flanks open and retaining control over the whole neighborhood of your position, to send one column to Centreville and another to Fredericktown, of both which places you will take possession. At the same time you {p.438} are required to send out, with all necessary precaution, a moving column on the road 10 Greenville, whose duty it will be to ascertain the enemy’s forces, movements, and intentions. A report having reached this department that Potosi had been captured by a force of the enemy’s cavalry, I yesterday ordered Colonel Schaefer, with his regiment, strengthened by two companies of Illinois troops and fifty Illinois cavalry, to retake and hold that place.

After the occupation of Potosi, Colonel Schaefer is directed to report to you and to make the proper disposition for the protection of the railroad and bridges.

Major Kraut, at present in Ironton, will be ordered to this city for the purpose of erecting fortifications here. His place will be supplied by First Lieut. William Hoelcke, of the Engineer Corps, who will be instructed, immediately upon his arrival, to report himself to you and to carry on and complete the work commenced by Major Kraut.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Ironton, Mo., August 12, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Since my report of yesterday my scouts have returned from towards Brunot, having penetrated as far south as a point occupied by the enemy’s most advanced pickets the night before. All had left, and from the best information received two forces are moving, one as if to come in upon the railroad from the west, the other from the east. Marauding bands are still reported on the road from Potosi to Caledonia and farther south. To-morrow I shall have a party in pursuit of them. Yesterday quite a party of horsemen were 7 miles south of here on a road west of the one leading to Brunot, but could not be found this morning. Without cavalry it is impossible to pursue these bands with any prospect of overtaking them, and with the amount of picket guard, fatigue, and other duty that must necessarily be performed, it is difficult to spare men for these scouting parties. To-day my guard detained the mail coming in, and I have stopped the delivery of letters to a few suspected persons, and the forwarding six packages of letters, as follows:

Four to points in Arkansas and Memphis, via Little Rock, and one to Brunot. These will be detained, awaiting the decision of the department commander thereon. I am entirely without orders for my guidance in matters like the above, and without recent acts of Congress which bear upon them.

I would respectfully urge the necessity of forwarding to this point, say, forty complete teams. About one hundred good and well-broken mules now in use about the furnaces, can be purchased here; also harness and some good wagons.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 12, 1861.

Maj. W. E. MCMACKIN, Commanding Expedition to Potosi, Mo.:

SIR: Press into service as many teams as you want from secessionists who will be pointed out by Union men of character, and march up by {p.439} way of Caledonia to this place. Bring with you as guide Mr. J. O. Sawyer, the bearer of this, and any one of the Home Guards you may choose. They will be sent home by rail. You will do all you can to capture the party of rebels who are infesting the country through which you pass, but be careful about crediting reports you receive from citizens. When it is necessary to get provisions for your men, you will take them from active secessionists, if practicable; if not practicable, from Union or law-abiding citizens, giving an order on the post commissary here for the pay. Compel persons whose teams you press to send teamsters to take the reams back. You have my private instructions how to conduct this pressing business so as to make it as little offensive as possible. Order the train taking Mr. Sawyer to return to this place immediately.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 13, 1861.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

General Lyon’s aide reports engagement, with severe loss on both sides; General Lyon killed; Colonel Sigel, in command, retiring in good order from Springfield toward Rolla. Let the governor of Ohio be ordered forthwith to send me what disposable force he has; also governors of Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Order the utmost promptitude. The German (Groesbeck’s) Thirty-ninth Regiment, at Camp Dennison, might be telegraphed directly here. We are badly in want of field artillery, and to this time very few of our small-arms have arrived.

J. C. FRÉMONT, General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, August 13, 1861.

His Excellency Gov. WILLIAM DENNISON, Columbus, Ohio:

Send the Groesbeck (Thirty-ninth) Regiment and all other available force to General Frémont without a moment’s delay. Give him full supply of field artillery and small-arms. Advise this Department of your action.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, August 13, 1861.

His Excellency Gov. O. P. MORTON, Indianapolis, Ind.:

Send all the organized and available force to General Frémont with out delay. Give him full supply of field artillery and small-arms. The utmost promptitude is desired. Advise this Department of your action.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

[Same to Governor Randall, Wisconsin, and Governor Yates, Illinois.]

{p.440}

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SAINT LOUIS, August 13, 1861.

Colonel LAUMAN [Seventh Iowa]:

SIR: You are hereby ordered to proceed by railroad forthwith to Rolla, to re-enforce and support Brigadier-General Sigel, with five other regiments ordered there. As it is apprehended that the rebels under Hardee will threaten Rolla from Salem, and endeavor to cut off General Sigel’s communication with Saint Louis, that place (Rolla) is to be held at all hazards.

The command will be assumed by the senior colonel, who will report at once to this department.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

[The same, mutatis mutandis, to the colonels of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Illinois and Second and Seventh Missouri Regiments of Infantry.]

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, August 13, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

Will the President read my urgent dispatch to the Secretary of War?

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, August 13, 1861.

Hon. MONTGOMERY BLAIR, Washington City:

See instantly my dispatch to the Secretary of War. My judgment is that some regiments with arms in their hands, and some field artillery ready for use, with arms and ammunition, ought to be expressed to this point. The report of the action comes from General Lyon’s aide Major Farrar. If true, you have no time to lose.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 13, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Army, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have reliable evidence that about 3,000 troops, mostly mounted, but badly armed, staid near Fredericktown last night, and expressed the intention of moving to-day toward Farmington, with the intention of coming in and destroying the railroad. At the same time it is very reliable that 5,000 well-armed men, under General Hardee, are advancing upon this place. I express you the facts, and leave it to the general commanding whether in his judgment more troops should not be sent. I have to report at the same time that 32-pounder iron pieces sent here are not yet mounted, and I fear cannot be to-morrow. Could a battery of field artillery and one regiment of infantry be sent here to-morrow {p.441} I would feel that this point would be secure beyond any present contingency.

My impression, from the facts before me, is that if attacked at all, it will be on Thursday, possibly Wednesday.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 14, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

General Grant, commanding at Ironton, attacked yesterday at 6 by a force reported at 13,000. Railroad seized by the enemy at Big River Bridge, on this side of Ironton. The governor of Ohio postponed my urgent request for aid until ordered by you. Will you issue peremptory orders to him and other governors to send me instantly any disposable troops and arms? An artillery company of regulars at Cincinnati, which has been there three months. I have applied for it repeatedly. The enemy is in overpowering force, and we are very weak in men and arms. We have neglected nothing, and will do all that is possible, but not one moment should be lost in giving us any possible aid in fixed artillery and men with arms in their hands. A little immediate relief in good material might prevent great sacrifices.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 14, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Comdg. Dep’t of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Your letter of the 9th instant to the Hon. Montgomery Blair has been submitted to me by him. With a view to place the new troops under your command in a state of efficiency for active service in the shortest possible time, you are authorized to carry into effect your suggestion of accepting the services of instructed officers and men who have seen service to form the skeleton or frame-work for the organization of your forces. Let the captains of companies thus begun procure transportation from the railroad companies, and give their receipts to the road as vouchers.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 14, 1861.

General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Your message to President received.

Positive order was given yesterday to Governor Dennison and to the governors of Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin, to send all their organized forces, with full supply of artillery and small-arms.

{p.442}

Governor Dennison replies that Groesbeck’s regiment will be promptly forwarded.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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PROCLAMATION.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 14, 1861.

I hereby declare and establish martial law in the city and county of Saint Louis. Maj. J. McKinstry, U. S. Army, is appointed provost-marshal. All orders and regulations issued by him will be respected and obeyed accordingly.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 14, 1861.

Colonel THAYER [First Nebraska]:

SIR: You are directed to proceed with your regiment, in company with that of Colonel Lauman, immediately by extra train, on the Iron Mountain Railroad, to Ironton. Colonel Holman will inform you of the movements of the enemy and the points on the railroad where protection is now needed, and you will adopt such measures as may be necessary to keep communication open and frustrate their intentions. With all your troops not left behind for such purposes you will report at Ironton to Brigadier-General Grant, commanding at that place.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

P. S.-Lieutenant Riemann will report to you with two 6-pounder guns, and proceed with you to Ironton.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

I. C. WOODS, Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Ironton, Mo., August 14, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Since my report of yesterday two spies have come in, and report the position of the enemy about the same as yesterday. Two companies sent from here yesterday morning traveled northwest to Caledonia, meeting there three companies from Potosi; found all quiet, as infantry must necessarily do, unless they fall in with an overwhelming party. With the troops from Potosi is one company of Colonel Schaefer’s regiment, which I have ordered to Saint Louis by to-morrow’s train, understanding that Colonel Schaefer had been ordered there. To-night I have sent out towards Fredericktown Colonel Hecker, with all of his regiment not otherwise on duty.

I will call your attention again to the fact that there is no field artillery or cavalry at this post. Both are much needed, especially if effective movements are to be made from here. There are three 24-pounder {p.443} pieces, four 32-pounders, and one 6-pounder brass piece, without a limber. Ammunition sufficient for not exceeding thirty minutes’ steady firing. Heavy ordnance can be of no special service here, for there is no point scarcely where point-blank range of a 6-pounder can be got.

To-day, supposing an attack possible, I had eleven teams, belonging to the Pilot Knob Iron Company, drawn into service, giving a receipt for them. The command was directed to make storehouses of the wagons for their provisions, so that, in case of a move to the support of our pickets becoming necessary, supplies could be moved to them without delay. Every move of the enemy seems to evince a determination to fall upon the railroad at some point north at the same time an attack is made here. I am not fully persuaded that an attack will be made here for the present, but hold my command ready to make the best resistance possible with the means at hand.

The engineer ordered here to relieve Major Kraut has not yet arrived, and, under the instructions from General Frémont, I do not understand that Major Kraut is to be relieved until his successor does arrive. I understand that equipments for 100 horses are here, but the fact was never reported to me officially.

I should have stated in the proper connection that I have no artillerists, nor officer suitable to take command of a company to drill them as such. I would respectfully recommend the appointment of an ordnance sergeant for this post.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, August 15, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis:

Been answering your messages ever since day before yesterday. Do you receive the answers? The War Department has notified all the governors you designated to forward all available force, and so telegraphed you. Have you received these messages’? Answer immediately.

A. LINCOLN.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS:

SIR: Four regiments of your command have been ordered to leave Bird’s Point by steamboats and disembark at Sulphur Springs, where they will await orders. You are therefore directed to repair to-morrow morning by railroad to that place, and with these troops, taking the cars of the Iron Mountain Railroad, proceed to Ironton. You will assume command of the whole force stationed at that place, and will at first secure communication from Saint Louis to Ironton and Potosi, on the Iron Mountain Railroad, from all danger of interruption, by strong guard at all the bridges and assailable points. After the accomplishment of this you will proceed to Fredericktown and to Centreville, take possession of those places, attacking and dislodging the enemy should they be encamped there as reported, and secure those positions by a force sufficiently strong. You will then open communication with Saint Genevieve and Cape Girardeau, and keep the same open by constant scouting parties. You will also make reconnaissances in the direction of Greenville.

{p.444}

The general commanding expects frequent reports in relation to your own proceedings, as well as of the strength and movements of the enemy.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 15, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

SIR: I have to-day to note the arrival of two regiments of infantry-Colonel Lauman, Seventh Iowa Regiment, and Colonel Thayer, First Nebraska Regiment. I have also ordered the Twenty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers, under Colonel Alexander, forward upon the Greenville road, and Col. Frederick Hecker, Twenty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, upon the Fredericktown road, taking five days’ rations, with instructions to form a conjunction at Brunot. I expect to follow tomorrow with artillery, should any arrive, a few companies of infantry, and more provisions, if means of transportation can be procured; otherwise I shall send teams back from Brunot or Greenville for additional rations.

I purchased to-day sixteen wagons and sixty-eight mules, subject to the approval of Major-General Frémont. These teams are well adapted for our use-more suitable and more efficient than those which we have heretofore employed or found in the service of this command. I shall to-morrow purchase five more wagons and twenty mules on the same terms. The teams which I have conditionally purchased have been for some time in the service of the Government without charge if now purchased; otherwise to receive compensation.

Requisitions were made upon Quartermaster McKinstry some days since for camp equipage, &c., but as yet I have received nothing. At this time I have not a single tent for my headquarters, nor is there any stationery in the quartermaster’s department.

Several prisoners now in my charge I shall at the earliest convenience send to the arsenal, with charges accompanying.

Since writing the above a messenger has come in from a spy I have out, who reports the rebel force much greater than has heretofore been represented-from 25,000 to 30,000. The spy mentioned is an officer in disguise. From representations made by the messenger, the information which has caused them to retreat was obtained from a preacher of this place, who managed to get out of camp, and is now back again, without a pass. I have ordered his arrest, and will have him sent to Saint Louis if caught.

I shall move with the detachments of my command, viz, the Twenty-first and Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiments, towards Brunot, subject to any order from your department, and will report as often as practicable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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IRONTON, MO., August 16 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Army, Saint Louis. Mo.:

SIR: I have just received a message from one of my spies, stating that last night the rebels returned to the ground retreated from by them {p.445} the day before. The party returned to Fredericktown number from 1,200 to 1,500, and will have a column sent out by me upon them by 12 o’clock probably to-day. It is just time for the cars to leave, which precludes the possibility of my reporting more fully.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 16, 1861.

Col. P. E. BLAND, Sixth Missouri Volunteers:

SIR: As soon as the wagon train is all up you may move with your command to the first convenient place for halting overnight. In the morning move cautiously on to about 10 or 12 miles from here, and await orders from me.

Permit no pressing of horses or other property by your command. The policy meets with my decided disapproval, and must be suppressed.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 16, 1861.

Col. J. W. S. ALEXANDER, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers:

SIR: To-morrow morning reconnoiter the ground in advance of you as far as Marble Creek. There make a halt for further orders, unless you should have such information as would make it an undoubted good move to depart from these instructions. Since you left I have learned that Hardee has returned to his position at Greenville, and is much stronger than has been heretofore supposed. Colonel Hecker has been instructed to join you at Marble Creek, if a practicable road is to be found across. Five companies will leave here to-night following you, and, in case of necessity, can re-enforce you by a forced march.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Ironton, Mo., August 16, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I send this evening three companies of the Ninth Missouri Regiment to Saint Louis, in accordance with instructions just received. The late hour of receiving the order, and the distance to the railroad depot, precludes the possibility of sending their baggage to-night. That will follow in the morning, however. I have now one regiment of troops 12 miles from here, on the Greenville road, and eight companies at or near Fredericktown. This last is a key-point to the railroad north from here, and should be held. To-night four companies move from here towards the position occupied on the Greenville road.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

{p.446}

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LEAVENWORTH, KANS., August 16, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Commanding Western Department:

SIR: Inclosed find the report showing our weakness. To-day I move upon Fort Scott, to stay the advance of the enemy into Kansas, and protect a large train turned back upon that point after the retreat of General Sigel. I hope to concentrate by Monday some 1,700 troops at that point, to fortify and to call on the people of that portion of Kansas to rally upon us. We should be re-enforced at the earliest possible moment with not less than three regiments. We should be supplied with artillery and small-arms, horse equipments, &c. Kansas is destitute. I have a thousand horses now arriving and eager men to mount them, but without arms or equipments.

Our men are without uniforms, blankets, or shoes. The Government promised to supply us, but as yet have failed. With supplies, when Sigel advances, I trust to operate upon the flank of the enemy to some purpose.

Let me hear from you at length. I send this by Hon. M. F. Conway and Mr. Coffin, superintendent of Indian affairs, who will more fully post you.

Yours, truly,

J. H. LANE.

[Inclosures.]

HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Fort Leavenworth, Kans., August 15, 1861.

General J. H. LANE, Leavenworth City:

GENERAL: Captain Blanton is getting his arms while I pen this. Colonel Leonard has called upon me, and states that he is just from Fort Scott, where the large Government train intended for Lyon’s column has arrived and unloaded. The news of Lyon’s battle had reached that place, and if, as admitted, Lyon’s column has fallen back upon Rolla, it is of the utmost importance that time whole of Weer’s regiment proceed by forced marches upon Fort Scott. If you concur with me in this measure, please inform me at the earliest possible moment. I propose to send the regiment, with sufficient rations to supply them en route, and follow up their movement with additional supplies.

Respectfully,

W. E. PRINCE, Captain, U. S. Army, Commanding.

LEAVENWORTH, KANS., August 15, 1861.

Captain PRINCE:

I do fully concur that all the force we have should be concentrated at Fort Scott at the earliest possible moment and should fortify strongly, as also that Blanton should be removed to Humboldt, and fortify that point. I will direct an engineer to both points to mark out and superintend the fortification.

Yours, truly,

J. H. LANE.

{p.447}

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Leavenworth, Kans., August 17, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: The general and his staff will leave at 5 o’clock this evening for Fort Scott, at which point communications for headquarters will hereafter be received. The Third Regiment, under Colonel Montgomery, is en route, by forced marches, for Fort Scott. Colonels Weer and Johnson, respectively, of the Fourth and Fifth, are under orders to march, and will leave to-night for Fort Scott. The whole force, when concentrated at Fort Scott, will number upwards of 2,000 men of all arms, with no artillery save two pieces-a 6-pounder howitzer and a 12-pounder mountain howitzer. A concise brigade report will be forwarded to you soon after reaching Fort Scott.

Yours, respectfully,

J. H. LANE Commanding Kansas Brigade, By MARCUS J. PARROTT, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Saint Louis, August 17, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: In compliance with directions from the general commanding the department, I have the honor to submit the following brief remarks concerning the condition of the district under my command:

In consequence of the firing on the trains of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph road, General Hurlbut, with 600 men and two pieces of artillery, has been occupying Marion County for the past ten days, and enforcing the provisions of General Orders, No. 3, from these headquarters, which requires the inhabitants to furnish quarters, subsistence, and transportation in case of difficulties of the kind. The effect has been complete, and in compliance with solemn pledges on the part of the citizens, presented by a delegation sent to me, they were yesterday relieved from the penalty. The force under Martin Green has been driven into the northern part of Adair County. Colonels Moore and Bussey from the east, and 550 men and two pieces of artillery from the south, are moving upon him, and will probably unite to-day in the immediate vicinity of his camp. No doubt his forces will disperse, as has been usual. No surprises are possible in a country where all the inhabitants are willing to warn, if not to assist, such parties. With these exceptions all is quiet in North Missouri, as reported to me by the committees of public safety appointed in conformity to General Orders, No. 3. That order seems to have united all responsible persons who have anything to lose in efforts to preserve the peace, and they have organized for that purpose. If any skirmishing is done, it will be done by the people themselves, who are abundantly able to protect themselves, and who have a motive to do so which they had not before. Of course they wish troops sent to do this service, as it will save them the necessity of personal exertion, but I think it best that they should do the work themselves where it can be done.

Both railroads are undisturbed since the penalty inflicted in Marion County. Of course there is munch excitement and uneasiness among the people since the affair at Springfield, but I think from the best {p.448} information I can get that it will result in no disturbance of moment. I have ordered all the forces in and near Jefferson City to concentrate at some strong point in the town or immediate vicinity, and shall order Colonel Worthington’s Iowa regiment, after visiting Booneville, Glasgow, Lexington, and Brunswick, to return and take position also at Jefferson City. I transmit a letter from General T. L. Price bearing on this subject.*

Authentic intelligence from Booneville represents everything quiet and no fear of a disturbance. I have encouraged the formation of Home Guards to act under the orders of the commanders of the U. S. troops at every point occupied by them, but have given them no encouragement as to being armed, equipped, or rationed by Government, except such as have been authorized by the general commanding the department. I have the honor to request to be furnished with the names, place of residence, and forces authorized to be thus raised within my district. Rumors and exaggerated stories are current, but after as full information as can be procured by letters and reports, I think North Missouri can be left as it stands without apprehension of serious disturbance.

If consistent with the views of the general commanding, I would be glad if two companies of Marshall’s cavalry and a section of Davidson’s artillery, now at Jefferson Barracks, could be placed at my disposal for temporary service of six or eight days.

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Ironton, Mo., August 18, 1861.

Col. L. F. ROSS, Seventeenth Illinois Volunteers:

You will hold your regiment in readiness to move upon Fredericktown, which you will occupy until further orders. Quartermaster B. M. Joel will provide necessary transportation. You will make your reports to these headquarters, and receive rations from here. Owing to the scarcity of transportation at this point, you will only take with you five days’ rations, and order back as much of your train as can be spared, under a small escort, to get new supplies. Instructions, if not given before, will be sent to you at Fredericktown. You should move as early as Tuesday morning, if practicable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Cape Girardeau, August Is’ 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Department of the West, Saint Louis. Mo.

SIR: My pickets today brought in a man called Captain Grant, direct from New Madrid. He states that General Pillow has about 12,000 men at New Madrid; that his movement down the river was to Point Pleasant, where he intended to take the plank road for Beach, thence to Bloomfield; but finding the plank road in such condition as {p.449} to forbid the transporting of artillery, he returned to New Madrid, where he was on Friday morning, with all his forces.

Jeff. Thompson’s main body was at Sikeston this morning. He has a detachment at Benton of some 500.

I have the honor to inclose you a letter from Ex-Lieutenant-Governor Reynolds (a copy of which has been sent me); also another from Jeff. Thompson to me, containing several threats.

I plead guilty to the charge of having written the note mentioned, and would have done as I promised had Captain Price committed the threatened outrages on the peaceable citizens of Commerce. My threats had the desired effect, and prevented his doing any act of violence there. I tried hard to get hold of Captain Price and his troop of marauders, but they always run, even when but half their number of foot soldiers are opposed to them. The young man Price and his brother-in-law, who were taken prisoners, have been notoriously active in aiding the enemy. Their father, the brother of Captain Price, was the agent for procuring supplies for the New Madrid forces, and his mules, servants, and family were all engaged in transporting them.

I am happy to learn that the pretended governor of the State disapproves of the proclamation of his commanding general and I shall most certainly endeavor to aid him in carrying on the war according to civilized usage. I can furnish the ex-governor with information which, if he means what he writes, will keep him steadily engaged for some time in punishing Missouri forces.

I will dispatch you by telegraph from Jonesborough tonight as to whether I shall take any action in regard to the Branch Bank at this place.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. C. MARSH, Colonel, Commanding Post.

[Inclosures.]

NEW MADRID, MO., August 15, 1861.

Maj. Gen. FRÉMONT, U. S. A., Commanding U. S. Forces in Missouri:

SIR: Capt. Charles Price, of the Missouri State Guard has received a letter from Messrs. B. S. Curd and William M. Price, dated Cape Girardeau, August 10, 1861, in which they write: “The colonel says that if you attack Commerce to-night he will hang us.” With this note is another, recognized to be in the handwriting of Col. C. C. Marsh, and of which the following is an exact copy:

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Cape Girardeau, August 10, 1861.

SIR: Your relatives have written you the above note. It is true. If you injure the people of Commerce or their property I will hang them, and take a bitter revenge on you in other respects.

C. C. MARSH, Colonel, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cape Girardeau.

The gentlemen held by Colonel Marsh are, as I am credibly informed, citizens of this State, and unconnected in any way with military operations. Even were they so connected in a manner justifying their being made prisoners of war, the Articles of War and Army Regulations of the United States require humane treatment of prisoners.

I also learn that the detachment of Colonel Marsh’s troops which {p.450} captured Mr. William M. Price wantonly burned his father’s warehouse and took away a large quantity of corn and 60 mules. Similar outrages are believed to have been very lately committed at the farm of General N. W. Watkins, near Cape Girardeau, and also by Colonel Marsh’s troops. I therefore, in the interest of humanity, lay these matters before you, and request a frank answer to these inquiries:

Does this conduct of Colonel Marsh and his troops meet your approval? If not, what steps do you propose to take in respect to the guilty parties and in order to prevent the repetition of such conduct?

It is the desire of the Missouri State authorities to conduct the present war according to civilized usages, and any departure from them by Missouri forces will be properly punished by their officers if aware of it. I deem it proper to add that on seeing Colonel Marsh’s letter I immediately instructed the general commanding the Missouri State Guard in this district to hold in close custody a number of prisoners recently taken by him and belonging to your forces. Should Colonel Marsh’s future treatment of Messrs. Curd and Price necessitate the hanging of any of those prisoners in retaliation, I am content that impartial men shall judge who is morally responsible for their melancholy fate.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. C. REYNOLDS, Acting Governor of Missouri.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST MILITARY DIVISION, MO. S. G., Camp Sikeston, August 17, 1861.

Col. C. C. MARSH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cape Girardeau, Mo.:

SIR: I send Edmund Burke, a citizen of Scott County, as bearer of letters from Governor T. C. Reynolds to General Frémont and yourself. Governor Reynolds has sent me a copy of these letters, and I will take it upon myself to remark, in addition to the letters of Governor Reynolds, that whenever such threats are used as that which is believed to have been uttered by you in the letter referred to, or that whenever any such threats are carried into execution, I will retaliate to the utmost of my ability.

Yours, &c.,

M. JEFF. THOMPSON, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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STEAMER LEXINGTON, August 18, 1861.

Colonel OGLESBY, Commanding, Cairo, Ill.:

SIR: I have the honor to report for your information, I got under way about 9 o’clock last night, ran up the Mississippi River, and anchored opposite Smith’s Point, agreeably to the request of Colonel Waagner.

In the morning at daylight we got under way and went up to the town of Commerce, Mo., where we found the people in a great state of excitement and terror from apprehensions of violence from the rebels, whom they report to be in force from 800 to 1,000. They report these secession forces as armed mainly with shot-guns and rifles. Some few have muskets. Many of these troops are reported as being very young-boys from 12 to 14 years of age.

{p.451}

The inhabitants of Commerce have mostly fled to Santa Fe, in Illinois, a village opposite. They are full of stories of wanton and cruel destruction of the property of Union men, killing stock, stealing horses, burning corn fields, destroying household property, robbing women and children of their wearing apparel, and of carrying off young girls to their camp.

The inhabitants of Commerce are earnest in their entreaties that some force may be sent to protect them.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS, Commander, U. S. Nary.

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SAINT LOUIS, August 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS:

SIR: I have this moment received information from Cairo per telegraph that the rebels are moving from Charleston towards Commerce with a force of from 3,000 to 5,000 men. The gunboats are already ordered to Commerce, and cavalry scouts sent upward along the shore to watch the enemy’s movements. Asking your attention to these facts, you are directed to detach a force of your command sufficient, in concert with our troops at Cape Girardeau, to prevent the enemy from taking possession of Commerce and interrupting the free navigation of the Mississippi River. I have received no report from you either in relation to your own proceedings or the strength and movement of the enemy, but presume that you have made dispositions to prevent General Hardee’s command at Greenville (reported to be about 7,000 men, 2,000 horses, ten 6-pounders, and two 12-pounders) from co-operating with the rebel forces moving from Charleston.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 21, 1861.

Col. CHESTER HARDING, Jr., Missouri Volunteers:

SIR: You are assigned to the command of the district comprising the western portion of the county of Saint Louis, commencing at Meramec Station, and the counties of Franklin, Washington, Jefferson, Gasconade, Osage, and Crawford. Proceed to Pacific Station, on Pacific Railroad, and there establish your headquarters. You are directed to raise for three years’ service three or more infantry regiments in those counties, which regiments, with your own, will form a brigade, and to establish one or more camps of instruction at a point or points from which troops can be readily moved to Saint Louis, Jefferson City, or Rolla. You are charged with the protection of the railroad, the suppression of all hostile gatherings in the region; but you will not be required to keep a guard upon that portion of the Iron Mountain Railroad which passes through Jefferson and Washington Counties.

The chief quartermaster at Saint Louis will purchase clothing and other stores of his department necessary for your brigade. You are authorized to appoint a brigade staff.

You are directed to organize squadrons of cavalry to be attached to your brigade, the horses as far as practicable to be furnished by the men. A competent cavalry officer will be placed in command of them.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.452}

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Jefferson City, Mo., August 22, 1861.

Capt. SPEED BUTLER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Saint Louis, Mo.:

During yesterday I visited the camps of the different commands about this city, and selected locations for troops yet to arrive. I find a great deficiency in everything for the comfort and efficiency of an army. Most of the troops are without clothing, camp and garrison equipage. Ammunition was down to about ten rounds of cartridges, and for the artillery none is left.

The artillery here consists of four 6-pounders, without artillery-men, and one 24-pounder howitzer, too heavy for field use. The post quartermaster and commissary have not been here since my arrival, so that I cannot report fully as to these departments. They are apparently in a bad condition. There are no rations to issue. The mules sent some time since are guarded in a lot, no effort being made to get them into teams, and a general looseness prevailing. I have fitted out an expedition of 350 men to scour the country around where the cars were fired into day before yesterday. Such information has been received here as will probably lead to the arrest of many of the parties engaged. The party in pursuit will subsist off of the community through which they pass. Stringent instructions have been given as to how supplies are to be got. From reports received here the whole of this country is in a state of ferment. They are driving out the Union men and appropriating their property. The best force to put this down would be mounted Home Guards, and I would therefore recommend that as many as possible of this class of troops be put upon horses. Generally they are able to mount themselves, and when they cannot, horses could be obtained from good secessionists who have been aiding and abetting the Southern cause. I would further recommend that companies of Home Guards be received without any reference to their being organized into regiments. They can be attached to other regiments either by companies or squadrons, and be quite as effective as if in large bodies.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Jefferson City, Mo., August 23, 1861.

Capt. SPEED BUTLER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Since my last report the Twenty-fifth Illinois Regiment, Colonel Coler commanding, and seven companies of the First Illinois Cavalry have reached here. I telegraphed you yesterday the precarious condition Lexington was in, and of the expedition I was fitting out for the relief of that point. As the gentleman from whom I got my information (Mr. -) called upon you, it is not necessary that I should enter into particulars.

Colonel Marshall goes in command of the expedition, taking with him all his own command, about 300 Home Guards, and a section of Taylor’s battery, should it arrive in time. They will subsist on the country through which they pass, under full instructions. I am not fortifying here at all. With the picket guard and other duty coming upon the men of this command, there is but little time left for drilling. Drill and discipline are more necessary for the men than fortifications. Another difficulty in the way of fortifying is that I have no engineer officer to direct it; no time to attend to it myself, and very little disposition to {p.453} gain a “Pillow notoriety” for a branch of service that I have forgotten all about. I have nothing from west of here since my telegram of yesterday, but shall have to-day. Will telegraph if anything of importance should be learned. As soon as I can get reports from subordinates I will send you a consolidated morning report, and will try and keep this command in such condition as to enable me to have a report made when called for.

There are no county maps published for this section of the State, nor anything to point out the different roads and traveled routes more distinctly than the State maps you have. I can learn, however, from persons conversant with all the roads their relative practicability.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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FORT LINCOLN, August 24, 1861.

Captain PRINCE, Commanding Post Fort Leavenworth:

SIR: Inclosed find letter of Colonel Montgomery. It speaks for itself. If you have re-enforcements, or can get any, of men or artillery, send them forward. The point to defend Fort Leavenworth is in the neighborhood of Fort Scott; say so for me to Major-General Frémont and to Captain Reno.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Regiments, By ABRAM CUTLER, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Send such re-enforcements by the way of Dutch Henry’s and Mound City to Jewel’s Crossing, on the Little Osage.

[Inclosure.]

FORT SCOTT, August 23, 1861.

General J. H. LANE:

SIR: I have information from sources hitherto reliable that a body of men 1,000 strong left Greenfield on Tuesday last on their march to Fort Scott. Our informant saw them 12 miles this side of Greenfield, under command of Captain Clarkson.

He says McCulloch is sending 4,000 picked men from Springfield, and armed with Colt’s, Sharp’s, Maynard, and minie rifles.

Our boys have not yet returned. I have heard nothing from them.

Very respectfully,

JAMES MONTGOMERY, Commanding Post at Fort Scott.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 25, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Commanding at Ironton:

SIR: A report has just reached me that 4,000 rebels are fortifying Benton, Mo., and 1,500 more are encamped behind the hills 2 miles below Commerce, opposite Big Island. To disperse these forces a combined attack by your troops and those stationed at Cape Girardeau has been determined upon. You are therefore directed to move forthwith with all your disposable force to Dallas. From that place you will proceed {p.454} towards Cape Girardeau, first attacking and destroying the rebels at Jackson, should you ascertain that they are stationed at that place. From there, in conjunction with the forces of Colonel Smith, who has been instructed to put himself in communication with you at Dallas, you will march upon the enemy at Benton, attack and annihilate them. Immediately on effecting a junction with the forces from Cape Girardeau under command of Colonel Smith, you will dispatch one or more messengers, with intelligence of your arrival to Colonel Wallace, commanding at Bird’s Point, who has been directed, upon the reception of such news, to move with two regiments to Charleston, and, after occupying that place, to make reconnaissances along the railroad and advance as far as possible. Two regiments will be sent immediately from this place to Ironton. The two regiments at Sulphur Springs, with Boyle’s battery, are ordered to Cape Girardeau, and will form a part of Colonel Smith’s force; all to be united under your command.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Jefferson City, Mo., August 25, 1861.

Capt. SPEED BUTLER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

The instructions of General Frémont relative to the seizure of the banks at Lexington and Liberty have been communicated to Colonel Marshall, who was under marching orders at the time the instructions were received. It is not possible to spare men from here for the expedition to Paris without leaving this place too much exposed. With regard to the Home Guards I should like to have some instructions. I have not been able to learn head nor tail about them, not withstanding all my efforts. I know there are many of them-some mounted, others with teams, and some without arms, teams, or saddle-horses. I would recommend that some officer be sent here with special instructions as to how they are to be organized and received, and who will have no other duty to attend to until this is performed. The party sent out by me to the neighborhood of where the cars were fired into on Tuesday has returned. The report has not yet been received, but may be in time to accompany this. A few persons have been arrested who are suspected of having been engaged in the firing.

I have no reliable information as to the movements of McCulloch’s forces, but there is a current rumor here that he is moving towards this point. From a spy who came in yesterday I learn that companies are being organized in all the counties west of here. Some of these bands are acquiring considerable proportions. Many troops have crossed the Missouri River from the north within the last two weeks, and are joining the forces on this side. If I had sufficient force, all that could be stopped.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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FORT LINCOLN, Little Osage, August 25, 1861.

Captain PRINCE, Commanding Fort Leavenworth:

SIR: Your directions and orders as to stores at Fort Scott will be forwarded to Colonel Montgomery, who is in command of that post. I {p.455} intend to defend the line of the Marmiton, including Fort Scott. But as that post cannot be fortified, I am withdrawing therefrom all trains and stores not required for immediate use. This, the Little Osage line, about 12 miles north, I can, and am fortifying, and here I will establish such depots as are necessary while organizing the brigade. There are now at Fort Scott about 1,200 men, say 600 cavalry, and about the same number of infantry, including the little artillery. The cavalry will be employed in defending the border and dispersing such parties as they can reach. The infantry are drilling industriously, and all at work filling up their companies. At this point we have two companies, about 100 men, engaged in erecting intrenchments and drilling.

Three miles in advance, on Fish Creek, on the road to Fort Scott, we have 40 men; 5 miles below, at Barnesville, 3 miles from the line, on this river, on the military road from Kansas City to Fort Scott, we have about 100 men intrenched and drilling; at Mound City we are fortifying, to be manned by the local militia.

With a small force on last Monday I could have destroyed Rains’ Division; he was within 30 miles of us. Yesterday we dispersed a force at Ball’s Mill. Night before last we sent a force south to disperse a camp; they have not yet returned. Dean’s command, about 230, that you are conversant with, left us yesterday to return to Bates County. This morning at 3 o’clock I received a dispatch from him and Jennison, informing me that 500 rebels had crossed the line and were threatening Paola and Osawatomie. I directed him to pitch in and clear the border between us and Kansas City, calling in such assistance as he could get from the country. I at the same time directed Montgomery to send a body of cavalry along the border north from Fort Scott up the military road.

Our little force will be actively employed to defend Kansas and confuse Missourians. But, sir, I assure you that Fort Leavenworth and Kansas should be defended from this point, and the idea of holding artillery to rust at Fort Leavenworth does not strike me with any favor. I hope the first troops forwarded will bring down artillery that can be used to some purpose.

General Weed has this moment come in from Fort Scott. He says the enemy is threatening; that a large force is marching upon us; that a rumor reached Fort Scott yesterday that our party, under Williams, had a fight; we feel some uneasiness, but hope for the best. All the Government stores and trains will be removed back upon this line today and night from Fort Scott.

Can you not send us re-enforcements; with it, we could play hell with Missouri in a few days.

Yours, truly,

J. H. LANE.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FORT LEAVENWORTH, August 27, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT GENERAL, Headquarters Western Department, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Respectfully submitted. Lane’s brigade should be supplied with a battery of four pieces, caissons, ammunition, &c., which, with the two pieces now in this command, will materially strengthen him; if approved, please send them to this place at once.

W. E. PRINCE, Captain, Commanding.

{p.456}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI, Saint Louis, August 25, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Comdg. Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: In view of my conversation with you this morning, I have the honor to report as follows:

The policy of making the people along the lines of railroad in North Missouri responsible for any damage done to the roads has perfectly secured them from destruction since it was established. The system of holding property of counties responsible for breaches of peace enlists by the only method possible the active agency of the secessionists in keeping down riots and disturbances. When so large a portion of the population sympathizes with the authors of the atrocious acts of guerrilla warfare which have hitherto disgraced North Missouri, it is impossible to apprehend the perpetrators of such outrages. Since the population has been notified that their property would be made to pay the expense of suppressing such disturbances, thousands of persons have taken an active part in preventing them who never did so before. Marion County, from which came the protests against this policy, has been the worst county in the State. At the request of a deputation from that county, it was relieved from the first levy made for firing into a train on the Hannibal and Saint Joseph road, but the troops which had been quartered at Palmyra had not proceeded 3 miles from the place before the train carrying them was fired into from the road-side, and one man killed and several wounded. They are now under contribution for this second and aggravated charge.

I have received intelligence from persons of character in most of the counties of North Missouri stating that this policy alone, and the fear of the penalty to property prescribed in it, prevents the secessionists from driving out Union men and destroying their property. The secession papers in North Missouri are now entreating the population to preserve the peace, because the leading State-rights men (secessionists) are made to serve on committees of safety against their will, and their property is made responsible for any violence or breach of peace committed by their friends. Whenever it is discovered that the penalty set forth will not be executed, I firmly believe that every county in North Missouri will be in a state of tumult, and will require for the restoration of peace five times the force now needed. It is possible that some lukewarm Union men may turn secessionists under the operation of this policy, but it is my sure conviction that if it be not enforced thousands of good Union men will be driven from their homes and their property despoiled. By enforcing it in Marion County, the only place it has been necessary to do so, I feel sure there will result quiet in that section of country. Where outrages are so expensive, they will not be repeated. The system of pursuing the perpetrators of these outrages can lead to no good results while so large a body of people sympathize with them. Its only effect is to break down and demoralize our forces, to carry distress and apprehension to districts hitherto quiet, and to render our forces less and less fit for service.

I do not doubt, from the results up to this time, that the policy of holding property responsible is the true policy, and I firmly believe that if the penalty now hanging over Marion County be rigidly enforced, there will be no occasion for anything of the kind there or elsewhere a second time. I therefore respectfully, but earnestly, request you to suffer this penalty to be exacted, lest a much worse thing befall that {p.457} people hereafter. It is, of course, entirely in the power of the people of the various counties in North Missouri to keep the peace among themselves. If they will not do so, it surely is not harsh to require that the expense of having it done should be paid by the county. No one will say that if this policy be abandoned there will be anything like quiet in North Missouri. It is the object of the protestants against it to have large forces of Home Guards, paid and subsisted by the United States, raised in their midst, so that much money will be distributed among them, and the United States shall pay a large local police force of their own people. If they have to pay the expense themselves, they will take care that nothing occurs that will render such a force necessary. It is to be borne in mind that the disturbances in North Missouri are purely local and personal, and have no view to the result of the great operations of Government. The people in that region are merely fighting with each other, in many cases to satisfy feelings of personal hostility of long standing. It is a war which can only be ended by making all engaged in it suffer for every act of hostility committed. As I am satisfied from personal examination and experience that this policy will keep North Missouri quiet with the smallest force, and that a departure from it now will only result in an uprising in every county against the Union men, which will require large forces to be withdrawn from here to put it down, I most urgently recommend that no favorable reply be made to those who have addressed you on this subject. On the one side there is the risk of alienating a few men hitherto half-way for the Union; on the other the risk of having a considerable portion of the people in every county of North Missouri in arms against the peace. One failure to enforce rigidly this penalty will destroy all belief that it will ever be enforced at all.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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BOSTON, August 27, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War, Washington:

SIR: The State of Missouri is so important to the Union, that I suppose you will be glad of any information regarding it which comes from a reliable source. I hand you a few extracts from the late letters of Mr. Hayward, general agent of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad. Through the agencies of this line across the State he has great facility for obtaining information and judging of the progress of our cause in the northern portion of the State. His views with regard to the probable effect of measures which have been heretofore taken towards suppressing the rebellion in that vicinity have shown so clear a judgment as to give with us here much weight to his opinions.

With rebel camps forming undisturbed all along through that part of the State their early concentration into another formidable army may reasonably be looked for. All they seem to lack is a leader for a vigorous demonstration. It is the opinion of some of our best-informed citizens, obtained from their Southern correspondence, that the possession of Missouri is regarded of the utmost importance to the Southern cause. The possession of the lead mine of that State by the rebels will also be a most unfortunate thing for the country. Its position, lying between the rest of the free States and Kansas, Nebraska, Utah, and even California {p.458} on the west, and controlling the banks of the Mississippi opposite Kentucky and half of Tennessee on the east, makes its early possession by the Government a vital matter connected with any movements in the Mississippi Valley. Surrounded as it is by free States, any delay in its subjugation will have a damaging effect upon the Government at home and a disastrous influence abroad. It is supposed that very great efforts will be made by the secessionists of that State to carry in their favor the election soon to be held for new State officers. Union voters near the borders are being driven out, and large numbers of others with their families put in such extreme peril that self-preservation is rapidly joining them to the forces of the enemy. While it may be true that the Union force can beat more than their number of rebels if it can get at them, the general character of the rebels in that State is such, that their subjugation by an equal number of Government soldiers will certainly be a very expensive and tedious process, if not a total failure. Large bodies of mounted guerrillas will require a large force and severe measures to bring them to terms, and it seems to me that every day’s delay in pushing the most vigorous offensive measures in North Missouri is fraught with great peril and mischief that it will cost much blood and treasure to correct.

In view of the intense activity of the enemy-his rapidly gaining strength; his continued successes, with the choice of secession or Union soon to be voted on in the selection of State officers, and the larger part of the voters now in the control (by friendship or fear) of the rebels-seeing so much affecting not only that State, but the whole cause at stake there, I have felt it my duty to write you, upon whom rests so much of the responsibility in this matter.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. BROOKS.

[Inclosures.]

-Extracts from letter of J. T. K. Hayward to J. W. Brooks, dated “Steamer Hannibal City, August 13, 1861.”-

I go down to-day with a committee from Palmyra to see what can be done to put a stop to the outrages perpetrated on the community by Government troops, partly under orders of officers and partly without orders. I will state the case in part. Last week our trains were fired into several times about 6 miles west of Palmyra, in Marion County. On Thursday night a party of rebels came into Palmyra, disarmed a few Union men, and did some trifling damage. I think there is good reason to believe that the cars were fired into by rangers from another county, and without any knowledge of the people near them, and that the course is disapproved and reprehended by nearly all. The citizens, I think, are generally opposed to violence, and some of the leading secessionists interfered to prevent trouble and bloodshed when the rebel band visited Palmyra. Now, to carry out General Pope’s programme, some 600 men are sent to Palmyra, and the county court notified to provide them with rations and pay all expenses. In their failure the city council is notified to do it at county expense, and in their failure notice is given that they shall take it where they can most conveniently find it, and that these men will be quartered there until they (the people) arrest and deliver over to military authority the men who have been guilty of these offenses. Yesterday, as the rations were not forthcoming, they sent out a company of troops, and visited the stores, and took {p.459} enough for two days’ rations, giving orders on the county. In addition, contrary to all general orders, many citizens were arrested without cause, and generally soon discharged. Houses also have been opened and searched, and for no good reason. Then, as a sample of what is done by some officers last week a man named McAfee (speaker of the last house of representatives) was arrested. General Hurlbut ordered him to be set to digging trenches and pits for necessaries, at which he was kept all one day when the mercury ranged about 100 degrees in the shade. A few days after he was taken from Macon to Palmyra, and the general ordered him to be tied on the top of the cab on the engine. It was prevented by our men, who, when persuasion failed, the engineer swore he would not run the engine if it was done (and I upheld him in it), and as he was being marched to the engine to mount it the signal was given, and the train started, giving them barely time to get on the cars. When there is added to this the irregularities of the soldiery-such as taking poultry, pigs, milk, butter, preserves, potatoes, horses, and in fact everything they want; entering and searching houses, and stealing in many cases; committing rapes on the negroes and such like things-the effect has been to make a great many Union men inveterate enemies, and if these things continue much longer, our cause is ruined. These things are not exaggerated by me, and, though they do not characterize all the troops, several regiments have conducted in this way, and have also repeatedly fired on peaceable citizens-sometimes from trains as they passed-and no punishment, or none of any account, has been meted out to them. Then, drunkenness is a great curse of officers and men. Frémont would no doubt be glad to have things different, but he has a great deal of care and responsibility thrown upon him. It is a new sphere of duty, and one with which he cannot be very familiar. Then he hardly knows who to trust and confide in. I presume he feels that other parts of his field demand his attention more urgently, and he intrusts these matters to Pope and Hurlbut. “Then,” he says to me, “the Government appoints and sends these men. It is hard to get rid of them. I must prefer charges and maintain them,” &c. If the thing goes on this way much longer, we are ruined. I fear we cannot run the road or live in the country except under military protection. It is enough to drive a people to madness, and it is doing it fast. I heard a good Union man in Palmyra, who keeps a hotel, say: “I am doing what I can and feeding these men. I get nothing; $1,000 will not make me whole, and if it goes on much longer I am ruined, and if this is the way my property must go I would rather apply a torch to it.” I urged upon Frémont that the best disposal he could make of the money it would require would be to appoint a commission to appraise the damage and loss occasioned by the lawless acts of the soldiery and have them paid. The members of one regiment at one time sent over sixty horses and mules to Quincy, with orders to send them to Chicago and sell them on their own account. They were discovered and sent back, with orders to return them to their owners; which was done, I think, in most cases. This same regiment, it is claimed, took off several negroes when they left town, and I think there is no doubt of it. I shall now make a strong effort to have these abuses corrected. I hope to succeed. If I fail here, I shall have to depend upon influences to be brought to bear elsewhere. I say again we shall be ruined in our cause unless there is a change. I can fully substantiate all I have written.

{p.460}

-Extracts from letter of J. T. K. Hayward to J. W. Brooks, dated “Steamer Jennie Deans, August 14, 1861.”-

I am on my way from Saint Louis home. I have waited on General Pope with a committee from our county, and have succeeded in obtaining promises from him which are tolerably satisfactory. I hope he will carry them out.

The news of recent movements in the State is exciting, and I fear its effect on our community. It is of great importance that the Government should be successful here and elsewhere now. The death of General Lyon casts a gloom over us all. Troops at the Iron Mountain are threatened, but have not been taken, as it was reported this morning. I think if re-enforced soon, as is intended, the enemy will be in shape to be cut off completely. I hope it will be done.

Saint Louis is under martial law, but it is quiet now. I think it will be, although many anticipate trouble at any time, and no doubt it would require but little to start a fight. It is thought there are 8,000 secessionists in the city who would rise if they saw a chance to do so with any hope of success. Over 7,000 are organized and armed for the Government, and have signals so arranged that they can be got together at their rendezvous in 20 minutes. I hear there are about 18,000 troops in Saint Louis to-day; besides, there is great activity in military circles. No one can see what will turn up next. There seems to be at present in our part of the State a disposition on the part of good citizens of secession sympathies to cease hostilities and urge those who will fight to enlist and join the regular forces. The partial success of the rebels, and the fact that in greatly superior force they are constantly advancing into the State, is what I most fear. On the other hand, it is very strange, with all our boasted superiority in men and resources, that the rebels manage at nearly every point to meet our troops with greatly superior numbers. There are screws loose somewhere. I am tired of receiving blows. I want to see the war offensive on our part. This course of events will soon ruin our cause before the world.

Extract from letter of J. T. K. Hayward to J. W. Brooks, dated “Hannibal, August 17, 1861.”

Most of this week has been spent in efforts for peace and conciliation. Things were getting to such a pass here that no one felt safe, and all could see that the matter as it was going on would soon be much worse, and men on either side would be shot down at sight, while property would be entirely insecure. I think it is a consciousness of this that has made our most respectable and leading secessionists manifest a desire of late to have a stop put to this irregular warfare. At least I have taken advantage of this disposition and worked with them, I trust, to some purpose; it remains to be seen to how much. Our train was fired into last night, and one man killed and three wounded. It was a train mostly of soldiers. A ball passed close to the head of the conductor, aimed, as is believed, at him expressly. Two of our best runners have left in consequence of their trains being fired on. We intend, how ever, to run the road if Farley and myself have to go on the engines and run them. But we must have a change in our military rule here or we are helplessly gone. It is a load the Union men cannot bear.

Yours, truly,

J. T. K. HAYWARD.

{p.461}

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HANNIBAL, August 19, 1861.

J. W. BROOKS, Esq., Boston:

DEAR SIR: Our train was fired into yesterday. There were troops on board. No one hurt. If we cannot have a change in the administration of military affairs here in North Missouri our cause will be ruined. There are a good many rebel camps known to be within 3 to 10 miles of the road. Union men constantly driven out. Trains fired into, &c. and yet no effort made to attack them.

Yours, truly,

J. T. K. HAYWARD.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 27, 1861.

Col. JEFFERSON C. DAVIS, Commanding, Jefferson City:

SIR: Your attention is called to the unprotected and defenseless state of Booneville, in Cooper County. It has been reported at these headquarters by Capt. Joseph A. Eppstein, commanding U. S. Reserve Corps at that place, that the Home Guards have, owing to the withdrawal of the U. S. troops, been obliged to leave Booneville, leaving their families unprovided for and their property exposed to depredation. Captain Eppstein was intrusted with the raising and organizing of a battalion of Home Guards in Cooper County, but cannot proceed there unless re-enforced. Major Kraut, of the Engineer Corps, has been ordered to proceed at once to Jefferson City to commence the work of fortification there, and will report to you.

No intelligence is received at these headquarters from you. I desire that you will make full and frequent reports concerning your own forces and movements, as well as of the numbers, acts, and designs of the enemy, as far as known to you.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 27, 1861.

General POPE, U. S. A., Comdg. North Missouri District, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to say that your letter of yesterday, transmitting information received from General Grant, has been submitted to Major-General Frémont. He directs me to say, in reply, that arms and ammunition have been sent to Colonel Morgan’s 750 men at Brookfield. It is believed that it will warrant the withdrawal of a portion of the Illinois volunteers from the line of the railroad in that vicinity, with a view to a movement south and southwest. He suggests that the service near Palmyra and Paris is so well guarded by the opportunity of succor from Illinois on one side and from Iowa on the other, that considerable detachments may safely be made from General Hurlbut’s force to aid in operating in this, from Brookfield and vicinity towards Jefferson City and Lexington, and in keeping the navigation of the Missouri River from hostile interruption. With these suggestions the general commanding leaves the disposition of matters to yourself.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Major, U. S. Army, and Military Secretary.

{p.462}

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IRONTON, MO., August 27, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Brig. Gen. B. M. Prentiss left here this forenoon in pursuance of your order, taking all the troops here except my regiment, the First Nebraska, and the Twenty-first Illinois, and a few companies now occupied in guarding the bridges of the Iron Mountain Railroad.

The Twenty-first Illinois is at Marble Creek, some 12 miles southward on the Greenville road. This regiment is without transportation. I shall send all the teams I can procure for it to return with in the morning.

For the present, several companies of the two regiments now here having been detached for railroad guard duty, the command is in a state of great weakness. We are far too much extended for our numbers. But the importance of holding all the positions now occupied, coupled with the certain expectation of being re-enforced before morning, together with the want of transportation, has induced me to remain as we are. If the two promised regiments fail to reach me by morning, I shall deem it my duty to contract our limits, taking care to remove the guns back within the lines.

I am under no apprehension of an attack to-night, because, though the rebels are quickly informed of our movements and condition, it is impossible for them to have received intelligence at Bolinger’s and Greenville in time after General Prentiss left, for them to reach us to-night.

A well-known Union man from Cedar Creek, Mr. Edward Settle, came in this evening. He says the rebels are encamped at Bolinger’s Mill, in command of Jeff. Thompson, who proposes, in conjunction with Hardee, to take this place. It is believed here among the more intelligent Southern sympathizers that McCulloch is also advancing on this point, and that we will here have to oppose a large force. I am satisfied it is the settled opinion of those men that there will be a most formidable attack here before many days. The importance of this opinion arises from the fact that they have means of knowing, while we are in ignorance of the enemy’s movements.

The squadron of 150 horse arrived this afternoon and will be sent forward to-morrow to General Prentiss. Could they be retained, the position and probable numbers of the enemy might soon be ascertained with some degree of certainty. There is much in the drift of circumstances, taken in connection with the fact that they subsist by taking everything in the country, to indicate the concentration in and around here of an army many times larger than had been deemed possible for them.

I am not aware that any inquiry has been ordered in the case of Colonel Hecker, nor what, if anything, has been done in the premises. There are no papers left me touching the matter.

I am, sir, respectfully,

P. E. BLAND, Colonel Commanding.

P. S.-August 28.-No troops having come down, I shall apply all our energies to the contracting of our limits within reasonable dimensions. It will be difficult to do this before night, having only eight disposable teams and one regiment to move some 10 or 12 miles. Last night the fact of our exposed situation gave me greater uneasiness than I had yet ever experienced.

Respectfully,

P. E. BLAND.

{p.463}

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HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES, Jefferson City, Mo., August 27, 1861.

Capt. SPEED BUTLER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Two spies, one from the neighborhood of Lebanon and the other from Springfield, have come in this morning. The one from Lebanon reports that the Southern Army is traveling north in small bodies, and secessionists say with a view of concentrating about Linn Creek. The citizens of Lebanon expected a body of 10,000 men within a few days of the time my informant left. The one from Springfield reports substantially the same thing, so far as the leaving of troops in detachments goes. He says that after the battle of Springfield the rebels concealed a portion of their artillery and commenced a retreat without burying any considerable portion of their dead. Finding, however, that a retreat had commenced from the other side, they returned to Springfield, after having made a retrograde movement of some 5 miles.

I sent out on Sunday a detachment of Home Guards to arrest two secession captains that I learned had come in. They succeeded in finding them by coming upon them in the night. Their names are J. Johnson, of Miller County, and B. Barnd, of Cole. These men claim to have come in under the proclamation of Governor Gamble, and with the intention of laying down their arms. I have proof; however, William Mathews, John Hicks, and Aaron Bell being witnesses, that B. Bard stated that these difficulties had to be settled by the sword, and that he (Bard) was going back to Jackson’s army, and that Johnson was also going. The manner and apparent ignorance of these men as to condition of affairs about Springfield goes very far against the plausibility of their having come in in good faith.

I have appointed an ordnance-sergeant here to take charge of all stores that may arrive.

I am getting teams broken in as rapidly as possible. I have to report that the harness sent here is entirely too light and very inferior in quality. The chains are so light and brittle that they snap with the least strain. I have been compelled to order the purchase of new traces here for the teams we are working, and shall be compelled to do so as fast as additional ones are hitched up.

The detachment that left here a few days since to arrest parties for firing into the cars west of here brought in a number of prisoners, but from all the evidence they were the most innocent men in the county. I had them liberated. I would renew my recommendation of yesterday, that a large force be concentrated here; that the road be prepared and possession taken, and protection be given to all the counties bordering on the Missouri.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, D. C., August 28, 1861.

Hon. FRANK P. BLAIR, Saint Louis, Mo.:

DEAR COLONEL: Your brother, the Postmaster-General, has handed me your letter of the 21st of August. I asked him to let me have it, in order that I might, by a few words, strengthen your hands and General Frémont’s, and disabuse both him and you of some errors which may give trouble.

If there was any deficiency in the quartermaster’s department in Missouri, {p.464} the blame does not rest here; all requisitions have been promptly met here, and the officers have been instructed to spare no effort and no means of their department in aiding to the extent of their power General Lyon’s movements.

I gave to General Frémont, in addition to Major McKinstry, Captain T-, who I fear from what I have since been told is not as prudent as zealous. I take it for granted that General Frémont leaves estimates of prices of supplies to his quartermaster, and when I find, as Quartermaster-General, that the prices are probably too high, it is my duty to the Government and to General Frémont, as well as to this Department, to say so. At the same time, I understand that there may be reasons of time, of quality, which induce a general to order a purchase at a higher rate, and while I communicate to the quartermasters information as to the ruling prices of horses-the market rates-I called upon the Treasury to send all the money he asked for.

Tell General Frémont that no man more than myself desires to sustain him; no one is more ready to take a responsibility to assist him, and that he has, in my opinion, already the power which you say ought to be conferred upon him by the President. Whatever a general commanding orders, the subordinates of his staff are by regulations compelled to do, if possible.

If General Frémont orders Captain Turnley to pay $1,000 for an ax, Captain Turnley will be supported by this Department in obeying. The propriety of such a payment, however, will be between General Frémont and the Government.

The general is charged with saving the country. The country will be very careful to approve his measures, and will judge his mistakes, if any, very tenderly if successful. Success crowns the work, and let him spare no responsibility, no effort, to secure it, and above all let him not take in ill part what is done with a sincere desire to assist him, and let him not estrange friends by too hastily finding fault with their counsels.

All the requisitions for money for Missouri have been promptly passed through this office; the delay, if any has occurred, is at the Treasury Department, which has allowed the Department to fall in debt in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, each about a million of dollars, for clothing and camp equipage.

There are wagons making in Cincinnati, which Captain Dickerson will send to Saint Louis if wanted; those made at Milwaukee I ordered to Saint Louis long ago. A number of wagons were ordered to be made in Saint Louis, and authority given to Major McKinstry to provide all that might be required for moving the armies of that department.

In regard to advertising and delay, the law of 1861 and the regulations expressly provide that in case of public exigency supplies are to be bought in open market, as between individuals. Exercise this power. Moreover, advertisement or public notice does not require postponing opening of bids for a month, or a week, or two days.

If forage, wagons, horses are wanted, the law, the necessity are fully met by putting a notice in the paper and purchasing as fast as offers come in-the next day or the same day; take the then lowest bid or the then most advantageous offer. The day after you will have a still better offer; take that for a portion of your supplies, and so on until you have all you need. By this system I have brought down the prices of horses from $128 to $120, of wagons from $141 to $108, since I came here, and have got abundant supplies.

These explanations will, I hope, remove many difficulties from the {p.465} way of our armies in Missouri. Count upon me as ready to aid in what I believe the right, cheap, strategic, statesmanlike mode of conducting this war, that which I am sure the people desire, and the want of which they censure-the most rapid possible concentration of overwhelming forces by the United States.

M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General.

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JEFFERSON CITY, MO., August 28, 1861.

Capt. SPEED BUTLER, Saint Louis, Mo.

I have no special information to impart to-day except the return of Colonel Worthington from Booneville. His report is inclosed herewith.* Prisoners taken will be sent to Saint Louis to-day, charges accompanying.

A steamer is now just starting, in compliance with your telegraph of yesterday, to capture all means of crossing the river.

I would recommend the stoppage of mails west from here, or at least that they be placed under some regulation which would prevent the indiscriminate transmission of news.

Captain Taylor’s battery, four pieces, arrived last night.

A copy of charges against prisoners is also forwarded to the commanding officer at Saint Louis Arsenal.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Fort Scott, August 29, 1861.

Captain PRINCE, Commanding Post Fort Leavenworth:

SIR: We have now reliable information that a force estimated at not less than 6,000 is advancing from Papinsville, 35 miles distant, to this point for the subjugation of Kansas.

We are here with about 2,000 raw troops and no artillery of any consequence to meet them. We have called and called again for re-enforcements of men and artillery. We expect to do our best to stay their march, and in that view we call again. Send us re-enforcements of men and artillery as rapidly as possible. If any are on the road or at Fort Leavenworth, hasten them forward.

Yours,

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS POST AT ROLLA, August 29, 1861-4 o’clock a. m.

To Major-General FRÉMONT, Commanding Department of the West:

GENERAL: As the train from Saint Louis was approaching this place last evening, and when within 7 miles, a terrible explosion was heard immediately under the tender of the engine and the baggage car of the {p.466} train. As soon as the train was stopped it was ascertained that a keg or part of a keg of powder had been put upon the track, and so arranged with combustibles as that it would explode when the train went over it. It did explode, but most fortunately without injuring any person or damaging the track in the least. I immediately dispatched 40 of my best-mounted men to the point, with orders to re-enforce the guards already on the road and to arrest any suspicious persons they might find. A messenger is just in from them, and informs me they have found two places where the rails have been removed from the track, evidently with the intention of destroying the train with troops which was to have left here at 3 o’clock this morning. As soon as it is light enough to admit I shall start the train, on which is embarked the Second Kansas Regiment and some good track-repairers, and I trust there will be but little delay in getting through. The receipt of this will enable you to judge.

I am of the opinion that two good and full regiments should be sent here at once, one of them to go into camp at Salem, Dent County, and one at Saint James Station, a point 12 miles east of this, on the Southwest Branch of the Pacific Railroad. By this means we could scour the counties of Crawford, Dent, Phelps, and Manes thoroughly, and not weaken this post to a degree that would be impolitic or dangerous. I shall write you again by the 10.30 a. m. train, giving you any and all further information I may become acquainted with.

I am, general, respectfully and obediently, yours,

J. B. WYMAN, Commanding at Rolla.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 29, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM GILPIN, Governor Colorado Territory:

SIR: I am instructed by Major-General Frémont to say that you have authority to increase your force to 1,000 men, so that you can send the companies to relieve the garrison at Fort Wise. That garrison, when relieved, is ordered to repair to Santa Fe and report to Col. E. R. S. Canby.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Major, U. S. Army, and Military Secretary.

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PROCLAMATION.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 30, 1861.

Circumstances, in my judgment, of sufficient urgency render it necessary that the commanding general of this department should assume the administrative powers of the State. Its disorganized condition, the helplessness of the civil authority, the total insecurity of life, and the devastation of property by bands of murderers and marauders, who infest nearly every county of the State, and avail themselves of the public misfortunes and the vicinity of a hostile force to gratify private and neighborhood vengeance, and who find an enemy wherever they find plunder, finally demand the severest measures to repress the dailyincreasing {p.467} crimes and outrages which are driving off the inhabitants and ruining the State.

In this condition the public safety and the success of our arms require unity of purpose, without let or hinderance to the prompt administration of affairs. In order, therefore, to suppress disorder, to maintain as far as now practicable the public peace, and to give security and protection to the persons and property of loyal citizens, I do hereby extend and declare established martial law throughout the State of Missouri.

The lines of the army of occupation in this State are for the present declared to extend from Leavenworth, by way of the posts of Jefferson City, Rolla, and Ironton, to Cape Girardeau, on the Mississippi River.

All persons who shall be taken with arms in their hands within these lines shall be tried by court-martial, and if found guilty will be shot.

The property, real and personal, of all persons in the State of Missouri who shall take up arms against the United States, or who shall be directly proven to have taken an active part with their enemies in the field, is declared to be confiscated to the public use, and their slaves, if any they have, are hereby declared freemen.

All persons who shall be proven to have destroyed, after the publication of this order, railroad tracks, bridges, or telegraphs shall suffer the extreme penalty of the law.

All persons engaged in treasonable correspondence, in giving or procuring aid to the enemies of the United States, in fomenting tumults, in disturbing the public tranquillity by creating and circulating false reports or incendiary documents, are in their own interests warned that they are exposing themselves to sudden and severe punishment.

All persons who have been led away from their allegiance are required to return to their homes forthwith. Any such absence, without sufficient cause, will be held to be presumptive evidence against them.

The object of this declaration is to place in the hands of the military authorities the power to give instantaneous effect to existing laws, and to supply such deficiencies as the conditions of war demand. But this is not intended to suspend the ordinary tribunals of the country, where the law will be administered by the civil officers in the usual manner, and with their customary authority, while the same can be peaceably exercised.

The commanding general will labor vigilantly for the public welfare, and in his efforts for their safety hopes to obtain not only the acquiescence but the active support of the loyal people of the country.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 30, 1861.

The commanding general sincerely regrets that he finds it necessary to make any reproach to the patriotic army under his command. He had hoped that the rigid enforcement of discipline and the good example of the mass of the enlightened soldiery which he has the honor to lead would have been sufficient to correct in good time the irregularities and license of a few who have reflected discredit upon our cause and ourselves. But the extension of martial law to all the State of Missouri, rendered suddenly necessary by its unhappy condition, renders {p.468} it equally imperative to call the army to good order and rigorous discipline.

They, are reminded that the power to inflict the extraordinary seventies of the now governing law is rigidly confined to few, who are to be held strictly accountable for its exercise.

They are also reminded that the same necessity which requires the establishment of martial law demands also the enforcement of the military law, which governs themselves with the same sudden severity. The commanding general therefore strictly prohibits all vexatious proceedings calculated unnecessarily to harass the citizens, and also unauthorized searches, seizures, and destruction of property, except in cases of military necessity, and for which the officer authorizing or permitting it will be held strictly and personally responsible. All officers commanding districts, posts, or detachments are enjoined to use the utmost prudence and circumspection in the discharge of their duties. Under the circumstances a strict obedience to orders, close attention to duties, and an earnest effort to protect and to avoid harassing innocent persons us requested and expected everywhere from officers and men.

The commanding general trusts that he will find few occasions to reproach the troops. He hopes and believes that he will find many to admire and commend them.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J. C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., August 31, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE, U. S. A., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Major-General Frémont directs that you proceed forthwith to Northeast Missouri and take command in person in that quarter. Please report to the general in person before you start.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Major, U. S. Army, and Military Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN POPE:

SIR: You are hereby directed to take possession, if possible, of all the specie in the banks located at Clinton and La Grange, Lewis County, Mo., and send the same at once to the city of Saint Louis, under a sufficient escort, giving a proper receipt for the same to the person entitled thereto.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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STATE OF KANSAS, EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Topeka, September 1, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

DEAR SIR: An effort is being made to get up a panic in our State, and I am told messengers have been sent to you representing a fearful state of things on our border. As some parties are interested to have {p.469} war on our border, and consequently may not be impartial in their reports, I desire to say that we are in no danger of invasion, provided the Government stores at Fort Scott are sent back to Leavenworth and the Lane brigade is removed from the border. It is true small parties of secessionists are to be found in Missouri, but we have good reason to know that they do not intend to molest Kansas in force until Jackson shall be reinstated as governor of Missouri. Indeed, when a short time since a guerrilla party came over and stole some property from our citizens, the officers in command of the Confederates compelled a return of the property, and offered to give up the leader of the gang to our people for punishment. But what we have to fear, and do fear, is that Lane’s brigade will get up a war by going over the line, committing depredations, and then returning into our State. This course will force the secessionists to put down any force we may have for their own protection, and in this they will be joined by nearly all the Union men of Missouri. If you will remove the supplies at Fort Scott to the interior, and relieve us of the Lane brigade, I will guarantee Kansas from invasion from Missouri until Jackson shall drive you out of Saint Louis.

I am progressing rapidly with the organization of the Home Guard, and have arranged for speedily filling one of the New Mexico regiments. With reference to the other, I am expecting to hear from your secretary. A gentleman here thinks he could furnish five companies for the Second New Mexico Regiment in a short time if Mr. Wood has not filled it.

Could I have one company of cavalry and one of artillery in the Home Guard regiment, provided the State furnish the guns or a part of them and the cavalry company furnish their own horses and horse equipments I If so, I should like it.

I think the outfit for the New Mexico regiments could be purchased here to good advantage, so far as mules, wagons, and provisions are concerned.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. ROBINSON.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., September 2, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

MY DEAR SIR: Two points in your proclamation of August 30 give me some anxiety:

First. Should you shoot a man, according to the proclamation, the Confederates would very certainly shoot our best men in their hands in retaliation; and so, man for man, indefinitely. It is, therefore, my order that you allow no man to be shot under the proclamation without first having my approbation or consent.

Second. I think there is great danger that the closing paragraph, in relation to the confiscation of property and the liberating slaves of traitorous owners, will alarm our Southern Union friends and turn them against us; perhaps ruin our rather fair prospect for Kentucky. Allow me, therefore, to ask that you will, as of your own motion, modify that paragraph so as to conform to the first and fourth sections of the act of Congress entitled “An act to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes,” approved August 6, 1861, and a copy of which act I herewith send you.

This letter is written in a spirit of caution and not of censure. I {p.470} send it by special messenger, in order that it may certainly and speedily reach you.

Yours, very truly,

A. LINCOLN.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 3, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, Washington City:

Will you allow me to suggest that for the present no authority be given to Governor Gamble to raise regiments in Missouri?

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.}

HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 4, 1861.

By virtue of directions from headquarters Department of the West, Cairo will be included in the Southeast Missouri District, and the undersigned therefore assumes command.

Brig. Gen. J. A. McClernand, U. S. Volunteers, being senior officer of the post of Cairo, is assigned to duty as commander, and will assume his duties as soon as practicable.

Bird’s Point and Mound City will be considered as parts of the command at Cairo.

Headquarters of the Military District of Southeast Missouri will be at this place until otherwise directed.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, September 5, 1861.

General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis:

I have seen your message to the President. The governor of Indiana telegraphed some days since that matters in Kentucky presented a threatening aspect. He was then advised, by consent of the President, to hold his four regiments in camp for the emergency he feared. One regiment has since been ordered from camp, the others remain there. Under your statement that rebel forces are probably being moved into Kentucky, is it advisable to send regiments from Indiana to your assistance?

If this Department was more fully advised by you of the wants of your department, we might be able to serve you more promptly. It certainly is my desire to give you every possible assistance.

SIMON CAMERON.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, September 5, 1861.

Brigadier-General CURTIS, Commanding Jefferson Barracks:

General Frémont orders you to make up a command sufficient to capture or disperse the rebel camp west of Sulphur Springs; to arrange {p.471} for the movement as you shall think best towards that object. Commanding officer at arsenal to furnish you such additional force as you need; also commanding officer at Carondelet the same.

J. H. EATON, Major, and Military Secretary.

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HUNNEWELL, MO., September 6, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Arrived here this evening. Salt River Bridge repaired so as to be passable. Rebel forces retreated from the road to Paris or Florida. Third engine went to Shelbina and saw train from the west, which came within 3 miles. The road will be clear to-morrow. Please send blankets and tents. Moore’s men are without either.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, September 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General POPE:

Your dispatch received. I am re-enforcing you. Make no important move till you hear further.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General GRANT, Paducah, Ky.:

To enable you to continue personally in command of our forces at Cairo, Bird’s Point, Cape Girardeau, and Ironton, I have directed Brigadier-General Smith to repair to Paducah, and assume command of the forces now at that place and on the Kentucky side of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. The order of the 5th instant informs you as to the nature of the operations to be carried on on both sides of the Mississippi River.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Jefferson City, Mo., September 5, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: The steamer which transported Colonel Worthington’s command up the river returned yesterday, bringing considerable property which they had taken and some prisoners. Harris is in that section beyond doubt, and I hope Worthington may find him.

I have dispatches from Colonel Marshall at Lexington. This place is for the present perfectly safe.

{p.472}

Colonel Mulligan’s command is progressing well, and nothing is to be apprehended from him-other than success.

News from the country south and west of this confirms my reports of yesterday.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JEFF. C. DAVIS, Colonel Twenty-second Indiana, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Jefferson City, Mo., September 6, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: The news since yesterday is still more convincing that Price, Parsons, and Rains are directing their movements up the Osage, with the view eventually, I think, of taking position somewhere on the river above here, probably just below Lexington.

Their movements certainly threaten Fort Scott, and they may attack it; but their intention is, in my judgment, to take a strong position on the river and cut us off from the forces above. This is necessary for them to do in order to get the forces and supplies now raised in Northeast Missouri across the river.

In my communications to General Pope some days ago I ventured to suggest the propriety of sending a reliable force to occupy Warsaw or some point in that vicinity. A well-managed force at this point would in a great measure prevent recruits and supplies being raised there for McCulloch’s forces. It would render Price’s movements very insecure, as he would be nearly if not quite cut off from McCulloch, and might, if he moves farther north, be easily captured by a concentrated movement of troops upon him from this place, Fort Scott, Warsaw, and Lexington.

The plan submitted to you by Major Kraut for the defense of this place meets with my approval. A few well-selected sites for field-works, flanked and supported by a series of block-houses, abatis, &c., seem to be the best I could recommend. The material for building here is abundant, and sites which would secure them from the range of the enemy’s artillery can generally be found. Should you think proper to order these works to be commenced it would do much to allay the fears of the citizens of this place. There seems to be no grounds of fear from immediate danger, but they think so.

The Home Guards give me much trouble on account of not being clothed and equipped. When called upon for duty they make this a complaint.

Reports (not very reliable) last night state that Colonel Worthington had taken possession of Columbia. The rebels evacuated it at his approach, but had made a stand some 4 miles from there in such force that he was doubtful about attacking them. I have a regiment and boats in readiness to succor him at once should it be necessary.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JEFF. C. DAVIS, Colonel Twenty-second Indiana Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS, September 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General POPE:

SIR: According to the report received at these headquarters, Colonel Williams, with his command of 800 men, has been forced to retreat from {p.473} Shelbina to Macon City (Hudson) by a band of rebels, under Green, numbering about 3,000, where he is now cut off from all lines of communication east of his position.

In order to arrest the constant depredations of the rebels in Marion, Monroe, Shelby, Macon, and adjoining counties, and to visit on them the whole rigor of martial law, I have resolved upon a combined attack on Green’s men and their total annihilation.

To effect this object you will be re-enforced by the First Kansas Regiment and the Twenty-third Indiana Regiment.

Brigadier-General Sturgis will advance on Macon City (Hudson) with the Twenty-seventh Ohio Regiment; Colonel Groesbeck’s Thirty-ninth Ohio Regiment; one squadron Frémont Hussars, under Captain Von Blume; and Captain Schwartz’s full battery, under command of the first lieutenant.

You will leave a comparative reserve at Palmyra, and then advance west towards Salt River, and you will, under any circumstances, endeavor to put yourself in communication with the command of Brigadier-General Sturgis, who will operate towards the east against Shelbina.

It will be your object not only to disperse the enemy, but to follow him into his hiding-places and annihilate him.

After having put yourself in communication with Brigadier-General Sturgis by means of a reliable messenger, and after General Sturgis has advanced east towards Shelbina, you will force the passage of Salt River (should the bridge be destroyed, you will find a suitable bridge towards the north or south), and thus make a combined attack on the rebels.

After the junction of the forces has been accomplished, Brigadier-General Sturgis will be under your command.

As communication between you and General Sturgis will be subject to the constant hazard of interruption, you will report by telegraph as often as necessary to these headquarters whence dispatches may be sent to him.

I inclose a copy of the order addressed to Brigadier-General Sturgis.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, September 6, 1861.

Brigadier-General STURGIS, Commanding at Arsenal:

SIR: In order to put a stop to the robberies and violences committed by the rebel hordes under Green, who are now assembled at Shelbina to the number of about 3,000, and who have cut off Colonel Williams from his eastern communication lines, I have resolved upon a combined attack on the rebels and their annihilation.

General Pope will endeavor, with his disposable force, re-enforced by the First Kansas and the Twenty-third Indiana Regiment, to force a passage across Salt River, or to gain a crossing by some other means. Further details concerning the general plan and the junction of the forces General Pope will endeavor to transmit to you by a reliable messenger.

To carry out this combined attack you will assume command of the following forces:

The Twenty-seventh Ohio Regiment, Colonel Fuller.

The Thirty-ninth Ohio Regiment, Colonel Groesbeck.

One squadron of Frémont Hussars, Captain Blume.

{p.474}

Captain Schwartz’s full battery, under the command of the first lieutenant.

Your main endeavor will be to cut off the enemy from the road leading to Shelbyville, and generally to render impossible the dispersion of his forces by squads, and to annihilate the gang of rebels as a whole.

As the communication between you and General Pope will be subject to the constant hazard of interruption, you will report as often as necessary by telegraph to headquarters, whence dispatches can be sent to him.

I inclose a copy of the order addressed to Brigadier-General Pope.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HUNNEWELL, MO., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

The road is now open. Train went west this afternoon. Leave 1,500 men here, and make night march against Green with 1,600 men and four pieces of artillery. You will not hear from me before late to-morrow.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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JEFFERSON BARRACKS, MO., September 7, 1861.

Maj. J. H. EATON:

The union of cavalry and infantry was all right at Sulphur Springs at 7.30 o’clock last night. It moved forward as directed, effectually preventing the news preceding it. I directed telegraphic reports from Sulphur Springs, but no news has yet been received there. I now leave this post to execute my order, to assume command at Camp Benton, and direct dispatches from Sulphur Springs to be forwarded to you and I also.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Further reports render it morally certain, in my opinion, that the enemy under Polk is about 6,000 strong at Columbus; that yesterday their heavy cannon were lying on the ground under the bluff, and that Thompson, with an additional force, was encamped opposite [in] Missouri. The account is that the force at Columbus is from Union City and Madrid, and this is poorly equipped.

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Information received since my last, which I believe to be true: Pillow and Jeff. Thompson are now at Columbus, with a force of 8,000 or 10,000 men, perhaps more, and are fortifying the heights there.

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Brigadier-General.

{p.475}

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CAIRO, September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

General Paine, in command of the Federal forces at Paducah, reports this morning that General Pillow, having left Missouri, will probably march upon Paducah with a reputed force of 4,000 men in two days, and further says that General Tilghman, with a reputed force of 2,000 Confederates, is within 24 miles of Paducah. General Paine, in order to provide against exigencies, asks to be immediately re-enforced, at least by two regiments of infantry.

...

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Brigadier-General.

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HUNNEWELL, MO., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Road will be open to-day. Green, from all accounts, encamped near Florida, 20 miles southeast of this place. Three hundred men of the regiment at Quincy now occupy Palmyra. Have not yet heard direct from Hurlbut, but shall by morning.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS., September 7, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

The communications of rail and wire entirely cut off on the Hannibal and Saint Joseph. Lane reports the enemy’s column marching on Lexington. Can a force attack from Jefferson City while Lane attacks from the west?

W. E. PRINCE.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Fort Lincoln, September 7, 1861.

Capt. W. E. PRINCE, Commanding Post Fort Leavenworth:

I send you the latest news from the front.* Although but a handful of men and but little artillery, I propose to pursue far enough to threaten their rear and confuse them.

I can only say again that if the Government had furnished us artillery, the army that we are now pursuing would have been blotted out.

The object of the pursuit is a hope that we will be able to cut off their train and recover the mules they have stolen from us.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

* Inclosure not found.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Charles, Mo., September 7, 1861-9 p. m.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Dept. of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I reached this place about 1 p. m. to-day, and found the troops still on board the boats, which did {p.476} not arrive until 10 a. m. The artillery and cavalry have not yet arrived.

There appears to be some difficulty ahead, and I fear the track is torn up and the bridges destroyed. An engine started last night to bring some cars down from a point 90 miles distant and has not yet returned; also the freight train due from above at 4 p. m. to-day has not been heard from. Mr. Gamble (the railroad agent here) informs me that we have been expected on this road for the last three days, and he is of opinion that the bridges have been destroyed; he is confirmed in this opinion by the circumstance that if an ordinary accident had happened to these trains a hand car would have been sent in to bring the intelligence.

This letter will not go out until 11 p. m., so that if you receive it at all you will know that no down trains have arrived up to that hour, for otherwise I should not send it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. D. STURGIS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

P. S.-I forgot to mention that a Major Krekel of the Home Guards, started north this morning with his force, taking one engine and eighteen of the cars intended for the troops of my command. By what authority he is acting does not appear, but by so doing he has delayed our starting somewhat, and, indeed, he may be interfering with the trains now due.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Charles, Mo., September 7, 1861-11.30 p. m.

Major I. C. WOODS, Department Headquarters:

MAJOR: Your letter is just received. We have been delayed here, which my previous letter will explain. Green is evidently falling down to Mexico, with a view to destroy the bridges at that point. The two regiments will start at daylight, and in view of the present condition of things will order them to take position at the most advanced bridge and hold it until we can get the cavalry and artillery up. They have not yet reached this point.

Respectfully, &c.,

S. D. STURGIS, Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 7, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

Six 8-inch columbiads and ten 32-pounder guns, with barbette carriages, left Pittsburg for Cairo on two special trains-the first last night, the second at noon to-day. One regiment from this place should arrive at 5 o’clock to-morrow. A boat sent to take regiment from opposite Commerce to Cairo. Other re-enforcements will follow to-morrow. General Smith must throw up earthworks and plant guns at Paducah, but make no advance. He should occupy Smithland with four companies, if they can be spared. At least one gunboat should be kept at Paducah. The work at Fort Holt must immediately be commenced with all the laborers at Cairo and Bird’s Point. The place should be strongly guarded, an advance guard pushed across Caney Creek, and the heights commanding Fort Jefferson and Blandville should be occupied. Crossing at Norfolk and Belmont watched.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

{p.477}

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HEADQUARTERS, September 7, 1861.

Col. JEFFERSON C. DAVIS, Jefferson City, Mo.:

Brigadier-General Sturgis, with strong force, left last night for Macon City. He will have cavalry and artillery by morning. Rebels under Green are reported as having retreated from Shelbina to Paris or Florida.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 8, 1861.

The PRESIDENT:

MY DEAR SIR: Your letter of the 2d, by special messenger, I know to have been written before you had received my letter, and before my telegraphic dispatches and the rapid development of critical conditions here had informed you of affairs in this quarter. I had not written to you fully and frequently, first, because in the incessant change of affairs I would be exposed to give you contradictory accounts; and, secondly, because the amount of the subjects to be laid before you would demand too much of your time.

Trusting to have your confidence, I have been leaving it to events themselves to show you whether or not I was shaping affairs here according to your ideas. The shortest communication between Washington and Saint Louis generally involves two days, and the employment of two days in time of war goes largely towards success or disaster. I therefore went along according to my own judgment, leaving the result of my movements to justify me with you.

And so in regard to my proclamation of the 30th. Between the rebel armies, the Provisional Government, and home traitors, I felt the position bad and saw danger. In the night I decided upon the proclamation and the form of it. I wrote it the next morning and printed it the same day. I did it without consultation or advice with any one, acting solely with my best judgment to serve the country and yourself, and perfectly willing to receive the amount of censure which should be thought due if I had made a false movement. This is as much a movement in the war as a battle, and in going into these I shall have to act according to my judgment of the ground before me, as I did on this occasion. If upon reflection your better judgment still decides that I am wrong in the article respecting the liberation of slaves, I have to ask that you will openly direct me to make the correction. The implied censure will be received as a soldier always should the reprimand of his chief. If I were to retract of my own accord, it would imply that I myself thought it wrong, and that I had acted without the reflection which the gravity of the point demanded. But I did not. I acted with full deliberation, and upon the certain conviction that it was a measure right and necessary, and I think so still.

In regard to the other point of the proclamation to which you refer, I desire to say that I do not think the enemy can either misconstrue or urge anything against it, or undertake to make unusual retaliation. The shooting of men who shall rise in arms against an army in the military occupation of a country is merely a necessary measure of defense, and entirely according to the usages of civilized warfare. The article does not at all refer to prisoners of war, and certainly our enemies have no ground for requiring that we should waive in their {p.478} benefit any of the ordinary advantages which the usages of war allow to us. As promptitude is itself an advantage in war, I have also to ask that you will permit me to carry out upon the spot the provisions of the proclamation in this respect. Looking at affairs from this point of view, I am satisfied that strong and vigorous measures have now become necessary to the success of our arms; and hoping that my views may have the honor to meet your approval,

I am, with respect and regard, very truly, yours,

J. C. FRÉMONT.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, September 8, 1861.

The PRESIDENT:

MY DEAR SIR: I send by another hand what I ask you to consider in respect to the subject of the note by your special messenger.

In this I desire to ask your attention to the position of affairs in Kentucky. As the rebel troops driven out from Missouri had invaded Kentucky in considerable force, and by occupying Union City, Hickman, and Columbus were preparing to seize Paducah and attack Cairo, I judged it impossible, without losing important advantages, to deter any longer a forward movement. For this purpose I have drawn from the Missouri side a part of the force which had been stationed at Bird’s Point, Cairo, and Cape Girardeau, to Fort Holt and Paducah, of which places we have taken possession. As the rebel forces outnumber ours, and the counties of Kentucky between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, as well as those along the latter and the Cumberland, are strongly secessionist, it becomes imperatively necessary to have time co-operation of the loyal Union forces under Generals Anderson and Nelson, as well as of those already encamped opposite Louisville, under Colonel Rousseau.

I have re-enforced, yesterday, Paducah with two regiments, and will continue to strengthen the position with men and artillery. As soon as General Smith, who commands there, is re-enforced sufficiently to enable him to spread his forces, he will have to take and hold Mayfield and Lovelaceville, to be in the rear and flank of Columbus, and to occupy Smithland, controlling in this way the mouths of both the Tennessee and the Cumberland Rivers. At the same time, Colonel Rousseau should bring his force increased, if possible, by two Ohio regiments, in boats to Henderson, and, taking the Henderson and Nashville Railroad, occupy Hopkinsville, while General Nelson should go with a force of 5,000 by railroad to Louisville and from there to Bowling Green.

As the population in all the counties through which the above railroads pass are loyal, this movement could be made without delay or molestation to the troops.

Meanwhile General Grant would take possession of the entire Cairo and Fulton Railroad, Piketon, New Madrid, and the shore of the Mississippi opposite Hickman and Columbus. The foregoing disposition having been effected, a combined attack will be made upon Columbus, and, if successful in that, upon Hickman, while Rousseau and Nelson will move in concert, by railroad, to Nashville, Tenn., occupying the State capital, and, with an adequate force, New Providence.

The conclusion of this movement would be a combined advance toward Memphis, on the Mississippi, as well as the Memphis and Ohio Railroad, and I trust the result would be a glorious one to the country.

{p.479}

In reply to a letter from General Sherman, by the hand of Judge Williams, in relation to the vast importance of securing possession in advance of the country lying between the Ohio, Tennessee, and Mississippi, I have today suggested the first part of the preceding plan. By extending my command to Indiana, Tennessee, and Kentucky you would enable me to attempt the accomplishment of this all-important result; and in order to secure the secrecy necessary to its success, I shall not extend the communication which I have made to General Sherman or repeat it to any one else.

With high respect and regard, I am, very truly, yours,

J. C. FRÉMONT.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 8, 1861.

General JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Information received from a spy, and also from Kentuckians who have fled from their homes, report the rebel strength at Columbus to-day at eighteen regiments of infantry and a considerable number of artillery and cavalry. They have two batteries of heavy pieces and two gunboats. One of their gunboats has been up to within 3 miles of Cairo this evening. No troops from Saint Louis to-day.

U. S. GRANT.

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HUNNEWELL, MO., September 8, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Did not move last night, because the re-enforcements from Hurlbut did not reach here until 10 p. m.-too late for the object. I have now force enough to move on Green, and will do so to-night. Your dispatch, to make no important movement without further advices, received.

Please answer, and give me authority to move.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HUNNEWELL, MO., September 8, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

The road is now open and clear as far west as Platte River. I have heard nothing of the re-enforcements of which you telegraphed.

JNO. POPE.

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HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 8, 1861.

Col. FRED. HECKER, Commanding Twenty-fourth Illinois Volunteers:

I have reliable information that a guard of 500 cavalry, unsupported by infantry or artillery, are now 7 miles from you, on the Cairo and Columbus road. By leaving at 11 o’clock or later I think you will be able to take them. Be exceedingly cautious not to be led too far, and surprise them if you can. I am at the same time fitting out an expedition to try and surprise Jeff. Thompson, who is on the Missouri side of the river about the same distance off. Keep these matters to yourself for to-night.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.480}

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HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 8, 1861.

Col. J. B. TURCHIN, Commanding Nineteenth Illinois Volunteers, Fort Holt, Ky.:

I am informed that Colonel Hecker has got to the rear of some rebel forces, while Colonel Ross’ regiment is in their front. You will proceed at once, with six companies of your command, to their relief. Captain Schwartz, of the artillery, who is at Fort Holt, will give you the necessary directions.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General MCCLERNAND, Cairo, Ill.:

Send forthwith the two regiments required by General Paine and also the two 6-pounders. Send forward also Smith’s regiment. Do not permit the least delay. Re-enforcements from Saint Louis are being sent forward to replace them. Keep up frequent communication with Paducah, and keep me minutely advised. Report to me the arrival of artillery now on the way to Cairo from different points. Acknowledge this dispatch.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo:

Has General Smith gone to Paducah? I am credibly informed from Louisville that Pillow, with 7,000 men and artillery, is marching on Paducah; also that the Tennesseeans are going to make a forward movement to-night or to-morrow to Kentucky. Has the re-enforcement from Saint Louis reached Cairo? Inform General Smith, at Paducah, that I direct him to place a battery at the Marine Hospital immediately and the other on the heights near Cross Creek, and prepare for forward movements towards Mayfield as soon as re-enforcements arrive.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 9, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

Colonel Hecker has got in the rear of 500 cavalry, Kentucky side. Colonel Ross’ regiment is in front, and six companies of Turchin’s will go to their assistance. We occupy Norfolk.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 9, 1861.

Col. G. WAAGNER, Chief of Artillery, Comdg. Detachment near Norfolk, Mo.:

I am directed by General Grant to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatches from camp near Norfolk, and to inform you that he has {p.481} issued orders to Colonel Wallace to send you four additional companies of infantry and two days’ rations for your whole command. You will hold your position as long as you think it prudent to do so.

WM. S. HILLYER, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 9, 1861.

Col. J. COOK, Seventh Illinois Vols., Comdg. Cape Girardeau, Mo.:

You will please send an express to Jackson immediately upon the receipt of this, and direct Colonel Marsh to move into Cape Girardeau, with all his command, at once. He will then proceed by first conveyance to this place, bringing all his baggage with him. Captain Stewart, with his cavalry company, will cross the river at Cape Girardeau, and march to this place as soon as joined by the detachment at Jackson, sending his baggage by river. Push the works of fortifying as rapidly as possible to completion. With them completed, your garrison will be sufficient to hold the place against any force that can be suddenly brought against it.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 9, 1861.

Commander Gunboat CONESTOGA:

I understand Norfolk is being marched upon by troops on the Missouri side; also that the gunboat Lexington will likely be attacked. You will therefore proceed to her assistance as soon as practicable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo:

Second dispatch, about Hecker, not understood. Keep strictly within your orders in reference to the Kentucky movements. After Norfolk is occupied take a position at or near Belmont, out of reach of gunboats, so as to prevent any communication between Belmont and Charleston, with the object to surround and annihilate Thompson, who is reported yet to be at or near Commerce. Say to General Smith that it is most important that Smithland should be occupied by four companies immediately, to control the Cumberland River.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, September 9, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

Your two dispatches received. I will start copy of them to General Smith, at Paducah, at once. Colonel Hecker has been no further in Kentucky than you directed. Pickets to be thrown out. No troops from {p.482} Saint Louis. I do not know if General Smith has been re-enforced or not. He returned here the battalion of Oglesby’s regiment, which he was ordered to retain until re-enforcements did arrive. Pillow has not yet started for Paducah. I will telegraph you any re-enforcements that arrive at this place.

U. S. GRANT.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS., September 9, 1861.

General J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade, Fort Lincoln, Kans.:

GENERAL: I received your note of the 7th last evening, and the communication by Lieutenant Hollister, U. S. Army, at the same time. As requested, I will forward copies. Indeed, I have forwarded to General Frémont copies of all your reports, in order to place before that officer a full and comprehensive view of affairs in your section of country.

You are not aware that the communication with Saint Louis via the Hannibal and Saint Joseph road is and has been cut off the past week, and in order to obtain a co-operation of the troops at Jefferson City, I have communicated by telegraph to Omaha, thence by mail to Burlington, thence by telegraph to General Frémont, suggesting the propriety of dispatching a column from Jefferson City to attack on the east whilst you were attacking on the west. This proposition will reach General Frémont to-night, the 9th. I have been, and shall continue to be, unceasing in my efforts to strengthen you with men and means; but, general, let me advise you to husband all your supplies, especially ammunition. I am aware that new levies are not so easily handled as veterans, but the everlasting admonition for economy will in time have its effects. I propose to send Lieutenant Hollister back to you in a day or two, after instructing him in the details of his duties, and I would suggest that he be placed upon ordnance duty at your headquarters, to superintend the distribution of the supplies pertaining to that important branch of the public service. I hope you will adopt early and active measures to crush out this marauding which is being enacted in Captain Jennison’s name, as also yours, by a band of men representing themselves as belonging to your command. Captain Wilder will be able to give the details of their conduct at Leavenworth City, and doubtless their atrocities in other localities have been already represented to you. Please have a formal examination into the plundering of private and public buildings which has recently taken place, as I am informed, at Fort Scott. It will be necessary for representation to higher authority and for the adjustment of the accounts of disbursing officers.

I have heard nothing as yet from Colonel Peabody. I inclose you an extract from an official letter received yesterday from Lieutenant Case, acting assistant quartermaster at Kansas City. I cannot strengthen the sentence by any official information. If the troops are there, they must have been sent from Jefferson City-ordered first upon Lexington, then west-and Colonel Peabody’s command may be with them.

A few days since I recommended the employment of spies to scour the country 100 miles west of Scott, to give information of any movement of the enemy towards the Santa Fe road. I hope you have initiated the work.

{p.483}

If you desire to have commissions from the governor of Kansas for the field officers of the Third, Fourth, and Fifth Regiments of your command, and will give me the names, rank, and date, I will have them sent to you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. PRINCE, Captain, First Infantry, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT LEAVENWORTH, KANS., September 9, 1861.

General J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade, Fort Lincoln, Kans.:

GENERAL: I inclose you a telegram this moment received. I would recommend that you concentrate forces sufficient to form a strong column of attack and march at once upon the enemy’s rear. Of course find out definitely where Peabody is.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. B. PRINCE, Captain, First Infantry, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

KANSAS CITY, September 9, 1861.

Capt. W. E. PRINCE:

In accordance with Colonel Peabody’s order I forward you the following information, which was received at 7 o’clock yesterday evening:

Colonel Peabody marched from Lexington towards Warrensburg Sunday, intending to camp at said point last night, where the Irish Brigade awaits them. When the junction is formed, the strength of the combined forces will be 4,000. Colonel Peabody, acting under the impression that General Lane is retreating on this point before Price, says that he will form a junction with General Lane 25 or 30 miles south of this point; also that I must move from here to keep the communications open between him, General Lane, and Colonel Marshall, in command at Lexington. Should the forces leave here at this time, we give the town up to pillage. Of this I am satisfied. Rains’ advance is at Harrisonville, west of Warrensburg 30 miles. The enemy is gathering around in detached parties from 200 to 500. I forwarded a copy of Colonel Peabody’s command to General Lane. Has been on the road twelve hours.

M. P. BERRY, Major, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Mexico, Mo., September 9, 1861.

Capt. JOHN C. KELTON, Assistant Adjutant-General, Western Department:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you of my arrival at this place today at 10 o’clock a. m., with my entire command, except the cavalry and baggage wagons, none of which have arrived, nor will it before to-morrow. The supply of engines and cars was not sufficient to reach this point earlier or to bring it all. The consequence is that we may not be able to move as soon as might be hoped.

{p.484}

From all I can learn Green’s band is some place in the vicinity of Florida. Nothing has reached me yet from General Pope. Considering the raw character of the troops under my command, I would respectfully suggest that if a few companies of regular infantry could be spared from Rolla, they would add greatly to our hopes of success in case we should fall in with the whole rebel force. The rebels, furthermore, are all, or nearly so, mounted; and should they feel disposed to scatter (which they are sure to do if we are too strong for them), it will be impossible to overtake them with infantry, and therefore more cavalry (particularly regular) is very desirable.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. D. STURGIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, September 9, 1861.

Col. J. H. EATON, Military Secretary, Saint Louis

COLONEL: I am instructed by Col. Jefferson C. Davis, commanding at Jefferson City, to ask two additional regiments of infantry (Indiana), two batteries light artillery (Indiana), and some heavy guns for the field work now under construction at that place. Colonel Davis instructed me to say that this force will be necessary to the execution of his plans touching Warsaw and other places in that direction. He would like to have the Indiana cavalry, if ready for service.

Respectfully,

GORDON TANNER, Major, Twenty-second Indiana Volunteers.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

Dispatch received. Push forward actively on the Missouri side. Move the gunboats cautiously in concert with the troops on shore, and confine yourself to holding the positions we have taken in Kentucky. Gratified to know that Fort Holt is progressing well. Inform General Smith that the Eleventh Regiment Indiana Volunteers, with three companies of regular cavalry and one company of volunteer cavalry, left for Paducah this morning at 4 o’clock.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 10, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

The heavy ordnance I proposed sending you has not yet arrived. As soon as it reaches here it will be forwarded. I am sending you to-day 50,000 rations. The artillery you asked for cannot be spared from here. I have, however, applied to General Frémont for two additional pieces, to be added to Lieutenant Willard’s battery. I regret to say, also, that it will be impossible to send you cavalry from this lost for the present. There are but three companies-only one of them fully {p.485} armed-at all three posts, and General Frémont has directed me to send not less than two companies to Fort Holt.

Please inform me if you have received information from up the Ohio. The information I get here has rather indicated that the rebels have withdrawn their forces from towards Paducah, and are organizing at Columbus, Ky., where they now have not less than sixteen regiments of infantry, thirteen siege guns, four batteries of field artillery, and two battalions, of eight companies each, of cavalry. In addition to this, they have a column of 2,000 to 3,000 on the Missouri side opposite. I get my information from an official of Major-General Polk, brigading this command.

On the return of the steamer Graham I will send her to Saint Louis, and put some other boat in her place.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Fort Lane, Barnesville, September 10, 1861.

Capt. W. E. PRINCE, Commanding Fort Leavenworth:

SIR: I am thus far on my march eastward. I propose to march east as far as Papinsville, if possible, clearing out the valley of the Osage. I will from there turn north, clearing out the valley of the Marais-des-Cygnes, Butler, Harrisonville, Osceola, and Clinton, and proceed in that direction until I hear from the column under Peabody. If attacked by an overwhelming superior force, I will, of course, fall back on Kansas.

I am moving with a column of about 1,200 infantry, 800 cavalry, and two pieces of artillery. I will leave at Fort Scott about 200 cavalry, at Fort Lincoln about 300 infantry and cavalry, and at Barnesville, Fort Lane, about 200 infantry and cavalry, which I think sufficient to protect these points.

I will camp in the neighborhood of Ball’s Mill to-night, and in the neighborhood of Papinsville to-morrow.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

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WASHINGTON, September 11, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

SIR: Yours of the 8th, in answer to mine of the 2d instant, is just received. Assuming that you, upon the ground, could better judge of the necessities of your position than I could at this distance, on seeing your proclamation of August 30 I perceived no general objection to it. The particular clause, however, in relation to the confiscation of property and the liberation of slaves appeared to me to be objectionable in its non-conformity to the act of Congress passed the 6th of last August upon the same subjects; and hence I wrote you, expressing my wish that that clause should he modified accordingly. Your answer, just received, expresses the preference on your part that I should make an open order for the modification, which I very cheerfully do. It is therefore ordered that the said clause of said proclamation be so modified, held, and construed as to conform to and not to transcend the provisions on the same subject contained in the act of Congress entitled “An act to confiscate {p.486} property used for insurrectionary purposes,” approved August 6, 1861, and that said act be published at length with this order.

Your obedient servant,

A. LINCOLN.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 11, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Since my report of last night nothing has transpired of note except the information that re-enforcements to the number of about 5,000 men arrived at Columbus last night. About that number crossed to the Missouri shore. The rebels have not shown themselves as far up the river to-day as yesterday. To-day a soldier, representing himself as a member of Colonel Bowen’s regiment, deserted, and succeeded in reaching our gunboats. He states that he is from Wisconsin, emigrated to Southern Missouri last year, and when our difficulties broke out was pressed into service. He says that Jeff. Thompson’s forces, about 2,600 men (700 of them cavalry), occupy ground opposite Columbus. They are badly armed and clothed. Last night 5,000 men from Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee arrived, and about an equal number crossed to the Missouri shore. These troops are represented as well clothed and armed. Provisions, blankets, clothing, ammunition, and arms are plenty in their camp; thinks most of their pork is obtained from Ohio. Heard the officers talk of attacking Bird’s Point and Cairo at times; then again of awaiting an attack where they are. Are throwing up breastworks along the whole front of Columbus. They are represented to have thirty-five to forty pieces of artillery (a portion rifled) and six or seven siege pieces in position, and more on the ground ready to put up. In Colonel Bowen’s regiment there are quite a number of Northern men, who are not there from choice, but only await an action to turn on their officers and leave the Southern Confederacy forever.

I would respectfully urge the necessity of having clothing of almost every description, particularly shoes, blankets, and shirts, forwarded here as soon as possible. Tents also are required. Cavalry is much needed; also cavalry equipments for the troops here and more batteries of light artillery. All the re-enforcements that can be spared for this post, of every arm of service, would be welcome. There are two companies of the Seventh Iowa Regiment now stationed at Potosi, Mo.; the balance of the regiment here. I would recommend that they be relieved and sent to their regiment.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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BROOKFIELD, September 11, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

I have command of this post some days, but must have four pieces of artillery if I hold it much longer. The rebels are concentrating around in every direction, and I know we will be attacked before long. This post and stores and round-house must be held. Over 200 of my command are aiding to build the Platte River Bridge, near Saint Joseph. No communication with General Pope since he has been on the road. Fifteen hundred of Green’s forces commenced crossing the river about Glasgow yesterday, 45 miles from here.

W. JAS. MORGAN, Colonel.

{p.487}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 11, 1861.

Col. G. WAAGNER, Chief of Artillery, Norfolk, Mo.:

You will renew your reconnaissance of yesterday, pushing as far down the river as practicable, and annoying the enemy in every way possible. Colonel Oglesby is instructed to give you all the force that can be spared from Norfolk, and the gunboat Conestoga will act in conjunction with you. Should you make any important discoveries, inform me as early as possible.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 11, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Norfolk, Mo.:

Throw forward, under the direction of Colonel Waagner, as large a force as can be spared from Norfolk, to reconnoiter down the river in conjunction with the gunboat Conestoga. Norfolk must be held. Send back to your post for rations. The forces from Cairo will be relieved as soon as another regiment arrives to take their place.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HUDSON, September 12, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

It is altogether untrue that any bridges or culverts have been destroyed between this place and Hannibal, as stated in the papers. Since my arrival in this section a trestle work was destroyed by Green. It was repaired, and day before yesterday spread out as the train passed over. It was a simple accident. It is now repaired, and the road is clear to Platte River. The news that Green has crossed at Glasgow is undoubted. He has carried out of North Missouri a large part of the ruffians and bridge-burners who have committed outrages. Within a few days all will be quiet again. I go forward to Saint Joseph, and thence to Keokuk. I will have Glasgow and Brunswick immediately visited by a strong force, and as soon as the regiments of Glover, Moore, Tindall, and Foster are ready I will turn the regiments to the line of the Missouri River.

JNO. POPE.

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HUDSON, MO., September 12, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

The Sixteenth Illinois and the Second Kansas, numbering about 1,100 men, with two pieces of artillery, go forward this morning, to occupy Saint Joseph. As soon as the Platte River Bridge is repaired, I shall march on Glasgow, where Green and Bevier are arriving, to cross the Missouri in three columns-from this point, from Brookfield, and from Sturgeon, on North Missouri. I am awaiting here the arrival of a regiment from Mexico. There are several small squads dispersed from {p.488} Green’s command at Florida skulking in the neighborhood of Monroe, trying to rejoin him. A party of 50 men was attacked yesterday by Moore’s force, near Ely Station, and dispersed with a loss of 2 killed. I shall march myself with the column from this point.

The drunkenness, incapacity, and shameful neglect of duty of many officers of rank in this district have brought matters to a sad state in North Missouri. I shall repair the mismanagement rapidly; but to do so effectually the principal offenders must be brought to punishment. I have sent Colonel Blair, Second Kansas, and Major Hays and Captain Ralston, Sixteenth Illinois, to Saint Louis in arrest. Charges will be transmitted as soon as there is a moment’s leisure to make them out. A thorough reform is needed in the regiments which have been stationed in this district, and must be made vigorously and with the strong hand. I am satisfied I shall have your cordial support in carrying it out against all clamor.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO ILL., September 12, 1861

General JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

Cannot the troops move from this place to Paducah or a part of them be returned? More troops are needed here.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 12, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Colonel Wallace reports all quiet on the other side. Colonel Marsh, with his regiment, at Bird’s Point. I have sent down “Aleck Scott” with two regiments and camp equipage to Norfolk, with orders to hold the position. A gunboat will be there to prevent attack by river and a transport will keep up communication and supplies.

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 12, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

To-day our scouts have not been able to discover anything of the enemy. A reconnaissance has been made of the roads around Fort Jefferson, and I shall take possession of it day after to-morrow with most of the force at Fort Holt. A battery at Fort Jefferson will not command down the river but very little, but commands up to the mouth of the Ohio completely.

I am told that a paper picked up below here to-day gives the rebels’ loss in the little engagement with our gunboats yesterday at 68 killed, 3 guns and gunboat Yankee disabled, and a large number wounded. Of course the Federal loss is reported very large.

McCulloch is reported to have been in Columbus within the last few days. He is such a ubiquitous character that I place no great reliance in it.

I would earnestly repeat my recommendation that a complete assortment {p.489} of clothing be sent here at once; also accouterments, arms, and tents. I am very glad to hear that cavalry is to come here immediately, and would also be pleased to hear of the expected arrival of more artillery.

I am of opinion that if a demonstration was made from Paducah towards Union City, supported by two columns on the Kentucky side from here, the gunboats, and a force moving upon Belmont, the enemy would be forced to leave Columbus, leaving behind their heavy ordnance. I submit this to your consideration, and will hold myself in readiness to execute this or any plan you may adopt. I inclose you a map, giving a sketch of the proposed field of operations.

I telegraphed to-day, requesting that six telescopes be sent here. They were suggested by Colonel Waagner, and I think are much needed. A large map of Kentucky is much needed. The Austrian muskets, now in the hands of some of our men, are reported to be entirely unreliable. The difficulty seems to be more in the cap than in the arm itself.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill:

Fort Jefferson, just at this time, desires a battery. Be careful to find out all about the roads, taking all natural advantages for the advance as well as the retreat on the Mayfield Creek line from the Mississippi to Level (or Sevel, or the like), if the enemy cannot be prevented from crossing at Belmont, and should they move that way inform me, and be present with a force on the Missouri as well as the Kentucky shores.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 12, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

I will send you more troops. Keep me informed minutely.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, 111., September 12, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Commanding, &c., Norfolk, Mo.:

You will continue to occupy Norfolk. Throw out pickets to keep you constantly informed of the movements of the enemy, but make no movement with the main body of your command without further instructions, unless it should be necessary for protection. Your whole command should have their baggage with them, and I gave directions to that effect yesterday. Have delivered to Colonel Waagner the accompanying orders. I desire him to come here and report to me for other service.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.490}

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 12, 1861.

Col. J. COOK, Commanding, &c., Cape Girardeau, Mo.:

All boats passing your post not recognized as in the employ of the Government will be hailed and brought to, papers examined, and if necessary, cargo. Everything must be done to prevent the enemy’s receiving supplies.

The work on the fortifications should be pushed forward as rapidly as possible. Protect all loyal citizens in all their rights, but carry out the proclamation of General Frémont upon all subjects known to come under it. Keep out pickets and scouts, so that you cannot be surprised.

I have no information about the Home Guards under your command, but as long as they carry United States arms and Government rations, they are entirely subject to the orders of the commanding officer. Should they refuse to obey you, arrest the officers, disarm the soldiers, and report the matter at once to General Frémont, and also to me.

If you are strong enough to give protection to points distant from you, it may be done; but be cautious to have always the post protected.

I approve of your course in sending Captain Stewart’s cavalry by boat. I should not have ordered them by land after the storm of yesterday.

See that your post is constantly kept supplied with rations, at least ten days ahead, and that a full supply of ammunition of all kinds is kept constantly on hand.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Mine Creek, September 12, 1861.

Captain PRINCE:

SIR: I am moving north with a smart little army of about 1,500. The attack at Humboldt compelled me to leave a larger force at Forts Scott and Lincoln and Barnesville than I intended. I left at Fort Scott about 800 troops, at Fort Lincoln about 300, and at Barnesville about 150. I have directed the erection of six stockades on our southern border; Captains Holt and Ford to erect one on Turkey Creek, on the neutral lands immediately south of Bourbon County; Captain Miller at Humboldt; Captain Scott at Le Roy; and other competent captains, one on Verdigris, one on Fall River, and one on Walnut.

I have ordered a system of signals to be established by which they can arouse the country. These stockades will soon be completed, and our southern border, I think, secure.

As yet I have heard nothing of Peabody or the force moving from Sedalia. I will move north and east as far as I can safely with my force until I can hear from them, and probably pitch into Butler, Harrisonville, and Papinsville, so as to disturb the rear of the advancing column of the enemy. My whole moving force will be at the Trading Post at 10 o’clock this morning.

I have been compelled to dispatch a force from Fort Scott, and Ford and Holt from Turkey Creek, to follow the marauders who attacked Humboldt, with orders to follow them to the Arkansas line or take them. I have offered a reward of $1,000 for the head of Matthews.

J. H. LANE.

{p.491}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 13, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Commanding, &c., Norfolk, Mo.:

To-morrow I would like to have a reconnaissance down the river as far as you can safely go. Take all the force that can be spared. At the same time an expedition will be sent out from Bird’s Point towards Charleston and one from Fort Holt. It is important to find the position of the enemy, if possible.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 13, 1861.

Col. W. H. L. WALLACE, Commanding, &c., Bird’s Point, Mo.:

You will please direct a reconnaissance towards Charleston with as large a force as can be spared from your command to-morrow. It is important to find out the position of the enemy, and I wish it conducted with a view of ascertaining if he has taken up a position in that direction. Colonel Oglesby has been directed to make a similar movement from Belmont.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 13, 1861.

Brigadier-General STURGIS, Mexico:

SIR: Information having been received at these headquarters of an intended attack on Booneville, you are hereby ordered to move at once by the shortest possible route, and with all practicable speed, direct to that place with your force of infantry and artillery.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, September 14, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis:

On consultation with the President and heads of Departments, it was determined to call upon you for 5,000 well-armed infantry, to be sent here without a moment’s delay. Give them three days’ cooked rations. This draft from your forces to be replaced by you from the States of Illinois, Iowa, and Kansas. How many men have you under arms in your department? Please answer fully and immediately.

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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WASHINGTON, September 14, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Detach 5,000 infantry from your department to come here without delay, and report the number of the troops that will be left with you. The President dictates.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

{p.492}

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 14, 1861.

Col. P. E. BLAND, Ironton, Mo.:

If you have no confirmation of the advance of an enemy, so that your regiment can with safety be withdrawn from the point, you will immediately, upon the receipt of this order, bring it to this city and report yourself to these headquarters. You will direct the officer left in command to use Colonel Baker’s cavalry to explore the country towards Greenville, and will direct him to furnish me with daily and minute reports. Also direct him to make use of the express engine to communicate to me any certain information of the enemy’s force.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, U. S. ARMY Saint Louis, September 14, 1861.

Col. T. T. TAYLOR, Commanding at Springfield:

SIR: Yours of the 8th instant,* containing an erroneous construction of my proclamation dated on the 30th ultimo, has had my attention. I understand the object of your note to be to inquire whether it was my intention to shoot the wounded who might be taken prisoners by the forces under my command. The following paragraph, extracted from the proclamation, will be strictly enforced within the lines prescribed against the class of offenders for whom it was intended, viz:

All persons who shall be taken with arms in their hands within these lines shall he tried by court-martial, and if found guilty will he shot.

The lines are expressly declared to be those of the army in the military occupation of this State. You have wholly misapprehended the meaning of the proclamation. Without undertaking to determine the condition of any man engaged in this rebellion, I desire it to be clearly understood that the proclamation is intended distinctly to recognize all the usual rights of an open enemy in the field, and to be in all respects strictly conformable to the ordinary usages of war. It is hardly necessary for me to say that it was not prepared with any purpose to ignore the ordinary rights of humanity with respect to wounded men or to those who are humanely engaged in alleviating their sufferings.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE Camp Montgomery, West Point, Mo., September 14, 1861.

COMMANDANT OF POST, Kansas City:

We have moved this far with our limited force, clearing our front and rear as far as practicable, for the purpose of co-operating with the force under your command and the column under Colonel Peabody. We have been unable to hear anything from either column. Can you give us any information as to either column? If Peabody has been driven back, Kansas City should be largely re-enforced, and a column moved {p.493} down the border until we get into communication. The enemy yesterday were concentrating at Rose Hill, intending, I think, to prevent a junction of Peabody’s command and mine and as a flank movement upon Kansas City, and should be met by a counter-movement, as I have suggested.

I started a dispatch to Captain Prince last night, which he will get to-day, communicating the same information and making the same suggestion. I have a force actually engaged at Forts Scott and Lincoln and Barnesville, and are now starting a small force at the Trading Post, and occupying this place with 700 cavalry, 700 infantry, and two pieces of artillery. Yesterday I cleared out Butler and Parkville with my cavalry about 20 miles.

You are now posted as to my command and of my movements; reciprocate by letting me hear from your column and Colonel Peabody’s at the earliest possible moment.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 15, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

Reliable information from the vicinity of Price’s column shows his present force to be 11,000 at Warrensburg and 4,000 at Georgetown, with pickets extending towards Syracuse. Green is making for Booneville with probable force of 3,000. Withdrawal of force from this part of Missouri risks the State; from Paducah, loses Western Kentucky. At the best, I have ordered two regiments from this city, two from Kentucky, and will make up the remainder from the new force being raised by the governor of Illinois.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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U. S. MILITARY TELEGRAPH, Saint Louis, September 15, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON:

Subjoined is a list of our total force, with its distribution:

Saint Louis, including Home Guard, 6,899; under Brigadier-General Pope, including Home Guard, 5,488; Lexington, including Home Guard, 2,400; Jefferson City, one-quarter Home Guards, 9,677; Rolla, 4,700; Ironton, 3,037; Cape Girardeau, 650; Bird’s Point and Norfolk, 3,510; Cairo, including McClernand’s brigade, 4,826; Fort Holt, opposite Cairo, Kentucky shore, 3,395; Paducah, 7,021; under General Lane, 2,200; Mound City, near Cairo, 900. Total of present and absent on detailed duty, 55,693.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

[Indorsements.]

SEPTEMBER 16, 1861.

Secretary of War please send to General Scott a copy of your dispatch from General Frémont, showing the localities and number of his forces.

A. LINCOLN.

{p.494}

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Lieutenant-General SCOTT:

Inclosed please find original message. Preserve it for future reference.

Very respectfully,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS, September 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Cairo, Ill.:

Embark with as little delay as possible, on the Illinois Central Railroad at Cairo, for Sandoval, the regiments of Colonel Hecker, Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Turchin, Nineteenth Illinois. Transportation will await them there by orders of the President. Answer on receipt of this. Telegraph when they will be there.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, September 15, 1861.

General JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Commanding Department of the West, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Reconnaissances which I had made yesterday disclose the fact that the enemy have broken up their camp above Belmont, also that they have no force from there to some distance beyond Charleston. As telegraphed by me to-day, I believe they are leaving Columbus; whether marching upon Paducah or leaving Kentucky altogether I will try and determine to-morrow. I have ordered the Tenth Illinois Volunteers, Colonel Morgan commanding, to Fort Holt, to take the place of the Twenty-fourth, leaving to-night, and the Seventh [?] Iowa to Elliott’s Mills, near Fort Jefferson, to take the place of the Nineteenth Illinois. I would call your attention to the fact that there are many troops here without arms, and some armed with the Austrian musket, which, with the caps now furnished, is unreliable; also that clothing, camp and garrison equipage, and accouterments are deficient. Requisitions, I am told, are before the proper Departments for all these articles. Money is much required here to pay for secret services. It is highly necessary to get information which cannot be obtained from our own reconnoitering parties, and without money to pay, the services of citizens cannot much longer be obtained.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding, &c., Cairo and Bird’s Point:

You will please direct Colonel Morgan to move his regiment to Fort Holt this evening to relieve Colonel Hecker, who is under marching {p.495} orders; also direct the Second [?] Iowa to move with all dispatch to Colonel Ross’ command, at Elliott’s Mills.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 15, 1861.

Colonel Ross, Seventeenth Illinois, Comdg. U. S. Forces Elliott’s Mills, Ky.:

You will please detach as much cavalry as you can spare from your command to make a reconnaissance in the direction of Blandville, under the direction of Colonel Waagner. You will be re-enforced by one regiment to-morrow, should they not arrive to-night.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT JOE, September 15, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Road to Hannibal open, except Platte River Bridge (finished to-morrow), and all quiet. Secessionists, numbering some 2,500, in detached bands, retreating southward, to cross river below Independence. I have sent column of 1,000 men and three pieces of artillery, under Colonel Smith, to march rapidly from this place in pursuit, and the Iowa regiment, with one piece of artillery and 50 irregular horse, to move rapidly from Cameron upon Liberty, and there effect junction with Smith. There is no doubt in my judgment that the large train of plunder will be captured, though, as usual, I presume the forces will disperse, and, being cavalry, will mostly escape, unless Smith can surprise them. I have put all irregular forces-Home Guards and others-in motion scouting the country on all sides. Colonels Cranor and Edwards-the first commanding irregular forces of Missouri volunteers, the second about 600 Iowa State troops-will be here to-day, having swept whole region north of this place clean. I put them immediately in motion along both sides of railroad to clean out the small squads remaining in the woods from Saint Joseph to Chillicothe. In five days North Missouri will be again quiet, and the regiments of Tindall, Moore, Foster, Morgan, and Glover will return. So will you please send Tindall’s regiment as soon as possible to Chillicothe?

I go East to-day to urge into the field the regiments named. There are some disturbances of minor importance in the extreme northeast, and I must get to Canton and Keokuk, without awaiting the return of Smith’s command. Can Glover and Bussey get their cavalry armed at once?

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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CAMP OF INSTRUCTION, Benton Barracks, Mo., September 16, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

This will introduce Mr. Pegram, bearing dispatches from Governor Gilpin, of Colorado Territory. He goes to Washington on important {p.496} business relating to the far West, and understands the country and people well. Your orders move California troops through the Territory east. General Frémont has requested that these troops shall delay and deflect south. I commend the matter to your early consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLORADO TERRITORY, Denver, August 26, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

GENERAL: I send as special messenger, for the essential means of defense for this Territory and people, Benjamin R. Pegram, who is fully furnished with dispatches and instructions to represent the extreme dangers enveloping our position. This people are inclosed in a circle of hostile elements converging upon them, and are utterly destitute of arms, ammunition, or any weapons of self preservation. The Indians are hostile, and pushed upon us by enemies and their emissaries from the outside.

New Mexico can only be regarded as likely to aid the advance of the enemy. A strong army corps, such as that lately withdrawn from Utah, will protect this people and reconquer New Mexico. I ask that this army corps may be stopped on its eastward march, and deflected down the foot of the mountains to this place. The greatest economy in time and military operations will be the result of such a policy. The population is 30,000, but so beleaguered and destitute of materials and provisions as to be helpless and without a place of retreat from the advancing enemy. The essential supplies are 10,000 muskets, rifles, and equipments; 2 field batteries and supplies of fixed ammunition for use in the field, and abundant reserve supplies.

The extreme desperation of our position, calmly appreciated, will, I know, secure your prompt action. Energy, loyalty, and bravery preeminently belong to the mountain people. To conquer their enemies appears to them more glorious than to perish. Essential military assistance is all they require to preserve themselves and assist their country’s cause.

Very respectfully,

WILLIAM GILPIN, Governor of Colorado.

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JEFFERSON CITY, September 16, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT:

Have just received dispatches from Glasgow, Arrow Rock, and Booneville by the hands of a man who escaped from the steamer Sunshine. This proves to be the boat captured and used by Green at Glasgow, and not the Clara Bell, as reported. Green has not crossed the bridge. This boatman helped to cross Green, and reports the number at 3,000, and 1,200 more ready to cross-all horsemen, with two pieces of artillery. He reports Lexington as having been attacked with 10,000 men on Thursday, but held the work; subsequently it was reported as having surrendered. This is improbable.

JEFF. C. DAVIS, Colonel, Commanding.

{p.497}

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CAIRO, September 16, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Reconnaissance to-day shows no enemy between Charleston and 2 miles above Belmont. None on the Kentucky shore within 2 miles. Our troops occupy Fort Jefferson.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HUDSON, MO., September 16, 1861.

General FRÉMONT:

Just arrived here on my way to Keokuk. Find Ohio regiments on their way to Utica. If you can send Tindall’s regiment to Chillicothe immediately, the Sixteenth Illinois and Third Iowa can also be forwarded to Lexington. There will be no more considerable trouble in North Missouri.

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 17, 1861.

Col. L. F. ROSS, Comdg. Elliott’s Mills, Ky.:

Our forces having been so much reduced by the withdrawal of two regiments, I deem it prudent to withdraw your camp from its present position. You will therefore return with all your command to Fort Holt. Upon your return to Fort Bolt, Ky., Colonel Morgan’s regiment will be relieved from duty at that point and return to their old quarters.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding Paducah, Ky.:

I regret exceedingly that I am not able to spare you any troops in the present emergency. A most extraordinary movement took place here yesterday, which will compel me to contract my present limits, particularly on the Kentucky shore. I have received orders, and have sent off two of the best regiments under my command; where, can only be surmised. My orders read to the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad, where transports would await them.

I send you a battery of artillery, which may be of material service. The substance of your communication was dispatched last night.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., September 17, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

The Seventh Regiment, Buel’s battery, and three companies of cavalry at Jackson; two regiments of infantry and one company of cavalry {p.498} at Cape Girardeau; three regiments of infantry, one four-gun battery, and one company of cavalry at Cairo, besides General McClernand’s ineffective men; at Bird’s Point, five regiments of infantry and 300 cavalry and artillery; at Mound City, one regiment of infantry. Total force at Cairo, Bird’s Point, and Mound City, 8,500 men; at Cape Girardeau and Jackson, about the same; reduced by sickness near one-sixth.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 17, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

I have detached the Nineteenth and Twenty-fourth Illinois Regiments under your requisition. They are in Cincinnati to-day. Information of the most grave character reaches me that General Johnston has arrived at Columbus, Ky., and taken command. He is threatening our lines with superior forces, and at the same time the enemy in separate bodies, numbering upwards of 20,000, is hovering between Lexington and Booneville. I need all the troops now here and expected. I ask the Department most urgently to permit me to retain the remainder of the 5,000 infantry called for, and to substitute therefor two regiments of Illinois cavalry, accepted by the War Department, and which I am unable to arm. The other troops will take away just so many arms from me, which I cannot for some time replace.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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QUINCY, ILL., September 17, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Arrived here last night, but did not find boat I had requested to be sent from Saint Louis to carry me from Canton to Keokuk. Cannot do my business without her. There is now no difficulty in North Missouri, nor do I believe that 50 armed men can get together in the region south of Knox and Lewis Counties. Shall be up there as soon as I can get a boat. Railroad all clear and will remain so, and will return to Saint Louis as soon as I finish up the river. Bussey and Glover need their cavalry arms.

JNO. POPE.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, West Point, September 17, 1861.

Capt. W. E. PRINCE, First U. S. Infantry, Commanding Fort Leavenworth:

SIR: ... I am here within 24 miles of Harrisonville, and there is nothing in the way of forming a junction with any troops that may be moved upon that point. You will find inclosed Colonel Blunt’s report of what he is doing south and Captain Hayes’ and Lieutenant-Colonel Moore’s report of the forces at Fort Lincoln and Barnesville.

I very much doubt the policy of forming a junction which will require my moving farther north than Harrisonville. There is nothing in Jackson County in the way of a force moving from Kansas City on Harrisonville. If a column could move from there while I am moving upon it {p.499} through Butler, we might catch some of the cowardly guerrillas between us and the border, while, if I move up the border and form a junction near Kansas City and then move on Harrisonville, the effect would be to herd the enemy, as Sigel did at Carthage and Lyon did at Springfield.

Start your column from Kansas City for Harrisonville, give me notice of the time of their arrival, and I will meet them there. My infantry having marched all day Sunday and my cavalry yesterday and to-day, they will be compelled to rest for one day and night, and we cannot move until the ammunition arrives, which you say you have sent.

No one feels the importance of making a diversion in favor of Peabody more than I do, if it is true he is falling back on Lexington. A column united at Harrisonville could make that diversion, and if it be true that a force is moving from Sedalia, they could unite and perhaps cut off Price’s and Rains’ commands.

Another reason in favor of these views: A movement up the border will enable the enemy to concentrate and strike me in the rear.

Forts Scott, Lincoln, and Barnesville are endangered. While here I can cover them, and a movement into the interior protects them. The two Kansas regiments, if they are intended for my command, should be hastened forward to this point. It is a commanding position for the protection of Kansas and the striking of Missouri. Forage is plenty, vegetables for the men to be had for the gathering, good quarters, good water, and plenty of timber.

I am informed that there are three companies of Jennison’s regiment at Fort Leavenworth mustered in. They should be armed and sent forward without delay.

I received a letter from Sickles, of Chicago, who says he has several companies for my brigade. They should be hastened to this point.

Should Kansas City be threatened, a column here could strike them while this column is being strengthened. Be assured we will not be idle. Whenever and wherever we can strike the enemy it shall be done. I am just informed that the last words of the gallant Johnson were, “Come on, boys!”

Can you not induce Captain Reno to send me down a 12-pounder? I am told you have one. I have as brave and skillful artillery officers as there are in the world.

J. H. LANE.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 210.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 17, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. Prentiss, volunteer service, is assigned to the command of that section of the State of Missouri bordering on and lying north of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad.

Brigadier-General Prentiss will open, and use stringent measures to keep open, said railroad, and preserve the telegraph line from interruption by the secessionists.

In order to prevent the secessionists from meeting in bands for camp and drill for a few days or a week, as has been their custom in Northeast Missouri, Brigadier-General Prentiss will use the Third Regiment of Iowa Cavalry, Colonel Bussey, and the cavalry of Major Bishop, as soon as they are ready for service.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant-Adjutant General.

{p.500}

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WASHINGTON, September 18, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

General Scott acquiesces to your wishes in your proposition to retain troops not already forwarded. He has telegraphed order to retain the two regiments which have left to Cincinnati to wait orders for a few days, if they have not passed beyond that city.

E. D. TOWNSEND.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 18, 1861.

General J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade:

SIR: Col. Jefferson C. Davis, commanding at Jefferson City, has been ordered to increase his forces at the crossing of the Pacific Railroad over La Mine Creek to 5,000 men, adding, according to his judgment, artillery and cavalry; attack the rebels at Georgetown, and after defeating them take the road to Lexington.

Should he fail to defeat the enemy, it is still confidently expected that he will be able to break through his lines, and, in co-operation with the forces stationed at Lexington, make a combined attack upon the rebel forces now menacing that place. You are, therefore, directed to march with your forces on the State Line road to Kansas City, put yourself immediately in communication with Brigadier-General Sturgis, commanding at Lexington, and co-operate with him to defeat the enemy.

If the rebel forces should change their line of attack and advance upon Kansas City, the above-mentioned commanders will co-operate with you in the defense of that city.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 18, 1861.

Brigadier-General STURGIS, Commanding at Lexington, Mo.:

SIR: Col. Jefferson C. Davis, commanding at Jefferson City, has been this day ordered to increase his forces at the crossing of the Pacific Railroad over La Mine Creek to 5,000 men, adding, according to his judgment, artillery and cavalry; attack the rebels at Georgetown, and after defeating them take the road to Lexington. Should he fail to defeat the enemy, it is still confidently expected that he will be able to break through his lines, and, in co-operation with you, make a combined attack upon the forces now surrounding Lexington.

General Lane, commanding the Kansas brigade, has been ordered to march his forces by the State Line road to Kansas City, and put himself immediately in communication with you, with a view of co-operating in these movements. Should the rebel forces, how ever, change their line of operation and attack Kansas City, you will unite with him and Colonel Davis in the defense of that place.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

{p.501}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 18, 1861.

Col. W. H. L. WALLACE, Commanding Bird’s Point, Mo.:

I understand Colonel Oglesby’s pickets have been driven in. Hold your command in readiness to afford all the assistance you can.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 20, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

There has been nothing in the movements of the enemy for the last few days that I could learn worthy of note. They now seem to be falling back from Mayfield upon Columbus, Ky. I have received no confirmation of the rumor that General A. S. Johnston was to take command. I would respectfully call your attention to the fact that the Tenth Illinois Regiment, Colonel Morgan commanding, has but seven companies in it, and the Eleventh Illinois has but nine companies. These two regiments are commanded by colonels of experience, and who have profited by their experience. I would therefore urgently recommend that the governor of Illinois be requested to assign companies to these regiments, to fill them up as soon as possible. I left here after 1 o’clock this morning for Cape Girardeau, and returned, arriving at 2 p. m. My visit was in reference to the Bittinger property, which has been taken possession of for purposes of fortification. I appointed a board of three officers to assess the damage done the property, and wanted to make an agreement myself for the monthly rent to be paid while held for the use of the Government. Mr. Bittinger was absent, however, and I left this part of the contract to be agreed upon hereafter. I find the fortifications progressing fairly, considering the large sick report at this point.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding, &c., Paducah, Ky.:

Orders by telegraph have just reached me from headquarters Western Department for the gunboat Conestoga to proceed at once to Saint Louis. Will you please communicate the order? I will send you one of the two left here to morrow evening. One of them is now undergoing repairs and cannot be got off the stocks before that time. I have just returned from Cape Girardeau, and consequently did not get your note inquiring of the position occupied by Colonel Waagner in time to answer by to-day’s boat. The colonel has been appointed by General Frémont as chief of artillery, as I understand, and is addressed from headquarters as such. The position I do not know that I understand the full effect of, but I have ordered here that all reports from artillery companies shall come through Colonel Waagner. I had no plan to submit to you for action; but Colonel Waagner, having been very active in the reconnaissances which I have ordered from time to time, some {p.502} of them extending near Columbus, I have talked to him of the plan I would approve or recommend if we were in a situation to advance. At present, however, the force is scarcely more than a weak garrison. Two of the most efficient regiments were ordered to Washington two days ago, and I sent you one-half of the field artillery left to me.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 21, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Commanding, &c., Norfolk, Mo.:

I have directed a reconnaissance in force on the Kentucky shore to be made to-day. You will please cross over about one-half of your command to Fort Jefferson, and follow up the expedition. Instruct the steamer that crosses you over that it is to run down the river this evening, to take you aboard at a landing below Island No. 1.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 21, 1861.

Col. J. G. LAUMAN, Commanding Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

I want a reconnaissance made in force from your command from Elliott’s Mills towards the river at Bird’s Landing, above Island No. 2. You will be supported by two gunboats, and Colonel Oglesby will be instructed to cross the river and follow in your rear. Let this expedition start as early as possible. Four companies of infantry will be sufficient to retain possession of Fort Jefferson.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 16.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 21, 1861.

I. The following-named officers are hereby placed on duty in command of divisions as acting major-generals, the brigades composing the divisions to be hereafter designated:

Brigadier-General Pope.

Brigadier-General Sigel.

Brigadier-General Asboth.

Brigadier-General McKinstry.

II. The following-named officers are hereby placed on duty in command of brigades as acting brigadier-generals, the regiments composing the brigades to be hereafter designated:

Colonel Davis.

Colonel Mulligan.

Colonel Kelton.

Lieutenant-Colonel Totten.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.503}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 22, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, Commanding Rolla, Mo.:

SIR: A combined movement upon the country lying between Springfield and Lexington, infested by large rebel forces, having been decided upon, you are directed to take command of the First Division, the forces of which you will find specified in the accompanying list.* A part of your division has left already for Jefferson City. The rest will follow at once, and you will join it there, where detailed orders will be given you.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 23, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Commanding Post, Norfolk, Mo.:

Information having reached me that the Confederates are crossing the river at Columbus, you are directed to watch their movements, observing, however, proper caution. Should there be indications of a formidable attack upon your post, try and inform me in time to re-enforce you. If it should become necessary, the whole force from Fort Jefferson and Elliott’s Mills could be sent to you.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 23, 1861.

Col. W. H. L. WALLACE, Commanding Bird’s Point, Mo.:

Move the portion of your regiment now at Bird’s Point to the support of Colonel Oglesby at Norfolk. I want a reconnaissance made to-night, and if it appears that the rebels are crossing the river in force, I want the whole command moved to Bird’s Point in the morning.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 23, 1861.

Col. J. G. LAYMAN, Seventh Iowa, Commanding, &c., Fort Jefferson, Ky.:

Move two regiments and all your cavalry but one company to Norfolk as soon as possible. The balance must be held in readiness for a move. Put your baggage on board of a steamboat, to be taken to Bird’s Point, where it will have to be discharged.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.504}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, September 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. MCKINSTRY, Act. Maj. Gen., Commanding Fifth Division:

SIR: For a basis of operations the army will take the following positions:

Right wing, Second Division, Acting Major-General Pope; headquarters at Booneville covering the line between Booneville and Palestine and keeping communication with-

Center, Fifth Division, Acting Major-General McKinstry; headquarters at Syracuse.

Left wing, First Division, Major-General Hunter; headquarters Versailles.

Advance guard, Third Division, Acting Major-General Sigel; headquarters Georgetown, keeping communication with troops stationed at Marshall.

Reserve, Fourth Division, Acting Major-General Asboth; headquarters Tipton.

The bridge over the Osage River at Osage City and the crossings at Tuscumbia and Linn Creek are to be occupied by the division of General Hunter.

The First Kansas Regiment, of General Pope’s division, is directed to proceed from Hannibal at once to Chillicothe, re-enforcing our troops at that place, and preventing in this manner the enemy from crossing Grand River. General Pope, after arriving at Booneville, will open communication by way of Glasgow and Brunswick, and add re-enforcements, in his discretion, to the post at Chillicothe. The commander of the troops which have already advanced to Marshall will also open communication with the troops at Chillicothe by way of Brunswick. The commanders of the different divisions will so order their troops as to occupy their designated stations in the quickest time and by the shortest possible route.

It is also recommended to obtain by every mode, especially by strong scouting parties, all possible information in regard to the strength and movements of the enemy, and it is especially enjoined upon them to send daily reports to the commanding general whether any movements have been made by the enemy or their own forces or not,, and also to communicate daily with the commanders of adjoining divisions.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAUNCEY McKEEVER Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 24, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have no new move of the enemy to report. I still continue active reconnaissance, and have, I believe, driven the enemy back to Columbus and Belmont. Every day our advance scouts come in sight of parties of rebels, but they always retreat upon sight of our troops. I have withdrawn all the troops from Fort Jefferson and strengthened the command at Norfolk. Should re-enforcements be sent here, however, I will retake that position. It was only abandoned this morning. The three men reported missing by me day before yesterday have all returned, with the loss of one horse.

{p.505}

It is reported to me by Captain Walke, of gunboat Tyler, that his men cannot receive pay short of Cincinnati. As it would be attended with much injury to the service to grant leaves of absence for his men to go there for their pay, and with great expense, either to the men or to the Government, to send them, I would respectfully recommend that some arrangement be made by which they may be paid here. The number of applications for discharge on surgeons’ certificate of disability has become so great, and as it appears to me granted on such trivial grounds, that I have felt it my duty to throw such restrictions in the way that certificates cannot be obtained in future when not really deserved. I would ask whether it is necessary that the final discharge should come from department headquarters or whether they may not be given here?

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 24, 1861.

Col. J. B. PLUMMER, Eleventh Regiment Missouri Vols., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: You have been appointed by the commanding general of the department colonel of the Eleventh Regiment Missouri Volunteers, now serving at Cape Girardeau, and commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Bayles. The general directs that you proceed forthwith to that post and assume command of the regiment and post. It is believed that there is much in the condition of the service there that demands the attention of an officer of experience. He therefore calls your attention to the necessity of reorganizing the service, and particularly of pushing the entrenchments or forts there to a speedy completion. You will please also give your attention to keeping yourself informed of the movements, strength, and position of the enemy by the employment of reliable scouts or spies, and convey, by special express riders or other expeditious means, a report of important movements to the general himself. Such persons as you find in the vicinity of your post engaged in conveying information to the enemy you are directed to deal summarily with. It is notorious that every movement of our, troops near Ironton, even of small parties, is immediately conveyed by express riders to the enemy. It is notably so also at Cape Girardeau. Report by letter to General Grant, as your post is within the district comprising his command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Military Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Camp Montgomery, September 24, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Commanding Western Department, Saint Louis:

SIR: ... Although Lexington has fallen since your order of September 18, I propose to move on Kansas City, there to form a junction with General Sturgis. I will be able to move with about 700 cavalry, 500 infantry, 100 artillery, with a battery of two 6-pounder howitzers and two 12-pounder mountain howitzers. I will leave here Friday morning, {p.506} September 27, at 5 o’clock a. m., and will reach Kansas City Sunday, 29th.

I will leave at Fort Scott Major Judson’s command of about 800 men, about 100 men at Fort Lincoln, and an irregular force which I have had organized and placed in forts all along the southern and eastern border. Inclosed you will find copies of reports of the commandants of Forts Scott, Lincoln, Barnesville, and some of the forts on the southern border, by which you will see all that has transpired at those points.*

You will see by the reports I inclose that rumors are rife that there is a force moving on Southern Kansas. If such is the case, God only knows what is to become of Kansas when we move on Kansas City.

I hope, as you have now opened communication with me, to hear from you frequently. I trust you will approve the march on Osceola and its destruction. It was the depot of the traitors for Southwestern Missouri. The movement was intended, first, to destroy the ammunition train; second, as a demonstration for the relief of Peabody; third, hoping to hear of a force moving from Sedalia; and, fourth, a covered movement I supposed we would have to make to the north. Our march east was through Papinsville, Prairie City, down the south side of the Osage, returning through Pleasant Gap and Butler to this point.

I inclose you a printed copy of a proclamation* which I have issued, which it is hoped will meet your approbation.

But for the misfortune at Lexington this part of Missouri was safe.**

J. H. LANE.

* Not found.

** Portion of this letter omitted above appears as report of skirmish, September 22, at Osceola, Mo., p. 196.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 25, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

I have had the proper estimate made, completed this day, for a portion of the supplies and materials needed for the use of my artillery and cavalry. I have ordered the officers of the Quartermaster’s Department to take immediate measures to procure the articles required. The proper estimates for funds will go forward by mail in one or two days. I have respectfully to ask that you will make arrangements with the Treasury Department, and advise me by telegraph, authorizing Capt. P. T. Turnley, assistant quartermaster, to draw upon Treasury to amount of $2,500,000, payable in Treasury notes. This will enable me to continue operations most essential in this department. This estimate is exclusive of $1,700,000 estimated for some days ago, one-half of which amount is due to railroads in the West on account of military operations since the beginning of the war. I await your affirmative response to leave these headquarters to take the field.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., September 25, 1861.

Lieut. Col. E. P. WOOD, Commanding Fort Holt, Ky.:

You will make a reconnaissance to-morrow towards Elliott’s Mills, and beyond, if found practicable. Learn all you can of the movements {p.507} and position of the enemy, but avoid being led into ambush. Take two leading secessionists from the neighborhood of Elliott’s Mills prisoners, to be held as hostages for the safety of William Mercer, a Union man and Kentuckian, taken by the invaders of his State and carried to Columbus or elsewhere as a prisoner.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant.

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 26, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT, Commanding at Cairo, Ill.:

Your report of the 23d instant received.* I will order arms to be furnished for the regiments under command of Brigadier-General McClernand and re-enforce you with two new regiments as soon as possible. By this means you will be enabled, in concert with Brigadier-General Smith, to control the rebel forces on both the Kentucky and Missouri shores. Should the enemy expose a weak point on either side of the river, you may inflict upon him a combined blow; but at present I am not in favor of incurring any hazard of defeat. It is not impossible that the enemy may cross at Belmont and attempt to march upon Cape Girardeau by way of Charleston. Should you be unable with your limited force to prevent this by the occupation of Charleston, you will do so by frequent demonstrations and strong reconnaissance in that direction.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, September 26, 1861.

Brigadier-General STURGIS, Commanding, &c., Fort Leavenworth:

GENERAL: General Prentiss reports to the commanding general that from the best information he can get 3,000 rebels, under Harris, have crossed the Missouri to fall on you, while General Price, with his main body, remains on the right bank of the river. You are therefore directed to make in the first place special efforts to ascertain whether this report is correct, and should it prove true, then to use every endeavor to force the troops of Harris to a battle, and to prevent their escape.

The general hopes that accessions which your force has recently received, or will soon receive, of regular troops must make your command number double that of Harris, and, should the information of General Prentiss be accurate, promptness and activity must insure your success.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Military Secretary.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Jefferson City, September 28, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U. S. GRANT:

It is reported that the rebels have evacuated Columbus and crossed over to Belmont, to attack Cape Girardeau or Ironton. Should that be {p.508} the case, the troops now stationed at Fort Jefferson, Elliott’s Mills, and at Norfolk should be immediately ordered to Bird’s Point. One battalion of infantry and a small detachment of cavalry should be left at Fort Holt for the protection of the siege battery, and the two gunboats stationed near Island No. 1, to protect Fort Holt and control Norfolk. As soon as the concentration of all troops at Bird’s Point is completed, a demonstration against Charleston should be made. Paducah is under all circumstances to be held, and Smithland well protected, for the control of the junction of the Ohio and Cumberland Rivers.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., September 28, 1861.

General GRANT, Commanding at Cairo, Ill.:

Colonel Carlin reports from his headquarters, at Iron ton, Mo., under date of September 26, that there is no rebel force nearer that point than Pitman’s Ferry, Ark., except small marauding bands near Bloomfield.

On the 23d instant Hardee was at Pitman’s Ferry and Pocahontas with 7,000 men. Three of his regiments left that day for Columbus, Ky., via Point Pleasant, Mo. For the latter place the balance of the force was to leave about next week. The whole command was composed of nine regiments and twenty-six pieces of artillery.

CHAUNCEY McKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.}

HDQRS. SECOND DIV. ARMY OF THE WEST, Jefferson City, September 28, 1861.

By virtue of General Orders, No. 16, from department headquarters, the undersigned assumes command of the Second Division of the Army of the West.

For the present, the division consists of the following brigades and regiments, with such artillery and cavalry as shall hereafter be designated, viz:

First Brigade, Acting Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, commanding: Eighth, Eighteenth, Twenty-Second, and Twenty-fifth Indiana Regiments.

Second Brigade, Acting Brig. Gen. J. C. Kelton, commanding: Iowa Fifth, Illinois Thirty-seventh, Missouri Ninth, and Kansas First.

...

JNO. POPE, Acting Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Jefferson City, September 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Paducah, Ky.:

It having been reported that the rebels have evacuated Columbus and crossed over to Belmont to attack Cape Girardeau or Ironton, Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant was yesterday directed, in case the information should {p.509} be correct, to order the troops now stationed at Fort Jefferson, Elliott’s Mills, and Norfolk immediately to Bird’s Point, leaving one battalion of infantry and a small detachment of cavalry at Fort Holt for the protection of the siege battery, and stationing the two gunboats near Island No. 1, to protect Fort Holt and control Norfolk. He was also instructed to make a demonstration against Charleston as soon as the concentration of all the troops at Bird’s Point should be effected, and to prevent the advance of the enemy’s forces through Charleston. You will in such case co-operate to the full extent of your ability with General Grant, and especially in the defense of Cape Girardeau. At the same time you will constantly watch the movements of the enemy in Kentucky, hold Paducah under all circumstances, and protect Smithland suitably for the control of the junction of the Cumberland and the Ohio Rivers. I have ordered a 24-pounder howitzer with abundant ammunition to be sent to you immediately. I have directed also that Noble’s cavalry shall be armed as soon as practicable, and placed entirely under your orders. Should General Grant, however, need that cavalry for the defense of Cape Girardeau, you will send it to him.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, September 29, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Everything here is quiet, and no rumors to disturb it. I have heard this evening that Hardee has arrived at New Madrid from Bloomfield, probably to re-enforce Johnston at Columbus. I scarcely credit the rumor, but it may be true. There are quite a number of troops at this place doing service that have never been sworn in. I would respectfully request that a mustering officer be sent or some one already here be duly authorized to act as such.

I have in confinement here a soldier charged with willful and malicious murder, committed upon a fellow soldier. The crime was perpetrated in Missouri, where it is impossible to bring a criminal to justice by usual process. By law he cannot be tried in any court out of the State where the offense was committed. I would, therefore, ask if he cannot be tried by a military commission.

The cold season is now so nearly at hand, that it is time to think of providing winter quarters for the garrison that must necessarily occupy this place. Lob huts could be cheaply built, but even they would call for the outlay of some money. Credit will not do at this place longer. I understand that the credit of the Government has been already used to the extent of some hundred thousand dollars, and no money ever paid out. This causes much murmuring among the citizens, and unless the paymaster is soon sent to pay off the troops the same may be expected from the soldiers. I would respectfully urge, therefore, that funds be ordered here for the quartermaster’s department, and also that the troops be paid off as soon as practicable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

{p.510}

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CAIRO, ILL., September 30, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY McKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General:

Our pickets were attacked to-day below Norfolk; a rebel mortally wounded. Reported below 20,000 moving on Mayfield. We are threatened towards Charleston.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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PADUCAH, KY., October 1, 1861.

The ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Department of the West, Jefferson City, Mo.:

SIR: By special messenger from Saint Louis, I have just received (7.30 o’clock p. m.) Major-General Frémont’s letter of instructions, dated September 29, to co-operate with General Grant in his operations on the other side of the Mississippi, &c. I have telegraphed to General Grant to know in what way I can most advantageously assist him, &c.

My scouts report no movement this way from Columbus. About 2,000 of the enemy from Columbus are in Feliciana. This perhaps arose from my sending a regiment a few days since to the neighborhood of Mayfield, to get possession of the cars (though unsuccessfully) on this railway. Front 4,000 to 6,000 are said to have moved to Union City from Columbus.

I am engaged in constructing a redoubt around the Marine Hospital.

With the exception of diarrhea and intermittent fever, the command is healthy.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. F. SMITH, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 1, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT, Tipton, Mo.:

The rebels have burned the bridge over Big River, about 20 miles from Ironton. I have sent the Eighth Wisconsin, with a pioneer company, to drive back the rebels and rebuild the bridge.

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 1, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Bird’s Point, Mo.:

From information received this evening Thompson will probably march upon Charleston to-morrow, on his way north. Move out with 1,000 infantry and all the cavalry you can spare and intercept him.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.511}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 1, 1861.

Col. R. J. OGLESBY, Commanding, Norfolk, Mo.:

Despairing of being immediately re-enforced, I deem it the better part of valor to be prudent. You will therefore move your entire force back upon Bird’s Point and take position there. Select your encampment with a view of leaving as clear a field for defense as possible. You will assume command at Bird’s Point until such time as I may be able to brigade the command about this point.

U S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 1, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have to-day concentrated my command at this place, Bird’s Point, and Fort Holt. The work of placing these points in a strong defensive condition will be prosecuted with all our force. There is no enemy on the Missouri side of the river from Cape Girardeau to New Madrid, except Jeff. Thompson’s force at Belmont. I had troops in Charleston last evening. All quiet there. The packets plying between Saint Louis and Cairo constantly leave freight at points above here intended for the interior. This enables the enemy to supply all his wants.

Day before yesterday I sent a force to Charleston to bring back goods that had been landed for that place. Accompanying is an inventory of the goods seized. I have my serious doubts whether there is any law authorizing this seizure, but feel no doubt about the propriety of breaking up the trade now carried on. I respectfully refer this matter to the general commanding the Western Department for instructions. There is evidently a large force moving from Columbus to the interior. Whether upon Paducah or not I do not know.

I received a dispatch from General Asboth to send two companies of cavalry from here to Georgetown, Mo., via Saint Louis. My force is so small, especially cavalry, that before sending them I asked to have them replaced with other troops.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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WASHINGTON, October 1, 1861.

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

SIR: I received verbal instructions from Colonel Woods, chief business manager for Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, to proceed to Washington and ask for money and arms for the use of the Western Military Department.

Permit me to say that a very large sum of money is required to meet the obligations incurred from contracts made by order of the commanding general in the prosecution of the war in Missouri. The credit of the Government is suffering greatly, and individuals are seriously embarrassed from the non-payment of debts due in Cincinnati, Saint Louis, and elsewhere. To the question, “How much money shall I {p.512} ask for in Washington?” Colonel Woods answered, “Twelve million dollars.” Of course I assume no personal responsibility in respect to the amount, as I have had no connection with business transactions in Saint Louis.

I am instructed also to procure arms, which are greatly needed both for the infantry and cavalry. Several thousand soldiers are now in Saint Louis without arms, and such is the perilous condition of the State, that they ought to be sent with the least possible delay. They are required by no less than three regiments of cavalry and six of infantry, and the enemy having gathered in large force in several places, we have not a man to lose from the want of a gun.

Having said thus much in relation to arms and money for General Frémont as a representative of the people as well as a special friend of the Army in the West, I think it my duty to call your attention in this place to some other matters that have an important bearing upon the prospects of the campaign in Missouri.

A great deal of trouble and confusion is springing up in the Western Military Department from a seeming conflict of authority between General Frémont and the authorized agents of the Government, which I trust a statement of facts may help to remove. He has given commissions to colonels and other staff officers, which I find are not recognized in Saint Louis or Washington. On this subject I herewith submit a statement of facts received this morning from Col. C. J. Wright, of Cincinnati. If the authority here given, and in numerous like cases, by the general, be not promptly recognized by the Government, the utmost confusion will prevail among the officers and volunteers now in the service in the West. A large number of persons from Ohio have received, and others have been promised, commissions under him; but if his acts in such cases are not respected in Washington, there will be no end to vexation and trouble growing out of these transactions.

The same remark is applicable when applied to the contracts that have been made in Cincinnati, New York, and Boston for cannon, clothing, and arms in general. The contractors are pressing their claims for payment, and it is for the Department here to say whether innocent persons shall suffer from a non-recognition of General Frémont’s authority to make such contracts.

The perilous condition of Missouri seems to require that all trouble of this character should at once be removed by such instructions as the President may be pleased to give. The serious disasters that have befallen our army there; the surrender of Lexington, taken in connection with the battle in which General Lyon lost his life; the scattered condition of a portion of our forces, and other unfortunate circumstances which need not here be mentioned, have filled the Union men with alarm and consternation.

It is believed by our best men that nothing but the most prompt, wise, and powerful action of our forces will save the State from the control of the rebel army. It is generally admitted that its fate depends upon an impending battle at Lexington, and I cannot but ask, Is it wise to hazard everything there as well as in Kentucky? For if one State is lost, the other probably will be, upon a single battle, with the odds now very much against us.

In connection with others, I have sent at General Frémont’s request several thousand volunteers into Missouri from Ohio, and I cannot remain indifferent to their wants and dangers. I am fully satisfied that if arms, men, and money are not speedily and liberally supplied, and {p.513} a wise direction given them, the secessionists will take possession of Saint Louis.

And now, Mr. President, I most respectfully submit that one of two things ought to be done immediately, viz: Either General Frémont’s military commissions and contracts should be recognized and his drafts for money and arms to carry on the war honored, or some person should take his place whose acts will receive full recognition by the Government.

There is not one hour to lose in sending the means to save Missouri. To all human view no battle can be fought successfully at Lexington without the sending of additional arms and money, and if the Government neglects to supply them on the requisition of General Frémont and he fails, he will place the responsibility of his defeat upon the administration.

With great respect, yours,

JOHN A. GURLEY.

[Indorsement.]

OCTOBER 4, 1861.

Respectfully submitted to the War Department.

A. LINCOLN.

[Inclosure.]

Statement in relation to claims for compensation in Missouri.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., August 20 1861.

Crafts J. Wright is appointed colonel of Thirteenth Missouri Volunteers, commission to date from August 3, 1861.

Colonel Wright is empowered immediately to proceed to muster and organize said regiment, and is charged with the responsibility of seeing that the various officers pertaining to said command are efficient and satisfactory, appointing such officers as may be efficient.

Colonel Wright is authorized at once to obtain whatever is necessary of arms, equipments, camp equipage, and subsistence to prepare said command for the active field. The officers in the different departments will facilitate the operations of Colonel Wright and those detailed by him.

When the companies are not full, or in case of deficiency of companies, any enlisted men not assigned may at once be transferred to said regiment to make the full complement.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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Memorandum.-On the 3d August, 1861, Hon. F. P. Blair received a telegram from Saint Louis to designate a colonel for a regiment then ready. On the same day Hon. J. A. Gurley telegraphed C. J. Wright, offering the position to him at the request of Mr. Blair. The position was accepted.

At Cincinnati the Hon. J. A. Gurley was telegraphed to send the party to Saint Louis as soon as ready to take his position as colonel.

On the 20th August the party reached Saint Louis with Mr. Gurley, and received the confirmation by the paper copied, and was detailed on {p.514} duty. Two full and two half companies were then ready, and six companies were on duty as Home Guards, who wore ordered to report as soon as relieved.

Colonel Wright proceeded to organize the regiment, to provide for its equipment, to designate officers, and appointed, August 20, 1861, to the special duty of quartermaster and adjutant and as drill-master Capt. B. T. Wright and First Lieut. W. E. Fay. They have been on duty since. Colonel Wright has during all this interval been daily and actively engaged on duty.

August 25, 1861, Colonel Wright was transferred as colonel to the Ninth Missouri Volunteers.

August 26, was detailed on duty on court-martial, and acted.

On September 3d was retransferred to Thirteenth Missouri Volunteers from Ninth Missouri, and was ordered to Washington, Mo., with his command.

September 20, detailed on special duty to guard bridges.

September 23, returned to Camp Benton, where three companies had assembled.

During all the time from 3d August the colonel has been under orders and performing active duty as such. The officers of the regiment have been acting as such.

That the companies and regiments have not been full has been owing to the duties performed, or Colonel Wright did not assume to form a regiment but only to organize companies formed, and has been on duty.

On the 27th September, 1861, on asking to have a pay-roll made out, Colonel Wright received the answer of which a copy is annexed:

SAINT LOUIS, MO., September 27, 1861.

My instructions from Washington are to recognize captains when they have companies organized, &c., and over the minimum allowances of privates, &c., and to recognize field officers and staff officers only when their regiments are enrolled and organized-as, for instance, a colonel when he has a full regiment. I refer to General Orders of the War Department, No. 36, dated June 24, and General Orders, No. 61, dated August 19, 1861, and the last part of section 2 of the act of 22d July, 1861.

I view the letter of General Frémont, annexed, as an authority to Colonel Wright to raise and organize a regiment, which when organized and enrolled would entitle him to he its colonel.

I give this note at the request of Colonel Wright.

T. P. ANDREWS, Deputy Paymaster-General, U. S. Army.

Note on this.-The State of Missouri and the Western Department are peculiar. The detail of companies and parts of companies postpones and prevents their formation, and the same cause has and does prevent the regimental formation. The duty is performed by regimental and company officers the same as if full.

This is not a letter referred to; it is an appointment, dating from acceptance. It is a detailment of the colonel and his officers on duty performed. It does not look to the formation of the regiment ere the officer is to be recognized and receive the pay of a colonel. The transfer from one regiment to another is a recognition of the position; the detailment on duty as colonel for a court-martial and its performance, another; the detailment on duty as a mustering officer is another; the meeting of requisitions and obtainment of supplies another, &c.

The paper of August 20, 1861, is a direct order to paymasters as well as others. The general orders referred to cannot be had. Parties rely on the general authority of Major-General Frémont in Missouri, and could not controvert it.

The detailment on duty might prevent, as it has, a full regimental {p.515} organization whilst field and company officers were performing duty as they have.

It is submitted that under this authority the regimental and company officers who have been performing duty are entitled to the compensation and expenses pertaining to the several ranks in which they have performed and been recognized in the same.

CRAFTS J. WRIGHT, Colonel Thirteenth Regiment Missouri an Volunteers.

SAINT LOUIS, September 28, 1861.

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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO., October 2, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. Western Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th ultimo, and have complied with its requisitions. It is reported here by different persons who have come into town that the enemy are concentrating in large numbers upon the river opposite the town of Columbus, Ky. under the command of General A. S. Johnston, and intending to move for this place. It is said they expect to have, or have already, there 60,000 men I hope to be able in a day or two to communicate to headquarters the facts in the case. I am disposed to believe the report.

There arrived here yesterday the Tenth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, numbering about 800.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. PLUMMER, Colonel Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 2, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY McKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Last evening, hearing through a deserter from the rebel encampment at Belmont that Jeff. Thompson was breaking up there to start for points north, I ordered out to Charleston 1,200 to 1,500 men to intercept him. The party has not returned yet. Should anything important grow out of the expedition I will report by telegraph. The same authority denies the arrival of Hardee at Columbus, but says that he is expected soon; also reports the return to Columbus of the force under Pillow. They reported among the troops that they have been to Paducah and driven out our forces from there. It has so far proven impossible to get morning reports correctly made out by the different commands from which to consolidate. I have been returning them for correction until now I think they will come in correct, &c., in future.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Kansas City, October 3, 1861.

Major-General FRÉMONT:

Captain Williams, of my command, who was sent out on the Harrisonville road last night, reports that the enemy, with his whole force, some {p.516} 2,000 or 3,000 men, are moving south on the road they came up; that they camped night before last near Rose Hill. I have ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Blunt, in command at Fort Scott, to concentrate his entire force, leaving but a small guard at Fort Scott and Fort Lincoln, and move northward through Barnesville, Trading Post, and West Point in the direction of Harrisonville, while I will move to-morrow morning, in connection with General Sturgis’ command, southward, through West Point, forming a junction with Lieutenant-Colonel Blunt..

We will do all in our power to annoy the enemy in their flank and rear. General Sturgis will have about 2,000 men. After the junction with Lieutenant-Colonel Blunt I will have about 3,000.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Kansas City, October 3, 1861.

General S. D. STURGIS:

GENERAL: In answer to your note of this day* I have this to say, that I don’t care a fig about rank; I have enough of the glittering tinsel to satisfy me. I am here in obedience to an order from Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont to co-operate with you in ferreting out and fighting the enemy. Kindly and promptly do I desire to obey that order. My brigade is not here for the purpose of interfering in anywise with the institution of slavery. They shall not become negro thieves, nor shall they be prostituted into negro catchers. The institution of slavery must take care of itself.

I said in the Senate of the United States, and my experience since only demonstrates its truth, that in my opinion the institution would perish with the march of the Federal armies.

Again I say that the mass of the personal property in Missouri, including slave, is at this moment held by the wives and children, assisted by the Federal Army, while the husband and father are actually in arms against the Government. In my opinion our policy in this regard should be changed.

Confiscation of slaves and other property which can be made useful to the Army should follow treason as the thunder peal follows the lightning flash. Until this change is made you offer premiums for the men to remain away in the army of the enemy. I had a man cowardly shot in the woods to-day within sight of our camp by the very man, I have no doubt, whose property you are so anxious to protect.

I am endeavoring to find what transportation I have to spare, if any, and will report to you accordingly.

Yours,

J. H. LANE Commanding Kansas Brigade.

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SAINT LOUIS, October 3, 1861.

Col. THOMAS A. SCOTT:

Dispatch just received.* Lane’s victory over Parsons is important and complete. When Lane burned the town of Osceola every house exploded with concealed powder. Yesterday General Frémont ordered {p.517} the Utah regulars to him. The commander replies that he has orders from McClellan to go to Washington. Think of that! This moment we have a rumor that Frémont is superseded. Is that so? All here is moving strong and well as an army can without money.

B. RUSH PLUMLY.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, October 3, 1861-8 p.m.

Col. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War:

From the reports of General Frémont’s removal we are in a state of incipient revolution. Committees besiege the headquarters; mass meetings are being prepared all over town: all is excitement and rage among Union people. If he is removed, don’t be surprised at anything the people do.

B. RUSH PLUMLY

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HEADQUARTERS, SAINT LOUIS, MO., Thursday night, 10 o’clock, October 3, 1861.

Col. THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

Your dispatch* has revolutionized the town with joy. We send it to all the hotels and to the public meetings now in session and to Camp Benton. There is great rejoicing. All thank you.

Lane chased Rains into Osceola, and was compelled to shell the place to dislodge the rebels. In doing so he burned the town and destroyed large stores of the rebels, of which the town was the depot. Killed 50 rebels without losing a man. Lane, not being strong enough to pursue Rains, withdrew to Kansas City and joined Sturgis. General Frémont is moving his column with tremendous energy at Jefferson City to cut off Price at Lexington. A week will give you stirring news. I will keep you posted. Your dispatch came before any other.

B. RUSH PLUMLY.

* Not found.

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CHILLICOTHE, MO., October 3, 1861.

Captain MCKEEVER:

An old acquaintance, in whom I have confidence, has this day returned from Lexington, and assures me that there are but 2,000 rebels remaining at Lexington, the others having left in different directions, a lame majority for their homes, and asserts that it is not the rebels’ intention to give battle. He says that McCulloch is not north of Springfield. I have sent messenger to Lexington.

B. M. PRENTISS, Brigadier-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Near Jefferson City, October 3, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs that you move with whatever regiments and corps of your division are now here under your orders as early to-morrow morning as possible, after the men have {p.518} taken coffee and breakfast, by the regularly-traveled road, to a point called Little Monica, on the line of the Pacific Railroad, 18 miles from Jefferson City. From the above may, in your discretion, perhaps be excepted Ellis’ cavalry, though horseshoes are not likely to be received for some days. You will leave all your baggage to be placed upon the cars by a portion of your command left behind for that purpose, and cause also the knapsacks of the men to be filled by companies, to be conveyed to the cars for transportation. The cars will meet you at the camp ground with rations and forage. Additional force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery will also be marched to the same point, at which you will receive instructions for the following day’s march.* The 40 or more teams you brought from Rolla you will take with you without loading.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-As you will be the officer highest in rank at Monica, you will give such orders for the whole camp as may be needful.

* The other troops ordered to Little Monica at this date were Asboth’s and Totten’s brigades the Sixth and Seventh Missouri Volunteers, and the Benton Cadets.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Near Jefferson City, October 3, 1861.

General T. L. PRICE, Jefferson City:

GENERAL: The telegraph wire running from this camp to Jefferson City was cut last night, probably by some person residing in the city. General Frémont directs that you order out before dark a sufficient force to surround the city, and cause every house to be searched well, in view to find if the cut piece and the perpetrator may not be discovered, he also directs that the same search be directed to the finding of arms or ammunition of war, and their seizure, in the houses of secessionists. Whatever additional force may be wanted besides those under your order you can obtain by the exhibition of this letter of instructions to other commanders. Please be prompt.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 3, 1861.

Col. J. B. PLUMMER, Commanding U. S. Forces, Cape Girardeau, Mo.:

On the arrival of Colonel Ross with the Seventeenth Illinois Volunteers you will designate a regiment to take his place here. The regiment so designated will avail itself of the same transportation that conveys Colonel Ross’ regiment. It is rumored here, by way of Saint Louis, that a force has crossed the river at Columbus, and is marching upon Cape Girardeau, Mo. I do not credit the rumor, however, for the reason that I have reconnaissances made every day or two beyond Charleston and on all the roads leading north and west from Belmont. {p.519} It would be well, however, to keep a lookout for the approach of an enemy; and should you satisfy yourself that either Jeff. Thompson or Lowe, unsupported by any one else, are near, you can easily drive them from your vicinity.

...

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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JEFFERSON CITY, October 4, 1861.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War:

We are moving against the enemy, and have few instructed officers. I have placed General McKinstry at the head of a division, and it will be a personal favor if you will allow me to retain him for a few days.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION, Jefferson City, Mo., October 4, 1861.

Col. J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: Your letter of yesterday, ordering me to march this morning, was only received this morning at 10 minutes after 2. You will see by my report of transportation, sent you on the 2d instant, that for the 41 wagons in possession of my quartermaster he has only 40 mules; it will therefore be impossible for him to take the 40 or more wagons agreeably to your order.

Colonel Stevenson, of the Seventh Missouri Regiment, informs me that he is attached to Colonel Totten’s brigade of the Fifth Division. I must protest in the strongest terms against this very unmilitary proceeding of depriving me of the most important part of my command, when under marching orders, without giving me an official notice of the change. Detaching Colonel Stevenson from my division will leave me but one regiment here fit to take the field.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding First Division.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 4, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Owing to loss of health of the Seventeenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Colonel Ross commanding, I have ordered them to Cape Girardeau, directing Colonel Plummer to designate a regiment from there. Six companies of the Second Illinois Cavalry have arrived here. After receiving their arms they will be a powerful auxiliary to our force. Cavalry is much required for the purpose of reconnaissances I have nothing reliable from the enemy further than that Jeff. Thompson has broken up his encampment at Belmont and gone to New Madrid, Mo. No doubt it is with the view of going north from there, but whether any other force goes with him I have no positive information. My impression {p.520} is, there is no concerted plan to attack this place, Cape Girardeau, or Paducah, for the present.

When I first learned that Thompson had broken up his camp, I ordered out a force to Charleston to cut him off in that direction. I inclose you the report of Colonel Oglesby, who made the detail for the expedition.* Before I assumed command of this military district a steam ferry had been seized on the Mississippi and taken into Government service at Cape Girardeau. I knew nothing of the circumstances until within the last few days. Finding that Government was using private property under these conditions, I ordered the commanding officer at Cape Girardeau to require the quartermaster of the post to enter into a contract for the use of the boat. I have just received the report of the quartermaster and the opinion of Colonel Plummer thereon. The owner of the ferry demanded $75 per day. The quartermaster (Lieutenant Shields, of the Twentieth Illinois Volunteers) regards $8 per day as a fair compensation, and Colonel Plummer, on advising with old steamboat men, regards Lieutenant Shields’ estimate as a fair value of the services of the ferry. The Luella will be retained until otherwise directed by higher authority, and no contract be entered into.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* See report of expedition, October 2, 1861, from Bird’s Point to Charleston, p. 198.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. -.}

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Sedalia, October 4, 1861.

Acting Brigadier-General Osterhaus will from this date take command of the Second Brigade, Third Division, consisting of the following troops:

Twelfth Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Osterhaus.

Seventeenth Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Hassendeubel.

N. W. R. R. [Forty-fourth] Illinois Volunteers, Colonel Knobelsdorff.

Third Regiment Missouri Volunteers, First Battalion, Major Conrad.

Third Regiment, U. S. Reserve Corps, Colonel Fritz.

Light Artillery, Company A, Captain Welfley; Company B, Captain Hoffman; Major Backof.

Benton Hussars, Captain Woldemar.

...

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General Third Division, Commanding.

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KANSAS CITY, October 4, 1861.

General J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade:

GENERAL: I inclose for your information a letter just received from General Frémont. You will please return it by the bearer after reading it. I would be glad to have any opinion you may have formed after reading this letter that may influence your or my movements.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. D. STURGIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.521}

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Jefferson City, September 29, 1861.

SIR: You are directed to fall immediately back upon Fort Leavenworth, sending up the Government stores, should there be any in Kansas City, by water to Leavenworth, or destroying them in case there are no means of transport.

Should there be any regular troops at Leavenworth, or immediately expected there, you will effect a junction with them, and proceed by railroad to Chillicothe, and from there move by the Grand River to join General Pope.

You will instantly advise General Lane, who at the last accounts had a successful engagement with the enemy at Papinsville, and was between that place and Warsaw, of all your movements, if practicable, by a verbal message. General Prentiss has been instructed to facilitate your movements, and in concert with Governor Robinson, of Kansas, to use every possible endeavor to hold Fort Leavenworth. As however, under no circumstances ought the Government stores to fall into the hands of the rebel forces, you will make all necessary preparations to effect their speedy and certain destruction should the enemy attack that place in such force as to render its capture certain.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, October 4, 1861.

[Brigadier-General STURGIS:]

GENERAL: I have inspected the letter of General Frémont of September 29. Are you not satisfied it was predicated upon the fact that the enemy crossed a force on the north side of the river that we know has recrossed?

I am satisfied if this order is acted upon we will present the singular spectacle of retreating from an army that is itself retreating. Can we be mistaken in our information or is General Frémont? Let me see you, general, before you act on this letter.

Yours, truly,

LANE.

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HEADQUARTERS KANSAS BRIGADE, Camp Mitchell, October 4, 1861.

Brigadier-General STURGIS:

SIR: I have had further time to consider the order of Major-General Frémont of September 29, and I am so confident that it is founded in misconception of the enemy’s movements and intentions, that I do again earnestly solicit a conference with you before a single step is taken in the premises. To obey the order is to give up the contest in the West, to stampede the people of Kansas, and to devastate it. Not until a battle is fought and a defeat suffered should Kansas City be given up to the enemy. Allowing the order to be predicated upon correct knowledge, I am clear that Fort Leavenworth and Kansas should be defended at or near Kansas City. I will await a message from you naming a time and place for a conference. It would suit me very well to have it here.

J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Brigade.

{p.522}

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CALIFORNIA, October 5, 1861.

General FRÉMONT:

The command were entirely without provisions for more than twenty-four hours. Exposed to a violent storm all night, without tents. The cavalry and artillery are without overcoats, and cannot perform efficient service without them. Most of the tents and baggage are still behind. The cavalry have but two rounds of cartridges.

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Camp Lillie, near Jefferson City, October 6, 1861-Evening.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: I am instructed to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of this morning by your aide-de-camp and telegram of this evening relative to the wants of the troops.* Every attention will be given to supply deficiencies at the earliest moment. Some great-coats, it is understood, can be procured in Saint Louis, and will be ordered to be purchased at once. Sabers have been forwarded from Saint Louis, and should have arrived before this time. In reference to transportation, it was not the intention in this movement towards posts of rendezvous to place the whole allowance of wagons with the troops. That could not be accomplished, as there is not a fill supply of wagons provided. The object has been to concentrate the divisions at particular points from which it is expected they will eventually move, but while thus fixed to convey to them all the supplies they need to prepare them for an active campaign against the enemy. The post of your division is Versailles. The divisions of McKinstry and Asboth are in reserve, the former at Syracuse, the latter at Tipton. Portions of your division are in advance, and will soon be recalled to join you.

To-day Colonel Wyman has been ordered to proceed with a full and complete train of wagons from Rolla to Versailles to join you. The general regrets the suffering of the troops, and he cannot understand how, with reports from the director of transportation that baggage and supplies had reached the neighborhood of your camp with but little delay, that the troops should have been without tents or provisions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

* Not found, but see dispatch of October 5.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Camp Lillie, near Jefferson City, Mo., October 6, 1861.

Brigadier-Generals LANE and STURGIS, Kansas City, Mo.:

As Kansas City is not threatened now, you will, in accordance with the last movements of the rebel forces, move in concert with General Sturgis’ command to Warrensburg. From there, united, to Clinton, with the view of proceeding towards Warsaw, where you will join my advance guard, 10,000 strong.

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

{p.523}

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NEAR JEFFERSON CITY, October 6, 1861.

Col. J. B. WYMAN, Camp Rolla:

SIR: The enemy having evacuated Lexington, and the circumstances of the service having made it unnecessary for you to come to this place, the major-general commanding the department directs that you move immediately from Rolla direct to Versailles, with full transportation complete. You will direct your line of march to cross the Osage River at Linn Creek, or, if you deem it more convenient and expedient, to march upon Versailles, and cross the Osage by whatever route you think best. Versailles is to be occupied by the division of General Hunter to which you belong, but should he have left that place (which is not likely to be the case), scouts sent about to learn his position will enable you to vary your march to join him accordingly.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 6, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Western Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: For the last two days I have had no reliable intelligence of the movements of the enemy. The gunboats have been out of order, so as to be unable to make reconnaissances, and one of my spies, from whom I expected a full and accurate report, has not returned. Our scouts report nothing of importance. I have ordered a force of 1,200 men to Charleston. They will leave early in the morning. My own opinion is that the enemy have no present intention of moving on Cape Girardeau. I think Paducah is more likely the point they design to approach. I have ordered one gunboat to cruise down as far as Norfolk to-night, and will send the other gunboat (now at Mound City, repairing) to reconnoiter farther down to-morrow morning. We are very much in need of the new gunboat promised, and I trust she will be here very soon. I expect to go to Cape Girardeau to-morrow night, to inspect the troops there and the condition of the post.

Colonel Cook’s Seventh Illinois Regiment arrived here last evening, and are now stationed at Camp Holt. I had ordered the exchange of Colonel Ross’ and Colonel Cook’s regiments before I received your instructions to that effect.

Since writing the above I have received a report from Colonel Plummer, commanding at Cape Girardeau, informing me that there is a force of 1,000 or 1,500 of the enemy, under command of Lowe, at Bloomfield, and that preparations are making at Benton to receive the enemy. I had heard of this force of Lowe’s, and instructed him to send out scouts and ascertain his whereabouts.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO., October 6, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Hdqrs. Western Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that my scout reports that there is a force of the enemy at Bloomfield of 1,000 or 1,500 men, under the {p.524} command of Lowe. There are only marauding parties between this point and that. Preparations are being made at Benton, a town 18 miles from here, for the reception of a force there of the enemy.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. PLUMMER, Colonel Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION ARMY OF THE WEST, Sedalia, October 6, 1861.

Major-General POPE, Commanding Second Division, Cold Neck Bridge:

GENERAL: In accordance with your dispatch, dated Booneville, October 5, and sent to General Davis, I have the honor to state the following:

The troops of the Third Division, now at my disposition, are stationed at Sedalia and Otterville. At Sedalia there are four regiments of infantry, with a total strength of 2,600 men, two batteries of six pieces each, and one company of cavalry. These troops are mostly provided with transportation means. At Otterville there are two regiments of infantry, with a total strength of 1,500 men. These two regiments have no transportation, and can therefore not be moved for the moment, otherwise I would have ordered them to Sedalia.

Inclosed you will find the following papers:

1st. A disposition, in case I thought proper to resist an attack of Price’s forces advancing from Warrensburg.

2d. A report of myself to General Asboth, dated Sedalia, October 3, 3 o’clock p. m., showing my views in regard to future operations should Price retreat beyond Grand River towards the south.

3d. A report to General Asboth, dated October 4.

4th. A dispatch from headquarters of the Western Department to this command.*

By sending you these papers I hope to give you the best information I possibly can, and comply with your wishes expressed in your dispatch to General Davis.

I am, general, with the greatest respect, yours,

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General, Third Division.

* Not found.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, Sedalia, October 3, 1861.

Acting Brigadier-General OSTERHAUS, Commanding Second Brigade:

SIR: In case of an attack by the forces of General Price the following disposition is hereby made, and will be strictly obeyed, unless revoked before action:

1. General Davis will take position at Georgetown, with three regiments and four pieces of artillery, to form the right of the general position of this command. He will send a good scouting party towards the north, in the direction of Longwood, to guard Muddy Creek and to report any approach of troops from that side. This service should be done by {p.525} reliable scouts, to spare the troops for action. Cold Neck Bridge must be occupied by at least four companies, and mounted scouts sent out from there in a northwestern direction to watch any movement made against the bridge.

2. Two regiments and one battery of the command now at Georgetown will take position in some proper place south of Georgetown, to be in communication with this command, which I will post front southwest on the heights between Georgetown and Sedalia.

3. The troops at Otterville will proceed to Arater, and advance on the road leading from Arater to Georgetown. They will send one company to the left as far as the railroad track to watch the enemy’s movements from Sedalia. They will also have with them some mounted scouts to bring news to me as often as thought proper, to inform me of all the movements of the enemy. If transported by railroad, the troops from Otterville will not proceed farther than Priceville or Farmer City. From there they will march to the north, to strike the road leading from Arater to Georgetown. Arriving at this road, they will take a position to guard our left flank and rear, and to act, under proper circumstances, as the left wing of the line of battle. They will also send scouts from Otterville to Cold Neck Bridge, to give notice to the detachment stationed there and caution them to be on their post.

4. Colonel Bissell will occupy with his command the intrenchments before the La Mine Bridge, where he will receive re-enforcements, if necessary, to protect the retreat of the army across the La Mine River, or in case a battle should be fought near Otterville.

5. The trains will be sent back towards Otterville and Cold Neck. The commissary stores will also be removed, or, if no transportation can be had, destroyed.

6. The whole material at the railroad depot of Sedalia shall be removed, or, if no time is given, shall be burned or otherwise destroyed.

7. In case it should be found proper to retreat towards La Mine River the command of General Davis will take the road to Cold Neck Bridge; while the Third Division and the troops from Otterville will be directed either to Arater and Otterville or to the Booneville road leading to Cold Neck Bridge.

8. If re-enforcements from behind the La Mine River should be sent forward during the battle, they should advance towards Sedalia, to act against the right flank and rear of the enemy. A special order will define the position of the troops in detail.

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General, Third Division, Commanding.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION ARMY OF THE WEST, Sedalia, October 3, 1861-3 p. m.

Acting Major-General ASBOTH, Commanding Fourth Division, Jefferson City, Mo.:

GENERAL: News just received by me from my scouts sent to Warrensburg, and corroborated by a dispatch of General Davis, leave no doubt that General Price has left Warrensburg, retreating towards Rose Hill and Papinsville, to effect a junction with Ben. McCulloch, in Bates County. I learn by the same man, who was staying twenty-four hours in and around Warrensburg, that, since the affair at Lexington, perhaps 500 troops of Price have left him, making their way in {p.526} small squads towards the south. They said that Price was about to dismount them and use them as infantry, which they would not like. Our forces here are said to be 50,000. Mr. M. adds that the secessionists in Johnson and Henry Counties are in very low spirits, and that the rebels were not very anxious to meet us in equal numbers. There were 500 rebels at Warrensburg when Mr. M. left the place yesterday night. This morning I sent the detachment of cavalry under Captain Woldemar to La Monte and Sissonville. They have not returned yet, but will be here to-night. General Lane has, according to my last information, left Henry County and marched back towards the Kansas line. Montgomery was said to be at West Point northwest of Butler. From the subjoined order you will see what instructions General Lane has received by me.

If the movement of Price is confirmed, I would propose the following course of operations:

1. All troops this side of the La Mine River (west) being able to move should at once proceed to Warsaw, sake possession of the place, and prepare the necessary means of crossing the river by the main corps of the army. For this purpose the corps of Colonel Bissell and a pioneer company should be immediately forwarded to Sedalia to join this command.

2. The troops behind the La Mine River (at Syracuse, Tipton, Booneville, Jefferson, &c.) should advance by Versailles to Warsaw.

3. The troops at Rolla to Linn Creek.

4. Lane and Sturgis should unite at Warrensburg, to be directed to Clinton and Warsaw. In case this plan, which is in conformity with your ideas previously expressed, should find your approbation, I will immediately advance to Warsaw. If the enemy should, after being re-enforced at Rose Hill or Papinsville, return towards the north or east, our position on the Osage River would be so that we could act under great advantages.

I am, sir, with the greatest respect, your most obedient servant,

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General, Commanding Third Division.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION ARMY OF THE WEST, Sedalia, October 4, 1861.

Acting Major-General ASBOTH, Jefferson. City, Mo.:

GENERAL: As no train did come up and leave yesterday, I could not send you my report No. 5 that day. The 40 men of cavalry, under Captain Woldemar, were within 8 miles of Warrensburg, and report 500 men at that place. Price was yesterday at Rose Hill, and has left the city, moving in a southwestern direction. He must now be between Big Creek and Grand River. Lane was not at Clinton, and did not, therefore, receive my dispatch. He is reported to be at West Point. It may be that Price is marching against Lane and Sturgis for the laurels of another Lexington, but this seems to me rather improbable. One of my scouts returning from Henry County reports that the troops of Price, amongst whom he was, speak about “reorganizing the army”; “the army would be given over to the Confederate States”; “that Johnston would bring them a great store of new clothing from the South and 25,000 men”; “that he would take the command, and that Price would serve under him.”

{p.527}

If Price is crossing Grand River to march to the south, Lane and Sturgis could advance to Warrensburg to join us. I will send to General Lane to direct him in this way. If Price advances towards Sedalia and Georgetown with re-enforcements, I will act according to your instructions. If he retreats towards southwest, I think my proposition of report No. 5 could be adopted. [See inclosure No. 2.]

I am, sir, with the greatest respect, your most obedient servant,

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General, Commanding Third Division.

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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO., October 7, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters Western Department, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I have received information, which I believe to be reliable, that forces of the enemy came up Tuesday last (1st instant) from below, and landed at Columbus. Their numbers I have not ascertained, but would remark that they are supposed to be a part or the whole of Hardee’s command.

On the same day Jeff. Thompson’s troops left Belmont, opposite Columbus, on boats and landed at New Madrid. On Wednesday morning they moved for Sikeston, 25 miles from here, and have thrown forward a detachment to Benton, 18 miles from here, which corroborates what I wrote a few hours ago. Their force consisted of about 2,000 men, and are called “Thompson’s Brigade.” They are armed with muskets, rifles, and shot-guns.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. PLUMMER, Colonel Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, Georgetown, Mo., October 8, 1861.

Col. J. H. EATON, Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen., and Mil. Sec., Jefferson City, Mo.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that I have left Kelton’s brigade at Booneville collecting means of transportation, to move forward as soon as orders to that effect are received from the general commanding. One steamer was sent up, the other down the river, with detachments, to land at various points and hire or press all the wagons that could be formed, whilst detachments for the same purpose were sent out by land from Booneville. None of these had returned on the 6th.

I came to this place yesterday with a small escort, to inspect General Davis’ brigade, and to examine into the condition of affairs and the character of the country as to supplies, &c., in view of a forward movement. Unless I receive orders to the contrary from headquarters, I shall return to Booneville to-morrow.

There is no longer a doubt that Price is slowly retreating to the southwest, and my own belief is that he will make an effort, and probably a successful one unless he is intercepted, to take Fort Scott, where I am informed there are considerable stores of ammunition, &c. It seems to be the impression here that want of ammunition, especially of percussion caps, induced him to move south so as to meet supplies sent him by {p.528} McCulloch, but my own belief is that if pursued he will not halt this side of the Arkansas line unless forced to do so. If it be the purpose of the general commanding to pursue as rapidly as possible, I would respectfully suggest that a limited supply of transportation and cavalry would enable General Sigel’s division and my own to move forward immediately. I think our combined force amply sufficient to deal with Price, who from the best information has not over 20,000 men with him. It is believed among people here that he will divide this force in order to subsist it during his retreat south, and General Sigel and myself, if not able utterly to rout him, will at least be able to force a halt until he can be dealt with.

I would suppose that 150 wagons, with what can be collected by pressing, would be sufficient to enable these two divisions to move efficiently.

I shall send this letter if possible by special express, and hope by tomorrow afternoon to know what are the purposes of the general commanding in relation to my division-whether it had not best be concentrated either here or at some point south of this place. I will report to-morrow the exact condition in all respects of Davis’ brigade.

I am, colonel, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Acting Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 9, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Yesterday I visited Cape Girardeau, and found that Colonel Plummer was working every available man upon the fortifications, and had really accomplished more in one week than would have been done under an inefficient officer in two mouths. At the same rate Cape Girardeau will be very completely fortified by Saturday; requiring, however, some more heavy ordnance. I am very much in favor, as a general thing, of 24-pounder pieces on siege carriages, instead of ponderous guns, that take so much to mount and are moved from one place to another with so munch labor. I never would use them except in permanent positions. Cape Girardeau wants four, can use six, pieces. Colonel Plummer reports the Home Guards as of no use, and not to be found when called upon. I authorized the discontinuance of all recognition of them; also recommended, rather authorized, Captain Powell, an efficient officer of the Twentieth Illinois Volunteers, who has been acting as engineer, to raise a company to manage the siege guns. He reported that the company can be raised in two days at Cape Girardeau. This authority was given subject to the approval of the commander of department. Information here would indicate that troops are assembling ready to attack Paducah. My belief is that the attack will not be made for the present, however, but should it I will give General Smith all the aid prudent. The fact is, when I sent troops to Paducah, I selected the fullest regiments and those best armed and equipped, leaving here the raw, unarmed, and ragged. I would recommend that authority be given the quartermaster here to purchase horses for the use of Captain Houghtaling’s company of light artillery. They can be purchased here as cheaply as at Saint Louis, and on certificate to be paid there.

I would renew my recommendation that huts be put up for winter quarters for such garrison as it may be contemplated will occupy this {p.529} place. I would further recommend for the consideration of the commanding general whether it would not be a good plan to purchase a number of coal barges, such as have been used for the Paducah Bridge, and fit them up for winter quarters. They could be used for transporting troops for a southern expedition with much saving of steam power, and could be made comfortable quarters wherever landed. A full detail of the plan I would submit would take more room than I propose here. In a small way a constant supply of the essentials is being furnished the rebels by steamers plying between here and Saint Louis. I have thought of sending a steamer to Cape Girardeau with a guard aboard to follow each of these steamers, make every landing they do, and pick up all freight landed by them.

I would state again that my information to-day confirms the belief that Cape Girardeau is only threatened by Thompson and Lowe. My correspondence to-day with State authority does not indicate immediate re-enforcements from that quarter. It will be impossible for me to furnish General Smith with a company of artillery.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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LEAVENWORTH CITY, KANS., October 9, 1861.

His Excellency A. LINCOLN, President of the United States:

SIR: Since my return from Washington to Kansas I have labored earnestly and incessantly, as commander of the Kansas Brigade, to put down the great insurrection in Missouri. After the State authorities here had failed to collect a force worthy of the name, I, by my own individual efforts and those of my personal friends, despite the opposition of the governor of this State, succeeded in raising and marching against the enemy as gallant and effective an army, in proportion to its numbers, as ever entered the field. Its operations are a part of the history of the country. That brigade to a man are exceedingly desirous of continuing in the service under my command, and I am very anxious to gratify its members in that behalf; but as matters are at present arranged, I feel compelled to abandon the field.

While the Kansas Brigade was being organized, Governor Charles Robinson exerted his utmost endeavor to prevent the enlistment of men. Since its organization he has constantly, in season and out of season, vilified myself, and abused the men under my command as marauders and thieves. For the purpose of gratifying his malice against me, he has conspired with Captain Prince, the commandant at Fort Leavenworth, to dissolve the brigade, and Captain Prince has apparently heartily espoused the cause in that direction. The latter-named person, in his official capacity, has refused to recognize my authority as commander, and wholly declined to respond to my lawful requisitions upon him for articles and supplies necessary to the efficiency and comfort of the brigade.

There being no hope of improvement in this condition of things so long as I am in my present position, in order that I may with my brigade remain in the field, and the Government be sustained in this region, and Kansas be protected from invasion from Missouri, I earnestly request and recommend the establishment of a new military department, to be composed of Kansas, the Indian country, and so much of Arkansas and the Territories as may be thought advisable to include therein. {p.530} After much consideration, and consultation with influential and intelligent gentlemen hereabout, I am decidedly of opinion that this at least should be done, and that the commandant thereof should have under him at least 10,000 troops.

If this can be done, and I can have the command of the department, I will cheerfully accept it, resign my seat in the Senate, and devote all my thoughts and energies to the prosecution of the war. But if nothing can be done to remedy the evils complained of, I will, as above intimated, be compelled to leave my command, quit the field, and most reluctantly become an idle spectator of the great struggle, and witness, I have no doubt, the devastation of my adopted State and the destruction of its people.

Yours, truly,

J. H. LANE.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., October 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. R. CURTIS, Commanding, &c., Benton Barracks, Mo.:

SIR: I have ordered Captain Callender to arm Colonels Wright’s and Boyd’s regiments. You will please detach the battery of the Ninth Iowa from the regiment and mention them separately in the consolidated reports. It will not accompany the regiment. You will order the Ninth Iowa to proceed to Pacific City to-morrow morning and report for orders to Brigadier-General Harding. They will take tents with them and rations for ten days. The order for them to proceed to Rolla is suspended for the present.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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Abstract from statement of troops in the Western Department, October 10, 1861.

Station. Strength. Station. Strength.
Benton Barracks5,221Brought forward42,872
Cairo, Bird’s Point, and vicinity13,608Paducah, Ky.6,821
Chillicothe1,700Rolla2,069
Georgetown9,071Saint Joseph1,000
Hannibal1,050Saint Louis Arsenal1,339
Ironton2,972Sedalia4,928
Jefferson City4,247Syracuse4,472
Kansas City1,200Tipton11,345
New Mexico3,803Miscellaneous points18,285
Carried forward42,872Grand total*93,131

* See McKeever to Thomas, October 19, post.

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[CIRCULAR LETTER.]

CAMP ASBOTH, Tipton, Mo., October 11, 1861.

GENERAL: The following movements of the several divisions of the Army of Western Missouri have been decided upon:

Acting Major-General Pope, with the forces under his immediate command, will march by way of Otterville to Sedalia, and from there by the most direct route to Leesville.

{p.531}

Acting Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis will start on the 13th of October from Georgetown by Sedalia with the troops belonging to General Pope’s division, and pursue the same direct road to Leesville, reaching his destination on the 15th.

Acting Major-General Sigel will start from Sedalia on the 13th and proceed in three marches, by Spring Rock and Cole Camp, to Warsaw, which place he will occupy, commence preparations immediately to cross the river next day, supported by Acting Major-General McKinstry’s forces, and cross on the 16th at all hazards, if a position can be taken on the right bank, under the protection of which a bridge may be built.

Acting Major-General McKinstry will start on the 13th, and proceed in four marches, by Florence, Haw Creek, and Cole Camp, to Warsaw, where he will co-operate with General Sigel.

Major-General Hunter will also start on the 13th, and proceed in four marches, by way of Versailles and Minerva (Hibernia), to Duroc Ferry.

Acting Major-General Asboth will start with his division on the 14th, and march in three days to Cole Camp Creek, by way of Wheatland and Hibernia.

Generals Sturgis and Lane are expected to be at the same time in Clinton, on our extreme right. You are, therefore, instructed to commence your march on the day appointed for your troops to move, and proceed according to the directions above laid down.

The state of the roads is such that trains may not be unfrequently delayed, which renders it more than usually necessary that the troops should in all cases have at least one day’s rations in their haversacks. The commanders of divisions will also, in all cases where possible, send forward in advance of the march a company of pioneers, protected by cavalry, to repair the bridges and roads wherever impassable.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 11, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Western Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Since my last report I have ascertained that Thompson with his troops has gone west to Bloomfield or farther. There is no force, therefore, threatening Cape Girardeau.

I sent the gunboats Tyler and Lexington down near Columbus to-day, not so much for the purpose of reconnoitering as to protect a steamer sent after wood belonging to Hunter, who is with the Southern Army. About 100 cords were brought up.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier. General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Tipton, Mo., October 12, 1861.

Col. J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I have received the general’s order directing my division to move in the morning. Not one-half of my division has yet reported. Colonel Ellis’ cavalry are without ammunition, cartridge-boxes, swords, {p.532} pistols, and great-coats, and many of them are greatly in want of clothing.

The men of the Indiana batteries are in want of great-coats, clothing, and ammunition.

Requisitions have been sent in for ambulances, but they have not been furnished. Some of our mules are unshod, and we shall have them lame and unserviceable, unless we can be furnished with portable forges and blacksmith’s tools.

About 50 tents are needed for the division. As we shall have to send our teams back for provisions after four days’ march, we should not leave here with less than 60,000 rations, as we cannot calculate on their return in less than 15 days to our camp, even if we should remain stationary at the end of our four days’ march.

The cavalry regiment has not a wagon; and Colonel Palmer’s and Colonel Bland’s have neither of them sufficient for their baggage.

To enable us to move efficiently, we need at least 100 wagons and the ambulances already ordered to be supplied to the division by the general commanding.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

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CAMP ASBOTH, Near Tipton, Mo., October 12, 1861.

General D. HUNTER, Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: In complying with the letter of instructions of yesterday, General Frémont directs that you proceed from Tipton for the present only so far as the first convenient camp ground, for the purpose of bringing your immediate command together and to enable you to organize the better your means of transportation. Colonel Woods, director of transportation, will confer with you to supply at the earliest moment practicable what is deficient. At a distance of 2, 3, or 5 miles your wagons can return to Tipton for what is needed.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 14, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Commanding Department of the West, Tipton, Mo.:

GENERAL: The Secretary of War directs me to communicate the following as his instructions for your government:

In view of the heavy sums due expended in the quartermaster’s department in this city, amounting to some $4,500,000, it is important that the money which may now be in the hands of the disbursing officers, or be received by them, be supplied to the current expenses of your army in Missouri, and the debts to remain unpaid until they can be properly examined and sent to Washington for settlement. The disbursing officers of the army to disburse the funds and not transfer them to irresponsible agents; in other words, those who do not hold commissions from the President and are not bonded. All contracts necessary to be {p.533} made, to be made by the disbursing officers. The senior quartermaster here has been verbally instructed.

It is deemed unnecessary to erect field works around this city, and you will direct their discontinuance; also those, if any, in course of construction at Jefferson City. In this connection it is seen that a number of commissions have been given by you. No payment will be made to such officers, except to those whose appointments have been approved by the President. This, of course, does not apply to the officers with volunteer commissions. Colonel Andrews has been verbally so instructed by the Secretary; also not to make transfer of funds except for the purpose of paying the troops.

The erection of barracks near your quarters in this city will be at once discontinued.

The Secretary has been informed that the troops of General Lane’s command are committing depredations on our friends in Western Missouri. Your attention is directed to this in the expectation that you will apply the correction.

Major Allen desires the services of Captain Turnley for a short time, and the Secretary hopes you may find it proper to accede thereto.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS POST, Rolla, Mo., October 14, 1861.

[Captain McKEEVER:]

CAPTAIN: A messenger from Colonel Wyman, commanding the Thirteenth Illinois and Major Wright’s command, arrived last night, bringing the following dispatch:

The rebels have left Iberia, and as near as we can learn the main body have gone to Lebanon-say not over 1,200 in all at that point. We took 5 prisoners last night, one of whom was armed with an English Tower gun and United States equipments. Some of their scouts have just fired on our pickets. The companies of rebels south and east of this post are ordered to the west of this place, to what point I cannot yet ascertain. They are all moving in that direction.

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 14, 1861.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 11.}

For the better convenience of administering the duties of this military district this command will be brigaded as follows, subject to such changes as may be deemed necessary in the future.

First Brigade, as now organized, and commanded by Brig. Gen. John A. McClernand, with the addition of the Tenth and Eighteenth Illinois Regiments, Schwartz’s battery of light artillery, and Stewart’s cavalry.

Second Brigade will be composed of Eighth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Seventh Iowa, and Twenty-second Illinois, Captain Houghtaling’s light artillery, and five companies of Second Illinois Cavalry, yet to be assigned, and will be under command of Col. R. J. Oglesby.

Third Brigade will be composed of the Eleventh and Twelfth Illinois Regiments, Second Iowa Regiment, Captain Taylor’s battery of light {p.534} artillery, and Langen’s, Pfaff’s, Burrell’s and Noleman’s cavalry, and will be under command of Col. W. H. L. Wallace.

Fourth Brigade, Col. John Cook commanding, will be composed of the Seventh and Twenty-eighth Illinois Regiments, McAllister’s company of light artillery, Delano’s cavalry, and one company of Second Illinois Regiment of Cavalry.

Fifth Brigade, Colonel Plummer commanding, will be composed of the Eleventh Missouri, Seventeenth Illinois, and Tenth Iowa Regiments, headquarters Cape Girardeau.

The command of the post of Cairo, including Mound City, will be retained by General McClernand.

Brigade commanders will make their reports immediately to these headquarters.

By order of Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General,

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JOHN A. MCCLERNAND, Commanding Post, Cairo, Ill.:

Information deemed reliable having been received at these headquarters that a large body of troops, supposed to be the rebel forces, are encamped on the Mississippi River opposite Chester, you will therefore order the gunboat Tyler and steamer Aleck Scott, with a regiment of infantry, with a sufficient number of days’ rations, to proceed up the Mississippi River as far as Chester, Ill., for the purpose of making a reconnaissance. Should the information prove correct, they will dislodge them from their position.

By order of Brigadier-General Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Camp Zagonyi, Mo., October 15, 1861.

General B. M. PRENTISS, Commanding, &c., Camp Zagonyi, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to say that he wishes you at the earliest moment to perfect your arrangements for insuring the efficiency of the public service in North Missouri, with a view to turn over to Brigadier-General Todd the command in that quarter, leaving with him sufficient force to secure peace and quiet there. You are authorized to aid in the procuring of new regiments from Illinois, in which service Colonel Koerner is now engaged, so as to replace your old brigade for active operations in the field, under instructions hereafter to be given from these headquarters. For the furtherance of this object you will communicate with Governor Yates, of Illinois, and instructions will be given to Major Allen, quartermaster in Saint Louis, to act upon your requisition for transportation for the outfit of your brigade for field service.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Camp near Warsaw, Mo., October 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that, after pushing the works of preparation at Saint Louis, Jefferson City, and Tipton, I left the latter place on the 14th instant, and, having fully matured my plans of operation against the enemy, have now reached this place with the major part of the division of Acting Major-General Asboth, near 5,000 strong, and only need the co-operation of the other divisions, already in march, or about to march, from their several points of departure on the line of the railroad, to move with all possible celerity against the enemy. Part of the division of Acting Major-General Sigel, which marched from Sedalia on the 13th, occupied Warsaw on the afternoon of the 15th, and this morning a detachment of cavalry, with the battalion of four companies of Missouri infantry, crossed the Osage River (not yet fordable). The other portions of his force have also been crossing during the day.

On the 14th the position of the enemy was reported as follows:

General Price, northeast of Montevallo, at the Prairie House; Steen’s command, at Montevallo; Harrison’s troops, at Big Alder Creek, and Rains’ troops, at a place three miles below Montevallo, on the same stream.

After the crossing of the Osage by the cavalry this morning, Sergeant Trautweire reports that on their advance towards the Pomme de Terre River Bridge they had an engagement with some rebel cavalry, taking several prisoners. Further reports of my operations will be duly dispatched to the Department.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, Saint Louis, Mo., October 16, 1861.

Col. T. A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

The effect of the special Washington dispatches to the New York Tribune on Missouri affairs has been to stimulate the rebels to great activity and aggression in the city and State. They are concentrating around Pilot Knob, having burned the bridge on the Iron Mountain road, to stop our re-enforcements. We have sent two regiments, and will whip them. They have cut the northern wires and are active and impudent. Hardee and Johnston have gone to Kentucky. General Frémont is 30 miles south of Tipton, marching fast. Your dispatch came while I was writing this. General Cameron left here Monday noon, he said, for Kentucky, to reach Washington Saturday night or Monday. I shall see you Monday or earlier.

B. RUSH PLUMLY, Major, Acting Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 16, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Wester Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: Two dispatches from General Frémont were received to-day and promptly attended to. I also received a dispatch from General Sherman, stating that Hardee had effected a junction with Buckner, and they were threatening Louisville; requesting me at the same time in connection with General Smith, to make a demonstration on Columbus. Sending troops to Cape Girardeau, as I have done to-day, and having out another expedition of some 200 men, it will be a day or two before any move can be made. I will communicate with General Smith and co-operate in any demonstration that may seem to recommend itself. I have no reliable information from the enemy not already communicated.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 16, 1861.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH, Commanding U. S. Forces, Paducah, Ky.:

I send you to-day a copy of a dispatch received from General Sherman.* If you have any plan to propose, I am ready to co-operate to the extent of my limited means. I had to send off quite an expedition to the neighborhood of Ironton to-day by orders from headquarters Western Department, and have another expedition out at the same time. Five thousand is the greatest number of men I could start out with.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found, but see next preceding dispatch.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, October 17, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Western Dept., Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: In pursuance of telegraphic instructions from the commanding general, I sent from here Colonel Marsh’s regiment of Illinois volunteers, three companies of cavalry, and a section of artillery, to be re-enforced by two regiments from Cape Girardeau, to go in pursuit of Thompson and such of the rebel army as have been committing depredations on the Iron Mountain Railroad.

There is a great difficulty in procuring storage here for commissary and quartermaster’s stores, particularly since the fleet of gunboats have commenced making preparations for fitting out. I have directed the employment of a very large wharf boat, capable of storing 2,500 tons, subject to the approval of the department commander. This accommodation, it now seems, the gunboat fleet wants. I ordered it more particularly for the commissary and ordnance departments. A great proportion of the rations issued from here going by water to the different posts, an immense labor is saved in hauling by storage upon the water.

{p.537}

I would ask if storage for the gunboat fleet is to be furnished by the Quartermaster’s Department, or is Captain Perry, Navy receiving officer here, to furnish this accommodation out of a different appropriation.

It is highly necessary, in view of possible high water, to revet the outer embankments of Fort Prentiss, to prevent them from washing away. There is no money in the engineer department to make the purchase of material with which to do it. Shall I order the quartermaster to purchase the necessary material? The labor can be furnished by detail.

In the matter of signing discharges on surgeon’s certificates I examined the regulations well, and come fully to the conclusion that now that General Frémont was in the field I might regard myself as commanding an army in the field also, and therefore be entitled to sign such discharges. Then, too, many of the cases coming before me are of such a nature that the applicant should not be detained a single day.

I would ask as to my authority to grant sick leaves; also if I have authority to send officers or men on recruiting service to fill up companies here.

For the last few days the reports I get from the enemy are so contradictory that I feel but little like reporting. I am satisfied, however, that Hardee, with 5 regiments, has joined Buckner; also that a large force has crossed to the Missouri shore-this latter chiefly, I think, to gather the large crop of corn now maturing.

There has been added lately to the works at Columbus a casemate battery.

Several days ago I ordered a steamer to Cape Girardeau to follow the first Saint Louis steamer, and make all her landings below that point and seize all goods landed. My orders were exceeded by seizing the steamer also, but she was released promptly on being brought into port. A copy of the report of the officer commanding, marked A,* is inclosed. Are these goods to be retained? I would again suggest that trade with Southeastern Missouri should be cut off. The enemy are enabled to get valuable supplies by that route, and all the information in possession of citizens of Saint Louis. Paper marked B* contains a list of articles seized in the same manner, landed by the steamer Arago.

I would suggest that, if consistent with the views of the commanding general, I would like to visit Saint Louis and Springfield strictly on business for this command. I have frequently reported our deficiency in many of the necessaries to a complete outfit, and want to give my best efforts to remedy the evil.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Not found.

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ROLLA, MO., October 18, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General, Saint Louis, Mo.:

CAPTAIN: A scout returned here last night and reports that the rebel forces at Vienna have dispersed, some joining Johnston and the balance scattered.

Freeman is about 40 miles south, with a force of 700 men.

Price has halted South of the Osage, and called the legislature together at Carthage on the 4th day of November.

{p.538}

Taylor has issued a proclamation prohibiting any Missourian carrying property out of the State.

Report from Springfield to-day that Johnston is ordered to take command in Missouri.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post, Rolla, Mo.

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WASHINGTON, October 18, 1861.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

DEAR SIR: The inclosed message from Gustave Koerner, aide-decamp to General Frémont, was read in Cabinet meeting today by the President. It was determined to refer all irregular appointments in the Department of the West to you for examination, with instructions to submit some plan that will do justice to those men now serving who are faithful and competent officers, and provide a remedy for the evils now existing.

Very respectfully,

THOMAS A. SCOTT, Assistant Secretary of War.

[Inclosure.]

SAINT LOUIS, October 16, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

Deputy Paymaster-General Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews refuses to honor General Frémont’s commissions, which have heretofore invariably been accepted by him. Officers of the Army who have sacrificed their all to take up arms for their country are thus left destitute, and their families in want of the most urgent necessities of life. Very many of these officers are now in the field and in face of the enemy. Their efficiency and the spirits of many of the troops serving under them will be most seriously affected by this course. Unless you will provide a remedy to insure these men in their well-deserved remuneration a portion of the army will necessarily disband, as no officers will or can serve without a valid commission.

GUSTAVE KOERNER, Aide-de– Camp.

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HARRISBURG, PA., October 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. LORENZO THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

GENERAL: When I did myself the honor to ask you to accompany me on my Western tour, it was with the view of availing myself of your experience as Adjutant-General of the Army. Finding that the result of my investigations might (as I at first apprehended) have an important effect not only upon the Army of the West, but upon the interests of the whole country, I requested you to take full notes upon all points connected with the object of my visit.

As you inform me that you have carefully complied with my wish, I now respectfully request you to submit your report as early as practicable, {p.539} in order that the President may be correctly advised as to the administration of affairs connected with the Army of the West.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* See Thomas to Cameron, October 21, p. 540.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., October 19, 1861.

General LORENZO THOMAS, Adjt. Gen. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I was taken sick the day you left here, and was not able to comply sooner with the instructions given me to furnish you with a copy of General Frémont’s order to print his proclamation of August 30. I herewith inclose a copy of the order to publish the President’s letter, together with the order to print 200 copies of the original proclamation.*

The return of troops** in this department was sent during my illness without a letter of transmittal. The number is apparently large, but it must be borne in mind that about 4,000 cavalry, 10,000 infantry, and one-half the artillery are without arms.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Of August 30, p. 466; see, also, p. 543.

** See p. 530.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Warsaw, Mo., October 19, 1861.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding, Paducah, Ky.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the general commanding to invite your attention to certain rumors of a meditated maneuver by the Confederate, forces at Columbus and in Southeast Missouri, which, if true, would compromise the safety of Ironton, and possibly of Saint Louis. Should General Johnston or Hardee, or perhaps even Pillow, advance upon either of those places, it would, whether a real or simulated movement, affect the operations here; and he would be glad to have you apprise him at the earliest moment of your views as to the whole service thus likely to be affected, desiring you on any sudden emergency to act in Kentucky as in your judgment may seem to you best.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 23.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Warsaw, Mo., October 20, 1861.

I. Depredations by individuals of the United States troops now marching southward are a subject of frequent and, in many instances, of just complaint. While it is the determination of the commanding {p.540} general to prosecute the war with the utmost vigor against all who are in arms against the Government, it is equally his aim to inspire confidence in the loyal inhabitants of this State, and to assure others of protection and immunity if they return to their allegiance.

When necessaries are taken along the route of the Army, it will be by the proper officers, under orders only from the commanding general or generals of divisions, and will be receipted for and the owners in due time paid. But plundering and marauding, doubly disgraceful in soldiers, whose duty is to protect the persons and property of their countrymen, are declared by the Army Regulations to be crimes of such enormity, as to admit of no remission of the terrible penalty decreed by the military law for offenses of this nature.

It is therefore strictly forbidden to take private property from any person, for any purpose whatever, except by authority of a general officer; to enter any dwelling occupied or unoccupied, unless accompanied by a commissioned officer; to fire a gun or pistol in camp or on the march, or to leave the ranks upon any pretense without the order or permission of the company commander.

This requirement is to be enforced amongst all those who accompany the baggage and field trains, as well as with those who march in the columns.

II. As a habitual practice during the campaign, the troops will be required to turn out at the reveille roll-call under arms, and stand to arms fully equipped and ready for service. After roll-call the arms and accouterments will be inspected by a company officer. The cartridges in the boxes will be counted and the men held to answer, and if necessary be punished, for any expenditure of ammunition not properly accounted for.

III. All commanding officers will be held responsible for the strict execution of this order.

By order of Major-General Frémont

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., October 21, 1861.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the report requested in your letter of the 19th instant.*

We arrived at Saint Louis, as you are aware, at 2.30 a. m. October 11. After breakfast rode to Benton Barracks, above the city. On the street leading to the camp passed a small field work in course of construction. Found the camp of great extent, with extensive quarters, constructed of rough boards. Much has been said of the large sums expended in their erection, but some one mentioned that General McKinstry, principal quartermaster, who made the disbursements, gave the cost at $15,000. If so, it was judicious. The actual cost should be ascertained. General Curtis was in command. Force present, 140 officers, 3,338 men– principally detachments, except the First Iowa Cavalry, 34 officers, 904 men, having horses, but without equipments.

General Curtis said of General Frémont that he found no difficulty in having access to him, and when he presented business connected with his command, it was attended to. General F. never consulted him on {p.541} military matters, nor informed him of his plans. General Curtis remarked that while he would go with freedom to General Scott and express his opinions, he would not dare do so to General Frémont. He deemed General Frémont unequal to the command of an army, and said that he was no more bound by law than by the winds.

After dinner rode to the arsenal, below the city, Captain Callender in charge. The garrison for its protection is under Major Granger, Third Cavalry. But very few arms on hand; a number of heavy guns, designed for gunboats and mortar boats. The captain is engaged in making ammunition. He said he heard that some person had a contract for making the carriages for these guns; that, if so, he knew nothing of it, and that it was entirely irregular, he being the proper officer to attend to the case. This, in my opinion, requires investigation. He expected soon to receive funds, and desired them for current purposes; was fearful, however, that they might be diverted for other payments. Visited a large hospital not distant from the arsenal, in charge of Assistant Surgeon Bailey, U. S. Army. It was filled with patients, mostly doing well; in fine order, and a credit to the service. The doctor had an efficient corps of assistants from the volunteer service, and in addition a number of Sisters of Charity as nurses. God bless these pure and disinterested women!

Colonel Andrews, chief paymaster, called and represented irregularities in the Pay Department, and desired instructions from the Secretary for his government, stating that he was required to make payments and transfers of money contrary to law and regulations. Once, upon objecting to what he conceived an improper payment, he was threatened with confinement by a file of soldiers. He exhibited an order for the transfer of $100,000 to the Quartermaster’s Department, which was irregular. Exhibited abstract of payment by one paymaster (Major Febiger) to 42 persons, appointed by General Frémont, viz: 1 colonel, 3 majors, 5 captains, 15 first lieutenants, 11 second lieutenants, 1 surgeon, 3 assistant surgeons; total 42. Nineteen of these have appointments as engineers, and entitled to cavalry pay.

A second abstract of payments was furnished, but not vouched for as reliable, as the paymaster was sick, and is only given to show the excess of officers of rank appointed to the major-general’s body guard of only 300 men; the commander being a colonel, &c. The whole number of irregular appointments made by General Frémont was said by Colonel Andrews to be nearly 200.

The following is a copy of one of these appointments:

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, August 28, 1861.

SIR: You are hereby appointed captain of cavalry, to be employed in the land transportation department, and will report for duty at these headquarters.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding.

To Capt. FELIX VOGELE, Present.

I also saw a similar appointment given to an individual on General Frémont’s staff, as director of music, with the rank and commission of captain of engineers. This person was a musician in a theater in Saint Louis. Colonel Andrews was verbally instructed by me not to pay him, the person having presented the two papers and demanded pay. Colonel Andrews also stated that these appointments bore one date, but directed payment, in some cases, a month or more anterior thereto. He was then without funds, except a small amount.

The principal commissary, Captain Haines, had no outstanding debts, {p.542} and expected funds soon. Major Allen, principal quartermaster, had recently taken charge at Saint Louis, but reported great irregularities in his department, and requested special instructions. These he deemed important, as orders were communicated by a variety of persons, in a very irregular manner, requiring disbursements of money. These orders are often verbally given (see paper No. 4, asking for instructions) [A]. He was sending, under General Frémont’s orders, large amounts of forage from Saint Louis to the army at Tipton, where corn was abundant and very cheap. The distance was 160 miles. He gave the indebtedness of the quartermaster’s department in Saint Louis to be $4,506,309.73.

In regard to contracts, without an examination of the accounts it would be difficult to arrive at the facts. It is the expressed belief of many persons that General Frémont has around him in his staff persons directly and indirectly concerned in furnishing supplies. The following is a copy of a letter signed by Leonidas Haskell, captain and aide-de-camp. He, though on General Frémont’s staff is said to be a contractor for hay and forage and mules, the person named in his note, Colonel Degraf, being his partner.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT Camp Lute, October 2, 1861.

SIR: I am requested by the commanding general to authorize Colonel Degraf to take any hay that has been contracted for by the Government, his receipt for the same being all the voucher you require.

Respectfully, yours,

LEONIDAS HASKELL, Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

What does this mean? Contractors deliver forage direct to quartermasters, who issue the same; but here another party steps in, and, if a contractor or the partner of one, to fill his own contract. This double transaction it is difficult to suppose is done without a consideration. The accounts should be examined, and the price paid to Degraf compared with that paid to the contractors whose forage was seized.

This same Captain Haskell, aide-de-camp, was a contractor for mules. He desired Captain Turnley to receive his animals-good, bad, and indifferent, as Captain Turnley said. This he would not do, and stated his prices for different classes-wheel lead &c. Besides, he had more mules than could possibly send to the army. Notwithstanding all this, he received an order to inspect and receive Mr. Haskell’s mules as rapidly as possible. Captain Turnley very soon received orders from General Frémont to leave Saint Louis and proceed to the interior. (See paper No. 7, showing his great labor and heavy responsibility) [B.]

By direction of General Meigs, advertisements were made to furnish grain and hay, and contracts made for specific sums-28 cents per bushel for corn, 30 cents for oats, and $17.95 per ton for hay. In face of this, another party at Saint Louis-Baird, or Baird & Palmer (Palmer being of the old firm in California of Palmer, Cook & Co.)-were directed to send to Jefferson City (where hay and corn abound) as fast as possible 100,009 bushels of oats, with a corresponding amount of hay, at 33 cents per bushel for grain and $19 per ton for hay. (See paper No. 7, Captain Turnley’s letter.)

Captain Edward M. Davis, a member of his staff, received a contract by the direct order of General Frémont for blankets. They were examined by a board of army officers, consisting of Captain Hendershott, Fourth Artillery, Captain Haines, commissary of subsistence, and Captain {p.543} Turnley, assistant quartermaster. The blankets were found to be made of cotton and to be rotten and worthless. Notwithstanding this decision they were purchased, and given to the sick and wounded soldiers in hospitals. These facts can be ascertained from the report of the board or the officers themselves, and the bill of purchase. Amongst the supplies sent by General Frémont to the army now in the field may be enumerated 500 half barrels, to carry water in a country of abundant supply, and 500 tons of ice.

We examined the barracks in course of construction in Saint Louis, near and around the private house occupied by him as quarters, the Brant House, rented at $6,000 per annum. These barracks have brick foundations and brick outer walls, weather-boarded, and are sufficient as quarters and stables for 1,000 men. Like those of Camp Benton, these barracks were not built by contract or proposals. They are certainly more expensive and more permanent than the quarters a temporary army would require, and the exact expense, though perhaps difficult to ascertain, should be discovered.

A pontoon bridge has been thrown across the Ohio River at Paducah. A ferry boat, in a region where such boats are readily procured, would be just as efficient and much less expensive.

Contracts, it will be seen, were given to individuals without resorting to advertisements for bids, as required by law and regulations. Having received an intimation from another quarter of an impropriety, I called on Captain McKeever, assistant adjutant-general, for the facts, which he gave me as follows: One week after the receipt of the President’s order modifying General Frémont’s proclamation relative to emancipation of slaves, General Frémont, by note to Captain McKeever, required him to have 200 copies of the original proclamation and address to the army, of same date, printed and sent immediately to Ironton, for the use of Major Gavitt, Indiana Cavalry, for distribution through the country. Captain McKeever had the copies printed and delivered. The order is as follows:

[Captain McKeever:]

Adjutant-general will have 200 copies of proclamation of commanding general, dated 30th August, together with address to the army of same date, sent immediately to Ironton for the use of Major Gavitt, Indiana Cavalry. Major Gavitt will distribute it through the country.

J. C. F., Commanding General.

SEPTEMBER 23, 1861.

We left Saint Louis October 12 for General Frémont’s headquarters at Tipton, 160 miles distant, passing the night at Jefferson City, the capital of Missouri, 125 miles from Saint Louis. General Price was in command of the place, with a force of 1,200 men. The Eighth Iowa was there, en route for Tipton. At this place there were accumulated a large quantity of forage landed from steamboats, and some wagons and mules, for transportation; also the half barrels for carrying water, and a number of mules, which Captain Turnley said he could not get forward, having no control over the transportation by railroad.

Leaving Jefferson City on the 13th, we arrived at Tipton at 9 o’clock a. m. The Secretary of War was called upon by General Frémont, and, upon the general’s invitation, accompanied him to Syracuse, 5 miles distant, to review the division under General McKinstry, nearly 8,000 strong. This body of troops is said to be the best equipped and best supplied of the whole army. They certainly are, so far as means of transportation are concerned. At Tipton, besides General Frémont and staff, his body guard, &c., I found a part of General Hunter’s First {p.544} Division and General Asboth’s Fourth Division. The force designed to act against Price consists of five divisions, as follows:

First Division, Hunter’s, at Tipton9,750
Second Division, Pope’s, at Georgetown9,2200
Third Division, Sigel’s, at Sedalia7,980
Fifth Division, Asboth’s, at Tipton6,451
Sixth Division, McKinstry’s, at Syracuse5,388
Total38,789

As soon as I obtained a view of the several encampments at Tipton, I expressed the opinion that the forces there assembled could not be moved, as scarcely any means of transportation were visible. I saw General Hunter, second in command, and conversed freely with him. He stated that there was great confusion, and that Frémont was utterly incompetent; that his own division was greatly scattered, and the force then present defective in many respects; that he required 100 wagons, yet he was ordered to march that day, and some of his troops were already drawn out on the road. His cavalry regiment (Ellis’) had horses, arms (indifferent), but no equipments; had to carry their cartridges in their pockets; consequently, on their first day’s march from Jefferson City, in a heavy rain, the cartridges carried about their persons were destroyed. This march to Tipton (35 miles) was made on a miry, heavy earth road parallel to the railroad, and but a little distance from it. The troops were directed by General Frémont to march without provisions, knapsacks, and without transportation. A violent rain storm came up, and the troops were exposed to it all night, were without food for twenty-four hours, and when food was received the beef was found to be spoiled.

General Hunter stated that he had just received a written report from one of his colonels, informing him that but 20 out of 100 of his guns would go off. These were the guns procured by General Frémont in Europe. I may here state that General Sherman, at Louisville, made a similar complaint of the great inferiority of these European arms. He had given the men orders to file down the nipples. In conversation with Colonel Swords, assistant quartermaster-general, at Louisville, just from California, he stated that Mr. Selover, who was in Europe with General Frémont, wrote to some friend in San Francisco that his share of the profit of the purchase of these arms was $30,000.

When General Hunter, at Jefferson City, received orders to march to Tipton, he was directed to take 41 wagons with him, when he had only 40 mules, which fact had been duly reported to headquarters. At this time Colonel Stevenson’s Seventh Missouri Regiment was, without General Hunter’s knowledge, taken from him, leaving him, when under marching orders, with only one regiment at Jefferson City fit to take the field (see paper No. 9**). General Hunter showed me the order for marching, dated October 10, which he only received the 12th (see paper No. 10).*** (See Hunter’s reply, showing the great wants of his command, marked No. 11)**** The same day the order was changed to one day’s march (see paper No. 12).*****

When General Pope, at Georgetown, 25 miles distant, received this order of march, he wrote a private letter to Hunter, which I read. It set forth the utter impossibility of his moving for the want of supplies and transportation, and asked whether General Frémont could mean what he said.

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All of the foregoing goes to show the want of military foresight and soldierly judgment on the part of General Frémont in directing the necessary means for putting and maintaining in the field the forces under his command.

General Hunter stated that, though second in command, he never was consulted by General Frémont, and knew nothing whatever of his intentions. Such a parallel, I venture to assert, cannot be found in the annals of military warfare. I have also been informed that there is not a Missourian on his staff, not a man acquainted personally with the topography and physical characteristics of the country or its people.

The failure of General Frémont to re-enforce General Lyon demands a brief notice. General Frémont arrived at Saint Louis July 26, called thither from New York by telegraph stating that General Lyon was threatened by 30,000 rebels. At this time General Pope had nine regiments in North Missouri, where the rebels had no embodied force, the Confederate forces in the State being those under Price and McCulloch, near Springfield, Southwest Missouri, and those under Pillow, Jeff. Thompson, and Hardee, in Southeast Missouri. Two regiments held Rolla, the terminus of the Southwestern Branch of the Pacific Railroad, whilst Jefferson City, Booneville, Lexington, and Kansas City had each a garrison of 300 or 400 men, behind entrenchments. Cairo and Bird’s Point were fortified and defended with heavy artillery. (Pilot Knob and Cape Girardeau were fortified after General Frémont’s arrival.) All these places could be re-enforced by railroad and river from Saint Louis and the Northwestern States, and could hold out until re-enforced, even if attacked by superior forces.

On his arrival in Saint Louis, General Frémont was met by Captain Cavender, First Missouri, and Major Farrar, aide-de-camp to General Lyon, with statements from the latter, and asking for re-enforcements. Major Phelps, M. C. from Springfield, Dr. Miller, of Omaha, and many other citizens, having ample means of information, made the same representations, and urged the sending of re-enforcements. To Governor Gamble he said, “General Lyon is as strong as any other officer on this line.” He failed to strengthen Lyon, and the result, as is well known, was the defeat of that most gallant officer. The two regiments at Rolla should have been pushed forward, and the whole of Pope’s nine regiments brought by rail to Saint Louis and Rolla, and thence sent to Lyon’s force. Any other general, in such an emergency, would have pursued this obvious course.

The battle of Springfield (or, more strictly, Wilson’s Creek)-one of the most desperate ever fought on this continent-took place August 10, when the brave Lyon fell, and the troops, borne down by greatly superior numbers, were obliged to fall back, but unpursued by a badly beaten foe.

General Frémont called four regiments from North Missouri, and went with them to Cairo. It is evident he had no intention of re-enforcing General Lyon, for the two regiments at Rolla, 125 miles only from Springfield, received no orders to march, and were not supplied with transportation, and 30 or 40 hired wagons, just returned from Springfield, were discharged at Rolla August 4, seven days before the battle, and returned to Saint Louis.

After the news of the battle reached Saint Louis four other regiments were drawn from Pope in North Missouri and sent to Rolla. Better to have called in these troops before the battle, as after the battle the whole revolutionary elements were called forth. The six regiments accomplished nothing and were not ordered to advance and cover the {p.546} retreat of Lyon’s army, although it was supposed in Saint Louis that Price and McCulloch were following it, and that Hardee had moved up to cut off its retreat on the Gasconade.

An advance of these regiments would have enabled the army to retrace its steps and to beat the forces of Price and McCulloch so badly, that they would have been unable to follow our forces in their retreat. It is said that every officer in Lyon’s army expected to meet re-enforcements, and to return with them and drive Price and McCulloch from the southwest.

General Hunter arrived at Saint Louis from Chicago, called thither on a suggestion from Washington, as an adviser. General Frémont submitted to him, for consideration and advice, a paper called “Disposition for retaking Springfield” (See Exhibit No. 13, C). It sets out with a statement that Springfield is the strong strategical point of that wide elevation which separates the waters of the Osage from those of the Arkansas, the key to the whole of Southwestern Missouri, commanding an area of nearly 60,000 miles. Why did not this enter the brain of the major-general before the fall of Lyon, and he strain every nerve to hold that important key when in his possession?

General Hunter, in answer to the paper, replied, “Why march on Springfield, where there is no enemy and nothing to take. Let me take the troops and proceed to Lexington,” in which direction Price was marching, and where he expected to be joined by 40,000 rebels. Instead of this, he was sent to Rolla, without instructions, and remained there until ordered to Jefferson City, still without instructions, and thence to Tipton, where we found him.

No steps having been taken by General Frémont to meet Price in the field, he moved forward his line of march, plainly indicating his intention of proceeding to Lexington. When within some 35 miles of the place he remained ten or more days, evidently expecting that some movement would be made against him. None being made, he advanced, and with his much superior force laid siege to Lexington, defended by Mulligan, with 2,700 men, September 12, and captured it the 21st, nine days thereafter.

Now for the facts to show that this catastrophe could have been prevented, and Price’s army destroyed before or after that disastrous affair.

Before Price got to Lexington the forces to resist him were as follows: Jefferson City, 5,500; at Rolla, 4,000; along the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, about 5,000; western line of Missouri, under Lane, down near Fort Scott, 2,300; Mulligan’s force at Lexington, 2,700; a large force in Illinois, along the Mississippi River, and on the Iowa line; outside of Saint Louis, some 17,000; in Saint Louis, 18,000, but say 10,000.

Hunter’s plan, up to Sunday, September 22, was to concentrate from Saint Louis, Jefferson City, and Rolla, also from the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad, 20,000 men, and relieve Mulligan. He said that if Price was a soldier Lexington had then fallen, but he could with energy be captured, with all his baggage and plunder. The objection that there was no transportation is idle. The railroads and river were at command, and the march from Sedalia was only 45 miles. The force could, General Hunter supposed, be thrown into Lexington by Thursday, as it appears, before it was taken.

General Frémont ordered Sturgis, in North Missouri, to Lexington, and by crossing the river to re-enforce Mulligan. Sturgis had only 1,100 men, and on reaching the river opposite the town found it commanded {p.547} by Price, and of course was compelled to fall back. Hunter’s plan of moving these troops was to strike the river at a point below Lexington in our control, cross, and march up to the place. In the interview with General Frémont the question was asked whether any orders had been given to re-enforce Mulligan, and the reply being in the negative, General Hunter suggested orders to Sturgis; and had the order then been given by telegraph he would have reached the river before Price had taken possession of the north bank and could have crossed. The order was not given until three days after the interview. This loss of time was fatal.

Mulligan was ordered from Jefferson City, then garrisoned with 5,000 troops, with only one regiment to hold Lexington until he could be relieved. When Lexington fell, Price had 20,000 men, his force receiving daily augmentations from the disaffected in the State. He was permitted to gather much plunder and fall back towards Arkansas unmolested until we were at Tipton, the 13th October, when the accounts were that he was crossing the Osage. Frémont’s order of march was issued to an army of nearly 40,000, many of the regiments badly equipped, with inadequate supplies of ammunition, clothing, and transportation. With what prospect, it must be inquired, can General Frémont under such circumstances, expect to overtake a retreating army, some 100 miles ahead, with a deep river between?

General Hunter expressed to the Secretary of War his decided opinion that General Frémont was incompetent and unfit for his extensive and important command. This opinion he gave reluctantly, owing to his position as second in command.

The opinion entertained by gentlemen who have approached and observed him is that he is more fond of the pomp than of the stern realities of war; that his mind is incapable of fixed attention or strong concentration; that by his mismanagement of affairs since his arrival in Missouri the State has almost been lost, and that if he is continued in command, the worst results may be anticipated. This is the concurrent testimony of a very large number of the most intelligent men in Missouri.

Leaving Tipton on the 13th, we arrived at Saint Louis late in the evening, and on the 14th the Secretary of War directed me to issue the following instructions to General Frémont.******

Instructions were previously given (October 12) to the Hon. James Craig to raise a regiment at Saint Joseph, Mo.

We left Saint Louis October 14, and arrived at Indianapolis in the evening. Remained at Indianapolis October 15, and conversed freely with Governor Morton. We found that the State of Indiana had come nobly up to the work of suppressing the rebellion. Fifty-five regiments, with several batteries of artillery, had been raised and equipped; a larger number of troops in proportion to population than any other State had sent into the field. The best spirit prevailed, and it was manifest that additional troops could readily be raised. The governor had established an arsenal, and furnished all the Indiana troops with full supplies of ammunition, including fixed ammunition for their batteries of artillery. This arsenal was visited, and found to be in full operation. It was under the charge of a competent pyrotechnist. Quite a number of females were employed in making cartridges, and I venture to assert that the ammunition is equal to that which is manufactured anywhere else. Governor Morton stated that his funds for this purpose were exhausted, but the Secretary desired him to continue his operations, informing him {p.548} that the Government would pay for what had been furnished to the troops in the field. It is suggested that an officer of ordnance be sent to Indianapolis to inspect the arsenal and ascertain the amount expended in the manufacture of ammunition, with a view to reimbursing the State.

Left Indianapolis October 16 for Louisville, Ky., where we arrived at 12.30 o’clock p. m., and had an interview with General Sherman, commanding the Department of the Cumberland. He gave a gloomy picture of affairs in Kentucky, stating that the young men were generally secessionists and had joined the Confederates, while the Union men, the aged and conservatives, would not enroll themselves to engage in conflict with their relations on the other side. But few regiments could be raised. He said that Buckner was in advance of Green River, with a heavy force, on the road to Louisville, and an attack might be daily expected, which, with his then force, he would not be able to resist, but that he would fight them. He as well as citizens of the State said that the border States of Kentucky must furnish the troops to drive the rebels from the State. His force then consisted of 10,000 troops, in advance of Louisville, in camp at Nolin River, and on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad at various points; at Camp Dick Robinson, or acting in conjunction with General Thomas, 9,000; and two regiments at Henderson, on the Ohio, at the mouth of Green River. (See paper No. 14) D. On being asked the question what force he deemed necessary, he promptly replied 200,000 men. This conversation occurred in the presence of Mr. Guthrie and General Wood. The Secretary replied that he supposed that the Kentuckians would not in any number take up arms to operate against the rebels, but he thought General Sherman overestimated the number and power of the rebel forces; that the Government would furnish troops to Kentucky to accomplish the work; that he (the Secretary) was tired of this defensive war, and that the troops must assume the offensive and carry the war to the fire-sides of the enemy; that the season for operations in Western Virginia was about over, and that he would take the troops from there and send them to Kentucky; but he begged of General Sherman to assume the offensive and to keep the rebels hereafter on the defensive. The Secretary desired that the Cumberland Ford and Gap should be seized, and the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad taken possession of, and the artery that supplied the rebellion cut.

Complaint was made of the want of arms, and on the question being asked, “What became of the arms we sent to Kentucky ?” we were informed by General Sherman that they had passed into the hands of the Home Guards, and could not be recovered; that many were already in the hands of the rebels, and others refused to surrender those in their possession, alleging the desire to use them in defense of their individual homes if invaded. In the hands of individuals and scattered over the State these arms are lost to the army in Kentucky. Having ascertained that 6,200 arms had arrived from Europe at Philadelphia, 3,000 were ordered to Governor Morton, who promised to place them immediately in the hands of troops for Kentucky; the remaining 3,200 were sent to General Sherman at Louisville. Negley’s brigade, at Pittsburgh, 2,800 strong, two companies of the Nineteenth Infantry from Indianapolis, the Eighth Wisconsin, at Saint Louis, the Second Regiment of Minnesota Volunteers, at Pittsburgh, and two regiments from Wisconsin were then ordered to Kentucky, making in all a re-enforcement of about 10,000 men.

We left Louisville at 3 o’clock p. m. for Lexington, accompanied by General Sherman and Mr. Guthrie, remained there a few hours, and {p.549} proceeded to Cincinnati; arriving at 8 o’clock p. m. At Lexington also we found that the opinion existed that the young men of Kentucky had joined the rebels; that no large bodies of troops could be raised in Kentucky, and that the defense of the State must necessarily devolve upon the free States of the West and Northwest.

Having accomplished the object of our visit to the West, we left Cincinnati on the 18th and reached Washington on the 21st, having spent the 19th and 20th at Harrisburg.

Respectfully submitted.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

Hon. SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

* Which, with this report, was submitted by the Secretary of War to the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War, under date of March 12, 1862.

** See Hunter to Eaton, October 4, p. 519.

*** See Circular, October 11, p. 530.

**** See Hunter to Eaton, October 12, p. 531.

***** See Eaton to Hunter, October 12, p. 531.

****** See Thomas to Frémont, October 14, p. 532.

[Inclosure A.]

QUARTERMASTER’S OFFICE, Saint Louis, Mo., October 11, 1861.

GENERAL: I take the occasion of the presence of the honorable Secretary of War and yourself to make certain inquiries.

Is it competent for every member of the staff of Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont to issue orders in the name of the general, directed to me, and involving an expenditure of money?

Am I bound to recognize any other signature than that of Captain McKeever, the regularly-constituted assistant adjutant-general of the Western Department?

I desire to be instructed whether the simple approval of an account by the commanding general carries with it the weight of an order.

There are heavy accounts, involving hundreds of thousands of dollars, that have come under my observation, which are approved by Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, but in direct terms are not ordered. It is doubtless the intention of the general to order the payment. But as I understand the Army Regulations and the laws of Congress, an approval is not an order. If I am mistaken in this, I desire to be corrected.

Great latitude is taken in verbal orders. Amid the general being in the field, I cannot stop to question the authenticity of these orders, and feel it to be my duty to see them executed, although I have not the authority on paper necessary to carry these expenditures through the Treasury.

Accounts involving hundreds of thousands of dollars have been presented to me within the few days I have been here, informal, irregular, and not authorized by law or regulations.

No quartermaster who understands his duty can pay this class of accounts without involving himself in irretrievable ruin. I do not mean to say that these accounts are not just or should not be paid; but as they are outside of the regulations-in other words, extraordinary-they can be adjusted only by extraordinary authority.

Some three days ago I telegraphed the Quartermaster-General, M. C. Meigs, a message; and I give you an extract from memory: “If the reckless expenditures in this department are not arrested by a stronger arm than mine, the Quartermaster’s Department will be wrecked in Missouri alone.”

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBT. ALLEN, Major and Quartermaster.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army.

{p.550}

[Inclosures B.]

JEFFERSON CITY, MO., October 11, 1861.

GENERAL: In June, 1855, I left Saint Louis with seven steamboats, with stores and troops for the Upper Missouri River. I remained there on duty until 1857. I joined General Johnston and went to Utah. I returned from Utah last winter, on the first and only leave of absence I have had in twelve years. While on my way to Washington, in April, I stopped at Harrisburg; and, at the request of Governor Curtin, I remained there to assist in organizing the troops there assembling into camps and to put their commissariat into order. From there I was on duty constantly, day and night, at various posts-York, Cockeysville, Baltimore, Perryville, and Annapolis. Finally, about the 20th of July, I was ordered to report to General Frémont. I did so at New York. I was ordered on duty at Saint Louis, where I resumed similar labors to those I had been at in the East, and have been on my feet night and day since. A few days ago I received orders to report at this place for duty in the field.

I left all my public accounts open, in an incomplete and exposed condition, on my office table in Saint Louis, besides a vast deal of property not turned over. My health is so broken down that I am not able longer to stand up. I desire, as an act of simple justice to me, I be allowed to resume the leave of absence I surrendered in April (it would have expired 15th June), or else that I be ordered permanently to a post where I can get some rest, and be able to make up and forward to the Treasury Department my public accounts.

Your early reply to this is respectfully requested.

Respectfully,

P. T. TURNLEY, Assistant Quartermaster.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General United States.

NOTE.-My unsettled and unadjusted accounts will reach over one million and a half dollars.

JEFFERSON CITY, October 13, 1861.

GENERAL: On the 25th September ultimo I opened the bids, in my office at Saint Louis, made under General Meigs’ advertisement for furnishing grain and hay. I made contracts in accordance therewith, and gave a notice to contractors of the amount I supposed would be required weekly. A day or two after, another party (a Mr. Baird or Baird & Palmer) in Saint Louis informed me they had received an order (per telegraph) from Colonel Woods or General McKinstry, then at Jefferson City with headquarters, to forward as fast as possible to Jefferson City 100,000 bushels of oats and a like or corresponding amount of hay. The contractors under advertisement objected to this order, because they said Baird got 33 cents for grain and $19 per ton for hay, while contractors got 28 cents for coin, 30 cents for oats, and $17.95 per ton for hay. I then told contractors they need not send any forage up the river; or, if they did, they would be paid the same as Baird was.

About 29th or 30th September, after the headquarters Western Department had left Saint Louis (I being left there highest in rank in my department, but no orders or instructions except the single remark of General Frémont, that he wished no delay or obstacle whatever in the forwarding of supplies, &c.), I was daily and almost hourly called upon by different persons and asked to have their mules inspected. All {p.551} stated they were turning in mules on Mr. Haskell’s account. I called for the contract or order under which Haskell furnished them, but never received any until I received a line from General McKinstry, quartermaster, stating that General Frémont desired me to inspect and receive Mr. Haskell’s mules as rapidly as possible. I received mules from Mr. Haskell only as they were required to ship off for field service. I received some from other parties in like manner.

I have good grounds for believing that in not receiving all Mr. Haskell’s mules I gave much offense to him and to his friends. But I believed then, and I do yet, that my action was for the best interest of the Government.

Respectfully,

P. T. TURNLEY, Assistant Quartermaster.

General L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General United States.

[Inclosure C.]

Disposition for retaking Springfield.

Springfield, the strategical point of that wide elevation which separates the waters of the Osage from those of the Arkansas River, is the key to the whole southwestern part of Missouri, commanding an area of nearly 60,000 square miles.

Around it is clustered a true and loyal population, large numbers of whom, driven from their homes and fire-sides, and burning with a desire to revenge their sufferings and recapture their homesteads, are eagerly awaiting the opportunity to join an advancing army.

Not only, therefore, military strategy, but a wise and humane policy, demands the reoccupation of that place.

To effect this in the shortest and speediest way, a combined movement of our troops should be made from Rolla and Jefferson City.

The column from the latter place, moving first, will cross, after two days’ marching, the Osage River at Tuscumbia. To prevent delay in crossing, anchors, ropes, pulleys, and other portable necessaries for the construction of raft bridges should be taken along from Jefferson City.

Upon an appointed day after the passage of the river has been accomplished, the column from Rolla will commence its march, and that place and Tuscumbia being each about 100 miles from Springfield, in six days the two forces will be able to unite at their destination.

As the lines of march converge upon their approach to Springfield, it will be practicable at Lebanon and Cross Plains (10 miles north of Buffalo) to open communication between the columns. Strong scouting parties will best effect this object, and each body will thus support and assist the other.

The Cole County Home Guards should occupy Tuscumbia. After the column from Jefferson City has passed that place, a reserve should be left at Linn Creek to cover the rear provision train, while Warsaw, the most important point on the Osage, should be immediately occupied by the Home Guards of Johnson, Pettis, and Benton County, re-enforced by a volunteer regiment and two pieces of artillery.

Rolla, Waynesville, and Lebanon can be occupied upon the withdrawal of the other troops by regiments of the United States Reserve Corps from Saint Louis, while Jefferson City can be placed in charge of an adequate force of General Sigel’s brigade, now under reorganization.

To co-operate with this combined movement, General Lane will be {p.552} directed to march from Fort Scott, in Kansas, to Springfield, by way of Lamar and Greenfield, re-enforced if possible.

The successful execution of this plan puts us in possession of the entire southwestern portion of this State, forces the enemy to retire into Arkansas, and enables us, immediately after the concentration at Springfield, to assume the offensive against that State.

The exhausted condition of the country through which our troops are to pass renders necessary the most particular attention to the organization and protection of the provision trains; the commencement of cool weather demands additional clothing for the men, and the sad experience of the past warns us to make every necessary preparation to meet their wants.

[Inclosure D.]

In camp at Nolin River and on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad at various points.

Sixth Indiana, Colonel Crittenden, Nolin River.

Twenty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Miller, Nolin River.

Thirtieth Indiana, Colonel Bass, Nolin River.

Thirty-eighth Indiana, Colonel Scribner, Nolin River.

Thirty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Harrison, Nolin River.

Thirty-second Indiana, Colonel Willich, New Haven.

Tenth Indiana, Colonel Manson, Bardstown.

Nineteenth Illinois, Colonel Turchin, Lebanon Junction.

Twenty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Hecker, Colesburg.

Thirty-fourth Illinois, Colonel Kirk, Nolin River.

Fifteenth Ohio, Colonel Dickey, Nolin River.

Forty-ninth Ohio, Colonel Gibson, Nolin River.

Third Kentucky, Colonel Rousseau, Nolin. River.

Fourth Kentucky (cavalry), Colonel Board, Nolin River.

Stone’s Kentucky light battery, four pieces, Nolin River.

Cotter’s (Ohio) six rifled pieces will be in camp in two or three days at Nolin River.

At Camp Dick Robinson, or acting in conjunction with General Thomas’ command.

Two Tennessee regiments, nearly full and nearly ready for service.

Four Kentucky regiments, in same condition as Tennessee regiments; one regiment cavalry.

Fourteenth Ohio, Colonel Steedman, Nicholasville.

Seventeenth Ohio, Colonel Council, Nicholasville.

Thirty-third Indiana, Colonel Coburn, Camp Dick Robinson.

Thirty-eighth and Thirty-fifth Ohio, Camp Dick Robinson.

Three batteries of artillery, Ohio.

Four Ohio regiments on line of Covington and Lexington Railroad, acting with General Thomas.

Thirty-first Indiana, Colonel Cruft, Owensborough.

Also, three or four Kentucky regiments at Owensborough, under General Crittenden, not full nor ready for the field, but probably 1,500 men could turn out under arms.

{p.553}

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CAMP BENTON, MO., October 22, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have very reliable intelligence of Thompson’s movements since the burning of the bridge, his force, his arms, including several cannon poorly mounted, and have also information that the troops from Pilot Knob have moved towards each other and probably scattered. His several bridges are unguarded; others and the Knob are guarded by force I sent down by General Frémont’s orders. If Colonel Carlin has moved forward, as he proposed doing yesterday, before these are withdrawn, they must be promptly received. I have telegraphed for further reports of the whereabouts of the forces sent down, &c.

SAML. R. CURTIS, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, October 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. R. CURTIS:

DEAR SIR: On receipt of this, with the accompanying inclosures, you will take safe, certain, and suitable measures to have the inclosure addressed to Major-General Frémont* delivered to him with all reasonable dispatch, subject to these conditions only, that if, when General Frémont shall be reached by the messenger-yourself or any one sent by you-he shall then have, in personal command, fought and won a battle, or shall then be actually in a battle, or shall then be in the immediate presence of the enemy in expectation of a battle, it is not to be delivered, but held for further orders. After, and not till after, the delivery to General Frémont, let the inclosure* addressed to General Hunter be delivered to him.

Your obedient servant,

A. LINCOLN.

* No inclosures found with this letter. The references are probably to the general order and letter of same date immediately following.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 18.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, October 24, 1861.

Major-General Frémont, of the U. S. Army, the present commander of the Western Department of the same, will, on the receipt of this order, call Major-General Hunter, of the U. S. Volunteers, to relieve him temporarily in that command, when he (Major-General Frémont) will report to General Headquarters, by letter, for further orders.

WINFIELD SCOTT.

By command:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, October 24, 1861.

To the COMMANDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE WEST :*

SIR: The command of the Department of the West having devolved upon you, I propose to offer you a few suggestions. Knowing how hazardous it is to bind down a distant commander in the field to specific lines and operations, as so much always depends on a knowledge of {p.554} localities and passing events, it is intended, therefore, to leave a considerable margin for the exercise of your judgment and discretion.

The main rebel army (Price’s) west of the Mississippi is believed to have passed Dade County in full retreat upon Northwestern Arkansas, leaving Missouri almost freed from the enemy, excepting in the southeast of the State. Assuming this basis of fact, it seems desirable, as you are not likely to overtake Price, and are in danger of making too long a line from your own base of supplies and re-enforcements, that you should give up the pursuit, halt your main army, divide it into two corps of observation, one occupying Sedalia and the other Rolla, the present termini of railroad; then recruit the condition of both corps by re-establishing and improving their discipline and instructions, perfecting their clothing and equipments, and providing less uncomfortable quarters. Of course both railroads must be guarded and kept open, judiciously employing just so much force as is necessary for this. From these two points, Sedalia and Rolla, and especially in judicious co-operation with Lane on the Kansas border, it would be so easy to concentrate and repel any army of the enemy returning on Missouri from the southwest, that it is not probable any such attempt to return will be made before or during the approaching cold weather. Before spring the people of Missouri will probably be in no favorable mood to renew for next year the troubles which have so much afflicted and impoverished them during this. If you adopt this line of policy, and if, as I anticipate, you will see no enemy in great force approaching, you will have a surplus of force, which you can withdraw from these points and direct to others, as may be needed, the railroads furnishing ready means of re-enforcing their main points, if occasion requires. Doubtless local uprisings will for a time continue to occur, but these can be met by detachments and local forces of our own, and will ere long tire out of themselves.

While, as stated in the beginning of the letter, a large discretion must be and is left with yourself, I feel sure that an indefinite pursuit of Price or an attempt by this long and circuitous route to reach Memphis will be exhaustive beyond endurance, and will end in the loss of the whole force engaged in it.

Your obedient servant,

A. LINCOLN.

* Maj. Gen. D. Hunter, U. S. Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, In the Field, Camp near Cornersville, October 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. J. H. LANE, Commanding Kansas Volunteers:

GENERAL: In reply to your application this day received, I am directed by the general commanding to say that although your march to Montevallo would be beyond the line he has desired you to follow in co-operation with the movements of the main army, he assents to your wishes in order that you may dispose of the stores destined for Fort Lincoln, provided you keep him daily informed of your position and of what is transpiring near you, and that you join him on the parallel of Springfield, and also that you expedite your march so as to accomplish that junction without difficulty.

...

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Colonel, and A. A. A. G.

{p.555}

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CAMP NEAR CORNERSVILLE, October 24, 1861.

Acting Major-General ASBOTH, Commanding Fourth Division, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: We are encamped at the Little Walloco Creek, near Cornersville, and will stay here to-day (the 24th), unless otherwise directed. The road from Pomme de Terre Bridge to Quincy is rough, but generally pretty good. That from Quincy to Cornersville, excellent. Half a mile south of Quincy, on the right of the road, a division can encamp, but the water is rather scarce on that place.

The encampment here is very good, as the creek furnishes plenty of water, and as there is no want of forage.

If I receive no further orders, I will advance on the 25th towards Bolivar, and send messengers to Buffalo and Lebanon to see what can be done in this direction and report to you.

If you should deem it necessary, I shall proceed towards Bolivar tomorrow afternoon or night.

The enemy has left Greenfield, and is on his march to Neosho. A party of the command of General Lane has taken possession of Howard’s Mill, opposite the mouth of Brush Creek.

The three cavalry companies ordered to follow me to-day and to form the rear guard until we had arrived here have not come up yet. It is a great pity that these troops know so little about what they have to do. Will you please send them after me? I must have them especially now.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

F. SIGEL, Acting Major-General, Third Division.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5.}

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, Near Warsaw, October 24, 1861.

This division will move on Friday, the 25th instant, to Hogle’s Creek. The First Brigade will march at 8 o’clock. The Second Brigade will march at 9 o’clock. Colonels of regiments will march opposite the rear of their regiments until they have crossed the Osage Bridge, to prevent any one from straggling from the ranks.

The commander of the rear guard will arrest all stragglers belonging to the command, and keep them in confinement until he has reported the facts to the commander of the brigade and received his orders in the case.

By order of General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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WASHINGTON, October 24, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. R. CURTIS:

MY DEAR SIR: Herewith is a document-half letter, half order– which, wishing you to see, but not to make public, I send unsealed. Please read it, and then inclose it to the officer who may be in command of the Department of the West at the time it reaches him. I cannot now know whether Frémont or Hunter will then be in command.*

Yours, truly,

A. LINCOLN.

* No inclosure found, but see Lincoln to commander of Department of the West, October 24, p. 553.

{p.556}

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., October 25, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

I have the honor to report my return to this command last evening. You have no doubt received the report of General McClernand as to the result of the flag of truce sent to Columbus during my absence. I have nothing new to add. My mission to Springfield was only partially successful. The governor has neither artillery nor small-arms at his disposal at present, but if my command (or this command) is not supplied when he does receive them, one company will be equipped with a battery of James’ rifled cannon. This cannot be done before the last of November. I think I will send the Second Iowa Regiment to Saint Louis immediately after muster, and hope you will replace them with all the troops disposable.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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CAIRO, ILL., October 25, 1861.

General C. F. SMITH, Commanding Paducah, Ky.:

I am just informed by Mr. Casey, of Caseyville, Ky., a strong, unconditional Union man, that a regiment of cavalry is organizing at Princeton, Ky., for the Southern Confederacy. At last accounts they had about 500 men, well mounted, but not yet armed further than they have succeeded in pressing arms from the community around.

Princeton is 12 miles east from Eddyville, on the Cumberland River. The two places are connected by a good macadamized road. Mr. Casey says that the cavalry sent from Paducah by steamers, leaving there at dark, would reach Eddyville by about 12 o’clock at night, and of course make the balance of the march in from two to two and a half hours. I report this to you, so that you may, if you deem it prudent, take steps to secure these fellows. It has been one week since Mr. Casey has heard from these troops, but he does not doubt but they are still there.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CAIRO, ILL., October 27, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

The health of the Second Iowa Regiment is such that I have thought it both prudent and humane to send them to Saint Louis to recruit their health. Colonel Tuttle, the commander, is desirous of returning to this place as soon as it will be prudent to do so, and I have directed him to report to department headquarters when he thinks the health of his regiment sufficiently recovered. As the district is but weakly garrisoned, I would respectfully request that a regiment be sent here to replace the Second Iowa, and all the troops you can send will be gladly received.

Such drafts have been made upon the force at Columbus lately for the Green River country and possibly other parts of Kentucky, that if General Smith’s and my command were prepared it might now be taken. I am not prepared, however, for a forward movement. My cavalry are not armed nor my artillery equipped; the infantry is not well armed, and transportation is entirely inadequate to any forward movement.

{p.557}

I shall make this evening a requisition on the quartermaster in Saint Louis for 8,000 bed-sacks. They are highly essential for the comfort and health of the men, and I hope the commander of the department will order their immediate delivery.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., October 30, 1861-1 a. m.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., Commanding First Division, en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by the commanding general to inform you that he has received information that the rebel army is marching directly on this place. He therefore orders that you march immediately to join him at this place with your command, and that it will require your utmost exertions to reach him in time to aid with your troops.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Same to Generals Pope, McKinstry, Sturgis, and Lane.]

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., October 30, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., Commanding Division U. S. Forces, en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to request you to notify him by return express of your present position and what place you are likely to reach with your division, say two days from your present camp. The general is waiting for the divisions to come up to attack the enemy, and desires to hear from you daily, supposing that each day you change your position, that he may know at what time he can depend upon the concentration of his whole force.

If Colonel Webb is near you, General Frémont desires you to order him forward immediately.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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ROLLA, MO., October 30, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: A messenger came in last night from General Frémont. Left Bolivar Monday night. Hunter was at Bolivar and General Frémont at Springfield. Price reported at Cowskin Prairie. Passed a large number of deserters from Price’s army between here and Lebanon. Colonel Freeman is camped 17 miles north of Houston. Snubbs has joined him, making his force 800. His pickets are 20 miles north of Little Piney. They are using every exertion to recruit in Texas, Douglas, Wright, and adjoining counties, and with considerable success. This is, reliable, by word brought in by my own scouts, and corroborated by all who come from that section of the country.

Freeman’s men are mounted and armed with shot-gnus and rifles.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE, Colonel, Commanding Post.

{p.558}

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SPRINGFIELD MO., October 31, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., Commanding First Division, U. S. Troops, en route:

GENERAL: Since forwarding the dispatch of last night, duplicate of which is herewith sent, the general commanding has received more positive information of the movements of the rebel army, which is now, or soon will be, but a day’s march from this place. You will therefore see the imperative necessity of moving with the greatest celerity, even if your command has to live on beef alone.

Please acknowledge receipt instantly.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Same to Generals Pope, McKinstry, Sturgis, and Lane.]

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Saint Louis, Mo., October 31, 1861.

Brig. Gen. B. M. PRENTISS, Commanding &c., Jefferson City, Mo.:

SIR: The major-general commanding directs me to say that you will proceed to organize and prepare for the field the four regiments of your old brigade, now at Cairo or in that vicinity. The necessary orders will be given to move these regiments to this city or Jefferson City whenever Captain McKeever, assistant adjutant-general, is officially informed that these four regiments can be relieved by four new regiments. The regiments of your former brigade at Paducah cannot be relieved at present.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM MCMICHAEL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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Abstract from the tri-monthly report of the District of Southeast Missouri, commanded by Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army.

OCTOBER 31, 1861.

Commanding officer.Troops.Present for duty.
Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery.
OfficersMen.OfficersMen.OfficersMen.
Brig. Gen. McClernand.First Brigade (Cairo and Mound City).1693,62831687
Col. R. J. OglesbySecond Brigade (Bird’s Point, Mo.).801,91015248
Col. W. H. L. Wallace.Third Brigade (Bird’s Point, Mo.).245088186
Col. John CookFourth Brigade (Fort Holt, Ky.)561,183377
Col. J. B. PlummerFifth Brigade (Cape Girardeau, Mo.)901,99110257
Total4199,2204295025505

Grand aggregate, 11,161.

{p.559}

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., November 1, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN POPE, Commanding Second Division, en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by the general commanding to inform you that he has sent duplicate dispatches to you, urging your moving forward with the greatest alacrity to join the advanced corps at this place. This communication has been sent to you in the uncertainty of the others having reached you, and to report that it is imperatively necessary that you should come here by forced marches. Mr. Jullan, who bears this to you, a well-informed and reliable guide, is directed to move with and guide you.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS SPRINGFIELD, MO., November 2, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. HUNTER, U. S. A., en route:

GENERAL: I am directed by Major-General Frémont to inform you that the advance guard of the enemy will be at Wilson’s Creek to-night. The Union men are flocking in here for protection, and he urges you to hurry forward your division with all possible celerity, and to push on yourself in person to assume the command.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., November 2, 1861.

Acting Maj. Gen. JOHN POPE, U. S. A., Commanding Second Division U. S. Forces, en route:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of this day en route is received. General Frémont directs me to say, that having been relieved from the command of the Western Department, and having relinquished command in orders in the hands of Major-General Hunter, when you reach here the control of the public service at this point will fall upon you; you should therefore, he says, push on to reach here with all dispatch.

Respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 28.}

HDQRS. WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Mo., November 2, 1861.

In compliance with General Orders, No. 18, from the Headquarters of the Army, this day received, the undersigned hereby relinquishes command of the Western Department and of this Army in the field into the hands of Maj. Gen. D. Hunter, U. S. Volunteers.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, U. S. Army.

{p.560}

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Mo., November 2, 1861.

Soldiers of the Mississippi Army:

Agreeably to orders this day received I take leave of you. Although our army has been of sudden growth, we have grown up together, and I have become familiar with the brave and generous spirit which you bring to the defense of your country, and which makes me anticipate for you a brilliant career. Continue as you have begun, and give to my successor the same cordial and enthusiastic support with which you have encouraged me. Emulate the splendid example which you have already before you, and let me remain, as I am, proud of the noble army which I had thus far labored to bring together.

Soldiers, I regret to leave you. Most sincerely I thank you for the regard and confidence you have invariably shown to me. I deeply regret that I shall not have the honor to lead you to the victory which you are just about to win, but I shall claim to share with you in the joy of every triumph, and trust always to be fraternally remembered by my companions in arms.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, November 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. R. CURTIS:

The General-in-Chief directs that you take at once the control of affairs in and around Saint Louis. Look to the safety of the arsenal. Take charge of the telegraph station. Act promptly under these orders till you receive instructions from General Hunter. Report frequently.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 10.}

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, Springfield, November 6, 1861.

The general commanding the division gladly avails himself of the opportunity to express to the officers and men of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Regiment his high appreciation of their prompt and soldierly response to the order for a forced march upon this place. Although they had been many days on the march, and were suffering fatigue and exposure, at the first call to face the enemy they forgot all their weariness, and for two successive days pushed forward to the scene of the expected action with a rapidity unusual amongst the oldest troops, and with an enthusiasm which promised that they would play a brilliant part in the engagement. Much as the general commanding the division regrets that their forced marches were unnecessary, he desires to assure the officers and men of the regiment that their soldierly conduct is not unmarked and that he feels renewed confidence that when the time for action does come they will play their part as becomes the State which sent them to the field.

By order of General Pope.

{p.561}

TWO MILES SOUTH FROM WARSAW, MO., November 6, 1861-2 p. m.

Maj. Gen. GEORGE B. MCCLELLAN, Commander-in-Chief Washington, D. C.:

Your dispatch of November 2 meets me on the road at this place on my way to Saint Louis. On the 2d instant I received at Springfield, at 10 o’clock a. m., the order of Lieutenant-General Scott, dated October 24, relieving me of my command, and directing me to turn over the department to General Hunter. On the same day I published my general orders to this effect, and on the night of the following day was relieved by General Hunter in person, who is now in command of the department.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General U. S. Army.

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SPRINGFIELD, MO., November 3 [?], (via Rolla, November 7, 1861.)

ADJUTANT-GENERAL U. S. ARMY:

I take command of the department to-day. General Frémont left for the East this morning. I do not think the enemy is in force in our neighborhood. I will telegraph you daily.

D. HUNTER, Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Mo., November 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Inclosed you will find copies of certain negotiations carried on between Maj. Gen. J. C. Frémont, of the first part, and Maj. Gen. Sterling Price, of the second, having for objects, first, to make arrangements for the exchange of prisoners; second, to prevent arrests or forcible interference in future “for the mere entertainment or expression of political opinions”; third, to insure that “the war now progressing shall be confined exclusively to armies in the field”; and, fourth, the immediate disbandment of “all bodies of armed men acting without the authority or recognition of the major-generals named and not legitimately connected with the armies in the field.”

You will also find inclosed [D] a copy of my letter of this date, dispatched under a flag of truce to General Price, stating that “I can in no manner recognize the agreement aforesaid or any of its provisions, whether implied or direct, and that I can neither issue nor allow to be issued the ‘joint proclamation’ purporting to have been signed by Generals Price and Frémont on the 1st day of November, A. D. 1861.”

It would be, in my judgment, impolitic in the highest degree to have ratified General Frémont’s negotiations, for the following, amongst many other, obvious reasons: The second stipulation, if acceded to, would render the enforcement of martial law in Missouri, or in any part of it, impossible, and would give absolute liberty to the propagandists of treason throughout the length and breadth of the State; the third stipulation, confining operations exclusively “to armies in the field,” would practically annul the confiscation act passed during the last session of Congress, and would furnish perfect immunity to those disbanded soldiers {p.562} of Price’s command who have now returned to their homes, but with the intention and under a pledge of rejoining the rebel forces whenever called upon; and, lastly, because the fourth stipulation would blot out of existence the loyal men of the Missouri Home Guard, who have not, it is alleged, been recognized by act of Congress, and who, it would be claimed, are therefore “not legitimately connected with the armies in the field.”

There are many more objections quite as powerful and obvious which might be urged against ratifying this agreement; its address, “To all peaceably-disposed citizens of the State of Missouri,” fairly allowing the inference to be drawn that citizens of the United States, the loyal and true men of Missouri, are not included within its benefits. In fact the agreement would seem to me, if ratified, a concession of all the principles for which the rebel leaders are contending, and a practical liberation, for use in other and more immediately important localities, of all their forces now kept employed in this portion of the State.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure A.]

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Springfield Mo., October 30, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Commanding Missouri Volunteers:

SIR: I am instructed by Major-General Frémont to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26th instant, through Adjutant-General Little, including your approval of the plan of exchange of prisoners, as submitted to Major Morton and others.

The list, as submitted herewith, the pledge of Colonel Mulligan, as also the approval of General Frémont, and the names, have been sent to Saint Louis, to be carried into effect. I am directed by the general to say that he accepts your proposition for empowering Major Williams and Mr. Barclay to arrange terms of release of citizens arrested and now confined or released on parole and for future exchanges of prisoners, &c. At this moment he has not time, before your agent, Colonel Hardee, shall leave, to fully agree upon the plan, nor for that of mitigating the evils of war in respect to all citizens who shall quietly devote themselves to their proper avocations.

He now, as heretofore expressed, repeats his desire of avoiding the character of warfare to which you allude, and will agree to take in no more Home Guards, so called, but only such as are of the character of regular troops, enlisted for the war, and who will be subject to orders, and can be restrained from all marauding. These matters will be further entertained when the gentlemen you have named shall have completed their present business in Saint Louis.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.563}

[Inclosure B.]

SPRINGFIELD, MO., November 2, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Commanding Missouri State Guard:

GENERAL: In reference to my letter addressed to you on the 20th ultimo and in furtherance of the suggestion and proposition intended to institute a plan for suppressing the irregular and reprehensible character of warfare now prevalent in this State, I am directed by Major-General Frémont to submit the accompanying memorandum proclamation to your attention.

Major-General Frémont instructs me to say that he is ready to affix his signature to this as it stands, and to enter to the best of his authority and ability upon the obligation which it imposes. Should you also assent, please convey such information to these headquarters as will enable General Frémont to interchange with you the assumption of this agreement and of the obligations.

Very respectfully,

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Subinclosure.]

Whereas Maj. Gen. Sterling Price, commanding the Missouri State Guard, by letter dated at his headquarters, near Neosho, Mo., October 26, 1861, has expressed a desire to enter into some arrangement with Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, commanding the forces of the United States, to facilitate the future exchange of prisoners of war released on parole; also that all persons heretofore arrested for the mere expression of political opinions may be released from confinement or parole; also that in future the war be confined exclusively to the armies in the field, and has authorized and empowered Maj. Henry W. Williams and D. Robert Barclay, esq., to enter into such an arrangement in his behalf; and

Whereas Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont concurs with Major-General Price:

Now, therefore, it is hereby stipulated and agreed by and between Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont and Maj. Gen. Sterling Price as follows, to wit:

1st. A joint proclamation shall be issued, signed by Major-General Frémont and Major-General Price, in proper person, in the following language, to wit:

PROCLAMATION.

To all peaceably-disposed citizens of the State of Missouri, greeting:

Whereas a solemn agreement has been entered into by and between Major-Generals Frémont and Price respectively commanding antagonistic forces in the State of Missouri, to the effect that in the future arrests or forcible interference by armed or unarmed parties of citizens within the limits of said State for the mere entertainment or expression of political opinions shall hereafter cease; that families now broken up for such causes may be reunited, and that the war now progressing shall be exclusively confined to armies in the field:

Therefore be it known to all whom it may concern:

I. No arrests whatever on account of political opinions, or for the {p.564} merely private expression of the same, shall hereafter be made within the limits of the State of Missouri, and all persons who may have been arrested and are now held to answer upon such charges only shall be forthwith released; but it is expressly declared that nothing in this proclamation shall be construed to bar or interfere with any of the usual and regular proceedings of the established courts under statutes and orders made and provided for such offenses,

II. All peaceably-disposed citizens who may have been driven from their homes because of their political opinions, or who may have left them from fear of force and violence, are hereby advised and permitted to return, upon the faith of our positive assurances that while so returning they shall receive protection from both the armies in the field wherever it can be given.

III. All bodies of armed men acting without the authority or recognition of the major-generals before named, and not legitimately connected with the armies in the field, are hereby ordered at once to disband.

IV. Any violation of either of the foregoing articles shall subject the offender to the penalty of military law, according to the nature of the offense.

In testimony whereof the aforesaid Maj. Gen. John Charles Frémont, at Springfield, Mo., on this 1st day of November, A. D. 1861, and Maj. Gen. Sterling Price, at Cassville, Mo., on this 5th day of November, A. D. 1861, have hereunto set their hands, and hereby mutually pledge their earnest efforts to the enforcement of the above articles of agreement according to their full tenor and effect, to the best of their ability.

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, Commanding. STERLING PRICE, Major-General, Commanding.

2d. Brig. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis, or the officer in command at Benton Barracks, is hereby authorized and empowered to represent Major-General Frémont, and Col. D. H. Armstrong, Col. J. Richard Barrett, and Col. Robert M. Rennick, or either of them, are hereby authorized and empowered to represent Major-General Price, and the parties so named are hereby authorized, whenever applied to for that purpose, to negotiate for the exchange of any and all persons who may hereafter be taken prisoners of war and released upon parole; such exchange to be made upon the plan heretofore approved and acted upon, to wit, grade for grade, or two officers of lower grade as an equivalent in rank for one of a higher grade, as shall be thought just and equitable.

Thus done and agreed at Springfield, Mo., this 1st day of Nov., 1861.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J. H. EATON, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. STERLING PRICE, Major-General, By HENRY W. WILLIAMS, D. ROBT. BARCLAY, Commissioners.

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE GUARD, Cassville, Mo., November 5, 1861.

Approved.

By order of Major-General Price:

HENRY LITTLE, Adjutant-General.

{p.565}

[Inclosure C.]

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE GUARD, Cassville, Mo., November 5, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FRÉMONT, Commanding U. S. Forces, Springfield, Mo.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by Major-General Price to acknowledge the receipt of Assistant Adjutant-General Eaton’s letter of November 2, inclosing a proclamation drawn up in accordance with the propositions submitted in my letter of the 26th of October. Major-General Price directs me to say that he receives your assent to his propositions with much satisfaction, and the agreement and provisions set forth in the proposed mutual proclamation fully meets his approbation. He has filled up and signed both copies of said proclamation received from Assistant Adjutant-General Eaton, one of which is retained for publication and distribution, and the other herewith inclosed to you for a like purpose. Major-General Price also approves of the agreement entered into on his part by Messrs. Williams and Barclay, and herewith returns the original document, retaining a copy of the same.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY LITTLE, Adjutant-General.

[Inclosure D.]

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Springfield, Mo., November 7, 1861.

Maj. Gen. STERLING PRICE, Commanding Forces at Cassville, Mo.:

GENERAL: Referring to an agreement purporting to have been made between Major-Generals Frémont and Price, respectively commanding antagonistic forces in the State of Missouri, to the effect that in future arrests or forcible interference by armed or unarmed parties of citizens within the limits of said State for the mere entertainment or expression of political opinions shall hereafter cease, that families now broken up for such causes may be reunited, and that the war now progressing shall be exclusively confined to armies in the field, I have to state that, as general commanding the forces of the United States in this department, I can in no manner recognize the agreement aforesaid, or any of its provisions, whether implied or direct, and that I can neither issue nor allow to be issued the “joint proclamation” purporting to have been signed by yourself and Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont on the “1st day of November, A. D. 1861.”

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. HUNTER, Major-General, Commanding.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 96.}

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GEN.’S OFFICE, Washington, November 7, 1861.

Authority to raise a force of State militia, to serve during the war, is granted, by direction of the President, to the governor of Missouri. This force is to co-operate with the troops in the service of the United States in repelling the invasion of the State of Missouri and in suppressing rebellion therein. It is to be held, in camp and in the field, drilled, disciplined, and governed, according to the Regulations of the U. S. Army, and subject to the Articles of War. But it is not to be {p.566} ordered out of the State of Missouri, except for the immediate defense of the said State.

The State forces thus authorized will be, during such time as they shall be actually engaged as an embodied military force in active service, armed, equipped, clothed, subsisted, transported, and paid by the United States in accordance with the Regulations of the U. S. Army and such orders as may from time to time be issued from the War Department, and in no other manner; and they shall be considered as disbanded from the service of the United States whenever the President may so direct.

In connection with this force, the governor is authorized to appoint the following officers, who will be recognized and paid by the United States, to wit: 1 major-general, to command the whole of the State forces brought into service, who shall be the same person appointed by the President to command the U. S. Military Department of the West, and shall retain his commission as major-general of the State forces only during his command of the said department; 1 adjutant-general, 1 inspector-general, and 1 quartermaster-general, each with the rank and pay of a colonel of cavalry; 3 aides-de-camp to the governor, each with the rank and pay of a colonel of infantry; brigadier-generals, at the rate of 1 to a brigade of not less than four regiments; and division, brigade, and regimental staff officers, not to exceed in numbers those provided for in the organization prescribed by the act approved July 22, 1861, “for the employment of volunteers,” nor to be more highly compensated by the United States, whatever their nominal rank in the State service, than officers performing the same duties under that act.

The field officers of a regiment to be: 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, and 1 major; and the officers of a company to be: 1 captain, 1 first and 1 second lieutenant.

When officers of the said State forces shall act in conjunction with officers of the U. S. Army of the same grade, the latter shall command the combined force.

All disbursements of money made to these troops, or in consequence of their employment by the United States, shall be made by disbursing officers of the U. S. Army, assigned by the War Department or specially appointed by the President for that purpose, who will make their requisitions upon the different supply departments in the same manner for the Missouri State forces as similar requisitions are made for other volunteer troops in the service of the United States.

The Secretary of War will cause any additional regulations that may be necessary for the purpose of promoting economy, insuring regularity of returns, and protecting the United States from fraudulent practices, to be adopted and published for the government of the said State forces, and the same will be obeyed and observed by all in office under the authority of the State of Missouri.

By order:

JULIUS P. GARESCHE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SAINT LOUIS, November 8, 1861-8 p. m. (Received November 9, 1861.)

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

General Fiala’s telegraph is from one on Frémont’s staff, and seems to flourish the premature movement on Belmont as a Frémont victory, which I sincerely hope it was, although improperly addressed and coming {p.567} from an irregular source three days after General Hunter’s order was published.* After sending a copy to General Hunter, I have concluded not to delay it, but allow it to go on the wires to you. A crowd, principally Germans, are waiting the arrival of General Frémont. It may be impossible to withdraw the money, but my officers are mixed in with the crowd to secure it if possible. All quiet.

CURTIS.

* Not found.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., November 9, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: My telegram from near Warsaw, on the 6th instant, apprised the major-general commanding-in-chief that I had complied with the order of Lieutenant-General Scott, and had relinquished the command of the Western Department to Major-General Hunter. In further compliance with those orders I have the honor now to report for further orders.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. FRÉMONT, Major-General, U. S. Army.

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SAINT LOUIS, November 9, 1861-3 p. m.

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General:

The paymaster and money chest have gone under a strong escort. All quiet. Yesterday Colonel Fiala sent report of General Grant’s movement on Belmont, as ordered by General Frémont to-day. Captain McKeever telegraphs from Cincinnati to General Frémont that General Grant had no orders from Frémont to attack Belmont or Columbus. Somebody has scattered the force in the region of Pilot Knob, creating anxiety at post and offering feeble detachment to the enemy. Have reported to General Hunter.

CURTIS.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 97.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, November 9, 1861.

The following departments are formed from the present Departments of the West, Cumberland, and Ohio:

1. The Department of New Mexico, to consist of the Territory of New Mexico, to be commanded by Col. E. R. S. Canby, U. S. Army.

2. The Department of Kansas, to include the State of Kansas, the Indian Territory west of Arkansas, and the Territories of Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota, to be commanded by Major-General Hunter, headquarters at Fort Leavenworth.

3. The Department of the Missouri, to include the States of Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Arkansas, and that portion of Kentucky west of the Cumberland River, to be commanded by Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, U. S. Army.

...

By order:

JULIUS P. GARESCHE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.568}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, D. C., November 11, 1861.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, U. S. A., Commanding Department of Missouri:

GENERAL: In assigning you to the command of the Department of the Missouri, it is probably unnecessary for me to state that I have intrusted to you a duty which requires the utmost tact and decision. You have not merely the ordinary duties of a military commander to perform, but the far more difficult task of reducing chaos to order of changing probably the majority of the personnel of the staff of the department, and of reducing to a point of economy, consistent with the interests and necessities of the State, a system of reckless expenditure and fraud, perhaps unheard-of before in the history of the world.

You will find in your department many general and staff officers holding illegal commissions and appointments not recognized or approved by the President or Secretary of War. You will please at once inform these gentlemen of the nullity of their appointment, and see that no pay or allowances are issued to them until such time as commissions may be authorized by the President or Secretary of War.

If any of them give the slightest trouble you will at once arrest them and send them, under guard, out of the limits of your department, informing them that if they return they will be placed in close confinement. You will please examine into the legality of the organization of the troops serving in the department. When you find any illegal, unusual, or improper organizations you will give to the officers and men an opportunity to enter the legal military establishment under general laws and orders from the War Department, reporting in full to these headquarters any officer or organization that may decline.

You will please cause competent and reliable staff officers to examine all existing contracts immediately, and suspend all payments upon them until you receive the report in each case. Where there is the slightest doubt as to the propriety of the contract, you will be good enough to refer the matter with full explanation to these headquarters, stating in each case what would be a fair compensation for the services or materials rendered under the contract. Discontinue at once the reception of material or services under any doubtful contract. Arrest and bring to prompt trial all officers who have in any way violated their duty to the Government. In regard to the political conduct of affairs, you will please labor to impress upon the inhabitants of Missouri and the adjacent States that we are fighting solely for the integrity of the Union, to uphold the power of our National Government, and to restore to the nation the blessings of peace and good order.

With respect to military operations, it is probable, from the best information in my possession, that the interests of the Government will be best served by fortifying and holding in considerable strength Rolla, Sedalia, and other interior points, keeping strong patrols constantly moving from the terminal stations, and concentrating the mass of the troops on or near the Mississippi, prepared for such ulterior operations as the public interests may demand.

I would be glad to have you make as soon as possible a personal inspection of all the important points in your department, and report the result to me. I cannot too strongly impress upon you the absolute necessity of keeping me constantly advised of the strength, condition, and location of your troops, together with all facts that will enable me to maintain that general direction of the armies of the United States which {p.569} it is my purpose to exercise. I trust to you to maintain thorough organization, discipline, and economy throughout your department. Please inform me as soon as possible of everything relating to the gunboats now in process of construction, as well as those completed.

The militia force authorized to be raised by the State of Missouri for its defense will be under your orders.

I am, general, &c.,

GEO. B. MCCLELLAN, Major-General, Commanding U. S. Army..

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HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, Benton Co., 15 miles south of Warsaw, Mo., Nov. 11, 1861.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

In conformity with the views of the President, in which I fully concur, I fall back on Rolla and Sedalia. Price left Cassville on the 7th in full retreat upon Arkansas, McCulloch having preceded by one day’s march, and I have no doubt they are both now out of this State. My command is in good order and fine spirits. Please correct a slander which has gone forth with regard to the Germans. An effort was made to induce them to mutiny, and I have found them loyal and efficient. I shall order to Saint Louis about 18,000 men, ready for service at the South, retaining sufficient garrison for Rolla and Sedalia.

D. HUNTER, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WARSAW, MO., November 11, 1861.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

Great portions of the army stores and other public property in this department are in the hands of irresponsible, ignorant, and illegally-appointed persons, who have given no security, hold no commissions, and are accountable to no tribunal. This must be at once corrected, and the department placed on a basis of integrity, capacity, and responsibility. I will need to aid me in the work two experienced and reliable ordnance officers, two engineers, and two thoroughly competent assistant quartermasters. Unless these are sent without delay, so that I can put them in charge, it will be impossible to guard against serious losses.

D. HUNTER, Brigadier-General.

[Note by operator.]

P. S.-As I am writing, General Hunter has a dispatch confirming his former dispatch as to General Price falling back into Arkansas.

OPERATOR.

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SAINT LOUIS, November 11, 1861-11 p.m. (Received November 12, 1861.)

Major-General MCCLELLAN:

Your three dispatches received.* All quiet here. I have the right men in the right place. Frémont is preparing a defense. He ought to be called away from here, so he cannot do much more harm. I shall be {p.570} neither rash nor timid; shall comply with your directions in regard to the plan of forts. I have a large lot of troops and more coming, but arms are scarce. Will write to your adjutant-general.

CURTIS, Commanding.

* Not found.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 305.}

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, November 13, 1861.

...

3. Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman, on being relieved from his present command by Brig. Gen. D. C. Buell, will repair to Saint Louis, Mo., and report to Maj. Gen. H. W. Halleck, for duty in the Department of the Missouri.

...

By command of Major-General McClellan:

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 14, 1861.

General S. WILLIAMS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

In conformity with a telegraphic dispatch from Major-General McClellan, received yesterday, asking a full number of my command, their condition, wants, position, &c., I have directed a full monthly report made out to be sent to your office. Owing to the activity with which troops under my command have been kept moving since the first of the mouth, full reports are not yet in. My command extends to Cape Girardeau, Mo., and in eludes the following posts:

Cape Girardeau, Mo., garrisoned with three regiments of infantry, one company light artillery, one engineer company, one company mounted Home Guards, and one siege company-both the latter anxious to be mustered into the service of the United States. The post commanded by Col. J. B. Plummer, Eleventh Missouri Volunteers.

Bird’s Point, Mo., garrisoned with six regiments of infantry, two companies light artillery, one engineer company, and eleven companies of cavalry. One company of artillery have just received their pieces, but have not yet been supplied with horses or harness. Four companies of the cavalry arrived yesterday.

Fort Holt, Ky., garrisoned with two regiments of infantry, one company each of cavalry and light artillery, the artillery with but four pieces (two of them taken at Belmont) and neither horses nor harness. I was very much opposed to occupying Fort Holt at the beginning, but now a great deal of labor has been expended in fortifying and strengthening the position, and the troops there have partially built huts for winter accommodation.

Mound City, garrisoned with one regiment of infantry.

Cairo, with six regiments of infantry, one company light artillery, and nine, companies of cavalry; one regiment of infantry and all the cavalry but one company without arms.

My whole command numbers less than 18,000, of which about 2,200 are sick. But for the measles, however, the health of the command would be comparatively good. We are deficient in land transportation, {p.571} arms, and clothing. The latter two are deficient both in quantity and quality. This post has been carried on so long without funds in the quartermaster’s department, that nothing can be procured at current cash rates, and not at all except with difficulty. I would urge the necessity of sending a supply of funds for the use of this post soon. I think also that the interest of the service demands that a regular quartermaster be sent here.

I have under my command two gunboats, one of which remains at Mound City, to guard the new boats being built there, the other here.

I shall hope to have ready by to-morrow a monthly report, showing the exact condition of my whole command, and accompanied by reports of the various departments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, Ill., November 16, 1861.

General S. R. CURTIS, Commanding U. S. Forces, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Several have come to this post with safe-conduct through, signed by yourself. I regret this, as one of the most exposed posts in the Army at this time, and would much prefer that the number sent South should be made as limited as possible or be sent by some other route. Although I shall accommodate, whenever it seems to me consistent with the interest of the public service, I shall in future exercise my own judgment about passing persons through my lines, unless the authority comes from a senior, and one who exercises a command over me.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT SOUTHEAST MISSOURI, Cairo, November 17, 1861.

Capt. CHAUNCEY MCKEEVER, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Inclosed herewith I send you a letter just received from Cape Girardeau, which fully explains itself.* I have also been called upon to-day by a lady from Bloomfield, who states that the Union people of that district are not only depredated upon, but their lives are constantly in danger. Many have already been murdered for entertaining Union sentiments, and people of this class are not permitted to leave on pain of death. She urges in behalf of the Union people that troops be sent there either to garrison the place permanently or for a stated period, giving the citizens notice of the length of time they intend remaining, so that they might take advantage of their protection to get away.

Bloomfield is geographically a commanding position, and if troops could be spared, I would earnestly recommend the occupation of it.

U. S. GRANT, Brigadier-General.

* Not found.

{p.572}

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, Syracuse, November 19, 1861.

Maj. W. E. LEFFINGWELL, First Iowa Cavalry:

MAJOR: Authentic intelligence has reached me that a camp of 500 rebels, mounted, and with one piece of artillery, has been formed near the town of Jonesborough, about 35 miles from this place. You are accordingly instructed to proceed by forced march to-night, so as to surprise their camp by to-morrow morning at daybreak, with five companies of your regiment and a section of horse artillery. You will march from this place at 6 o’clock this afternoon, taking all precautions to avoid having your movements made known, and will be careful to throw forward an advance guard and flankers to prevent a surprise.

Should you arrive near Jonesborough before daylight, you will not make an attack until it is light enough to see clearly, that no mistake or confusion arise among your own command. When you have ascertained exactly the position of the enemy’s camp, you will endeavor to make such disposition of your force as to cut off his retreat. Attack vigorously and promptly, and pursue until the rebel force is completely dispersed. Two days’ rations (cooked) will be taken with your command, but no tents nor baggage of any description.

Having executed this duty thoroughly, you will return with all speed to this place.

I am, major, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6