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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 1, Ch. VII–Union Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER VII.
OPERATIONS IN TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO.
February 1-June 11, 1861.
(Secession)
–––
UNION CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.579}

SAN ANTONIO, December 13, 1860.

Lieut. Gen. W. SCOTT, Commanding U. S. Army, New York:

GENERAL: I think there can be no doubt that many of the Southern States will secede from the Union. The State of Texas will be among the number, and, from all appearances at present, it will be at an early day, certainly before the 4th of March next. What is to be done with public property in charge of the Army? The arsenal at this place has some ordnance and other munitions Of war. I do not expect an order for the present for the disposition of them, but I would be pleased to receive your views and suggestions. My course as respects myself will be to remain at my post and protect this frontier as long as I can, and then, when turned adrift, make my way home, if I have one. I would be pleased to hear from you at your earliest convenience.

I am, general, with sentiments of respect and regard, yours, &c.,

D. E. TWIGGS.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, December 27, 1860. (Received January 12, 1861.)

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. of the Army, New York:

SIR: As there can be no doubt that many of the Southern States, and Texas among the number, will cease to be members of the Union, I respectfully ask instructions, or some intimation, as to the disposition of the United States property, such as arms, ammunition, and transportation. It appears to me some steps should be taken very soon. I shall remain here until my services can no longer be available.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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WASHINGTON, December 28, 1860.

Maj. Gen. D. E. TWIGGS:

My DEAR GENERAL: The General-in-Chief, himself laboring for the time under an attack of sickness, desires me to acknowledge and thank you for your letter of the 13th instant, the spirit of which he highly approves. He says you will understand its reminding him vividly of the interview be had with you in Augusta, in 1832.

In cases of political disturbance, involving local conflict with the authority of the General Government, the General-in-Chief considers that the military questions, such as you suggest, contain a political element, with due regard to which, and in due deference to the chief executive authority, no extraordinary instructions concerning them must be issued without the consent of such authority.

{p.580}

He has labored hard in suggesting and urging proper measures to vindicate the laws and protect the property of the United States without waging war or acting offensively against any State or community. All such suggestions, though long since made in good time to have been peaceably and efficiently carried out, have failed to secure the favorable attention of the Government.

The President has listened to him with due friendliness and respect, but the War Department has been little communicative. Up to this time he has not been shown the written instructions of Major Anderson, nor been informed of the purport of those more recently conveyed to Fort Moultrie verbally by Major Buell.

Probably the policy of the Government in regard to the forts and depots within the limits of seceding States will have been clearly indicated before events can have caused a practical issue to be made up in Texas.

The General does not see at this moment that he can tender you any special advice, but leaves the administration of your command in your own hands, with the laws and regulations to guide, in the full confidence that your discretion, firmness, and patriotism will effect all of good that the sad state of the times may permit. He adds his best wishes for your health and happiness; which are cordially shared by

Yours, very truly and respectfully,

GEORGE W. LAY.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 2, 1861. (Received January, 16, 1861.)

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. of the Army, New York:

SIR: Texas will certainly go out of the Union the latter part of this month. I respectfully ask instructions as to what disposition will be made of the troops now in this department. There is no time to lose; arrangements should be made at once in regard to them.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 7, 1861. (Received January 26, 1861.)

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Hdqrs. of the Army, New York:

COLONEL: I wrote a few days since to the headquarters of the Army asking instructions in the event of this State seceding from the Union; that event is certain. I do not think the end of the present month will find her in the Union. I respectfully ask for instructions. The crisis is fast approaching, and ought to be looked in the face. What disposition is to be made of the public property and the troops now in this department?

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

{p.581}

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SAN ANTONIO, January 15, 1861.

Lieut. Gen. W. SCOTT, U. S. Army, Washington:

GENERAL: Yours, through Colonel Lay, of the 29th [28th] December is received. I am placed in a most embarrassing situation. I am a Southern man, and all these States will secede. What is left will not be the “United States,” and I know not what is to become of the troops now in this department.

Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, and Georgia will certainly secede. As for coercion, that I consider impossible to keep them in the Union. A guard would have to be put at every house in the country, and that would not keep them in the Union. The feeling is universal, and the people are determined to secede. Coercion might have done at first; now it cannot. As soon as I know Georgia has separated from the Union I must, of course, follow her.

I most respectfully ask to be relieved in the command of this department on or before the 4th of March next. All I have is in the South, and as my health will not allow me to take an active part in the scenes that will probably be enacted, I must be a looker-on.

I am, General, with the greatest respect and regard, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Brevet Major-General, U. S. Army.

[Indorsement.]

Relieve Major-General Twiggs, and ask the Secretary to devolve the command on Colonel Waite, with an assignment according to this brevet.

W. S.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January, 18, 1861. (Received January 30, 1861.)

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The legislature of this State convenes on the 21st instant, and the Convention one week after. No doubt but the State will secede by the last of this mouth. All is quiet in my department (except the Comanches). No attempt has been made to interfere with the public property. All that has been done has been in the Department of the East; and where was the redoubtable hero that boasted he had two hundred thousand men on hand to regulate the South? Verily, military men should be cautious how they threaten the people. After secession I know not what will be done. I know one thing, and that is, I will never fire on American citizens.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 10.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 22, 1861.

I. The governor of this State having informed the commanding general that information has reached him that an effort will be made by an unauthorized mob to take forcibly and appropriate the public stores and {p.582} property to uses of their own, assuming to act in behalf of the State, the commanding officer of the post of San Antonio will, in consequence, take the most stringent measures to guard the public stores, and will arm two 6 pounders with fixed ammunition, and have them in readiness for immediate service.

II. The commanding officer of Camp Verde will send, immediately on receipt of this order, the infantry company under his command, with its most efficient strength, to these headquarters, where it will receive, its instructions. A detachment of the cavalry company, under Captain Brackett, will take post at Camp Verde.

III. The commanding officer of Fort Clark will direct two of the infantry companies of his command to repair to these headquarters without delay for temporary service.

IV. The Quartermaster’s Department will provide the necessary transportation.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 13.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 28, 1861.

Paragraph III, of Special Orders, No. 10, current series, from these headquarters, ordering two of the infantry companies from Fort Clark to this place, is hereby countermanded. Should the companies be en route, they will at once return on receipt of this order.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 23, 1861. (Received February 2, 1861.)

Col. S. COOPER, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.

SIR: Inclosed I transmit a letter from the governor of Texas and my answer. As I do not think any one in authority desires me to carry on a civil war against Texas, I shall, after secession, if the governor repeats his demand, direct the arms and other property to be turned over to his agents, keeping in the hands of the troops the arms they now have. I have asked for instructions as to what I was to do after secession four times, viz, on the 27th ultimo, the 2d, 7th, and 18th instants, and have received no answer. The troops in this department occupy a line of some twelve hundred miles, and some time will be required to remove them to any place. I again ask, what disposition is to be made of them?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

{p.583}

[Inclosures.]

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Austin, Tex., January 20, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. E. TWIGGS, Commanding Department of Texas:

My DEAR GENERAL: The present pressure of important events necessarily induces prompt action on the part of all public functionaries. In this view of the matter I send to you General J. M. Smith, of this State, on a confidential mission, to know what, in the present crisis, you consider [it] your duty to do as to maintaining in behalf of the Federal Government or passing over to the State the possession of the forts, arsenals, and public property within this State, and also if a demand for the possession of the same is made by the executive, you are authorized, or [if] it would be conformable to your sense of duty, to place in possession of the authorities of the State the forts, arms, munitions, and property of the. Federal Government, on the order of the executive, to an officer of the State empowered to receive and receipt for the same.

This course is suggested by the fact that information has reached the executive that an effort will be made by an unauthorized mob to take forcibly and appropriate the public stores and property to uses of their own, assuming to act on behalf of the State.

Any arrangements made with you by General Smith will be sanctioned and approved by me; and should you require any assistance to aid you in resisting the contemplated and unauthorized attack upon the public property, &c., and to place the same in possession of the State authorities, you are authorized to call on the mayor and citizens of San Antonio for such assistance as you may deem necessary.

I will hope to hear from you, general, through my confidential agent, General Smith, so soon as he can have the honor of a conference with you on matters embraced in the present epoch of our national affairs.

I am, general, yours, very truly,

SAM. HOUSTON.

P. S.–The legislature meets to-morrow. I will, as soon as possible, apprise you of its action.

H.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, January 22, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL HOUSTON, Governor of Texas, Austin:

SIR: Yours of the 20th is received. I am without instructions from Washington in regard to the disposition of the public property here or the troops, in the event of the States seceding. After secession, if the executive of the State make a demand of the commander of this department, he will receive an answer. I sincerely hope that the threatenings indicated in your letter from parties unauthorized by the executive authority of Texas may not take place.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Brevet Major-General, Commanding.

{p.584}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 22.

WAR DEP’T, ADJ’T-GENERAL’S OFFICE. Washington, January 28, 1861.

I. Bvt. Maj. Gen. David E. Twiggs, U. S. Army, is relieved from the command of the Department of Texas, and the command of that department is devolved upon Col. Carlos A. Waite, First Infantry, who is assigned to duty according to his brevet rank.

By order of the Secretary of War:

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS CAMP VERDE, TEX., January 28, 1861.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Department of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: The intelligence communicated in Special Orders, No. 10, from Department Headquarters, and the many rumors in circulation, would seem to admonish every officer who has the care of public property to adopt such measures as may be necessary to protect it from lawless violence, so far as the means at his command will permit. In this view of my duties as commanding officer of a post, and for the purpose of making some defensive arrangements, I have deemed it proper to order the remainder of Captain Brackett’s company to this place, without waiting for further instructions from your office. All the supplies for that company are drawn from this post, and the grazing in this vicinity is as good as that at Camp Ives. Captain Brackett’s company has always been under the control of the commanding officer at this camp for all military operations, and I am not aware of any particular reason for keeping it at Camp Ives.

This camp is spread over much ground, and is the most ill-chosen and least defensible site I have ever seen selected for any military purposes. It is on ground that slopes down to Verde Creek, a stream that is fordable every few yards, and every part is exposed to the high ground on the other side, which is within short rifle range, and which completely commands it. To defend this position I have a company of cavalry armed with carbines-an arm of short range and not of much accuracy in firing. A body of riflemen, under the cover afforded on the opposite bank of the creek, a, little beyond the range of our arms, could in a few hours kill a large number of our animals and inflict much injury on this command, while the troops would be comparatively powerless.

This camp can only be defended, without suffering much loss, by infantry, with the long-range musket or by having artillery. Not having infantry, I respectfully request that one or two pieces of artillery-say 6-pounders, or two mountain howitzers, with a supply of spherical-case shot, canister, and round shot, together with the necessary implements (port-fire, slow-match, &c.)-may be sent here as early as practicable.

In making this application I assume that there is a probability, or at least a possibility, that a mob of reckless men may attempt to seize the public property here, the most valuable of which consists of fifty-three camels. I presume they are worth some $20,000. Whether there are any grounds for fearing an attack you know better than myself. In this isolated place we get but little correct information of what is pass- {p.585} ing in Texas, and many of the rumors that reach us are no doubt greatly exaggerated. In the present feverish state of the public mind, however, it is impossible to say how far men may go, especially among such a population as is to be found in Texas, and I hold it to be the duty of every commanding officer to be at all times and under all circumstances prepared as far as possible for any and every emergency. To this end he must anticipate his wants, and take timely measures to meet them; hence the main reasons for making this application. I think there never has been any artillery at this post.

I am, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

C. A. WAITE, Colonel, First Infantry, Commanding Post.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington., January 30, 1861.

Col. H. L. SCOTT, Headquarters of the Army, New York, N. Y.:

Charter a steamer for Key West and the coast of Texas, to take out ordnance and bring back troops. Consult with Mr. Aspinwall. Instructions by mail.

L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, January 31, 1861.

Maj. Gen. D. E. TWIGGS, Commanding Officer of Department of Texas, San Antonio:

GENERAL: The General-in-Chief directs that you take immediate measures for replacing the five companies of artillery on the Rio Grande and put them in march for Brazos Santiago, to which place a steamer will be sent to bring them out of Texas. The light companies will take their guns and equipments, but will leave their horses.

I have, &c.,

L. THOMAS.

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ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, February 4, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. Gen. D. E. TWIGGS, U. S. Army, Commanding Department Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

GENERAL: Your communication of January 23, 1861, with its inclosures, has been received and laid before the Secretary of War. Those from you of December 27, 1860, the 2d, 7th, and 18th of January, 1861, have also been received, and were duly submitted to the Secretary.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

{p.586}

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 4, 1861.

Col. C. A. WAITE, U. S. Army, Commanding Department of Texas, San Antonio:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs me to write you as follows: To relieve Brevet Major-General Twiggs, you were put in orders the 28th ultimo to command, according to your brevet rank, the Department of Texas. Instructions followed three days later for sending the five companies of artillery on the Rio Grande to Brazos Santiago, there to be embarked in a steamer (ordered hence to meet them), with their batteries complete, leaving their horses, for sale or other service, behind. If necessary, the artillery companies will be replaced by detachments of infantry, unless Texas should, in the mean time, have, declared herself out of the Union.

In the latter case you will wait for instructions respecting the disposition of the troops (other than the artillery) under your command and the public property in their hands, which you will hold and preserve.

I am, &c.,

L. THOMAS,

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 4, 1861.

The ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: The secession ordinance of this State was passed on the 1st instant; it is referred back to the people to be voted on or approved on the 23d February, when the secession will be complete.

I send Lieutenant Washington, my aide-de-camp, to Washington for instructions as to what dispositions will be made of the troops in this department. I will endeavor to retain the clothing and provisions for the troops and the transportation that will be necessary to remove them. Some steps ought to be made at once, as the troops occupy a frontier of some 1,000 or 1,200 miles, and some time will be required to remove them. What will be done with the archives of the department?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 16.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 4, 1861.

...

2. Company A, First Infantry, on temporary duty in this city, will return without delay to its station, Camp Verde.

...

4. In compliance with instructions from the headquarters of the Army, Bvt. Col. Robert E. Lee, Second Cavalry, is relieved from duty in this department, and will repair forthwith to Washington and report in person to the General-in-Chief.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.587}

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CIRCULAR.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 4, 1861.

To the COMMANDING OFFICER of each post in the Department of Texas:

SIR: I am directed by the commanding general of the department to address you as follows:

The secession act has passed the Convention of this State, to take effect the 2d day of March next. Nothing has been heard at these headquarters as to the disposition of the troops. The general commanding has made five applications for orders or intimation from Washington as to what is to be done, but has received no answer.

You will therefore continue to do duty as usual until further orders, but prepare to move at a short notice, reducing the baggage as much as possible. If the general commanding knew at this time how the troops are to be disposed of, you would be informed, but he does not. He will, however, remain with them until something is done, and attend to their comfort as far as circumstances will permit.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 7, 1861.

Col. C. A. WAITE, First Infantry, Commanding Department of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

SIR: As notified the 4th instant, a steamer will sail in a few days from New York for Brazos Santiago, calling at Indianola to send you these dispatches, for the five companies of artillery serving on the Rio Grande. It is expected that all of these companies will be at the place of embarkation. On the arrival of the steamer there will be no time lost in getting the troops to their ultimate destination.

To facilitate the movement, Maj. Fitz John Porter, assistant adjutant-general, will proceed in the steamer to carry out the instructions of the General-in-Chief. He will be supplied with $40,000, to pay for the hire of lighters, &c., should it be found necessary.

The light batteries will leave their horses, but bring out their guns. A medical officer will embark with the troops.

I have, &c.,

L. THOMAS.

P. S.–February 11-Should French’s battery have been ordered to San Antonio, the steamer will not be delayed any time for it. It is desirable that the steamer should bring out as many troops as she can well carry, provided it can be done without delay; and Major Porter has been authorized to order, in the name of the General-in-Chief, infantry companies now at hand to embark with the artillery.

L. THOMAS.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 7, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. W. H. FRENCH, First Artillery, Fort Duncan, Tex.:

SIR: As the senior officer of the five companies of artillery serving in Texas, the General-in-Chief directs me to say to you that, under the orders of the commander of the Department of Texas heretofore given, {p.588} or, if time has not permitted you to receive them, then under these instructions, you will embark at Brazos Santiago, on the steamer you will find there in readiness, and proceed, first, to Fort Jefferson to land Companies L and M, First Artillery, next to Fort Taylor to land Companies F and K, after which the steamer will proceed to New York with the remaining company (M, Second Artillery), to take post temporarily at Fort Hamilton. The light batteries will bring their guns, but leave their horses. Recruits will be sent in the steamer to fill up the companies to re-enforce the garrisons of Forts Jefferson and Taylor to the maximum standard. The General expects you to use the utmost dispatch in getting all the troops to the seaboard and on board the steamer. Maj. F. J. Porter, assistant adjutant-general, goes out in the steamer to expedite the movement and execute the instructions of the General-in-Chief. He will have funds to pay the means of transportation, &c.

A medical officer will accompany the troops to Fort Jefferson, where he will relieve Surg. A. N. McLaren, and the latter officer will continue on duty with Company M, Second Artillery.

The General-in-Chief further directs that you take command of the five companies according to your brevet rank.

I have, &c.,

L. THOMAS.

P. S.–February 11-In case any infantry companies embark on the steamer they will also receive orders to proceed to New York.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 8, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. F. J. PORTER, Assistant Adjutant-General, Washington City:

SIR: The General-in-Chief authorizes you to give, in his name (should any extraordinary circumstances demand), additional orders to execute his instructions withdrawing the five companies of artillery now on the Rio Grande.*

Circumstances of an extraordinary character may arise in case the State of Texas shall declare herself out of the Union, or from the failure of proper orders reaching Forts Brown and Duncan. In the latter case you are authorized to secure the public property at those posts, or placing it in charge of ordnance sergeants or agents of the Quartermaster’s Department.

You are authorized to take to the Brazos, for security to the vessel and funds in your possession, a portion of the recruits assigned to the future garrisons of Forts Taylor and Jefferson.

Lieutenant Collins, Topographical Engineers, will communicate with you at Indianola, and receive from you his orders of route or of delay, if useful, in returning here.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. THOMAS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Exact date of seizure not known.

{p.589}

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 9, 1861.

Commanding officers of posts will transmit, without delay, to these headquarters inventories of the munitions of war at their posts, except the arms in the hands of the troops; also inventories of the quartermaster’s stores on hand.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 25.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, Tex., February 14, 1861.

Pursuant to instructions from the headquarters of the Army, dated January 31, 1861, received to-day, the following movements of troops will take place:

I. Companies F, K, and L, First Artillery, at Fort Duncan, Company M, First, and Company M, Second Artillery, at Fort Brown, will march, immediately upon receipt of this order, for Brazos Santiago, at which place a steamer has been directed to be in readiness to receive them for transportation out of Texas. The light companies will take their guns, ammunition, and equipments with them, but will leave their horses on embarkation. The other companies will move with their arms and ammunition, and all the companies with such camp equipage as can be transported by the means within their command.

II. Companies C and E, Third Infantry, will move to Fort Brown without delay, to replace the garrison ordered out of Texas, and will take charge of the artillery horses of Companies K, First, and M, Second Artillery, for which purpose details from each company will be made.

III. Company B, Third Infantry, will repair at once to Fort Duncan, and relieve the present garrison of that station.

IV. The troops from Fort Duncan will carry provisions as far as Fort Brown.

V. The transportation will be taken from the means at the posts from which the movements will be made.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, February 15, 1861. (Received March 1.)

Col. C. A. WAITE, First Infantry, Commanding Dep’t of Texas, San Antonio:

SIR: In the event of the secession of the State of Texas, the General-in-Chief directs that you will, without unnecessary delay, put in march for Fort Leavenworth the entire military force of your department.

Preliminary thereto, you will at once concentrate the troops in sufficient bodies to protect their march out of the country at central points on the proper lines of march. The following stations now occupied seem to be the best adapted for the purpose:

1. Fort Stockton, on the overland mail route., where it is joined by the stage route from San Antonio, for the posts of Camps Hudson and Lancaster, Forts Davis, Quitman, and Bliss-a rendezvous of ten companies of infantry. {p.590} 2. Fort Clark, for Fort McIntosh, Ringgold Barracks, and other posts on or near the Lower Rio Grande-a rendezvous for some three companies of cavalry and ten of infantry.

3. San Antonio, for the troops there in depot, and at Fort Inge-a rendezvous, as at present known, of one company of cavalry and two of infantry, but probably strengthened by additional companies from other stations.

4. Camp Cooper, or Fort Belknap, on the overland mail route, for the troops at Forts Chadbourne and Mason, Camps Colorado and Ives-a rendezvous for six companies of cavalry and three Of infantry.

The lines of march from these centers would probably all be on Fort Arbuckle, through Fort Belknap, and thence through the Indian country, and west of the State of Arkansas, to Fort Leavenworth. These lines of march will, of course, not be regarded as fixed, but be varied by you according as you may judge proper.

It is supposed that at each post there is a sufficiency of transportation for the baggage and supplies of the troops, but all the transportation within the department, including the camels, must be put in requisition to make the movement to bring out all the supplies and public property if possible. You will readily see that the private baggage of officers and men must be brought down to the lowest point. Whatever property it may be necessary to leave in the State will be put in possession of officers of the Quartermaster’s Department, to be shipped by water to New York. So far as water transportation can with safety be made available, you will prefer it for such public property as lies convenient to the coast.

I have, &c.,

L. THOMAS.

P. S.–Timely measures will be taken here to meet the northern movements of troops with supplies and forage, to be forwarded from the Missouri River, in the direction of the Arkansas, say, to some point on or near the Cherokee Country. The troops will probably be obliged to take beef on the hoof with them for a considerable portion of the march.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 18, 1861.

Lieut. Col. L. THOMAS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: On the 15th instant, the order relieving me in command in Texas was received. On the morning of the 16th, some thousand State troops took possession of the public property in this place.

Colonel Waite is absent some sixty miles from here at Camp Verde. I await his arrival to surrender the command to him.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

D. E. TWIGGS, Bvt. Maj. Gen., U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

{p.591}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 27.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 18, 1861.

I. The State troops having taken possession of the city of San Antonio and the property that belonged to the Federal Government, the officers of the general staff, viz, Bvt. Maj. W. A. Nichols, assistant adjutant-general; Maj. D. H. Vinton, quartermaster; Capt. A. W. Reynolds, assistant quartermaster; Military Storekeeper R. M. Potter; Capt. W. B. Blair, commissary of subsistence; Surg. E. H. Abadie, Medical Department; Maj. S. Maclin, paymaster; Maj. D. McClure, paymaster; Bvt. Second Lieuts. W. H. Echols and Nicolas Bowen, Topographical Engineers, and Capt. R. H. K. Whiteley, Ordnance Department, will, as soon as their several functions shall cease, proceed to Washington City, D. C., and report to the chiefs of their respective bureaus. The chief quartermaster aster will advance to each officer named the mileage from this place to Washington City.

By order of Brevet Major-General Twiggs:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 6.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 19, 1861.

Col. C. A. Waite, U. S. Army, having arrived at these headquarters, the undersigned, in compliance with Special Orders, No. 22, of 1861, from the War Department, hereby relinquishes the command of the Department of Texas.

D. E. TWIGGS, Brevet Major-General, U. S. Army.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 7.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 19, 1861.

In compliance with Special Orders, No. 22, of 1861, from the War Department, the undersigned hereby assumes command of the Department of Texas.

C. A. WAITE, Colonel, U. S. Army.

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FORT BROWN, Brownsville, Tex., February 19, 1861.

Col. S. COOPER, Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington, D. C.:

DEAR COLONEL: There have been a good many rumors afloat in regard to the disposition General Twiggs intends making of the troops of this department, in the event of the secession of the State of Texas. It is possible this may have reached the War Department. These reports are to the effect that it is the intention of the commanding general of the department to turn over to the State authorities all the Federal property within the borders of the State, on the requisition of the governor, and it is stated on good authority, or what is here considered good authority, that the general has so written to the governor.

{p.592}

There have also been rumors of an intended concentration of the troops at San Antonio, with a view to their disbandment. Lieutenant Graham, of my company, recently joined from leave of absence, informs me that in passing through New Orleans he was advised by Colonel Myers, son-in-law of General Twiggs, not to join his company; that the troops in Texas would not be allowed to leave the State, and that the general had been written to, or that there was a plan to concentrate the troops at San Antonio, to give all the officers who desired it permission to leave the department, and then to notify the President that he held the Army in Texas for the Southern republic.

I have just received two orders from the headquarters of the department (of which I inclose copies, lest you should not have received them),* and these orders, in conjunction with all the reports above referred to, leave so decided an impression on my mind that some unauthorized disposition of the troops is in contemplation, that I think I will be justified in refusing to move my command from this post on the order of General Twiggs, unless I am satisfied that he is acting under the orders of the General-in-Chief or the War Department.

It will, of course, be extremely unpleasant to disobey an order from department headquarters but you will perceive therein an intention is foreshadowed of moving the troops, and at the same time an admission that no orders have been received.

If an order is issued moving this command, I will believe that it is issued in bad faith to the Government, and I do not think I ought to hesitate to disobey it. I hope, however, that I will hear from you, either officially or unofficially. The Vote in this State on the question of secession will be taken on the 23d, and it is not probable that the result of the vote can be ascertained and disclosed before six weeks. Many of the precincts, such as El Paso, are very remote, so that, until the disclosed vote of the people is ascertained, the State, although nominally out of the Union on the 2d of March next, is not really so.

I presume that the policy of the incoming administration will be developed immediately after the 4th of March, and if you will write me by the 8th of March, your letter will reach New Orleans in time for the steamer of the 15th of that month.

There are reports, too, of official letters being opened, and I would suggest that your letter be sent under an unofficial envelope.

Should it be the intention of the department to withdraw these troops after the secession of the State of Texas, of course it is obvious that Brazos Santiago is the port where to embark.

Very truly, yours,

B. H. HILL, Captain, First Artillery.

FEBRUARY 21.

P. S.–The steamer Arizona has just arrived at Brazos. She brings intelligence that the steamer General Rusk was about to leave Galveston with several hundred men to seize Brazos Santiago and the ordnance stores there. She was directed (the Arizona) by her owners to delay twenty-four [hours] at Indianola, in order that the Rusk should reach Brazos in advance of her. I have apprehended some lawless attack on Brazos, and a short time ago sent down an officer and twelve men. There is a large quantity of ordnance stores and ordnance

* See circular February A and order February 9, pp. 587, 589. {p.593} there. I cannot bring it to this post at present from the want of transportation, and under all the circumstances of the case, and upon consultation with Captain Stoneman and those officers in whose judgment I have confidence, I have determined to destroy these stores. I have not time to write you officially, but this steamer brings us intelligence (unofficial) that a steamer has been sent to withdraw the artillery command; and to insure oar communication we must have the control of Brazos Santiago. There is also a rumor that a command of Texas troops is on its march from Indianola, and it is prudent not to scatter my command; and if the ordinance stores at Brazos axe destroyed or rendered unserviceable, there will be no necessity of retaining a detachment at that point.

Truly, yours,

H.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 31.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 23, 1861.

...

2. Capt. R. H. K. Whiteley, Ordnance Department, will point out to Mr. W. G. M. Samuel, authorized agent of the commissioners on behalf of the Convention of the People of Texas, the public property lately in his possession which was forcibly seized and Is now held by troops of the State of Texas acting under the orders of the said commissioners, in order that correct inventories of the same may be made..

3. The officers of the Quartermaster and Commissary Departments will point out to Mr. James Duff, authorized agent of the commissioners in behalf of the Convention of the People of Texas, the public property lately in their possession, which was forcibly seized and is now held by a body of armed Texans acting under the orders of the said commissioners, in order that correct inventories of the same may be made.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 24, 1861.

[No address.]

SIR: Information has reached these headquarters that three of the companies of the Eighth Infantry which have been serving in the Department of New Mexico (and by recent orders transferred to this department) have not left that, department. In view of the present position of matters connected with this State, of which you have all the requisite, information, I am directed by the commanding officer of this department to request that you will immediately communicate with the commanders of those companies, and direct them not to come within the limits of the State of Texas, but to remain within the limits of the Territory of New Mexico until they shall receive orders from higher authority. Please furnish the commander of the Department of New Mexico with a copy of this communication, and also each company commander herein referred to.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

38 R P.

{p.594}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 32.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 24, 1861.

The commissioners on the part of the State of Texas having turned over to the Quartermaster’s Department twenty-six wagons and team’s for the movement of the troops on the line above Fort Clark, those posts, viz, Fort Bliss, Fort Quitman, Fort Davis, Fort Stockton, Fort Lancaster, and Camp Hudson, will be evacuated by their garrisons in the following manner: The most remote garrison will move first, and the garrison of each succeeding post two days after the passage of the command which precedes it. They will direct their march upon Indianola, where transports will be in readiness for their embarkation. The troops will march with their arms and ammunition, the necessary clothing and camp equipage, and, as the means of transportation are limited, no extra baggage will be allowed. Lieut. Henry W. Freedley, Third Infantry, is appointed acting assistant quartermaster of the train. Special instructions will be given to him. Agents on the part of the State will be sent up to the several posts to receive the public property.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 35.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 26, 1861.

1. No enlistments will be made during the stay of the troops in this department. This prohibition does not apply to re-enlistments.

2. Should any of the troops on the lines about Fort Mason be found above that post in march for the coast, they will halt at that station and will immediately report the fact to these headquarters.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT MASON, TEX., February 27, 1861.

Maj. W. A. NICHOLS, Adjutant-General, &c., San Antonio, Tex.:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that, in obedience to orders, I forwarded General Orders, No. 5, of February 18, 1861, and the circular of the commissioners, to Camp Colorado on the 21st instant, by a corporal and three privates.

When about twenty miles from this post, they were taken prisoners by the State troops, under command of Capt. A. B. Burleson, the orders opened and read, the men dismounted, and made to walk about sixty miles out of their way, their horses being ridden by some of Captain Burleson’s men.

Captain Burleson then thought it advisable to send the orders forward. Accordingly, he released the corporal and one private and ordered them to proceed to Camp Colorado; he, however, detained two privates as prisoners for several days, sending one of their horses to Austin, ridden by one of his men, on express.

After detaining the two men for several days, he released them. The entire party reached this post late last night.

I inclose copies of letters received from Colonel McCulloch and Cap- {p.595} tain Burleson. Captain Burleson’s command is in the service of the State and under the orders of the governor.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

RD. W. JOHNSON, Captain, Second Cavalry, Commanding Post.

[Inclosures.]

CAMP ON RICHLAND, February 24, 1861.

Captain JOHNSON: I send to Fort Mason this morning two of your men that I have had in custody, and in doing what I have done I think I have acted right’, and I think the commissioners an the part of the State of Texas are a set of jackasses in allowing the regular troops in leaving Texas with their arms; and, to be plain with you, if I had a sufficient force I would make all of you lay down your arms in short order, and if I can get men I will yet do it. One of the United States horses that I took I have sent an express to Austin on him, and when he returns I will send him to you if you have not left, and in that case I will turn him over to some of the United States officers. In conclusion, allow me to thank you for the kind treatment I received whilst at Fort Mason from you.

Very respectfully,

A. B. BURLESON, Captain, Commanding Camp Texas Rangers.

HEADQUARTERS CAMP COLORADO, Texas, February 25, 1861.

Captain JOHNSON, Commanding Fort Mason:

SIR: I have seen a letter from Captain Burleson, Texas Rangers, to Captain Smith, Second Cavalry, of this post, saying that he had arrested your expressman en route for this place, opened the documents and letters, detained some of the property in his hands, and that he was acting under my orders. Captain Burleson was not called into the service by me, does not belong to my command properly, and I have given him no orders to interfere with any movement on this frontier. I did write to Captain Burleson to know if he would co-operate with me on the frontier and in all my service, and asked him to answer me at once, which he has never done, and should he have answered in the affirmative, should have given him orders, but certainly not to arrest the express from one of Your posts to another. I regret the indiscretion of Captain Burleson very much, and am sorry to be compelled, in order to place myself right, to cast the blame upon him; but I cannot permit injustice to be done myself in order to shield another.

Captain Burleson is a young officer, and I have no doubt thought he was acting for the good of his State, and am sorry he should have been so indiscreet.

Very respectfully, &c.,

H. E. McCULLOCH, Commissioner, and Col. Comdg. Northwestern Frontier of Texas.

FORT MASON, TEX., February 27, 1861.

Maj. W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General, Department Texas, San Antonio:

MAJOR: It may be asked why I did not rescue my men at all hazards. I reply, that the first intimation I had of this high-handed measure was {p.596} from the men after their return to the post. A great many of Burleson’s men left him on account of this unlawful proceeding, and he, too, has left his camp for some point unknown.

I hope the good people of Texas will permit us to depart in peace; but many such acts like this one, on their part, will sooner or later bring on a determined resistance.

Yours, truly,

RD W. JOHNSON.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 36.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 27, 1861.

Department Special Orders, No. 32, of February 24, 1861, are modified as follows:

The garrisons of the posts above Fort Clark, viz, Fort Bliss, Fort Quitman, Fort Davis, Fort Stockton, Fort Lancaster, and Camp Hudson, instead of marching as therein directed, will march upon the coast as soon as the means of transportation shall be received by them.

The public property at the several posts, except what is expressly mentioned in Department General Orders, No. 5, and the circular of the commissioners on behalf of committee of public safety, under date of San Antonio, February 18, 1861, will be turned over to authorized agents of the State of Texas, who will give due and proper receipts for the same. Should, however, any agent on the part of the State fail to appear or any one refuse to give the proper receipts, the commanding officer will call a board of survey, with instructions to make inventories of the property to be abandoned. (See General Orders, No. 22, of 1859, from the War Department.)

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 8.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 28, 1861.

Commanding officers of posts and others will, when the troops take up the line of march for the coast, turn over the public property in their charge (reserving such especially enumerated in General Orders, No. 5, of February 18, 1861, from these, headquarters) to the authorized agents of the State of Texas, who will be duly commissioned by the commissioners on the part of the State to give due and proper receipts for the same.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 37.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, February 28, 1861.

I. Companies I, First, and A, Eighth Infantry, now in camp at the head of the San Pedro, will, on the 2d proximo, proceed, under the command of Bvt. Maj. L. Smith, captain Eighth Infantry, to Green Lake, some twenty miles from the coast, and encamp there until further instructions. Major Smith will select such position as will be suitable for an encampment of six hundred men.

{p.597}

Capt. J. H. King, First Infantry, will perform the duties of quartermaster and commissary of the command at Green Lake until relieved by an officer who will soon be detailed for that purpose.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 5.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL’S OFFICE, Washington, March 1, 1861.

The following order is published for the information of the Army:

WAR DEPARTMENT, March 1, 1861.

By the direction of the President of the United States, it is ordered that Brig. Gen. David E. Twiggs, major-general by brevet, be, and is hereby, dismissed from the Army of the United States, for his treachery to the flag of his country, in having surrendered, on the 18th of February, 1861, on the demand of the authorities of Texas, the military posts and other property of the United States in his department and under his charge.

J. HOLT, Secretary of War.

By order of the Secretary of War:

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 41.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, March 5, 1861.

The garrisons of the following-named posts will march for the coast, via San Antonio, as soon as they receive the requisite means of transportation viz: Fort Inge, Camp Wood, Fort Mason, Camp Colorado, Fort Chadbourne, and Camp Cooper. Upon arriving at Green Lake, some twenty miles from Indianola, the troops will find a camp established, where they will remain until the transports are ready for their embarkation. It is desirable that sufficient provisions and forage be taken to last to that point. If the means Of transportation will not permit, recourse must be had to the several posts on the line of march.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 44.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, March 8, 1861.

2. The garrisons of Fort Davis and Fort Stockton will not commence the march for the coast until the arrival of the troops and trains from Fort Quitman and Fort Bliss.

4. The garrisons of Fort Clark and Fort Duncan, and I Company, Second Cavalry, Captain Brackett, will march for the coast, via San Antonio, as soon as they receive the requisite means of transportation. Upon arriving at Green Lake, some twenty miles from Indianola, the troops will find a camp established, where they will remain awaiting the arrival of the transports. Sufficient provisions and forage will be taken {p.598} to last to that point, if possible. The troops will march with their arms and ammunition, the necessary clothing, and camp equipage. No extra baggage will be taken.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, March 12, 1861.

Col. CARLOS A. WAITE, U. S. Army, or senior officer on duty with U. S. troops at Brazos and Indianola, Tex.:

SIR: The General-in-Chief directs that the troops arriving at Brazos and at Indianola, Tex., for embarkation, shall proceed to the harbor of New York, where they will receive further orders.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 50.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF TEXAS, San Antonio, March 19, 1861.

Maj. Sackfield Maclin, paymaster, U. S. Army, having accepted a military appointment under the State of Texas, and having entered upon the duties of that office, will immediately transfer to Maj. Daniel McClure, paymaster, U. S. Army, all funds pertaining to the Pay Department which may be in his hands or in any way under his control, in order that the companies of his district, which are daily arriving at this place may be paid.

By order of Col. C. A. Waite:

W. A. NICHOLS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, March 19, 1861. (Received April 1, 1861.)

Col. CARLOS A. WAITE, U. S. Army, Commanding the Department of Texas:

SIR: If the number of troops under orders to leave Texas and not yet embarked, or, if embarked, still within your call, be sufficient, you will immediately form a strongly-intrenched camp at some suitable point convenient to and covering the post of Indianola, of not less than five hundred, but preferably of twelve hundred, men, and hold the same against hostile Texans until further orders.

With the troops you will retain your means of transportation, with all the subsistence that can be spared from the steamers sent from New York to Texas for the reception of troops, together with one of those steamers for a time-the one on which the United States will have to pay the least damage-and discharge the other steamers. And if there be one or (preferably) two companies not needed for the above camp, you will send such company or companies by the steamers to Key West, to occupy the barracks on that island. If there be still a surplus of troops beyond those objects, they will proceed to New York in the steamers.

The objects of the intrenched camp near Indianola are, first, to keep {p.599} a foothold in that State till the question of secession on her part be definitely settled among her own people, and, second, in case of conflict between them, to give such aid and support to General Houston or other head of authority in the defense of the Federal Government as may be within your power, without imminent peril to your command or to some considerable portion thereof.

This restriction alludes to advances and co-operation in the interior too far for a probable safe return to your base of operations, but it is not intended to prevent you from taking reasonable war risks in order to afford the permitted support.

You will communicate as freely as practicable with General Houston or other leader of the Union party, and comply with his wishes or suggestions, if practicable, within the above restriction; of which you, on your responsibility, will be the judge.

A field battery and some heavier guns, together with subsistence and other necessaries, will be sent to you as your wants may become known.

For the use of your quartermaster and commissary of subsistence there will be deposited in time to your credit, with the assistant treasurer, New York, fifty thousand dollars, which you will draw out as may be needed by those disbursing officers.

It is expected that you will lose no opportunity of communicating with the Adjutant-General everything of interest that may occur to your command or in connection with these instructions.

With great confidence in your zeal, energy, and judgment, I remain, yours, respectfully,

WINFIELD SCOTT.

P. S.–If on the receipt of this duplicate it should be well known that neither Governor Houston nor any other executive authority of Texas has any considerable number of men up in arms in defense of the Federal Government in that State (and you may detain the steam transports some days for satisfactory information on this point), you will consider the foregoing instructions as withdrawn; all except what relates to the two companies to be landed for the occupation of the barracks on Key West.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, March 23, 1861.

Col. L. THOMAS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. of the Army, New York City:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report for the information of the General-in-Chief that I arrived here and assumed command of this department on the 22d instant. I feel it to be my first duty to call his attention at once to the condition of affairs which I find existing throughout this Territory. The expeditions against the Comanches and the Navajos have caused the loss of a very large portion of the means of transportation, and the secession of the State of Texas has involved an additional heavy loss to this department of subsistence stores, of transportation, and of funds.

By the mail of to-day, I have received a report from Maj. Isaac Lynde, commanding Fort McLane, a copy of which I inclose for the information of the General-in-Chief, and by the same mail I am informed of a, plan laid by the people about Albuquerque to possess themselves of the Government stores at that depot. The people in every portion of the Territory are beginning to refuse to credit the Government. The troops are {p.600} becoming uneasy and restless about their pay, and unless they can be assured at a very early day that they will be paid off, very serious consequences may result.

The great scarcity of means of transportation and the difficulty of hiring it must necessarily cramp the field operations now commencing against the Apaches and render long marches impossible, except for a small body of troops. I earnestly request, therefore, that I may receive at the earliest possible moment the means of paying off the troops and other creditors of the Government, or instructions for my guidance, and additional means of transportation in case it may not be possible to send the funds now imperatively required.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. LORING, Colonel Regiment Mounted Rifles, Commanding Department.

[Inclosure.]

HDQRS. FORT MCLANE, N. MEX., March 11, 1861.

To the ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL Headquarters Department of New Mexico, Santa Fé:

SIR: I have the honor to report that the public ox-train of fifteen wagons from Albuquerque that I reported as having been attacked by Indians at Cook’s Spring arrived at this place, and after refitting left for Fort Buchanan on the 25th of February.

On the 5th of March I received reliable information that a party of desperate men from the mines, at the instigation of Mr. Kirk, wagon-master had left for the purpose of taking the train and running it into Sonora and selling it. I have ascertained beyond a doubt that they have succeeded; that the train took the road to Janos, the nearest point in Mexico, and had crossed the line before I received the first report. I have also received information that the inhabitants of the mines have formed a plan to attack this post; to capture the public property; take all the arms, &c., from us. They hope to surprise us; but in that they will be mistaken. I shall defend the post unless overpowered by numbers. Their object is plunder, and the report states that when they have captured us they intend to take all the stock of the overland mail. I believe such an attack will be made, and they may get some of our animals, as we must send them out to graze.

I shall keep my command here, and cannot furnish escorts, as I shall have no men to spare if this attack is made with their whole force. I consider the preservation of the public property of the first importance.

Very respectfully, &c.,

I. LYNDE, Major, Seventh Infantry, Commanding.

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HDQRS. CAMP ON GREEN LAKE, TEX., April 8, 1861.

Maj. W. A. NICHOLS, A. A. G., Hdqrs. Dept. of Texas, San Antonio, Tex.:

MAJOR: I inclose a letter which I received from R. A. Howard, agent of the State, and my answer. They speak for themselves. I was very ill when called upon to make the answer. Every word cost me severe suffering. I did not consult anything but brevity. Delicacy towards the commission would be absurd. I wonder if they know that one of our {p.601} officers gave all his arms, his company arms, to Colonel Ford, that the colonel might have the means of keeping the scalping-knife from the heads of the people, at and near Brownsville. Captain Stoneman absolutely did, upon a touching appeal from Colonel Ford. Notice the circular of the commissioners of the 18th. It says: “Arms of the respective corps.”

Your obedient servant,

LARKIN SMITH, Brevet Major, Commanding.

[Inclosures.]

GREEN LAKE, TEX., April 6, 1861.

Maj. L. SMITH, U. S. Army, Commanding:

MAJOR: In obedience to instructions, as agent of the State of Texas to receive the public property from the embarking troops, and in accordance with the agreement entered into by General Twiggs and the commissioners of the State of Texas, I most respectfully ask that if there are any United States arms not in the hands of troops they may be turned over to the State of Texas.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

RICH’D A. HOWARD, Agent State of Texas.

HDQRS. GREEN LAKE, TEX., April 7, 1861-12 m.

RICHARD A. HOWARD, Agent of State of Texas:

SIR: I have just received yours of the 6th instant. Neither General Twiggs nor Colonel Waite had any idea of embracing the company arms in their orders designating the property to be delivered to the State authorities. This I am positive is the fact. Were it otherwise, I am not the person to decide such a point. It is strange that, the commissioners should instruct you to call on me with such a demand, when they have the commander of the department in their city.

General Orders, No. 5, of February 18, the circular of the Texas commissioners of same date, and General Orders, No. 8, of February 28, sustain my position. The latter also designates the place where, the demand has to be made. I must answer your letter by respectfully denying your premises.

Your letter with this answer will be forwarded to Colonel Waite.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LARKIN SMITH, Brevet Major, Commanding.

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HDQRS. CAMP ON GREEN LAKE, TEX., April 11, 1861.

Maj. W. A. NICHOLS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Hdqrs. San Antonio, Tex.:

MAJOR: The Empire City will doubtless sail to-morrow morning. Major Sibley still delaying, I have ordered Captain Johnson, Second Cavalry, with the Fort Mason garrison, to report to Major Shepherd. He will do so to-day, and, as the weather is very favorable, the troops will almost certainly embark to-morrow. Captain Johnson will return to camp in case Major Sibley arrives this evening.

There will ill then be left here for the Star of the West, if Captain Johnson’s command goes, Major Sibley’s three companies, say 200 persons; {p.602} Captain Granger’s and Captain Wallace’s companies, 141 persons; noncommissioned staff and band, First Infantry, 17 persons; Captain Jordan’s company (D), Eighth Infantry, 45 persons; my company (A), Eighth Infantry, 52. Total, 455. This number may be increased ten by the detached men and laundresses on the way.

There will be no necessity for any company here from the departure of the Star of the West to the arrival of the companies of the Eighth Infantry from the upper posts; therefore I add my company. It may be necessary that an officer should remain to answer communications, &c. I can stay. The company had better go with Captain Jordan to New York Harbor, where I have no doubt the second lieutenant is waiting for it; but as Lieutenant Jones is here there may be no necessity for my remaining, as there will be no other arrival of troops until the last come. I suppose it will be best to dispatch the Star of the West with the troops named above. I await your answer communicating the wishes of the colonel. I repeat, I am willing to remain myself. My company going will make so much more room in the last transport. The property will all be in the hired house, where I, Lieutenant Jones, and the non-commissioned officers employed by him, can look after it. It will be secure. Captain Granger arrived this morning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LARKIN SMITH, Brevet Major, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, April 22, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters of the Army, New York:

COLONEL: I have the honor to state, for the information of the General-in-Chief, that I have sent messengers to the Comanches, informing them of my willingness to meet them in council and to consider terms of peace.

They are very desirous of living in peace with the people of this Territory, and have sent in many messages to that effect; and, as the Texans are now said to be treating with them, I have thought it best for the interests of this department to listen to their propositions, and to suspend, for the present, operations against them.

In any agreement I shall make with these savages I shall stipulate for the exemption of the people of Texas from their incursions.

I inclose herewith an extract from a report, received by me from Lieutenant McRae, of the Rifles, on this subject.*

I am, colonel, very respectfully, &c.,

W. W. LORING, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

* Not found.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, May 5, 1861.

Capt. R. A. WAINWRIGHT, Ordnance Department, Santa Fé:

CAPTAIN: The department commander, not being able to meet the Comanche chiefs, in council on the 12th instant, wishes you to represent him at the time and place appointed.

{p.603}

You will please explain to the chiefs that he regrets his inability to confer with them in person, but, as other important public considerations detain him here, he sends you to talk to them, because he believes they are really anxious for peace, and he wishes them to understand as soon as possible the terms upon which he is willing to suspend active hostilities, which are as follows:

I. They must agree to discontinue their depredation upon the property and lives of the people of the United States, of this Territory, of Kansas, of Texas, and of all others entitled to the protection of the Government.

II. That the whole nation will be held responsible for the acts of any of its members, so that when any of their bad young men steal from or molest any of the people, as above specified, under the protection of the Government, the troops will be again sent against the nation, and will attack any portion of it wherever found, unless they promptly make restitution for the property taken or destroyed and give up to the military authorities the marauders.

III. They must keep away from the vicinity of the settlements on the Gallenos, Pecos, Red River, and all other settlements of this Territory; and when they desire to trade or talk with the authorities they must come to Fort Union for the purpose.

IV. They must be made to understand that no persons whatever are authorized to negotiate with them about peace or war except the military commander and his officers or the superintendent of Indian affairs and his agents, and that if they listen to any other people, or act upon what they tell them, they will get into trouble by it.

V. They must be particularly enjoined against acting in a troublesome or threatening manner towards the United States mail on the Independence roads and all passengers or trains passing and repassing over those roads, and advised that it will be prudent for them to keep away from those roads as much as they can.

VI. Explain to them that the Great Father at Washington thinks of establishing a military post on the Canadian River, and somewhere, in the vicinity of where you are to hold your conference with them; that he has not yet said whether it must be established there or not, but if he says so it will be done, and then that will be the place for them to come to trade or to talk with the military authorities, instead of Fort Union.

VII. If they seem honestly desirous to behave peaceably and to observe the above injunctions, you may grant them an armistice for ninety days, to enable them to prove by their acts their good intentions, and at the end of that time another talk will be held with them, provided they have acted in good faith, and peace will be made with them.

In conducting these negotiations the department commander recommends to you to confer freely with the superintendent of Indian affairs, who proposes to be present and will be associated with you in these negotiations. And he also recommends to your respectful consideration any information or opinions, as to the temper of these Indians or their relations with the people of the Territory, which may be offered to you by Lieut. A. McRae, of the Rifles, whose opportunities for observing them have, been very good, while his excellent intelligence and judgment render his opinions upon all subjects valuable.

I am, captain, very respectfully, &c.,

DABNEY H. MAURY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

{p.604}

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 86 1/2.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Washington, May 17, 1861.

...

2. The Fifth and Seventh Regiments of Infantry, and two companies of the Tenth Infantry now in New Mexico, and two companies of the Tenth Infantry at Fort Wise, will be put in march for Fort Leavenworth via Forts Wise and Larned, with as little delay as practicable. Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Canby will accompany the battalion of the Tenth Infantry.

Colonel Loring will station the regiment of riflemen and four companies of dragoons, constituting the regular force to remain in the Department of New Mexico, at such points as in his judgment will best protect the interests of the United States. He will also assign to stations ally volunteers who may be mustered into service and reported to him, under orders to be given by the War Department.

...

By command of Lieutenant-General Scott:

E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, May 19, 1861.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General, New York:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the campaign organized against the Mescalero Apaches by instructions from these headquarters of March 1, 1861, and placed under the direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Crittenden, was promptly and energetically conducted by that officer, and has been satisfactorily concluded. The Mescaleros have sued for peace, seem disposed to refrain from future hostilities against the settlements, and I have, therefore, suspended the further operations of the expedition, and relieved Colonel Crittenden from its command.

On the 13th instant a council was held with the Comanche chiefs near the Pecos River, in which the United States was represented by Capt. R. A. Wainwright, U. S. Ordnance Corps, and the superintendent of Indian affairs, as commissioners, while six of the prominent chiefs of the Comanches, including their head chief, represented that tribe. It resulted in granting an armistice of ninety days to the Comanches, at the end of which time, if they conduct themselves peaceably, another council will be held with them with a view to making a treaty of peace.

There seems no reason to apprehend any immediate disorder in this Territory. The troops are subordinate and quiet, and if I can procure their payment at an early day I shall feel no apprehension of trouble with them.

The people of the Territory continue tranquil enough. There are rumors of proposed political movements, but I do not anticipate any serious outbreak or revolution.

Notwithstanding the instructions from the Paymaster-General to Major Seward, I have felt compelled to send him up to pay the troops at Fort Stanton.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. LORING, Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Commanding Department.

{p.605}

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HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NEW MEXICO, Santa Fé, May 19, 1861.

Bvt. Maj. G. R. PAUL, Seventh Infantry, Commanding Fort Fillmore :

MAJOR: The department commander directs me to express to you his approbation of your course in using a portion of your forces to prevent violence and bloodshed amongst the people in your vicinity.

I inclose herewith an application from the people of Mesilla and from the governor of this Territory to the department commander, requesting that troops may be stationed in Mesilla for the preservation of lives and property of citizens against lawless combinations too powerful for the civil authorities to resist.*

While the colonel commanding does not think proper to order you to station troops in Mesilla unless you perceive a necessity for it, he wishes you to understand that he intrusts full discretion to you in the matter, and that he wishes you, if in your judgment it seems necessary, to use any portion of your command to aid the civil authorities in preventing violence and bloodshed amongst the people.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DABNEY H. MAURY, Assistant Adjutant-General.

* Applications not found.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, May 20, 1861.

Hon. CALEB B. SMITH, Secretary of the Interior:

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your favor of the 11th instant, calling the attention of this Department to the condition of New Mexico and the danger of invasion from Texas. I take pleasure in saying in reply that the attention of this Department has been duly given to that subject, and that measures have been or will be taken commensurate with its importance.

Very respectfully,

SIMON CAMERON, Secretary of War.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF NEW MEXICO, NORTHERN DIST., Santa Fé, N. Mex., June 10, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Fort Union:

SIR: Information from private sources indicates the possibility of demonstration by the people of Texas against the supply trains on the route to this country from the Missouri River, and the lieutenant-colonel commanding directs that the movements of Company G, Second Dragoons, as directed by Special Orders, No. 38, of the 13th instant, be suspended altogether, and that the mounted force of your command be held in readiness for any movement that may be necessary for the protection of the trains. Instructions in detail will be sent to you in a day or two by express.

Very respectfully, sir, &c.,

A. L. ANDERSON, Second Lieut., Fifth Infantry, Act. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

{p.606}

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SANTA FÉ , N. MEX. , June 11, 1861.

The ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL, Headquarters of the Army, City of New York:

SIR: I have the honor to report that Colonel Loring, of the Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, in anticipation of the acceptance of his resignation, left this place to-day, after placing me in the general charge of the affairs of the department and in the immediate command of the Northern District. He has not yet formally relinquished the command, and will await at Fort Fillmore, the action of the President upon the tender of his resignation.

I have no reason to apprehend any immediate political trouble in this department, and in the future this will be contingent upon the action of Missouri, with which the people of this Territory are more intimately connected in their commercial relations and associations than with Texas or the neighboring States of Mexico.

The disaffection in Arizona is, in my judgment, confined to a small portion of the people of that Territory, and the disaffected are believed to be without the means of effecting anything against the Government, as they have recently and repeatedly applied for the assistance of the troops in settling their local difficulties. A demonstration against Arizona by the people of Texas may be apprehended, and, although nothing is known here of any contemplated movement in that direction, I will take measures to increase materially the force at Fort Fillmore by transferring a portion of the troops from the interior posts, and, if possible, an additional mounted force from the upper country.

The long-deferred payment of the troops in Arizona, aided by the mischievous efforts of some individuals in that, country, have created some dissatisfaction among the troops at some of the posts; but this will be removed at an early period by the payment of a portion of the arrearages now due. The funds in the hands of the paymasters will not be sufficient to pay the whole amount, but will leave from four to six months still unpaid at the posts in Arizona. It is hoped that a sufficiency of funds to meet these arrearages will soon be received. Major Reynolds will pay the troops at Fort Fillmore; Major Seward those at Forts McLane, Breckinridge, and Buchanan; and Captain Wainwright, Ordnance Department, those at Fort Fauntleroy.

Major Reynolds, I think, contemplates, resigning, which will leave but one paymaster, Major Seward (now under orders for Washington), in the department. It is respectfully recommended that two or three additional paymasters be sent out as soon as practicable.

I think it proper to refer to the disabled condition of the mounted companies from the want of horses, and of the Quartermaster’s Department from the want of draught animals. The past two years have been seasons of great scarcity, almost famine, throughout the whole of New Mexico. The scarcity of water, grass, and forage, and constant hard service have destroyed a large proportion of the animals in the service of the Government. The same causes have operated to reduce the number in the possession of private individuals, so that the supply necessary to place the troops in this department in an effective condition cannot be procured here, and I respectfully recommend that the estimates heretofore made for remounts and for draught animals may be filled from the East.

Very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

ED. R. S. CANBY, Major, Tenth Infantry, and Bvt. Lt. Col., Comdg.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6