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 Research ACW US War Dept. Official Records HTML Ser. I, Vol. 1, Ch. I–Confederate Correspondence.

THE
WAR OF THE REBELLION:
A COMPILATION OF THE
OFFICIAL RECORDS
OF THE
UNION AND CONFEDERATE ARMIES.

CHAPTER I.
OPERATIONS IN CHARLESTON HARBOR, S. C.
December 20, 1860-April 14, 1861.
(Secession, Fort Sumter)
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CONFEDERATE CORRESPONDENCE.

{p.252}

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Charleston, December 28, 1860.

Hon. D. F. JAMISON, President of the Convention:

SIR: As the Convention sent for me yesterday, to be informed upon important business, I take the occasion to say that, under my order, Castle Pinckney was taken last evening, and the United States flag hauled down and the Palmetto banner run up in its place. And I also ordered a detachment from an artillery regiment to occupy Sullivan’s Island; and if it could be done without any immediate danger from mines, or too great loss of life, to take Fort Moultrie and to run up the Palmetto flag, and put the guns in immediate preparation for defense. I have now full possession of those two forts. I considered the evacuation of Fort Moultrie, under all the circumstances, a direct violation of the distinct understanding between the authorities of the Government at Washington and those who were authorized to act on the part of the State, and bringing on a state of war.

I therefore thought it due to the safety of the State that I should take the steps I have. I hope there is no immediate danger of further aggression for the present.

Respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

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[WASHINGTON], January 2, 1861.

Hon. M. L. BONHAM, Charleston, S. C. :

Holt succeeds Floyd. It means war. Cut off supplies from Anderson and take Sumter soon as possible.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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WASHINGTON, January 4, 1861.

A. N. KIMBALL, Jackson, Miss. :

No troops have been sent to Charleston nor will be while I am a member of the Cabinet.

J. THOMPSON.

* Correspondence between the Confederate and the United States authorities will be found in the “Union Correspondence, &c.”

{p.253}

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[JANUARY 5 (?), 1861.] Saturday-8 o’clock a.m.

Hon. JOHN ROBERTSON, Commissioner from Virginia, Charleston:

President’s reply: “Brooklyn not for South Carolina. On errand of mercy and relief.”

JOHN TYLER.

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WASHINGTON, Tuesday morning, January 8, 1861.

His Excellency F. W. PICKENS, Governor of South Carolina, Charleston, S. C.:

The Star of the West sailed from New York on Sunday with Government troops and provisions. It is said her destination is Charleston. If so, she may be hourly expected off the harbor of Charleston.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR, January 29, 1861.

HENRY A. MULLINGS, Esq., Commanding Cutter William Aiken:

SIR: You will proceed, with the cutter William Aiken, off Ship Channel, and when a friendly vessel comes over the bar you will make a signal, running your flag up to the mainmast head for a few moments, and then haul it down. If an unfriendly vessel, you will dip your flag at mainmast head, but be sure to keep it flying. Every vessel should be looked into, or partially examined, to see that, no unnecessary number of men are on board. The private signal has been arranged with the Nashville and Columbia. For the present, the former will show a flag of white and red from mainmast bead; the latter, her private signal, with the letter M in the center. The Adger will show from her mainmast head a blue flag, with letter M. If your boat should be detained or captured by an, unfriendly vessel, she (the unfriendly vessel) will be prevented from entering, by the battery east of Fort Moultrie, and by Fort Moultrie.

Very respectfully,

JAMES H. NORTH, Captain, Commanding.

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[FEBRUARY 2, 1861.]

Governor PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Communication made to President last evening. It elaborates the matter contained in instructions, and incloses the original demand. Cabinet meets to-day. I shall leave on Monday evening.

President, I think, will refer everything to Congress, and make his reply in his message. Letter from the Baron received. Ingraham’s resignation will go in to-day.

I. W. HAYNE.

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FEBRUARY 7, 1861.

Judge J. ROBERTSON, Montgomery, Ala.:

Hayne has returned. Prevent, if possible, collision. It is of great importance to results here.

J. TYLER. {p.254} [FEBRUARY 7, 1861.]

Governor PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Can my voice reach you? If so, do not attack Fort Sumter. You know my sincerity. The Virginia delegation here earnestly unite.

JOHN TYLER.

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[WASHINGTON], Saturday, February 9, 1861.

Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

The President says the letter to Colonel Hayne was designed to be both respectful and kind; that he read it, so considered it, and if it seemed otherwise he deeply regrets it.

The President desired me to say this to you. He complained much of Colonel Hayne’s last letter, as Mr. Holt in his letter bad no unkind intention, but the contrary. He manifested great solicitude on this point.

Will you give me an assurance, that no attack will be made on Fort Sumter by South Carolina, provided the President will give a like assurance and pledge that no re-enforcement shall be furnished or attempted by the Government here?

JOHN TYLER.

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FEBRUARY 12, 1861.

No. 5.–A RESOLUTION in relation to the occupation of the forts and arsenals, &c.

Resolved by the Congress of the Confederate States of America, That this Government takes under its charge the questions and difficulties now existing between the several States of this Confederacy and the Government of the United States of America, relating to the occupation of forts, arsenals, navy-yards, and other public establishments; and that the President of the Congress be directed to communicate this resolution to the several States of this Confederacy, through the respective governors thereof.

Adopted February 12, 1861.

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HEADQUARTERS, CHARLESTON, S. C., February 13, 1861.

Hon. HOWELL COBB, President of the Provisional Congress:

SIR: I had the honor last night to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram, in which you informed me that the Provisional Congress had taken charge of the “questions and difficulties” now existing between the several States of the Confederacy and the Government of the United States.* In the reply made to you by telegraph I stated that I would communicate with you by letter, and added to it the expression of the urgent conviction of the authorities of the State as to the period in which the reduction of Fort Sumter should be complete. And, in the first place, let me offer you my warm congratulations upon the success which has attended you in the organization of the Provisional Government. May it be equal to the emergency of every occasion which can arise, and be to each State in this new confederation the efficient guardian of those rights, which, ignored or usurped under the former confederation, has united these States in the bonds of a new political compact.

In taking charge of the “questions and difficulties” which relate to Fort Sumter, it will be necessary for the Congress to apprehend rightly their present position. The force of circumstances devolved upon this {p.255} State an obligation to provide the measures necessary for its defense. It has been obliged to act under the guidance of its own counsels, but has never forgotten the interest of its sister States in every measure which it was about to provide for its own safety. And I beg to assure you that, in all which it may at any time do, a regard for the welfare and wishes of its sister States in the new confederation will exercise a marked influence upon the conduct of this State.

The “questions and difficulties” of Fort Sumter can scarcely be fully appreciated, unless by those who have been familiar with its progress from the commencement of its history to the present moment. If it shall appear otherwise, it has, nevertheless, been the constant, anxious desire of this State to obtain the possession of a fort which, held by the United States, affected its dignity and safety, without a collision, which would involve the loss of life. To secure this end every form of negotiation which could be adopted, in consistency with the dignity of the State, or had the promise or seeming of success, has been honestly attempted. To all of these attempts there has been but one result: A refusal in all cases, positive and unqualified, varied only as to the reasons which were set forth for its justification, has followed each demand. And now the conviction is presented to the State, derived from the most calm and deliberate consideration of the whole matter, that in this persistent refusal of the President of the United States is involved a denial of the rightful independence of the State of South Carolina.

The questions and difficulties, therefore, of Fort Sumter, comprehend now, as you will perceive, considerations which are political as well as military; and it would scarcely be considered that ail undue estimate was made of the former if they were said to be as important as the latter. The establishment of them, moreover, is of the utmost consequence to every State which has united with this State, in the bonds of a new confederation. The State has held its right to the possession of Fort Sumter to be the direct and necessary consequence of its right, as a sovereign State, to have the control of a military post within its limits, which post, during the period of the political connection of the State with the other States, was held by the United States for the protection of South Carolina because South Carolina was a part of the United States, and being so, upon the United States was devolved the obligation to provide that defense for this State. With the termination of the political connection between South Carolina and the United States the obligation of the United States to defend that State ceased, unless that State itself was the property of the United States. If the State was au independent power the rightful control within its limits of a military post, which involved its dignity and affected its safety, was and is recognized by the plainest rules of public law. The denial, therefore, of the right of the State to have, possession of the fort was, in fact, a denial of its independence. Nor has there, been even a colorable pretext for a consistency of that, possession by the United States with the independence of the State, since the President authorized the distinct avowal that it was held as a military post. The sole use of it as a military post is in the control (called by the President the protection) it gives to the United States of the harbor of Charleston. The assertion, then, as you will perceive, of the rightful independence of the State carries necessarily with it the right to reduce Fort Sumter into its own possessions which is held, as it is, by a hostile power, for an unfriendly purpose. It is a hostile power when it asserts a right to exercise a dominion over the State, which that State refuses to recognize as consistent with its own dignity and safety; and its purpose cannot be otherwise than unfriendly {p.256} when it can only be to enable the United States to commit to its military subordinates a power to refuse “to permit any vessels to pass within range of the guns” which are within its walls. It has, therefore, been considered at once proper and necessary for this State to take possession of that fort as soon as the measures necessary for the accomplishment of that result can be completed, and it is now expected that within a short time all the arrangements will be perfected necessary for its certain and speedy reduction. With the completion of these preparations and the assurance they afford of success, it has ever been the purpose of the authorities of this State to take this fort into the possession of the State. The right to do so has been considered the right of the State, and the resources of the State have been considered equal to the exercise of that right.

Whatever may be the mode in which the Congress will take charge of these “questions and difficulties,” I trust that it is considered that in the solution of them you will regard the position which the State of South Carolina now occupies in relation to them. That position is marked by these propositions: That the right to have possession of the fort is a right incident to the independence (she) the State has asserted; that, to obtain possession of the fort, she has exhausted all modes which, consistently with her dignity, can be devised for a peaceful settlement; that the failure of such attempts has remitted her to the necessity of employing force to obtain that which should have been yielded from considerations of justice and right, and that as soon as her preparations are completed the reduction of that fort should be accomplished.

In the absence of any explanation or direction connected with the telegram received from you, I have assumed that the policy and measures which have been adopted by this State, and which are in prosecution, will be recognized as proper. In the consideration of the question of Fort Sumter, I have not been insensible of those matters which are in their nature consequential, and have, I trust, weighed, with all the care which befits the grave responsibilities of the case, the various circumstances which determine the time when this attack should be made. With the best lights which. I could procure in guiding or assisting me, I am perfectly satisfied that the welfare of the new confederation and the necessities of the State require that Fort Sumter should be reduced before the close of the present administration at Washington. If an attack is delayed until after the inauguration of the incoming President of the United States, the troops now gathered in the capital may then be employed in attempting that which, previous to that time, they could not be spared to do. They dare not leave Washington now and do that which then will be a measure too inviting to be resisted.

Mr. Lincoln cannot do more for this State than Mr. Buchanan has done. Mr. Lincoln will not concede what Mr. Buchanan has refused. Mr. Buchanan has placed his refusal upon grounds which determine his reply to six States, as completely as to the same demand if made by a single State.

If peace can be secured, it will be by the prompt use of the occasion, when the forces of the United States are withheld from our harbor. If war can be averted, it will be by making the capture of Fort Sumter a fact accomplished during the continuance of the present administration, and leaving to the incoming administration the question of an open declaration of war. Such a declaration, separated, as it will be, from any present act of hostilities during Mr. Lincoln’s administration, may become to him a matter requiring consideration. That consideration will not be expected of him; if the attack on the fort is made during his administration, {p.257} and becomes, therefore, as to him, an act of present hostility. Mr. Buchanan cannot resist, because he has not the power. Mr. Lincoln may not attack, because the cause of the quarrel will have been, or may be, considered by him as past.

Upon this line of policy I have acted, and upon the adherence to it may be found, I think, the most rational expectation of seeing that fort, which is even now a source of danger to the State, restored to the possession of the State without those consequences which I should most deeply deplore. Should such consequences, nevertheless, follow from an adherence to this policy, however much I would regret the occurrence, I should feel a perfect assurance that, in happening under such circumstances, they demonstrated conclusively that, under the evil passions which blind and mislead those who govern the United States, no human power could have averted the attempted overthrow of these States; and that, in the exhibition of an ability by the States of the new confederation to maintain their rights, there could be found satisfaction in the reflection that their sufferings at this time might purchase for them quiet and happiness in time to come.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS, Governor of South Carolina.

* See resolution, adopted February 12, p. 254.

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[FEBRUARY 18(?), 1861.]

Governor PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Kingman, known as “Ion,” who corresponds with the Baltimore San, and is considered reliable, in his letter of yesterday, says he has seen and read a letter from a former member of Congress from South Carolina, which assures him that Fort Sumter will be taken on or before the 4th of March., “without reference to what the Montgomery government may advise or order on the subject.”

This startles the President. Will you quiet him by your reply?

The State commissioners will adjourn during the week. No result yet.

JOHN TYLER.

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WASHINGTON, February 20, 1861.

His Excellency F. W. PICKENS:

Attempt to re-enforce Anderson by stealth at night in small boats determined on.

Answer if received.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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FEBRUARY 21, 1861--1/4 to 7 p.m.

Governor PICKENS, Charleston, S. C. :

The statement I gave you came directly from Chase.

I have not received your telegram as to what was reported by members of Congress.

J. TYLER.

{p.258}

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CONGRESS, February 22, 1861.

Mr. Bartow, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported the following resolution, which was adopted, viz:

Resolved, That the President of the Confederate States be requested to communicate, in such manner as be may deem expedient, to the governors of South Carolina and Florida the resolution of Congress concerning Forts Sumter and Pickens.

[Copy of the resolution above referred to.]

RESOLUTION in relation to the occupation of Forts Sumter and Pickens.

Resolved by the Confederate States of America in Congress assembled, That it is the sense, of this Congress that immediate steps should be taken to obtain possession of Forts Sumter and Pickens, by the authority of this Government, either by negotiations or force, as early as practicable, and that the President is hereby authorized to make all necessary military preparations for carrying this resolution into effect.*

Passed February 15, 1861.

* Communicated to governor of South Carolina under date of February 22, but letter of transmittal not found. See Governor Pickens’ letter of February 27, 1861, p. 258.

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MONTGOMERY, ALA., February 23, 1861.

Maj. W. H. C. WHITING:

MY DEAR SIR: You will proceed to Charleston and deliver the note addressed to Governor Pickens, which you will find herewith inclosed. After conferring with him as to the time and mode of visiting the different posts in Charleston Bay, you will enter upon a reconnaissance of the harbor of Charleston and its approaches. You will inspect the various works in our possession and gain such knowledge as circumstances will permit of Fort Sumter. In inspecting the works of the Confederate States you will bear in mind the double relation they may have as works of offense and of defense. You will make an inventory of the armament, and of the munitions at the forts and in store, noting particularly the different qualities of cannon powder, as indicated by grain. Generally, I desire you to perform all the duties which devolve upon an engineer charged with the examination of works, and the preparation for active operations under circumstances such as those of Charleston, in this emergency.

Very respectfully, truly, yours,

JEFF’N DAVIS.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Charleston, S. C., February 27, 1861.

The PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES, &C., Montgomery, Ala:

DEAR SIR: I received yours dated the 22d instant by Colonel Lucas, inclosing the resolution of Congress expressly taking charge of the military operations in the harbor of Charleston.* I have the fullest confidence that you and Congress will do everything that may be due to the honor and the rights of South Carolina.

Of course we feel that our honor and safety require that Fort Sumter should be in our possession at the very earliest moment possible. We have bad great difficulties to contend with. By the extraordinary movement {p.259} of the United States garrison from Fort Moultrie we were suddenly and unexpectedly precipitated into a situation which created the most hostile feelings, and were at the outset involved in the most scientific and expensive branches of modern warfare, where the most exact military knowledge and experience were required.

I felt this, and therefore telegraphed you to come by Charleston on your way to Mississippi, in order to consult on military matters, &c. I again sent to the governor of Georgia for General Twiggs, and then sent to you for a military engineer, as I desired the highest military approbation. Before taking the last step I earnestly wished the best military counsels.

Major Whiting is here, and thinks our energies have been too much directed to attacking Fort Sumter, and not enough to the defenses of the harbor, so as to prevent re-enforcements, &c. You will see him, and, of course, now we will await your orders and the directions of Congress, as we feel that our cause is common, and that it is due to our common government that we should do nothing to involve all the States united in a permanent war by any separate act of ours, unless it shall be necessary in self-defense or to prevent re-enforcements; but in the mean time I will go on with the same activity as ever in preparing our defenses and our men for any event that may arise.

We would desire to be informed if when thoroughly prepared to take the fort shall we do so, or shall we await your order; and shall we demand the surrender, or will that demand be made by you?

An answer to this by telegram is desired.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS.

* Resolutions approved February 15 and 2-2. See under last date.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 1, 1861.

Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Your letter to President received. This Government assumes the control of military operations at Charleston, and will make demand of the fort when fully advised. An officer goes to-night to take charge.

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 1, 1861.

His Excellency F. W. PICKENS, Governor, &c.:

SIR: Your letter of the 27th ultimo addressed to the President has, been referred by him to this Department for reply.

In controlling the military operations in the harbor of Charleston the President directs me to say that everything will be done that may be due to the honor and rights of South Carolina.

The President shares the feeling expressed by you that Fort Sumter should be in our possession at the earliest moment possible. But this feeling, natural and just as it is admitted to be, must yield to the necessity of the case. Thorough preparation must be made before an attack is attempted, for the first blow must be successful, both for its moral and physical consequences, or otherwise the result might be disastrous to your State in the loss of many of those whom we can least afford to spare. A failure would demoralize our people and injuriously affect us in the opinion of the world as reckless and precipitate.

{p.260}

Entertaining these opinions, the President directs me to say that he is engaged assiduously in pressing forward measures to effect results in which all are interested. Under the fourth section of an act of Congress to raise Provisional Forces for the Confederate States of America, and for other purposes, a copy of which I have the honor to inclose in another communication of this date, the President has appointed Peter G. T. Beauregard brigadier-general to command the Provisional Forces of this Government in the harbor of Charleston. General Beauregard will be accompanied by an adjutant, whose duty it will be to receive into the Provisional Army, with their officers, under the provisions of the act aforesaid, the forces of your State now in Charleston.

General Beauregard has the entire confidence of the President and of this Department, and I beg to commend him as possessing every soldierly quality.

I have the honor to be, with high regard, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. G. T. BEAUREGARD:

SIR: You will proceed without delay to Charleston and report to Governor Pickens for military duty in that State.

You are authorized by your appointment as brigadier-general, under the provisions of the third section of an act of the Congress to raise Provisional Forces for the Confederate States, to receive into the service of this Government such forces as may be tendered or may volunteer, not to exceed five thousand men, as you may require, or for whom you can make suitable provision. A copy of the act referred to has been this day transmitted to Governor Pickens.

You will report to this Department your arrival at Charleston, and give such information with respect to the defenses of that harbor as you may consider important. You will also secure, if possible, the services of a competent adjutant, and report your action in that behalf to this Department.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Montgomery, March 2, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD, Commanding at Charleston:

GENERAL: The Secretary of the Treasury has directed Governor Pickens to transfer to your credit, as commanding officer at Charleston, the sum of $20,000, to meet your present necessities. Other arrangements are in progress, with every prospect of speedy success, to place to your credit such sums as you may need from time to time. If you have failed to secure the services of a competent assistant adjutant and quartermaster, let me know it without delay, as I can now supply you with these officers. As there may be some temporary dissatisfaction with the State troops at Charleston, owing to the fact that you have superseded their commanding officers, it might be proper for you, as soon as possible, to muster one or more companies at least into the {p.261} Provisional Army. This would give you an organized corps and independent action.

I suggest, unless in your opinion it is absolutely necessary, that you decline to receive any cavalry into the Provisional Army, as you are aware the cost of this arm of the service is very heavy, and it is more than probable that the necessities of your position at Charleston will not require this outlay.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF WAR, Charleston, S. C., March 3, 1861.

Peter G. T. Beauregard having been appointed brigadier-general of the Confederate States of America, and having been ordered to assume command of the troops in and near Charleston Harbor, will be obeyed and respected accordingly, and all State officers of the volunteers, enlisted men, and militia, on duty, are commanded to obey all orders emanating from him.

D. F. JAMISON.

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WASHINGTON, March 4, 1861.

Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Do not permit any attack on Sumter without authority of Government of Confederated States. This is all important. Inaugural means war. There is strong ground for belief that re-enforcements will be speedily sent. Be vigilant.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

I concur, and believe this Government will act promptly.

L. Q. WASHINGTON.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Montgomery, March 4, 1861.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

SIR : I have the honor to transmit herewith the estimates required for the service of the War Department for twelve months:

Schedule A* is the estimate for the support of three thousand troops--the probable number now at Charleston-to be mustered into the service of this Government, under the act of the Congress “to raise Provisional Forces for the Confederate States of America, and for other purposes.”

Schedule B* is the estimate for the support of two thousand additional troops, should the same be required at Charleston, to be mustered into the service under said act.

Schedule C* is the estimate for the Regular Army of the Confederate States, under the bill now pending before the Congress.

{p.262}

The note appended to Schedule A explains the seeming discrepancy in that estimate and Schedule C the estimate for the Regular Army.

No estimate has been made for any of the State forces that may be mustered into the service of this Government, under the Provisional Army bill, other than those of South Carolina.

There were no data in this Department upon which any approximate estimate could be made, as no returns have been received from any of the States except South Carolina of the number of troops to be tendered, or that may volunteer under the provisions of the act referred to.

It is probable that the Regular Army to be provided for cannot be organized in time to meet the possible emergencies of the service, and the only present available forces belong to the military organizations of the respective States.

As no estimate is made for any of these State troops except those of South Carolina, and as the appropriations for the Regular Army could not be used for the support of the Provisional Forces without legislation to that effect, I would suggest that this authority be conferred by the Congress.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

* The items of these schedules are not deemed of sufficient importance for publication; their totals are as follows:

Schedule A$1,323,766 72
B860,228 45
C6,533,760 00

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HEADQUARTERS FORT MOULTRIE, S. C., March 5, 1861.

Maj. N. G. EVANS, Adjutant-General, South Carolina Army:

MAJOR: In accordance with the orders contained in your letter of this date, Major Smith’s battalion of the First South Carolina Volunteers is now embarking for Morris Island. Their departure will leave a total of 305, including 63 Vigilant Rifles, who are all required for guard at the five-gun battery. Of the 242, Company D, of the Artillery battalion, has been down but a few days, and are in constant readiness for duty in the floating battery. Their total present is 74, and deducting them, I have but 171 total, to man 15 guns on the channel, requiring 75; 11 guns on the Sumter battery, 55; 4 guns on the oblique battery, 20, and 40 men for the mortar battery, requiring 190 at least, to say nothing of guard duty at the fort, which, of course, must be attended to. In addition to this, the absence of a force of some efficiency entails upon this command the necessity of keeping up the guard at the eastern end of the island and at the steamboat landing and, in addition, I have set my men at work on the fortifications, to complete traverses, &c. I respectfully represent that in my opinion an efficient force for support to the batteries on this island is absolutely necessary, and that the artillery should be kept to the duties of their batteries a-lone. Again, the principal quartermaster’s duty on this island now falls on the battalion quartermaster of the artillery, who is now commanding a company, and cannot be spared. I respectfully represent that when a command is sent it should have its own quartermaster and staff.

In order to prepare as quickly and as fully as possible for contingencies, I have the honor to request that I may have permission to select from recruits (now in the various depots) a sufficient number to fill Companies A, B, and D, of the artillery battalion, to the maximum strength allowed by law, viz, one hundred privates to a company. I request the permission to select, because there are many newly-enlisted {p.263} recruits, who would have to be rejected, and of the enlisted men the artillery will be more specially required. Any failure in that branch of the service, I fear, may result in disaster. In this estimate above I do not include the infantry recruits, now on this island, who, I do not think, will be efficient for some weeks.

I have the honor to request, in conclusion, that you will bring this letter as soon as possible to the consideration of the brigadier-general commanding.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Artillery, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON CITY, March 5, 1861.

General L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

DEAR SIR: Judge Clay asked me before he left here to telegraph and write to Governor Moore any matters of importance. This was before the formation of the Provisional Government at Montgomery. Nothing has occurred since that request to justify a special dispatch, and now it appears to me that if there should be movements of troops or ships which come to my knowledge it would be better to send them to you. I shall do so on learning anything of importance in a reliable way. I may send the dispatch in a letter to Richmond to be telegraphed from there or I may send it from here, as circumstances dictate.

The inaugural undoubtedly means war, and that right off. I have never doubted as to Lincoln’s views, and nothing would have changed them but the secession of the border States, who have not acted.

Mr. Crawford is here, and will proceed to execute the duties of his mission as soon as the new Secretary of State is installed. This will be, I suppose, to-morrow morning at furthest.

I was present last evening at a consultation of Southern gentlemen, at which Messrs. Crawford, Garnett, Pryor, De Jarnette, of Virginia, and Wigfall, of Texas, were present. We all put the same construction on the inaugural, which we carefully went over together. We agreed that it was Lincoln’s purpose at once to attempt the collection of the revenue, to re-enforce and hold Fort Sumter and Pickens, and to retake the other places. He is a man of will and firmness. His Cabinet will yield to him with alacrity, I think. Seward has, of course, agreed to the inaugural, and the pretenses of his conservatism are idle.

We believe that these plans will be put into execution immediately. I learn five or six United States ships are in New York Harbor, all ready to start. The United States steamer Pawnee came here the other day suddenly from Philadelphia, fully provisioned and ready to go to sea.

I understand that it is spoken of in Army circles to re-enforce Sumter by sending in men in whale-boats by night. This will probably be attempted in the first instance. After the garrison is re-enforced sufficiently to stand an assault, then the attempt may be made to fight the way up by five or six war vessels. Simultaneously or prior to this will be the change of programme at Pensacola by the United States, Pensacola being a point of infinitely more importance. Considering this and the evident purpose announced in the inaugural, would it not be expedient to prevent anything in the shape of dispatches, letters, or messengers from going to Slemmer or the other United States officers or men {p.264} at Pensacola? By this you will have the advantage of knowing the movements from this point before the Government officers at Pensacola.

We shall endeavor to get hold of movements as soon as possible, and to advise you. Of course we labor under great difficulties in procuring early intelligence.

There is a general concurrence in the opinion that if any attack is made on Sumter it should be by order of the Government of the Confederate States and not by South Carolina alone.

Very truly yours,

L. Q. WASHINGTON.

Will you please show this letter to the Hon. Mr. Perkins, Secretary of the Navy ?

I fear the present Virginia Convention will not pass an ordinance of secession unless a collision or war ensues; then public feeling will force them to it. There is a majority of old Federal submissionists, who got in by pretending to be resistance men.

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HEADQUARTERS CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY, Charleston, S. C., March 6, 1861.

Lieut. Col. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Fort Moultrie, S. C.:

COLONEL: The general commanding desires that you send immediately to the five-gun battery, commanding Maffitt’s Channel, two 32-pounders, with the necessary ammunition, as ordered yesterday, and have them mounted. Be on the lookout to-night for the Crusader, a four-gun brig, reported to be on her way with one hundred and twenty men for the re-enforcement of Fort Sumter.

I am, colonel very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT MOULTRIE, S. C., March 6, 1861.

Capt. S. W. FERGUSON, Aide-de-Camp, Charleston S. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication (private and confidential) of this date. In reply, I have to state that I have no means at my disposal to send the 32-pounders from this post to the five-gun battery this evening, nor have I a gin to dismount or mount them. Moreover, I have not a single artificer to send to that battery, to build the traverses or pintle centers, some 290 indifferent artillerymen (74 of the 290 held in readiness for special service), 53 volunteers at the five-gun battery, and 318 helpless infantry recruits, almost without arms, without clothing, and totally and entirely unfit to meet the enemy, constituting all of my command. I will send the guns as soon as I can have the pintle centers and traverse circles in position; but, I imagine, the engineer in charge of the works is without the means to do the work required. Should the Crusader, however, come in this direction to-night, I beg to suggest, if the guard-boats do their duty, that I can attend to her case with the force at my disposal, although inefficient at this post.

{p.265}

I had the honor to send a communication, concerning the state of this command, last evening to Major Evans, adjutant-general, to which I beg now to refer.

To day, for lack of laborers, the men have been employed on the defenses, and I beg to say that the more drilling and the less of labor they do for some time to come the more efficient they will probably be.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

R. S. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

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CHARLESTON, March 6, 1861.

President DAVIS, Montgomery:

My DEAR SIR: I inclose you, according to promise, a statement showing the strength of the volunteer division of South Carolina. Some of the regiments are commanded by highly accomplished graduates of our military academies, and some by officers of the Palmetto Regiment. It is altogether a superb body of troops, and I think will give a good account of themselves by their acts.

Under the skillful conduct of General Beauregard the works here are likely to be put promptly in the best possible condition to prevent re-enforcements. The danger to be feared is that light-draught vessels, barges, or boats in the night may be sent in through the two middle channels, known as the Overall and North Channels; but you doubtless get fuller information than I can give you on these points.

Mr. Miles has doubtless apprised you of my readiness to enter the service of the confederation in the capacity you indicated. I say to you, however, frankly, that I should like to see my brigadiers in the field with their commands, or so many as may be needed, and be there myself with my present rank. If raising General Beauregard’s rank a grade does not embarrass you, I would cheerfully report to him. The exhibition of skill, promptness, and energy by General Beauregard is highly gratifying to the authorities here.

I am, very sincerely and truly, yours,

M. L. BONHAM.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, March 6, 1861.

M. L. BONHAM, Major-General, Commanding Volunteer Forces of S. C.:

GENERAL: The number of companies organized and received under the act of general assembly of 17th December, 1860, is one hundred and four-in the aggregate amounting to 8,835, rank and file, constituting ten regiments of ten companies each. The force is divided into four brigades, constituting one division.

Respectfully,

S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General of South Carolina.

{p.266}

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HDQRS. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 6, 1861.

Capt. FRANCIS D. LEE, Corps of Engineers:

CAPTAIN: Your communications of the 5th and 6th instants* have been received at these headquarters, and I am instructed by the general commanding, in acknowledging their receipt and thanking you for them, to say that the first is now under consideration, and that the last is approved, and you are hereby authorized to carry into execution what you therein propose. The general had determined last night on a similar project. The order for the guns to which you refer, and which are to be placed as designated yesterday, has already been issued.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain Infantry, and Aide-de-Camp.

* Not found.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., March 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Charleston and vicinity

GENERAL: I would respectfully call your attention to the following points in connection with the Ordnance Department in this vicinity:

I find no props under the center rail of the chassis, or elsewhere. Unless these props are supplied the guns are liable at any moment to dismount themselves. The chassis of the carriages at the iron battery at Cummings Point have not sufficient inclination, and unless the guns are secured by rope or other tackle they will probably soon dismount themselves. I have ordered all the necessary barbette carriages to be made, and as soon as possible spare parts of all kinds should be made, especially for the old carriages. I find only mortar shell at Fort Morris, and those I examined at the iron battery were case-shot-not even mortar shell. There is a scarcity of proper fuse-plugs and fuses. The small number of fuses at Fort Moultrie is being multiplied by cutting them in parts. I fear this may not only defeat the object intended but render the fuses of very little use at all. The magazine at Fort Morris, if possible, should be overhauled awl rearranged. Hot-shot furnaces, or even stoves, should be supplied at Morris Island batteries.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. BOGGS, Captain of Ordnance, S. C. Army.

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HDQRS. OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 6, 1861.

GENERAL ORDERS, No. 1.

I. By virtue of authority from the War Department, Confederate States of America, bearing date Montgomery, March 1, 1861, and of authority of the Department of War, State of South Carolina, bearing date March 3, 18617 the undersigned assumes command of all the troops-Regulars, Volunteers, and Militia-on duty in and near Charleston Harbor.

II. The following appointments are announced on the staff of the brigadier-general {p.267} commanding: Capt. D. R. Jones, as assistant adjutant-general Capt. Stephen D. Lee, of the regular artillery service of the State of South Carolina, as acting assistant quartermaster-general and acting assistant commissary-general; Capt. S. Wragg Ferguson, of the regular infantry service of the State of South Carolina, as aide-de-camp; First Lieut. Joseph J. Legare, of the regular engineer service of the State of South Carolina, as private secretary.

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 7, 1861.

Lieut. Col. R. S. RIPLEY, Commanding Battalion of Artillery, Fort Moultrie, S. C.:

SIR: Your two letters of the 5th and 6th instants have been received, and the matters referred to by you will be attended to forthwith. The affair of selections has been referred to General Dunovant. I am fully aware of the difficulties of your position, but from your zeal and known ability to surmount obstacles I have no doubt you will give a good account of yourself and command when the hour of trial shall have arrived. I regret (in the movement of troops lately taken place) you had to be deprived of the command on Sullivan’s Island, for which position I know you are highly qualified, but the necessities of the service required the order to be given. Whenever practicable a different arrangement will be made.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 7, 1861.

Maj. W. GWYNN, Corps of Engineers:

MAJOR: The general commanding desires that the embrasure enfilading battery, and the mortar battery beyond Moultrie, be constructed first, unless you have already commenced the one across the bay, in which case you will continue the latter to completion, and, instead of adding those two 32-pounders from Moultrie to the five-gun battery, as ordered, he intends to add them to the first-named mortar battery, with a strong traverse between them and the mortars. They must also have strong flank traverses.

Major Trapier will please caution Capt. S. Y. Tupper, of the five-gun battery, that the traverses and pintles being on a wrong level at that battery, the chassis must be propped up in their middle when the gun is fired to prevent its breaking, the slope being too steep.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

P. S.–At Cummings Point on Morris Island he wishes all work to be stopped at present, except at the iron battery (finishing the work he ordered there) and at the condemned mortar battery (which he ordered to be changed into a bombproof). The balance of the working force will {p.268} Immediately (under the charge of Colonel Lamar, who has command of the working parties) be put to work constructing those channel batteries he ordered Major Whiting to mark out, so as to have them completed as soon as practicable. Should Captain Lee, the local engineer, who has received instructions from Major Whiting, require assistant engineers, you will transfer to him one or two from Major Trapier, should the latter be able to spare them.

Very respectfully,

S. W. F.

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FORT PALMETTO, STONO INLET, S. C., March 7, 1861.

Brigadier-General DUNOVANT:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inform you that in the firing at this post yesterday, the 18-pounder guns, which are the largest at this post, were found entirely insufficient to command the Stono Channel of this entrance. At an elevation of five degrees the balls failed to reach the Stono Channel. I take occasion, therefore, again to call this matter to our attention and to request that two 32-pounders, or, at all events, two 24-pounders, be ordered to this post. In a conversation with Colonel Manigault, of the board of ordnance, on Friday last, March. 1, I was led to believe that two 24-pounders would be sent to this post in a few days; but they have not yet been received. Except our field guns, we have here but two 18-pounders.

In the present uncertain aspect of affairs, when any point seems subject to assault, I would suggest, for your consideration, the remoteness of the troops here from effective assistance, and the smallness of the force under my command. If the fortification had been brought to a comparative state of completion, we could hold it against large odds. The planters of John’s Island, who volunteered to complete it, as I was informed, left it not half finished, and the troops have bestowed much labor upon it, to bring it to a defensible condition. I therefore again call your attention to the smallness of the force here (considering the unfinished state of the fortification), to the difficulty of timely succor, and to the impracticability of a retreat, surrounded, as we are, by rivers, and without transports being furnished us, if retreat should become necessary.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

J. J. POPE, JR., Commander of the Post.

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HEADQUARTERS REGIMENT OF RIFLES, Sullivan’s Island, S. C., March 7, 1861.

Hon. D. F. JAMISON, Secretary of Tar:

SIR: In compliance with the order of yesterday, I left a detachment of forty-seven men, of the Regiment of Rifles, at Secessionville, to keep open communication with Morris Island. I would respectfully request that they be ordered to join the regiment again. They will be of little or no service for this purpose. Five ordinary employés of the quartermaster’s department would answer the end quite as well. Furthermore, Secessionville is not the proper point for the mere purpose of communication. The point should be Clark’s Landing, and the route from Dill’s Landing direct, thus avoiding a long detour. There is yet another {p.269} reason. Every post should keep open its own communication. They will feel far more interest in the work than the members of another regiment, who are to have no share in the honors of the contest. If your excellency agrees with me, I would suggest that orders to that effect be issued immediately, so that they can make use of the means of transportation now engaged in transferring the commissary stores.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

J. JOHNSTON PETTIGREW, Colonel Regiment of Rifles.

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HEADQUARTERS FORT MOULTRIE, S. C., March 8, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD, Commanding Army Confederate States of America:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of yesterday’s date, and thank you for the confidence you express. Did I not, however, make known my deficiencies, I should mislead the officer in command, and possibly entail disaster, from not having such as can be supplied. With regard to the command on Sullivan’s Island, I am very glad to be relieved from the details of it, as it enables me to give my attention to what I have no doubt is considered as of the first importance-the preparation of the artillery service. I beg to take the liberty of suggesting the importance, in my opinion, of the first turn in the beach of this island, east of this fort, as a position for a channel battery, rather than the position now occupied by the five-gun battery. From that point the guns can command every channel, and especially the north and south channels, where the vessels having re-enforcements are bound to come in, as things at present stand. Now those channels are only protected by this fort. If labor can be obtained and the work commenced, I would respectfully recommend the removal of four gun’s from the five-gun battery, leaving one, which can be so arranged as to traverse completely around and make the addition formerly proposed from this fort, or even more, in addition to the mortars which are to be placed there. The Maffitt Channel would be completely blocked and the new battery would materially add to the defenses of the channels mentioned above.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel, Artillery, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., March 8, 1861.

To the CHIEF OF STAFF OF BRIGADIER-GENERAL BEAUREGARD:

SIR : I received notice from the Ordnance Department yesterday afternoon that two 24-pounders and two 12-pounders were sent to this island, but without any information of the manner in which they were to come or the point at which the 12-pounders were to be landed.

This morning I learned that a steamer, the Chesterfield, was at the south point of the island, with the four guns, and with a framed stable, to be used for the horses of the battery of field artillery. I sent the quartermaster of my regiment with written orders for the 24-pounders to be landed at the south point, the 12-pounders near Vinegar Hill, and {p.270} the stable, at an intermediate point, where I propose to pitch my camp. Not being certain that it would be practicable to land the 12-pounders and the stable on the beach, I gave verbal orders, leaving it to the discretion of Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton to have them brought round the north point of the island, in order to be conveyed by the creek, on the west side of the island.

My quartermaster has just reported to me that the master of the steamer (Flynn, I think, is his name), in disobedience of my orders, and alleging orders to himself to land everything at the south point (but showing no written order to that effect), is proceeding to put out, not only the 24-pounders and the 12-pounders, but the timber of the stable, at the south point. This will be exceedingly inconvenient, as it will be an immense labor to haul all the material of the stable through the heavy sand this side of the south point. I have sent down Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton, with orders to arrest and confine the master of the steamer, put the next officer in command of the boat, and bring back the stable, together with the 12-pounders, to the north point of the island, whence they can be conveyed (in a smaller vessel) through the back creek. I am not sure, however, that this will be in time to remedy the inconvenience, as the landing of the material may be completed before Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton gets to the point. I respectfully suggest the necessity of putting the commanders of steamers in the service of the quartermaster-general under better control. Repeated instances of misconduct, negligence, and disobedience have come within my observation.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAXCY GREGG, Col. First Regiment S. C. Vols., Commander on Morris Island.

P. S.–Since writing the above letter, which was too late for this morning’s boat, Captain Flynn, of the Chesterfield, being brought to my quarters, under guard, and having promised to carry the stable and the two 12-pounders to the north point of the island, has been released from arrest and sent back to the command of his boat. If Daly, the master of the little steam-flat, obeys the orders given to him by Colonel Hatch, and comes to Cummings Point this afternoon, I shall be able to send the lumber and guns up the back creek by his boat. But his previous conduct leaves me in entire uncertainty whether to expect him.

M. G.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Engineer Bureau, Charleston, S. C., March 8, 1861.

Capt. S. W. FERGUSON, Aide-de-Camp:

CAPTAIN: By direction of the Secretary of War, I send you a copy of a report this day addressed to him. I am required to make daily reports to the Secretary, and am instructed by him to send copies of them to the commanding general.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WALTER GWYNN, Major of Engineers.

{p.271}

[Inclosure.]

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Engineer Bureau, Charleston, S. C., March 8, 1861.

Maj. Gen. S. R. GIST, Adjutant and Inspector General:

GENERAL: Owing to very pressing engagements, as also owing to daily reports not having been sent in regularly by the engineers in charge of the several works under construction in the harbor of Charleston, my daily reports have been interrupted for the past three or four days.

I have now to report that the reconstruction of the mortar battery on the beach at Fort Johnson is very nearly completed. It is designed to move two mortars from this battery and place them where I commenced a battery, for the removal of the four mortars from the beach battery. The battery and magazine for these mortars will be completed in a few days. On Morris Island all the guns and mortars which have been sent over have been mounted and placed.

The following postscript, attached to an order of the 7th instant, from the commanding general, will show, to some extent, future operations on Morris Island, viz:

At Cummings Point on Morris Island he wishes all work stopped at present, except at the iron battery (finishing, the work he ordered there) and at the condemned mortar battery (which he ordered to be changed into a bomb-proof). The balance of the working force will immediately (under charge of Colonel Lamar, who has command of the working parties) be put to work constructing those channel batteries he ordered Major Whiting to mark, out, so as to have them completed as soon as practicable.

Twenty-eight laborers (all that could be procured) worked yesterday on a battery for four 24-pounders, near the steamboat landing, at the point of Sullivan’s Island, ordered by the commanding general, for enfilading the guns en barbette on Fort Sumter.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WALTER GWYNN, Major of Engineers.

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HEADQUARTERS CONFEDERATE STATES ARMY, Charleston, S. C., March 8, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: The Department letter of the 2d instant has been received, but could not be answered sooner. Governor Pickens, who obligingly affords me all the assistance in his power, as well as all his officers, suggests that the State of South Carolina should continue to defray all the present current expenses incurred within its limits, so as not to complicate the present moneyed difficulties of the Confederate States Government. This would probably be a very proper arrangement.

With regard to the supposed temporary dissatisfaction of the State troops, alluded to by you, upon consultation with the governor, he advises that the brigade of State Regulars should remain as at present organized, until required to enter the Federal service, but in the mean time to be under my orders. Its commanding general and staff have readily assented to this arrangement, and by the order of the governor (already communicated to the War Department), it must have been seen that all the troops (State, Regulars, and Volunteers) in or about Charleston have already been put under my orders, and I can perceive among them no spirit of opposition or dissatisfaction. On the contrary, {p.272} they appear to be animated with the most kindly feelings towards me, and seem highly pleased at the order assigning me to their command.

I have already given the information here that cavalry would not, at present, be called into the service of the Confederate States.

Every one here seems to be gradually becoming aware, through my cautious representations, that we are not yet prepared for the contest, and that the first work in order is to endeavor to keep re-enforcements from getting into Fort Sumter by increasing our channel defenses, which I hope to be able to accomplish in about a week or ten days. In the mean time I will go on organizing everything around me.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. P. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

GENERAL: Your report of the 6th instant has been received at this Department. What you have done and what you propose to do is approved. Push forward your contemplated works with all possible expedition, especially with the view to prevent the re-enforcement of Fort Sumter. This must be prevented at all hazards, and by the use of every conceivable agency. Fort Sumter is silent now only because of the weakness of the garrison. Should re-enforcements get in, her guns would open fire, upon you.

There is information at this Department-not official, it is true, but believed to be reliable-that five or six United States ships are in New York Harbor all ready to start.

The United States steamer Pawnee has left Philadelphia suddenly for Washington, fully provisioned and ready to go to sea, and it is probable that, the effort to re-enforce Sumter may be made by sending in men in whale-boats tonight. Should this plan succeed and the garrison be re-enforced sufficiently to stand an assault the attempt may be made to fight their way up by five or six war vessels.

In his report to this Department Major Whiting suggested the possibility of re-enforcements by land. Upon examining the map it occurs to me that this possibility might be accomplished in two ways: First, at the south of Morris Island there is an inlet which connects with Schooner Creek, and affords a water communication in the rear of all our works directly up to Fort Sumter. The creeks are, however, very winding, and probably if taken in hand at once could easily be obstructed by sinking flats or boats. Second, Stono River affords, I should think, an entrance to vessels of from eight to twelve feet draught, which may land troops on James Island, or go through a cut known as James Island Cut. Neither method, I take it, would be practicable if any troops were on James Island; but in the absence of them a sudden rush might possibly avail.

These suggestions are made without special knowledge, and are submitted for your consideration.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

{p.273}

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 9, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: I inclose you herewith the report of Col. M. Gregg, First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, commanding on Morris Island, at the entrance of this harbor, reporting the circumstances connected with the accidental shooting of a loaded gun towards Fort Sumter on the 8th instant. From the inquiries thus far made, it would appear to have been entirely accidental; but I have ordered a thorough investigation of the affair to be made at once, and in order to prevent the recurrence of an event which might be attended with such disastrous consequences, I have ordered that hereafter no gun should be practiced with without first ascertaining whether it be, loaded or not.

The channel batteries are progressing regularly, and the other works are being corrected and consolidated. Nothing new otherwise.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., March 8, 1861.

To the CHIEF OF STAFF OF BRIGADIER-GENERAL BEAUREGARD:

SIR: I am informed by Major Stevens that a shot was accidentally fired from the iron battery this morning, which struck Fort Sumter. Major Stevens was practicing with blank cartridges, and does not know how a shot got in. He does not suspect that it was put in by any man intentionally. Major Stevens is about to go with a flag to Fort Sumter to explain the accident.

I have to request that General Beauregard will forward this note for the information of the commander-in-chief.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

MAXCY GREGG, Colonel First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, Commanding on Morris Island.

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WASHINGTON, March 11, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD. Commanding Army Confederate, States, Charleston, S. C.:

Believed here that Anderson will be ordered to evacuate Sumter in five days. Was certainly informally agreed on in Cabinet Saturday night. May have been done as ruse to throw you off your guard and enable them to re-enforce.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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WASHINGTON, March 11, 1861.

His Excellency JEFFERSON DAVIS, Montgomery, Ala.:

It is believed here in Black Republican circles that Anderson will be ordered to vacate Fort Sumter in five days. An informal conclusion to this effect was arrived at Saturday night in Cabinet. Anderson telegraphed, it is said, that he had no fuel and but fifteen days’ provisions.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

{p.274}

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 11, 1861.

Hon. D. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: I have taken the earliest opportunity my present duties would permit (yesterday) to make a thorough reconnaissance of the country south of this city to the Stono River and its mouth, to determine what works are required to prevent an enemy from approaching in that direction, either to throw re-enforcements during the night into Fort Sumter, through the Stono River, Folly River, or Light-house Inlet, and their numerous and intricate branches (see Bache’s maps of Charleston Harbor and adjacent coast and country), or to attack Charleston. I have selected the sites and ordered the construction of some field works that will, I think, effectually guard those channels of approach; but we must have time and means to complete them. With good assistants (chiefs of Engineers and Ordnance) this could probably be done in about eight or ten days; but Major Whiting and Captain Boggs (two most reliable an efficient officers) have been recalled to Savannah by the governor of Georgia, and I am again left to my own resources. Their absence fills me with care and grief, for other very important matters demand my attention; in fact, a great deal in the way of organization remains still to be attended to. I find a great deal of zeal and energy around me, but little professional knowledge and experience. I earnestly request the immediate return of the two officers just named, or that two others, of equal ability, if they can be procured, be sent me. Probably Capt. G. W. Smith, of New York, and Captain Gorgas might be induced to come, if a positive rank could be offered to them. Should an enemy succeed in effecting a landing on the Stono River (a very navigable stream), or anywhere else in that direction, I will take a position with all my disposable forces in a very advantageous location I have selected, a little in advance of the Savannah road bridge, leading into Charleston, covering, at the same time, the bridge with a tete-de-pont. From thence I will oppose to the last his direct attack, or take him in flank and rear, to cut off his communication, if practicable.

With regard to my letter of the 12th, referring to my present commission in the Confederate service, I desire to state that should my application to be appointed in the Regular service, instead of the Provisional one, occasion any embarrassment to the President, I desire it to remain unnoticed; and, moreover, should he at any time consider it necessary for the good of the service or safety of the country to send here an officer of more experience than myself, I hope he win do so without hesitation, as I care more for the success of our arms and of our cause than for the honor of being in command here, and I would serve under the orders of such a commanding officer with the same zeal and activity as at present.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.–Your letter of the 9th instant has just been received. Its remarks are answered in the above letter.

G. T. B.

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MARCH 13, 1861.

F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

Telegram to Wigfall received. He is absent. Evacuation of Sumter probable; not certain. If so, it is a necessity, not a concession

H. P. BREWSTER.

{p.275}

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WASHINGTON, March 14, 1861.

Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

I confidently believe Sumter will be evacuated, and think a Government messenger left here yesterday with orders to that effect for Anderson.

JOHN FORSYTH.

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MONTGOMERY, March 14, 1861

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Steamers Star of the West, Harriet Lane, Crusader, Mohawk, and Empire City ordered to sail from New York last night. Said to carry arms, provisions, and men. Destination not known.

L. P. WALKER.

[Copies to General Bragg, Pensacola; Captain Jones, Fort Morgan; Major Duncan, Forts Jackson and St. Philip.]

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 15, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the three telegrams of the 13th and 14th instants.* I telegraphed an answer to-day.

Major Whiting has this day reported for duty. Captain Northrop informed me a few days ago that, he had informed you he could not at present accept the commission offered him. I would at present have, no need of him. I have ordered the Drummond-light operator to be here forthwith, for his services will be required as soon as the apparatus arrives. After instructing two or three, persons here, he might be sent to New Orleans.

By the orders transmitted to-day it will be, seen that I am straining every nerve, to be ready to meet successfully any re-enforcements that may be intended for Fort Sumter. I believe in a very few days I will be ready at all points. I have made a thorough reconnaissance of all the coast approaches to Charleston, and, with a little time, see not much difficulty in preventing an enemy from using them with any prospect of success. I have succeeded in obtaining, for about ten days, the services of a competent ex-officer of the Ordnance, who is on a visit here-Lieut. Charles C. Lee, now professor in a military school of North Carolina. I hope, with his assistance, to be able to put the ordnance at this place in a better condition than it is at present. Captain Boggs, during the very few days he spent here, had already done a great deal towards that very desirable end. I found so much opposition here to the employment of Capt. J. P. Jones,* Lieutenants Williams, O’Brien, and Robertson, as Company officers in any of the regiments here that I put the first two on ordnance duty, as receivers of ordnance, &c., at the batteries, and the other two as assistant engineers. Lieutenant Williams has been quite sick since his arrival here; the others appear to be very zealous and energetic. As to Captain Jones, I cannot yet speak of him with much certainty; but although regretting not to be in command of his company, I {p.276} have found him anxious to be employed and to prove whether he is fit for the command of an artillery company or not.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your very obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* Except that of 14th given above, these refer only to matters of detail.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.

GENERAL: Dispatches just received from Washington, of the highest authority, speak of mines in Fort Sumter, and a purpose to destroy it and the garrison rather than be taken. Foster, the Engineer, might be a good guarantee, if kept in the fort.

Give but little credit to the rumors of an amicable adjustment. Do not slacken for a moment your energies, and be ready to execute any order this Department may forward.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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BALTIMORE, MD., March 16, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, C. S. A., Charleston, S. C.:

My DEAR SIR: By the authority of the Secretary of War, I have established a recruiting station here, and I am induced to believe that it will meet with decided success. By the time an officer can reach here there will probably be one hundred recruits to examine. The moneyed arrangements are all made. I have concluded that it would be better not to send the men to Charleston until they were examined. We will then avoid the danger of having to pay the passage money for men not fit for service. I was merely requested and authorized to recruit here for the Army of the Confederate States. I have made arrangements for sending them to you, supposing that you would have use for them, or, if not, that you could have them enlisted and drilled till they were ordered elsewhere. Be pleased to confer with the Secretary of War on the subject if you have no orders. The recruiting will go on rapidly, and as I determined this morning not to send men before they were examined, I telegraphed you for an experienced officer. The men will be kept together until he comes. If this shall reach you before you have sent an officer, be pleased to refer him to William T. Walters, of the house of Walters & Co., 68 Exchange Place, with whom I have made the financial arrangements.

Very respectfully,

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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MONTGOMERY, March 18, 1861.

General, G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Order Lieutenant Haskell to Baltimore. Inquire for W. T. Walters and Hon. L. T. Wigfall. His duty, superintend shipment of men to Charleston, where they will be enlisted, and see if they are fit. Must, conceal his mission except from those in secret. Wigfall has the money. Must go at once.

L. P. WALKER. {p.277} [MARCH 20, 1861.]

General BEAUREGARD, Commanding:

Has Sumter been evacuated? Any action by Anderson indicating it?

CRAWFORD. FORSYTH. ROMAN.

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WASHINGTON, March 20, 1861.

Hon. R. TOOMBS, Montgomery, Ala.:

You have, not heard from us because there is no change. If there is faith in man we may rely on the assurances we have as to the status. Time is essential to a peaceful issue of this mission. In the present posture of affairs precipitation is war. We are all agreed.

ROMAN. CRAWFORD. FORSYTH.

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WAR, DEPARTMENT, A. G. O., Montgomery, March 20, 1861.

Brig. Gen. PETER G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Forces Charleston Army, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The governor of South Carolina has, in a written communication, strongly urged the propriety and necessity of enlarging your command, and extending it so as to embrace the coast of South Carolina, say from Beaufort to Georgetown. After a careful consideration of the subject the Secretary of War has concluded to conform to the earnest recommendation of his excellency, with the full understanding, however, that in thus extending the limits of your command no risk is to be incurred by your temporary absence from the harbor of Charleston at any critical moment, and that your first duty will be to give your personal attention to the defense of that harbor. The Secretary desires, therefore, that you will confer with his excellency and be governed by these instructions.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Engineer Bureau, Charleston, S. C., March 20, 1861.

General D. F. JAMISON, Secretary of War:

GENERAL: The mortar battery at Fort Johnson, on the beach, has been completed. The battery on the elevated ground has all been completed, with the exception of the bomb-proof magazines in connection therewith.

On Morris Island Captain Lee reports that there have been mounted on the channel two Dahlgrens, three columbiads, two sea-coast howitzers, and two 24-pounders. This is the only report I have received from him in the last four days, and furnishes but a very imperfect idea of what has been done, or the condition of the new batteries on Morris Island. Before these batteries had been commenced there were mounted on the channel seven 24-pounders, two howitzers, and two Dahlgren guns.

{p.278}

On Sullivan’s Island the only report I have is that the batteries are progressing, with an increased force of two laborers on the enfilade battery. Quarters are in progress of erection for the laborers and mechanics who are to be employed on the battery on Battery Island.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WALTER GWYNN, Major of Engineers.

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WASHINGTON, March 21, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Large number of men in Baltimore. Cannot be kept together there much longer. Nothing heard of or from Haskell. What shall I do? Answer immediately.

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

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MONTGOMERY, March 21, 1861.

Hon. L. T. WIGFALL, Washington:

Officer leaves to-night with letter for you and full instructions. Did not know until half hour ago that Haskell had not gone. If men can’t wait ship them at once, and write Beauregard the vessel they are in, so that he may be ready to enlist on arrival.

L. P. WALKER.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 21, 1861.

Hon. L. T. WIGFALL, Washington, D. C.:

My DEAR SIR: I have just received your letter of the 17th instant. Orders were given to General Beauregard, at Charleston, to detail an officer for the special service at Baltimore, and I am only just informed that the officer appointed is still in Charleston. A person will be sent from this place to-night to perform that duty, with instructions to report to you if in Baltimore, and in your absence to William T. Walters, 68 Exchange Place, Baltimore. It will be much cheaper to ship the men as steerage passengers than by rail, and he will be so instructed unless you have special reasons for a contrary course.

Although it would be most agreeable to all of us to have you here, it occurs to me that you could render more efficient service by remaining in Baltimore until our recruiting depot is fully and successfully established as an institution. Captain Pender, the officer to be sent from here to inspect and superintend the shipment of the men, is directed to place himself under your orders, and will remain in Baltimore for some weeks. Such money as he may require within the scope of his business you will arrange for him to have.

I regret to say that I have no authority to receive the Washington company in the manner proposed. I have no other idea than war, and we hope soon to be ready for any emergency.

Very truly,

L. P. WALKER.

{p.279}

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CHARLESTON, March 21, 1861.

General L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

State ordnance board cannot spare book of plates.* Copies should be sent if required. Ordnance officer much needed here. Lieutenant Haskell cannot go immediately to Baltimore. Department better send another one from Montgomery.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

* This refers to plans, &c., seized at Charleston Arsenal, and called for by Mr. Walker under date of March 18, 1861.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, March 21, 1861.

General P. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The probability is, if there be any reliance on rumors semi-official in their character, that Fort Sumter will be shortly abandoned. Of course, it would be proper to afford Major Anderson and his men a safe conduct out of the harbor; but before this is done you must feel perfectly assured that there are no mines laid with trains within the fort. This might be individually accomplished by informing Major Anderson that you intended immediately on its abandonment by him to occupy it, and to take possession of everything left behind; that you did not desire to do this, except upon an inventory to be made out by yourself and one of his officers, and the proper officer to be detailed by him to perform this duty would be Foster, the Engineer.

Should he reply to this proposition that he cannot consider what course you may pursue after his abandonment of the fort, and therefore decline to assist in the inventory, it will be your duty to communicate to him the existence of the rumor, and to demand from him such assurance of its falsity as shall fully satisfy you. If he declines to give this assurance it will be your duty to prevent their departure. It is hardly probable that he will decline either of these propositions, but should he decline both you must pursue the course herein indicated, and keep him where he is.

Very respectfully,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, A. G. O., Montgomery, March 21, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Provisional Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: I am instructed by the Secretary of War to inform you that Capt. William D. Pender, of the Corps of Artillery, has been sent to Baltimore, Md., to direct the recruiting service in that city, whose duty it will be to have every recruit examined and passed by a medical officer previously to his being accepted. Such as may pass examination are to be shipped from time to time as they accumulate, and sent to Charleston. The officer will notify you by mail or telegraph of the facts of such shipments. The recruits on arriving in Charleston are to be there enlisted into the Army of the Confederate States for the term of years provided by law.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant-General.

{p.280}

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CHARLESTON, March 22, 1861.

General L. P. WALKER:

Special messenger from General Scott to learn Anderson’s condition arrived last evening. Went back last night. Reports Anderson nearly out fuel and provisions. All my batteries will be finished and armed in two or three days. Can I have Boggs?

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, March 24, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD:

My DEAR GENERAL: I have read the papers and your note to Major Anderson. As to the inventory suggested, of all public property, would it not be well to wait his propositions first? Because, if we propose an inventory, it will imply that our Government is to be responsible for the amount in any future settlement, whereas, considering that the United States forces inaugurated a state of hostilities, approaching a state of war (by the removal from Moultrie, by leaving the carriages, spiking the guns, and cutting down the flagstaff, and left the fort in actual flames, which would have reached the magazine if I had not taken possession and stopped the progress), then the attempt to throw re-enforcements in and the whole course of the Government and command here, has forfeited all claim for future accountability for armament and public property in this fort now; besides, the expenses they have forced us to, in order to ward off the conquest and subjugation intended by their occupation of Sumter, all cancel the obligation to account. If Anderson should offer or desire to have an inventory, then I will agree to it with pleasure, or any reasonable request, so as to get them out without difficulty. Bat I would, when they retire, sign the inventory with a protest against the Government being finally responsible, unless it might be expedient to do so in a full settlement. I have no idea that Anderson has as yet any authority to agree to your propositions in any shape, because I do not think the Government has yet empowered him. I merely throw out these suggestions for the present, and have no objections to your sending a letter somewhat like yours, if you think the time has now arrived.

With great regard, yours, very truly,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., March 25, 1861.

Col. EDWARD MANIGAULT, Chief of Ordnance S. C. Army, Charleston, S. C.;

COLONEL: Your communication of this date is just received. The brigadier-general commanding desires me to say that he wishes the following distribution to be made of the ordnance referred to by you:

One Dahlgren gun to Sullivan’s Island; two 10-inch sea-coast mortars to Sullivan’s Island; two 10-inch sea-coast mortars to Mount Pleasant battery; two-thirds of the 9-inch shells to Morris Island, for the Dahlgren battery; one-third of the 9-inch shells to Sullivan’s Island, for the Dahlgren battery; all the 8-inch shells to Morris Island; two hundred 10-inch shells to Sullivan’s Island, for mortar battery; two hundred 10-inch {p.281} shells to Mount Pleasant mortar battery. The balance of 10-inch shells to be equally divided between Morris Island and Fort Johnson.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain, and Aide-de-camp.

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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, State of South Carolina, March 25, 1861.

[General BEAUREGARD?]:

My DEAR SIR: I sent Lamon to Major Anderson, and all right. Will see you as soon as I can. I told him we would agree to evacuation upon any honorable and reasonable terms, but would not suffer any war vessel to come up to the fort, and everything must be conducted respectably, and in no arrogant or wanton manner towards us. He says Spencer will come out in a few days, certain.

Truly,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., March 25, 1861.

Brig. Gen. S. COOPER, Adjutant-General C. S. Army:

SIR: I have, the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your two letters dated, respectively, the 20th and 21st instants, the former extending the limits of my command, &c.; the latter in relation to the recruiting service in Baltimore; also, a telegram from the Secretary of War in relation to the recruits. The instructions contained therein will be complied with. I will not leave this city until after the evacuation of Fort Sumter. Sixty-four recruits arrived here from Baltimore, under the charge of Mr. R. E. Haslett, on Saturday, the 23d instant, and were sent to Castle Pinckney. They will be enlisted to-day. Captain Childs and Lieutenants O’Brien and Robertson have been assigned to duty with them. The quartermaster-general of the State of South Carolina has kindly offered to furnish them with the necessary rations, clothing, &c., to be settled for hereafter. It would, perhaps, be economical to prescribe the uniform for the Regular Army as early as practicable. Mr. Haslett informs me that a bounty was promised these men, but does not know the amount-thinks about $25 or $30. I have, therefore, to request that you notify me what amount will be paid, and under what regulations, that I may cause the same to be noted on their muster and pay rolls. I am just informed that Lamon, special messenger from Washington, has arrived, and is now conferring with the governor.

I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, March 26, 1861.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

My DEAR GENERAL: I have read the inclosed, and think it is very appropriate; and if he is not entirely satisfied, you can do no more. If {p.282} Lamon was authorized to arrange matters, Anderson ought now to say so, in reply to yours; and if he does not, I shall begin to doubt everything.*

Very truly, with great regard,

F. W. PICKENS.

* Seems to refer to letter from General Beauregard forwarded by Major Anderson to Adjutant-General U. S. Army, March 27, p. 222.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 26, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: The Department letter of the 21st has been received, and I inclose you herewith the copy of the letter I have thought proper to address to Maj. Robert Anderson, with whom I am personally well acquainted.* His answer will be communicated to the Department as soon as received, and I have no doubt it will be satisfactory. Mr. Lamon left here last night, saying that Major Anderson and command would soon be withdrawn from Fort Sumter in a satisfactory manner. I am, however, progressing with my offensive and defensive batteries, which will all be finished and armed to-morrow night or the day after. I find great difficulty, for want of an ordnance officer, in properly organizing the armament, &c., of said batteries. I have this day had assigned to me for that duty Lieutenant Rutledge, South Carolina Navy, who I hope will be of assistance to me in that department.

As already telegraphed, Capt. W. H. Stevens, of the Engineers, is not at present required here. He might be usefully employed at Savannah if not wanted elsewhere, or I may soon have need of him for the defenses of the sea coast of South Carolina, which I may have to order hereafter.

Four of the Drummond lights ordered for this harbor have this day arrived, with the required instructions, a copy of which is herewith inclosed. No operator could be sent with them. I have procured the welcome and generous services of Professor Gibbes, of Charleston College, for the purpose of instructing a proper person here in their use. I have no doubt that Professor Riddle, of New Orleans, postmaster, would be happy to give his assistance in a like manner for the six sent there, two of which might be sent to Pensacola or some other harbor. With four here we shall have enough now.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See inclosure No. 1 to Major Anderson’s letter of March 27, p. 222.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 27, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: I have the honor to inclose you herewith copies of Maj. Robert Anderson’s answer to my letter of the 26th instant, and of my reply to him.* It will be seen that he distinctly and positively refuses to give the pledge asked of him. But I consider his answer equivalent to any {p.283} pledge that might be required of him, for he is, in my opinion, a most gallant officer, incapable of any act that might tarnish his reputation as a soldier; and, should he ask for any assistance of Governor Pickens or myself for the removal of his command from this harbor, it will be a sufficient guarantee that Fort Sumter will be left in its present condition. At any rate, when he makes the said application, an officer will be appointed by me to verify the fact and make proper arrangements with him.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.–You will notice that I preferred writing to him unofficially, so as to obtain his views first.

B.

* See inclosures 2 and 3, Anderson to Thomas, March 27, pp. 222, 223.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., March 27, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.

SIR: I have the honor to inclose you herewith a copy of the letter from Maj. Robert Anderson in answer to mine of yesterday, a copy of which has already been sent to the Department. It will be seen by Major Anderson’s answer, if there be any truth in man, that nothing like a doubtful course can be feared from him on the evacuation of Fort Sumter, which ought now to be decided upon in a few days, for this state of uncertainty ought not to last longer than is necessary to have all our preparations made to compel him to a surrender, should the United States Government not be willing to withdraw him peaceably.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, A. AND I. G. O., Montgomery, March 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The Secretary of War directs that you will allow no further communications between the Government of the United States and Fort Sumter, unless the written instructions of the intermediary are first submitted to your inspection, with satisfactory assurances that there are no verbal instructions inconsistent with those which are written.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 1, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Montgomery, Ala.:

The following telegram just received from Commissioner Crawford:

I am authorized to say that this Government will not undertake to supply Sumter without notice to you. My opinion is that the President has not the courage to execute {p.284} the order agreed upon in Cabinet for the evacuation of the fort, but that he intends to shift the responsibility upon Major Anderson, by suffering him to be starved out. Would it not be well to aid in this by cutting off all supplies?

CRAWFORD.

Batteries here ready to open Wednesday or Thursday. What instructions?

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, A. AND I. G. O., Montgomery, April 1, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding, &c., Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: Capt. W. D. Pender, who is engaged on special service in Baltimore, has been directed to acquaint you with the amount of bounty which was promised to the recruits from that city, referred to in your communication of the 25th ultimo, in order that you may cause it to be noted on the muster-rolls, under the head of recruiting expenses. Captain Pender will also notify you of the condition under which the recruits will engage to serve. Such of the sixty-two men already examined and found to be physically disqualified should be sent back to Baltimore. The others may be retained if they are capable of being made good soldiers.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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WASHINGTON, April 2, 1861.

Hon. ROBERT TOOMBS, Montgomery, Ala.:

The war wing presses on the President; he vibrates to that side. He has conferred with several officers, and naval engineer, supposed to be in regard to Sumter; perhaps to collecting revenue at New Orleans.

Commodore Pendergrast is not at Key West but at Norfolk; could not therefore land troops. Senator Dixon conversed fully with Chase on Saturday; found him much moderated and strongly inclined to peace policy.

Their form of notice to us may be that of the coward, who gives it when he strikes. Watch at all points. It is said the Pawnee sailed from this place this evening with three companies of artillery.

MARTIN J. CRAWFORD. A. B. ROMAN.

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CHARLESTON, April 2, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Captain Foster asks permission to send his mechanics and laborers from Sumter. Shall it be allowed? I am inclined to object.

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.285}

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MONTGOMERY, April 2, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

No portion of the garrison must be permitted to leave unless all go.

L. P. WALKER.

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WAR DEPARTMENT C. S. A. Montgomery, April 2, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Charleston Harbor, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: The Government has at no time placed any reliance on assurances by the Government at Washington in respect to the evacuation of Fort Sumter, or entertained any confidence in the disposition of the latter to make any concession or yield any point to which it is not driven by absolute necessity, and I desire that you will govern yourself generally with strict reference to this as the key to the policy of the Government of the Confederate States.

You are specially instructed to remit in no degree your efforts to prevent the re-enforcement of Fort Sumter, and to keep yourself in a state of the amplest preparation and most perfect readiness to repel invasion, acting in all respects-save only in commencing an assault or attack, except to repel an invading or re-enforcing force-precisely as if you were in the presence of an enemy contemplating to surprise you.

The delays and apparent vacillations of the Washington Government make it imperative that the further concession of courtesies such as have been accorded to Major Anderson and his command, in supplies from the city, must cease; and, in general terms, the status which you must at once re-establish and rigidly enforce is that of hostile forces in the presence of each other, and who may at any moment be in actual conflict; but as past conditions have allowed this Government to continue thus far courtesies of personal convenience to Major Anderson and his officers, it is proper now, as these courtesies are required to be determined by the necessities of your position, that you signify in respectful terms to Major Anderson that all communication with the city from the fort and with the fort from the city, for any purpose of supply is absolutely inhibited; and after having so notified that gentleman at the very earliest moment practicable you will make your surveillance of the harbor and the enforcement of the rule of instruction indicated in the notice to the commander of Fort Sumter as rigid as all the means at your command and the most watchful vigilance can secure.

Until the withdrawal of the Commissioners of this Government from Washington-an event which may occur at any moment-no operations beyond what is indicated in the foregoing would be admissible. Promptly, however, on the receipt by this Government of the intelligence of such withdrawal the Department will transmit to you specific instructions for your guidance.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War.

{p.286}

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WASHINGTON, April 3, 1861.

HOD. ROBERT TOOMBS, &c., Montgomery, Ala.:

Much activity to-day in the War and Navy Departments. It is said the Minnesota, at Boston, has been ordered to the mouth of the Mississippi. Powhatan suddenly put in commission to sail next week. Four companies now here-three artillery, one sappers and miners-ordered to New York. Report says these movements have reference to the San Domingo question. Pawnee will not be ready for sea until Saturday.

Our intermediary says they dare not deceive him, as they know we do not rely upon them but upon Him.

CRAWFORD. ROMAN. FORSYTH.

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MONTGOMERY, ALA., April 3, 1861-10 p.m.

General BEAUREGARD:

Minnesota ordered to sea, supposed to be for mouth of Mississippi; Powhatan to sail next week; Pawnee ordered to sea on Saturday. Three companies artillery (one of sappers and miners) ordered to New York; probably for the South. Be on lookout.

L. P. WALKER.

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 4, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of instructions of the 2d instant, in reference to Fort Sumter, and respectfully ask to be further instructed in regard to the mails of Major Anderson, which have been allowed daily up to this time, whether they shall be continued or limited to once or twice a week.

The batteries are now all complete, but I regret to have, to state that there are but few, if any, well-instructed artillerists on Morris Island; also, that the shells and fuses of the sea-coast guns and columbiads cannot be entirely relied upon.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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WASHINGTON, April 5, 1861.

Hon. ROBERT TOOMBS, &c., Montgomery, Ala.:

The movement of troops and preparation on board of vessels of war, of which you have already been apprised, are continued with the greatest activity. An important move requiring a formidable military and naval force is certainly on foot. The statement that this armament is intended for St. Domingo may be a mere ruse.

We are, however, most creditably informed that Commodore Stringham, who takes charge of the squadron, sails for St. Domingo.

Having no confidence in the administration, we say, be ever on your guard. Glad to hear that you are ready. The notice promised us will come at the last moment if the fleet be intended for our waters.

CRAWFORD. ROMAN. FORSYTH.

{p.287}

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[APRIL 6, 1861.]

Hon. ROBERT TOOMBS, Secretary, &c., Montgomery, Ala.:

No change in the activity of the warlike armaments mentioned yesterday. The rumor that they are destined against Pickens and perhaps Sumter is getting every day stronger. We know nothing positive on the subject, but advise equal activity on your part to receive them if they come. We have not yet been notified of the movement, but the notification may come when they are ready to start.

CRAWFORD. FORSYTH. ROMAN.

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WASHINGTON, April 6, 1861.

Hon. A. G. MAGRATH, Charleston, S. C.:

Positively determined not to withdraw Anderson. Supplies go immediately, supported by naval force under Stringham if their landing be resisted.

A FRIEND.

[Indorsements.]

To CHARLESTON OFFICE:

The above is by a reliable man.

CALDWELL.

MONDAY, April 8-Sent by James E. Harvey by telegraph last Saturday morning.

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CHARLESTON, April 6, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

The following telegraph I have just received from Washington:

Positively determined not to withdraw Anderson. Supplies go immediately, supported by a naval force under Stringham, if their landing is resisted.

A FRIEND.

Governor and General Beauregard visiting the posts, in the harbor, and will not be here for a few hours. In their absence I telegraphed to Washington to know who was the person signing himself 11 A Friend.” The reply satisfies me that the person is high in the confidence of the Government at Washington. Mr. Wigfall, who is with me, concurs in the propriety of giving you notice of it without delay.

A. G. MAGRATH.

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WASHINGTON, April 6, 1861.

To Hon. A. G. MAGRATH, JAMES L. PETIGRU, B. F. DUNKIN, and Miss S. C. HARVEY, Charleston, S. C.

Order issued for withdrawal of Anderson’s command. Scott declares it military necessity. This is private.

JAMES E. HARVEY.

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Hon. A. G. MAGRATH, Charleston, S. C.:

Great efforts making to reconsider withdrawal, but will fail. Final consultation to-morrow.

JAMES E. HARVEY.

{p.288}

Hon. A. G. MAGRATH, Charleston, S. C.:

Final order still reserved. No decision reached in council yesterday, though six for withdrawal and one against.

Is it true your people will oppose voluntary withdrawal and demand capitulation! If so, friends of peace here are powerless.

JAMES E. HARVEY.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, April 6, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Charleston Harbor, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: Your letter of the 4th instant has been received. In reply to your inquiry as to Major Anderson’s mails, I have to say that the policy of the Government is most decided that there shall be such a surveillance of Charleston Harbor and of Fort Sumter as shall assure this Government that the latter is, for all military purposes, entirely isolated. The courtesies which have been accorded to the commander of that fortress have been, in the opinion of this Department, taken advantage of in some cases by persons whose object in visiting Fort Sumter was chiefly to obtain information of the state of our defenses, to be communicated to the Government at Washington. Acting, then, on the leading ideas that the military isolation of Fort Sumter and the prevention of all possible espionage by the Washington Government are absolutely required, you axe directed, while allowing Major Anderson to receive his mails, to exercise such instructive discretion as will secure the ends in view.

Minute instructions, covering every possible case, cannot, of course, be given you, but you are directed to exclude possibility of the admission of any one who may be sent by or be favorable to the Government at Washington, always excepting such messenger or bearer of dispatches from that Government as you may be fully assured shall be conveying orders for the surrender or evacuation of the fortress.

You are specifically instructed to permit no one of the persons now in Fort Sumter to depart therefrom; and to secure absolute compliance with this requirement you will use the utmost vigilance and apply all the means at your command. And in this connection the Department would ask your attention to a telegraphic statement generally published under date of “April 4th,” to the effect that Lieutenant Talbot, an officer of the garrison of Fort Sumter, had been allowed to depart therefrom. As this is in apparent conflict with the instructions communicated to you by telegraph, the Department presumes that there were special reasons, affecting the public interest, which, in your judgment, made the case properly exceptional, and I shall therefore be pleased to be made acquainted with the circumstances.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER.

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[APRIL 8, 1861.]

AN ORDINANCE to transfer to The Government Of the Confederate States of America the use and occupancy Of the forts, arsenals, navy-yards, custom-houses, and other public sites within the limits of this State.

We, the people of South Carolina, in convention assembled, do ordain and declare, and it is hereby ordained and declared by the authority of the same, that the Government of the Confederate States of America is {p.289} hereby authorized to occupy, use, and hold possession of all forts, navy-yards, arsenals, custom-houses, and other public sites within the limits of this State, and their appurtenances, lately in the possession of the United States of America, together with Fort Sumter, and to repair, rebuild, and control the same at its discretion, until this ordinance be repealed by a convention of the people of this State.

Done at Charleston, the 8th day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one.

D. F. JAMISON, President.

Attest: B. F. ARTHUR, Clerk.

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WASHINGTON, April 8, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

Accounts are uncertain, because of the constant vacillation of this Government. We were reassured yesterday that the status of Sumter would not be changed without previous notice to Governor Pickens, but we have no faith in them. The war policy prevails in the Cabinet at this hour.

M. J. CRAWFORD.

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CHARLESTON, April 8, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

Authorized messenger from Lincoln just informed Governor Pickens and myself that provisions would be sent to Sumter peaceably, otherwise by force.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 8, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Under no circumstances are you to allow provisions to be sent to Fort Sumter.

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, April 8, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Anderson’s provisions stopped yesterday. No answer from him. I am calling out balance of contingent troops.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, April 8, 1861.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

DEAR GENERAL: I inclose the within copy of Major Anderson’s note.* Please say to the Secretary of War that we thought detaching an officer from the garrison was weakening its efficiency and not taking much from the consumption of food. Tell him that you as well as myself saw the {p.290} foolish firing, and both regretted it, and that you immediately issued orders as to the future firing, &c., and that the captain in charge of the watch-vessel, the Petrel, was discharged for his neglect of duty &c. In great haste, but most sincerely,

F. W. PICKENS.

* See Anderson to Pickens, April 4, p, 238.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 8, 1861.

General L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: The War Department letter of the 6th instant has been received. I send herewith a copy of the letter addressed yesterday to Major Robert Anderson, stopping his provisions from this city, in obedience to the instructions of the Department.* He has not yet answered it, probably on account of the prevailing bad weather, or perhaps he wishes to await the orders of the United States Government.

Lieutenant Talbot was allowed to go to Washington in order to diminish as much as practicable the number of Major Anderson’s officers, and in the hope that he would communicate to the Government at Washington their true condition in Fort Sumter, which Governor Pickens and myself have reasons to believe is not satisfactory to them.

On account of the unfortunate publication this morning of the proceedings of the State Convention of South Carolina, containing a detailed report of the State secretary of war, giving the exact condition, strength, and number of batteries and troops collected for the defense of this harbor, I have called out the balance of the five thousand men to which I have been limited by my instructions of the 1st ultimo-a measure, rendered still more necessary on account of the warlike preparations at present being made by the United States Government with so much mystery.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See inclosure to Anderson to Thomas, April 71 11 Union Correspondence,” &c., p. 248.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A., Montgomery, April 8, 1861.

His Excellency F. W. PICKENS, Charleston S. C.:

SIR: The discontinuance by the United States of negotiations with the Commissioners representing this Government, of which doubtless you have before this been made aware, leaves no doubt as to the policy we should pursue.

A large force will probably, and if at all, almost immediately, be needed to resist the coercive measures of the Washington administration. To meet this condition of affairs, this Department, acting with reference to the power vested in the Executive by the act of the Congress entitled “An act to provide for the public defense,” suggests to your excellency the necessity of calling at once for three thousand volunteers, to be drilled, equipped, and held in instant readiness to meet any requisition from this Department. These troops will, of course, not be receiving pay until they shall be mustered into service, but the emergency is so pressing that your excellency will fully appreciate the great importance of thorough preparation, especially in regard to instant capacity to move. A similar {p.291} request has been addressed to the Executive of the Confederate States. Asking an early reply to the suggestions above made,

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. P. WALKER.

(Similar letters to the governor of Florida, Tallahassee; the governor of Georgia; governor of Louisiana, Baton Rouge; governor of Texas, Austin; governor of Alabama, Montgomery; governor of Mississippi.)

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APRIL 8, 1861.

“I am directed by the President of the United States to notify you to expect an attempt will be made to supply Fort Sumter with provisions only, and that if such attempt be not resisted no effort to throw in men, arms, or ammunition will be made without further notice, or in case of An attack upon the fort.”

The above was communicated to us on the evening of April 8 by Robert S. Chew, esq., of the State Department in Washington, and Captain Talbot stated that it was from the President of the United States, as did Mr. Chew, and was delivered to him on the 6th instant at Washington, and this was read in their presence and admitted.

F. W. PICKENS. G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 9, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston :

Major Anderson’s mails must be stopped. The fort must be completely isolated.

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, April 9, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

The mails have already been stopped.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Montgomery, April 9, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding Confederate Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: It is much to be desired that the recruits sent from Baltimore to Charleston should remain with your command and be provided for at present by the arrangements made by Captain Lee, or else by appointing him as acting assistant quartermaster for the troops of the Confederate States under your command, in addition to his present duties, which would involve very little increase of labor on his part, and afford the advantage of placing funds in his hands for disbursement on account of the military service of the Confederate States. If possible you will please make this arrangement, or else select some other competent officer of the army of the Confederate States for the same purpose. It is not deemed necessary at present to furnish the supplies for the full equipment of these recruits.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

{p.292}

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, April 9, 1861.

To the PRESIDENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES:

MY DEAR SIR: I send by the bearer important dispatches to the Secretary of War, and beg to call your immediate attention to them. The bearer is Colonel Hayne, an aide of mine, and will return immediately to me. If you have anything particular to General Beauregard or myself, you can trust it to him, and he will bring it back immediately. Since I inclosed the dispatch to the Secretary of War Major Anderson has written a polite note to General Beauregard, requesting that the letters taken from the mail might be returned, as he had been notified that his mails would be stopped entirely. The general returned for answer that the private letters had been sent to their destination, but the official letters were sent to the Confederate Government, because rumors, well established, indicated that Mr. Fox had violated his faith to me in visiting the fort, under the guarantee of Captain Hartstene, who went with him. The pledge was that he visited Major Anderson by authority, for pacific purposes entirely. You see that the present scheme for supplying the fort is Mr. Fox’s. It is thought that the at-tempt will be made to-night, and we have doubled our steamboats on the harbor and bar.

Since I wrote to the War Department we have increased the forces on Morris Island to two thousand one hundred men, and ten companies of fine men arrive to-night, in the next train, of eight hundred men, and two more regiments arrive to-morrow. We hope to have about six thousand men there on the harbor batteries and posts. I trust we are ready, and if they come we will give them a cordial reception, such as will ring through this country, I think. I hope we are not mistaken; but, at any rate, we will try, and do our duty.

With great esteem, yours, very truly,

F. W. PICKENS.

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STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, Headquarters, April 9, 1861.

Hon. Mr. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: At the request of General Beauregard I inclose the within. I took possession of the mails this morning from Sumter, and retained the packages marked “official.” These are all sent you. The private letters are all sent, as directed, to their owners. I did this because I consider a state of war is now inaugurated by the authorities at Washington, and all information of a public nature was necessary to us. The mails and all intercourse of any kind with Sumter are now forbidden, and I immediately refused Captain Talbot any interview with Major Anderson, and also his request to be restored to his command in the fort. I called in General Beauregard, and made Captain Talbot and Mr. Chew repeat in his presence what they had said and what the former desired as to Sumter, and General Beauregard entirely and immediately concurred.

You will see by these letters of Major Anderson how it is intended to supply the fort; but by God’s providence we will, I trust, be prepared for them; and if they approach with war vessels also, I think you will hear of as bloody a fight as ever occurred. We now have three thousand seven hundred men at the different posts and batteries, and will have by to-morrow three thousand more, which I have called down. From my calculation, I think they will have about two thousand six hundred, {p.293} and will attempt to land in launch-boats with 24 and 12 pounders, and it will probably be on the lower end of Morris Island, next the light-house. If so, we will have a flue rifle regiment to give them a cordial welcome from behind sand hills (that are natural fortifications), and two Dahlgren guns will be right on them, besides four 24-pounders in battery. I have four hundred fine Enfield rifles that have been practiced at nine hundred yards, and on that island, altogether, we have now one thousand nine hundred and fifty men, and are increasing it to day.

There has just arrived on the bar a fine rifled cannon from Liverpool, of the latest maker (Blakely gun), an improvement upon Armstrong, of steel rolls or coils, with an elevation of seven and one-half degrees to a mile. It throws a shell or twelve-pound shot with the accuracy of a dueling pistol, and only one and one-half pounds of powder. Such, they write me, is this gun, and I hope to have it in position to-night. We expect the attack about 6 o’clock in the morning, on account of the tide.

Very respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

[Inclosure No. 1.]

FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 8, 1861.

General JOSEPH G. TOTTEN, Chief Engineer U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: The increased activity and vigilance of the investing force, as reported yesterday, still continues. Three large traverses are nearly completed on the front, from battery No. 3 to 5, on Morris Island, and traverses are also being erected in the interior of battery No. 5. Additions of sand-bags are being made to the covering of the magazine, between Nos. 2 and 3, and to the left flank of No. 1, where I think they are constructing a service magazine.

I am busily at work constructing splinter-proof shelters on the terreplein. I obtain timber by taking the gun carriages to pieces, and form the covering of the 2-inch iron pieces for embrasures, as seen below. The plates are spiked oil, so as to be, securely retained in their places, even if struck by a shell, which I am confident it will turn.

Our supplies are entirely cut off from the city, and those on hand are very limited.

The besieging forces worked all day yesterday, whenever the intervals between the showers of rain would allow.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER, Captain, Engineers.

P. S.–I received yesterday a letter from the Secretary of War to Major Anderson, which, by mistake, bad been enveloped to me. I handed it to Major Anderson without reading.

Respectfully, &c.,

J. G. FOSTER, Captain, Engineers.

[Inclosure No. 2.]

Col. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General:

DEAR COLONEL: In another envelope I shall send a No. 962 which you will be pleased to destroy.

That God will preserve our beloved country, is the heart-felt prayer of your friend,

R. A.

{p.294}

No. 96.]

FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 8, 1861.

Col. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General, Washington, D. C.:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the South Carolinians have since about noon yesterday been very actively engaged in strengthening their works on Morris Island. I pray that God will avert the storm which seems impending over us, and restore amicable and permanently-pacific relations between the States who still stick to the old Union and those who have formed another Government in the South.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

P. S.–I omitted acknowledging the receipt of the letter from the honorable Secretary of the 4th instant.

[Inclosure No. 3.]

No. 96.]

FORT SUMTER, S. C., April 8, 1861.

Col. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-General U. S. Army:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that the resumption of work yesterday (Sunday) at various points on Morris Island, and the vigorous prosecution of it this morning, apparently strengthening nearly all the batteries which are under the fire of our guns, shows that they either have received some news from Washington which has put them on the qui vive or that they have received orders from Montgomery to commence operations here. I am preparing by the side of my barbette guns protection for our men from the shells, which will be almost continuously bursting over or in our work.

I had the honor to receive by yesterday’s mail the letter of the honorable Secretary of War, dated April 4, and confess that what he there states surprises me very greatly, following as it does and contradicting so positively the assurance Mr. Crawford telegraphed he was authorized to make. I trust that this matter will be at once, put in a correct light, as a movement made now, when the South has been erroneously informed that Done such will be attempted, would produce most disastrous results throughout our country.

It is, of course, now too late for me to give any advice in reference to the proposed scheme of Captain Fox. I fear that its result cannot fail to be disastrous to all concerned. Even with his boat at our walls the loss of life (as I think I mentioned to Mr. Fox) in unloading her will more than pay for the good to be accomplished by the expedition, which keeps us, if I can maintain possession of this work, out of position, surrounded by strong works, which must be carried to make this fort of the least value to the United States Government.

We have not oil enough to keep a light in the lantern for one night. The boats will have, therefore, to rely at night entirely upon other marks. I ought to have been informed that this expedition was to come. Colonel Lamon’s remark convinced me that the idea, merely hinted at to me by Captain Fox, would not be carried out. We shall strive to do our duty, though I frankly say that my heart is not in the war which I see is to be thus commenced. That God will still avert it, and cause us to resort to pacific measures to maintain our rights, is my ardent prayer.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ROBERT ANDERSON, Major, First Artillery, Commanding.

{p.295}

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Hon. D. F. JAMISON, President of the Convention, State of South Carolina:

SIR: I had the honor this morning of receiving, through a committee of your State Convention, its resolutions, expressing confidence in my professional skill, courage, and sound judgment, and in the efficient cooperation of the several members of my staff and other assistants, military and naval, and tendering to the individuals designated, and to the various forces in the service, the thanks of the State, for their successful efforts thus far in protecting the honor and interests of the State.*

Allow me, sir, through you, to thank the honorable body over which you preside for this evidence of their kindness to myself and assistants, and to the forces under my orders. I feel highly gratified that in so short a time it has been my good fortune to merit your approbation in the discharge of my official duties, and it is a source of pride for me to state that I feel much indebted for the expression of your resolutions to the active and willing co-operation of every one under my command. Never have I seen a more universal exhibition of determination and self-denial on the part of individuals for the promotion of any cause than that of the forces under my command, for the accomplishment of the great object we have in view. Encouraged by the great trust reposed in them, I can confidently express the hope that all under my command will continue to merit your approbation. It will be my pleasure to communicate to the troops and others under my orders the substance of your flattering resolutions.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See Beauregard to Walker, April 10, p. 298.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C. April 9, 1861.

Col. M. GREGG, Commanding, Morris Island, S. C.:

SIR: I have ordered two 12-pounders and a battery of 6-pounders to be sent to you this day, to be used in the defense of Vinegar Hill and Light-house Hills, and in preventing a landing on the low ground between them. Have them put in position forthwith, and look out for tonight or to-morrow morning. Caution Colonel De Saussure about not throwing away the shot of his batteries. Be careful that the sand does not fill up the holes of the nipples of your muskets and Enfield rifles.

Your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROV. FORCES CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Capt. G. S. JAMES, Commanding Fort Johnson, S. C.

CAPTAIN: The brigadier-general commanding directs that you send to-night to Legare’s Landing, on Schooner Creek, twenty, or, if practicable, {p.296} twenty-five men from your command, under the command of a commissioned officer; this detachment to guard that point during the night and return to you in the morning. You will send the same or an equivalent detachment to the same point every night until further orders.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

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HDQRS. PROV. FORCES CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Capt. F. L. CHILDS, Commanding Castle Pinckney, S. C.:

CAPTAIN: The brigadier-general commanding directs that in consequence of the difficulty of transporting your command to where it was ordered, you will hold it in readiness to embark this evening, about 7 p.m., on board three steamboats, that are to report to Captain Hartstene for duty in the outer harbor, at the rate of twenty-five men to each steamer, each man to be armed with his musket and take with him forty rounds of ammunition, which will be sent to you. These detachments will be returned in the morning and will hold themselves in readiness for similar duty every night until further orders.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. W. FERGUSON, Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Col. MAXCY GREGG, Commanding Morris Island, Charleston Harbor, S. C.:

SIR: I have ordered Major Whiting, of the Engineers, to represent to you what I consider the best positions for locating the troops on Morris Island, resulting from his reconnaissances. You will please consult with him freely on the subject, and afford him all the assistance he may require for the construction of the light-house battery, and such other works as may be required for the defense of the south end of said island, and of the strong position at or near Vinegar Hill. Should you have any disposable field pieces you will so locate them as to sweep the flat ground between the latter position and the Light-house Hills. Re-enforcements will continue to be sent to you as fast as practicable, to the extent of one or two regiments more besides the Seventeenth. Should you be attacked before their arrival, you will make a desperate stand on the Light-house Hills and at Vinegar Hill, which are the keys of Morris island.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.297}

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1861.

Col. J. J. PETTIGREW, Commanding Sullivan’s Island, S. C.:

SIR: You were informed last night that you were to hold your regiment in readiness for any change of station that circumstances might dictate. This order should not preclude you from maintaining all your present arrangements for the defense of Sullivan’s Island, for it is impossible to state now when you may be called upon to move from your present position. I may even have to strengthen the present forces on that island.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

P. S.–Have you put that flat-boat in position, as already directed, in the Sullivan Creek?

G. T. B.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., April 9, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

The messenger speaks doubtless by authority. He gives the promised notice to Governor Pickens. Diplomacy has failed. The sword must now preserve our independence. Our gallant countrymen will do their duty.

MARTIN J. CRAWFORD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 10, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston

If you have no doubt of the authorized character of the agent who communicated to you the intention of the Washington Government to supply Fort Sumter by force you will at once demand its evacuation, and if this is refused proceed, in such manner as you may determine, to reduce it. Answer.

L. P. WALKER.

–––

CHARLESTON, April 10, 1861.

L. P. WALKER.

The demand will be made to-morrow at 12 o’clock.

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General.

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MONTGOMERY, April 10, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Unless there are special reasons connected with your own condition, it is considered proper that you should make the demand at an earlier hour.

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 10, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

The reasons are special for 12 o’clock.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

{p.298}

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 10, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit copies of a set of complimentary resolutions, and of a resolution placing all the forces that may be called into service in this State under my orders, passed by the Convention of the State of South Carolina.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.–I am doing all in my power to prevent re-enforcements by barges to Sumter to-night or to-morrow night.

G. T. B.

[Inclosures.]

Resolved, That this Convention approves of the action of the governor, in placing the forces for the military defense of Charleston under the command of General Beauregard, and that he be authorized to call into the field immediately such number of the volunteer regiments, raised under the act of assembly, as General Beauregard may require for the operations under his control; the whole force to be placed under the command of General Beauregard, or such other general officer as may be ordered to the same command by the authorities of the Confederate States of America.

[Adopted Monday, April 8, 1861.]

Resolved, That this Convention, on behalf of the people of this State, repose entire confidence in the eminent professional skill, courage, and sound judgment of Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, and in the intelligent and efficient co-operation of the various members of his staff, and other assistants, military and naval, and respectfully tender to them, and to the various forces in the service, and individuals designated, the thanks of the State for their successful efforts thus far, to protect the honor and interests of the State.

Resolved, That if Fort Sumter shall fall into the hands of our present Government, and the harbor of Charleston should be relieved from all hostile occupation or obstruction, although without any actual conflict of arms, such result will be not the less achieved by our forces aforesaid, and their wise and effective operations.

Resolved, That the foregoing resolutions be communicated to General Beauregard, with a request that he extend them to the various regiments, battalions, and separate companies, and to his staff and assistants, in such form and manner as he shall judge expedient.

[Adopted Monday, April 8, 1861.]

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MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 10, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD, Commanding, Headquarters Provisional Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

My DEAR GENERAL: There are two 4-pounder pieces here, with their limbers. There is a caisson in the city. There is also ammunition. These guns are very light, and belong to the Citadel Cadets, who are, I believe, instructed in their use. Put horses to it, and it will make {p.299} a most excellent addition to our force against a landing. I regard this as very important, and the sooner it is carried out the better.

I learned this morning, with surprise, that the Dahlgren bad been dismounted at Sullivan’s Island, my countermand of your orders not having been forwarded, as it seems. In this case it must either be sent over here or at once remounted in its former position; the latter is, of course, the quickest. I think Stevens’ iron battery and the two 42s a sufficient fire on the gorge. I send this up by Captain Jones, who returns immediately.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING, Major, Engineers.

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STEAMER GORDON, Off Sumter, S. C., April 10, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD:

DEAR GENERAL: I have had under my charge during the night, in addition to my three steamers, the Charleston. The Seabrook came down about 8 o’clock and received orders, but I knew nothing of her during the night. She did not obey my orders. This morning I saw her anchored away to the southward. The Catawba has been all night in the offing. It is my opinion that Sumter can be relieved by boats from vessels outside of the bars, on any night as dark as the last, or, if we have to take it, you had better be making a beginning. If a vessel of war is placed off each bar, when Sumter opens I will lose all my steamers, as there will be no escape for me. Therefore, before firing, these steamers should be called in. If the steamers are to guard the entrance, please send them down before dark, that they may be positioned. Yesterday I looked into Bull’s Bay, at Stono, and saw nothing.

Excuse my bad writing, my hands are so cold, and my light is so bad that I can scarcely see. I have ordered the Charleston up.

Respectfully,

H. J. HARTSTENE.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES. Charleston, S. C., April 10, 1861.

Maj. W. H. C. WHITING, Engineers, Morris Island, S. C. :

DEAR MAJOR: Your note of this day from the wharf has just been handed to me. I have just ordered Lieutenant-Colonel Ripley to put that Dahlgren gun in position between the wharf and extreme westerly point of Sullivan’s Island, to fire on the landing of the westerly face of Sumter and its postern. I have ordered those two additional 24-pounders to be sent forthwith to Cummings Point. Do the best with them, and caution Colonels Gregg and De Saussure to be on the lookout to-night. To-morrow morning’s sun must see us victorious.

Yours, truly,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General; Commanding.

{p.300}

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES Charleston, S. C., April 10, 1861.

General R. G. M. DUNOVANT, Commanding Sullivan’s Island, S. C.:

My DEAR GENERAL: Please tell Colonel Ripley I have received his letter of this day to Major Jones. I appreciate all the difficulties he refers to, but this is one of those moments when the word impossible must be ignored, for the fate of Anderson and Sumter depends upon the result of this night’s firing. Captain Hartstene and the naval officers are of opinion that the barges can pass our batteries in a dark night hence we must be prepared to fire on their landing place, which will be the western face and postern of Sumter, not seen by any of our guns. Captain Hartstene is going to light up the entrance of the harbor with floating light-wood fires, and our Drummond lights must be set in active operation as soon as the alarm of “boats are coming” is given. Up to that time they must be kept ready for operations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 10, 1861.

General R. G. M. DUNOVANT, Sullivan’s Island, S. C.:

DEAR GENERAL: From all the information we can receive it is probable that the attempt to relieve and provision Sumter will be made to night in barges, through, probably, the Swash Channel. I have sent verbal orders to Ripley a moment ago to endeavor to put forthwith that dismounted Dahlgren gun (now on the Sullivan Wharf) in position near the extreme end of said island, and then to construct a hasty parapet in front of it. Its main object is to enfilade the landing of the western face of Sumter, and the postern in that angle, for that is where the disembarkation is going to take place. Will you see at once to the execution of these instructions? Then I wish Captain Hamilton to mark out the best position for his battery, just outside of said western point of Sullivan’s Island, for the same purpose as that already indicated by me for the Dahlgren gun, and to let me know when he will require a steamboat to report to him for that object. He must be careful to put his battery as near the point as practicable, so as to avoid the heavier fire of Sumter.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, Montgomery, Ala.:

SIR: I transmit herewith, for the information of the Department, a copy of my note of this morning to Major Anderson, commanding at Fort Sumter, demanding the surrender of that fort to the Confederate Government, together with a copy of his reply thereto.* As soon as {p.301} his answer was received a telegraphic dispatch (a copy of which is inclosed) was sent to you, communicating its purport, and asking for your instructions. I regret to add here that the new levies at Morris Island are not in as complete a state of organization as I desire; but I hope, in the event of an attempt to land by the enemy, that I will be able to give you a satisfactory account of them.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* See inclosures to Anderson’s report, p. 13.

[Inclosure.]

CHARLESTON, April 11, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

Major Anderson replies: “I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication demanding the evacuation of this fort, and to say in reply thereto that it is a demand with which I regret that my sense of honor and of my obligations to my Government prevent my compliance.” He says verbally: “I will await the first shot, and if you do not batter us to pieces we will be starved out in a few days.”

Answer.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 11, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Do not desire needlessly to bombard Fort Sumter. If Major Anderson will state the time at which, as indicated by him, he will evacuate, and agree that in the mean time he will not use his guns against us unless ours should be employed against Fort Sumter, you are authorized thus to avoid the effusion of blood. If this or its equivalent be refused, reduce the fort as your judgment decides to be most practicable.

L. P. WALKER.

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WASHINGTON, April 11, 1861.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

The Tribune of to-day declares the main object of the expedition to be the relief of Sumter, and that a force will be landed which will overcome all opposition.

ROMAN. CRAWFORD. FORSYTH.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 11, 1861.

ROMAN, CRAWFORD, and FORSYTH, Commissioners Confederate States, Washington, D. C.:

Evacuation of Fort Sumter will be demanded to-day. If refused, hostilities will commence to-night. Answer.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

{p.302}

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CHARLESTON, April 11, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Ought not demand of Sumter be made also by Commissioners at Washington for its evacuation?

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 11, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

No. Yours is the only demand to be made.

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, April 11, 1861.

L. P. WALKER:

Demand sent at 2. Allowed until 6 to answer.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 11, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD, Commanding:

My DEAR GENERAL: It is absolutely necessary that some assistance be sent here, in the Adjutant-General’s Department-I mean of the kind that will be useful. I am expected to be engineer and everything else. The regimental organization (mixed up of infantry and riflemen, without bayonets) cannot be preserved. Cannot you take charge, or at least come here and see the state of affairs? We must have a clerk experienced. Must have an order book, stationery. &c. Transportation is wanted. Horses are required for officers, staff, and orderlies (at least, half a dozen), especially if you come down.

Colonel Gregg has 1,100 men; Colonel Cunningham, 418; Colonel Kershaw, between 300 and 500-in all, 2,000, exclusive of artillery. Orders have been issued for all the batteries to be in readiness, but with the exception of Colonel Gregg’s I find great confusion in the new re-enforcements.

Very truly, yours,

W. H. C. WHITING.

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MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 11, 1861-4 p.m.

[General BEAUREGARD:]

GENERAL: We are ready, perhaps, to open fire, but we are not ready to support it. For God’s sake have this post inspected by yourself, or some one else competent, before you open fire. I am alone here, as you know, and heretofore have been exclusively occupied with the construction of batteries. De Saussure complains that he has not men enough to work his guns for any length of time, and Kershaw’s force is “helter-skelter,” having just arrived. Cunningham’s is but little better. Both are badly supplied with cartridges. A fall and efficient staff is needed. There are no regulars here at all. I can say but little now. The general agrees with me in begging you to examine this position.

W. H. C. WHITING.

{p.303}

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861.

Maj. W. H. C. WHITING, Assistant Adjutant-General, Morris Island, S. C.

MAJOR: Your letter and note of this day are just received. Things always appear worst at first sight when not perfect. We cannot delay now. I think you will have all day to-morrow to organize. I am, however, surprised that Lieutenant-Colonel De Saussure should not have men enough, when ten days ago I told him to call for any number he might require. General Simons must supply that deficiency; but I am of the opinion that two thousand Americans ought to beat, on favorable ground, twice that number of troops landing. Remember New Orleans. Moreover, to-morrow you will have another regiment. I send you. Captains Winder and Allston, and two of the best men as clerks from Winder’s company. Call on Colonel Cunningham for one or more men from his regiment as clerks. Major Trapier has been ordered as chief engineer on Morris Island, to relieve you of that duty. Colonel Gregg has more ammunition than you can all require.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

P. S.–My duties are so important here I cannot leave at present, but will be with you when the fighting commences.

G. T. B.

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HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, April 11, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD:

DEAR GENERAL: I inclose the within that you may see what General Bonham offers. His command is confined to the volunteer regiments, ordered into service under a bill to raise ten thousand volunteers in reserve. Three of his regiments are ordered here now. One difficulty I apprehend in his command is that General Dunovant will object, perhaps, to his command over him; but this is nothing, if you desire Bonham to command the whole as major-general. Yet, under the resolutions of the Convention, reporting to you for orders as commander of all, confirmed by myself, I will order him to report to you, with all his staff, and make a special order for him. Perhaps he might be of great service in bringing all into one command for you, and I know he would fight like a true soldier. Besides, he has knowledge, derived from actual service in Mexico, and stands high in the State. But, general, you must candidly say if it is suitable to you, for at this critical juncture I desire to do nothing but what is agreeable to you.

With great esteem, yours, truly,

F. W. PICKENS.

[Inclosure.]

CHARLESTON, S. C., April 11, 1861.

Governor PICKENS:

SIR: Three regiments of the division of the South Carolina Volunteers, of which you have been pleased to appoint me major-general, have been ordered into the field. I have the honor, therefore, respectfully, to ask the command of those troops, together with such as may {p.304} be associated with them. Having learned that the Convention of the State has made General Beauregard commander of all the State troops which have been or are likely to be ordered into service in and about Charleston Harbor, I take pleasure in saying I will cheerfully report to that able and distinguished officer.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant

M. L. BONHAM, Major-General of Volunteers, Division of South Carolina.

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861.

His Excellency Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR : I inclose you herewith the copy of the orders referred to in your letter of this morning. The copy of this day’s instructions, relative to the harbor lights, &c., have already been communicated to you.

With regard to your suggestion, relative to the application of Major General Bonham for service under my orders (an application which adds so much to the high reputation of that gallant and distinguished officer), I beg to state that they cannot at present be carried into effect; but, as soon as sufficient force shall have been collected on Morris Island or elsewhere to form two brigades thereat, I shall be most happy to accept his proffered services.

I remain, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICE, April 11, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD:

DEAR SIR: In corroboration of the information which I am told you have already received, Captain Davenport, of the pilot-boat Palmetto, reports that he saw the Harriet Lane this afternoon, making towards this city with speed, until within about fifteen miles of the bar, when she “hove to.” That then he was about two miles from her, when he distinctly recognized her. He says he has no doubt about her identity, as he knows her well.

I am, dear sir, respectfully yours,

D. F. JAMISON.

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HEADQUARTERS, CHARLESTON, S. C., April 11, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

SIR: I am in receipt of your two communications of 8th instant, and note contents. In reply to the suggestion of your Department of “the necessity of calling at once for three thousand volunteers, to be drilled, equipped, and held in instant readiness to meet any requisition from this Department,” I have to say the necessary orders have been issued to carry out the same as far as this State is concerned. One regiment, containing twelve companies, will concentrate as soon as practicable at {p.305} Columbia, to be there quartered, drilled, and prepared for orders to move to any point desired. Two companies of this regiment will be drilled as artillery, and two other full regiments are ordered to hold themselves in readiness for immediate service.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. PICKENS.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 13.

HDQRS. PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 11, 1861.

I. Brig. Gen. James Simons, S. C. V., having been ordered into service by the governor of the State, and having reported to the brigadier-general commanding for duty, is assigned to the command of the forces on Morris Island, whither he will repair without delay and assume the command.

II. Maj. W. H. C. Whiting, Corps of Engineers, C. S. A., is appointed acting assistant adjutant and inspector general of the forces on said island, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly. He will report to Brigadier-General Simons.

By order of Brigadier-General Beauregard:

D. R. JONES, Assistant Adjutant-General.

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MONTGOMERY, April 12, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

What was Major Anderson’s reply to the proposition contained in my dispatch of last night?

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 12, 1861.

L. P. WALKER.

He would not consent. I write to-day.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HEADQUARTERS PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 12, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER., Secretary of War:

SIR: I have the honor to transmit the inclosed copy of a correspondence with Major Anderson, in consequence of which our fire was opened upon Fort Sumter at 4.30 o’clock this morning, as already communicated to you by telegraph.* The pilots reported to me last evening that a steamer, supposed to be the Harriet Lane, had appeared off the harbor. She approached slowly, and was lying off the main entrance, some ten or twelve miles, when the pilot came in.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

* For inclosures referred to see Anderson’s report, pp. 12-16.

{p.306}

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CHARLESTON, April 12, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Heavy firing all day. Several guns dismounted in Sumter. Our batteries all safe. Nobody hurt. Four steamers off the bar. The sea pretty rough.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HDQRS. FIRST REGIMENT SOUTH CAROLINA VOLS., April 12, 1861-12 noon.

Maj. W. H. C. WHITING, Acting Adjutant and Insp. Gen., Morris Island, S. C.:

MAJOR: It is reported from the lookout on the light house that three steamers are in sight off the bar. One is supposed by the light-house keeper to be the Harriet Lane. This one is in sight from the hill at my camp, and appears different in its build and rig from a merchant steamer. A heavy gun was fired a short time since at sea, probably from this steamer.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MAXCY GREGG, Colonel First Regiment South Carolina Volunteers.

P. S.–The steamer referred to is also reported to have approached the merchant steamer which was off the bar, and has now gone south-ward.

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APRIL 12, 1861-afternoon.

The Pawnee, Harriet Lane (certain), and the Baltic (conjectured, from my knowledge of her build) are at anchor close at the North Channel; Illinois (conjectured) at anchor at the main bar. The wind and sea strong from the southeast; heavy surf. Troops are posted for the night. As many more as you can send will be welcome, No casualties whatever. Troops in good spirits. With your re-enforcements send, if possible, crackers and dried beef, or other provisions, in their haversacks. Shells still fire badly, owing to fuses prematurely bursting. The ships may try to send boats in. Already guns are trained and ranged for night firing on the landing. It is doubtful if the ships will try it. They may. If they run past they will have to go to the city. Men fire deliberately.

By order of General Simons:

W. H. C. WHITING, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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FORT PALMETTO, STONO INLET, S. C., April 12, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD:

GENERAL: I have the honor to call your attention to the force at this point. From the accounts received from abroad, large military preparations seem to have been made against us. A vigorous diversion of their force may be made at this point, and as your attention is much occupied by the large preparations in Charleston Harbor, I take the liberty of bringing our force here to your notice, that you may increase it if the same is, in your opinion, expedient. We have been occupied all day strengthening our fortifications by the use of sand bags. With some {p.307} laborers here, the main fortifications could be made much stronger against assault. The work is of such a character that it can only be done by those who are accustomed to this sort of labor.

I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant,

J. J. POPE, JR., Captain of Light Artillery, Commander of the Post.

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CHARLESTON HOTEL, Charleston, S. C., April 12, 1861.

Brigadier General BEAUREGARD, Commanding Provisional Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

SIR: You were pleased to say, in your letter of yesterday, to Governor Pickens, in reference to my tender of services: “So soon as a sufficient force shall have been collected on Morris Island or elsewhere to form two brigades thereat, I shall be most happy to accept his [my] proffered services.” There being now on Morris Island the two regiments belonging to General Simons’ brigade, Colonel Gregg’s regiment of volunteers, and Colonel Kershaw’s regiment, also the whole or a part of Colonel Hagood’s regiment (both of my division), making as large or a larger number of my division proper than of General Simons’ command proper, I submit that the state of things contemplated in your letter has arisen, and respectfully ask to be assigned immediately to that command.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. L. BONHAM, Major-General Division, South Carolina Volunteers.

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HEADQUARTERS, STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, April 12, 1861.

DEAR GENERAL: The display at Light-house Inlet, perhaps, is a feint, and if so, they intend to re-enforce, as you say, through Bull’s Bay and Sullivan’s Island Inlet; but I think there is danger at Stono, and of coming up in the rear of the city by the Long Bridge. The regiment, stationed at the race-course, is in good position, but they ought to have pickets out, so as to be in hearing of Stono, so as to report immediately to the colonel of the regiment if any attack is made. If they come through Sullivan’s Island Inlet or Creek, then Castle Pinckney might play her guns as they turn around to Sumter.

Respectfully,

F. W. PICKENS.

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HEADQUARTERS, April 12, 1861.

DEAR GENERAL: Plan of battle just determined on at Gregg’s quarters. Whiting, Huger, Gregg, Trapier, and Simons all agree that we greatly need infantry, to defend the batteries from assault. Four large steamers are plainly in view, and standing off the bar all day. Unanimous opinion that a landing will be attempted, and fears that some of the batteries will be taken, unless supported. Have made the best distribution of the troops we have, but need every man you can send. Should you not be here personally to direct? Such is the general opinion. I send this by order of Simons, who is at Greggs, and left me here to write, and send without delay.

Very respectfully,

LOUIS T. WIGFALL.

P. S.–We have no glass here, and have to rely entirely upon the eye to examine steamers. Four plainly in sight, and another vessel out a short distance. Fight expected to-night.

{p.308}

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 12, 1861.

Lieutenant-Colonel DE SAUSSURE. Morris Island, S. C.:

SIR: In order to economize our mortar ammunition, I desire that at or after 12 m. this day you should double the interval between the firing of the shells; that is, four minutes instead of two during the day, and twenty minutes instead of ten during the night. The action of your mortar batteries in that respect will guide the others elsewhere. Be careful, also, not to fire too fast at your other batteries, and to call in time for additional ammunition when required.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROVISIONAL ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES, Charleston, S. C., April 12, 1861.

Maj. W. H. C. WHITING, Assistant Adjutant-General, &C., Morris Island, S. C.:

MAJOR: Your note is received. Firing, I hope, will soon be better. To save ammunition of mortars, the time between each shell thrown should be doubled by day and by night-that is, four minutes instead of two for the first, and twenty minutes instead of ten for the last. I have written to Colonel De Saussure to that effect. This change should take place after 12 m. this day. The batteries elsewhere will follow those of Cummings Point. Great care should be taken at the other batteries (gun) not to fire too fast or uselessly, and timely calls for ammunition should be made. I have requested Colonel Wigfall to lend his assistance to General Simons as a volunteer aid. Be careful to strengthen the force protecting the batteries on south end of Morris Island, for if a landing is made it will be done there, probably. How would it do to send General Bonham to command from about the lighthouse down to Light-house Inlet? I am trying to dispatch to that locality as many new arrivals as possible. They will do very well for those hills.

Yours, truly,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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CHARLESTON, April 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War;

Officers’ quarters in Sumter burning. Part of roof supposed to have fallen in. Sumter Mug at long intervals. Ours regular and effective. Six vessels outside in signals with Sumter.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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CHARLESTON, April 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Anderson has hauled down the United States flag on Sumter and run up white flag. Fort has been burning for several hours from effect of {p.309} shells. Two explosions have been produced by shells. He has ceased firing some time, and fire of all the batteries has been continuous till now-3 o’clock. Aides have been sent by Beauregard to Sumter.

R. B. RHETT, JR.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 13, 1861-2 p.m.

President JEFF. DAVIS, Montgomery, Ala.

Quarters in Sumter all burned down. White flag up. Have sent a boat to receive surrender. But half an hour before had sent a boat to stop our firing and offer assistance.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 13, 1861.

Gov. F. W. PICKENS, Present:

DEAR GOVERNOR: I have sent Major Jones, Captain Hartstene, and Colonels Miles and Pryor to Major Anderson to tell him that I offer him the same terms that I did on the 11th, and that a vessel or steamer would be sent to him in the morning to take him to the steamer outside, and that he must be responsible in the mean time for the fort; otherwise, I would put four companies of artillery in there to-night. I also told Captain Hartstene to go out to the fleet and tell them that the fort was now ours, but under the safe-keeping of Major Anderson, and that no attack could be made upon it by them.

In the morning I will order two of Colonel Ripley’s companies and two of De Saussure’s to take possession of Fort Sumter.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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CHARLESTON, April 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Fort Sumter has unconditionally surrendered to the Confederate States, represented by General Beauregard, Colonel Wigfall, his aide, receiving the surrender. The same terms just offered will be granted. Engines are about to go down to put out the fire. Fight expected on Morris Island to-night.

R. B. RHETT, JR.

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CHARLESTON, April 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Anderson surrenders to the Confederate Government unconditionally, but I have granted him the same terms as on the 11th instant: “All proper facilities will be afforded for removal of yourself and command, together with company arms and property and all private property, to any post in the United States you may elect.”

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 13, 1861-6 p.m.

General BEAUREGARD, Commanding.

GENERAL: Brigadier-General Simons directs me to say that a boat from the fleet, bearing a white flag, and commanded by a lieutenant of {p.310} the U. S. Navy, has just communicated with him. He first inquired if Major Anderson had surrendered, to which (as informed by Colonel Wigfall, aide-de-camp) he was answered “Yes; unconditionally.” Second, if he could communicate with Fort Moultrie, to which he was answered “No.” (He evidently supposed the commanding general was at Moultrie, as he afterwards said.) Third, he asked if he could be permitted to come in, under a flag of truce, and take Major Anderson off. If not, whether he could come in with a merchantman and do the same. If not, that whether he could come in with his boats for the purpose. To these, inquiries General Simons replied that transportation could be furnished for Major Anderson to the fleet, but that, the commanding general was at hand, and could be communicated with at once, with the understanding that no hostile demonstration should be made during the night by the fleet. The lieutenant was informed that you would be furnished with his questions, and he might return for answers to-morrow morning, under a flag of truce. The lieutenant gave his personal guarantee that no hostilities would be attempted, and said he would return in the morning to hear your reply. He informed Major Whiting that their mission was not hostile, but one of peace.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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CHARLESTON, April 13, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER, Secretary of War:

We take possession of Fort Sumter to-morrow morning. I allow him the privilege of saluting his flag. No one killed on our side.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MONTGOMERY, April 13, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

Accept my congratulations. You have won your spurs. How many guns can you spare for Pensacola?

L. P. WALKER.

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HDQRS. FIRST BATTALION, THIRTY-THIRD REGIMENT, SOUTH CAROLINA MILITIA, April 13, 1861.

General D. F. JAMISON, Secretary of War:

SIR: Owing to the absence of Col. Charles Allston, jr., and being called on by the detachments stationed below this point to complete, the chain of coast guard to the North Carolina line, in view of the emergency of the case (war having actually begun), I have taken upon myself to order out one hundred and forty-six men and twelve commissioned officers as follows: From Captain Daggett’s company, Waccamaw Light Artillery, twenty-six men and two officers, stationed as coast guard, from the redoubt at North Island to Murray’s Inlet; distance, twenty-five miles. From Captain Ward’s company, Watchesaw Riflemen, twenty men and two officers, stationed at the redoubt at Murray’s Inlet. From Captain Gillespie’s company, Carolina Greys, forty men and three officers, stationed as coast guard, from Murray’s Inlet to the redoubt at {p.311} Little River, North Carolina line; distance, forty miles. From Captain Litchfield’s company, All Saints’ Riflemen, thirty men and three officers, stationed at the redoubt at Little River. I have also, by request, ordered a detachment of thirty, men and two officers from Captain Johnson’s company, to take post at the redoubt at the entrance of Santee River, that post being unoccupied. Have also taken possession of thirty muskets for said detachment from a quantity here in store. Also, a quantity of army stores.

I have detailed Captain Daggett as bearer of this report, who will furnish any further information you may require as to the defense at this point.

All of which is respectfully submitted; and, hoping it may meet your approbation, I am, very respectfully, yours,

W. C. WHITE, Major, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY, S. I. AND M. P., Fort Moultrie, S. C., April 13, 1861.

Maj. D. R. JONES, Adjutant-General:

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that we have had only two personal casualties in the force under my command, both very slight, and are privates in Company A (Sullivan and Miller). The effect of the enemy’s fire upon this fort has been pretty effectually to demolish the quarters and to injure the hot-shot furnace to a certain extent. The effects of the Sumter, enfilade, Dahlgren, floating, and mortar batteries, has been to keep the enemy from his barbette guns. The direct fire has been quite accurate for the distance, several shots having passed through the arches of the second line of casemates, two or three into his lower embrasures, and many grazing the crest of his parapet and penetrating the roof of his quarters. Still, our direct fire is only annoying, and I have directed it to be economized, to look out and keep the men as fresh as possible for the channel fight, which, it is to be presumed, is impending. I note what has been said respecting the hot-shot furnace, and shall endeavor to attend to it, although it has three shot-holes in it, which has already rendered one bar inefficient. I have directed Captain Hamilton, and the floating battery especially, to be economical with their ammunition, and have to request that the latter be supplied with one hundred rounds of shell and one hundred cartridges, with appurtenances, by boat this evening from the city. All our 9-inch and 8-inch shells are defective, and Captain Hamilton has filled several with rice to use them as solid shot. It would be well to have the floating battery supplied also, if possible, with 42 and 32 pounder ammunition, as it will be especially effective in keeping out re-enforcements.

I also have to suggest that Captain Martin be supplied with one hundred and fifty shell and ammunition, with authority to practice as much as he pleases until he gets his shell in. All the mortar practice is wild, owing to the range and the effect of the wind. As I am sorely pressed for time, I have respectfully to request that such requisitions as are approved may be ordered from headquarters.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY, Lieutenant-Colonel Artillery, Commanding.

{p.312}

P. S.–One of the rear transoms of Captain Hallonquist’s mortars, being made of pine, is split. I shall endeavor to have it repaired. The merlons stand very well, except the vertical palmetto logs, which collapse under our own fire. One 42-pounder shot entered the embrasure, but, being stuffed with a cotton bale, had no further effect than to take a splinter off a carriage. The new 8-inch columbiad carriages will not stand much.

Very respectfully,

R. S. RIPLEY.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. JAMES SIMONS, Morris Island, S. C.

My DEAR GENERAL: The accumulation of troops on Morris Island requires that another general officer should be sent to the southern end of that island. General Bonham has consented to go there in command, until we can divide the forces into two brigades, when he will assume command of the whole as major-general, to act under my orders. In the meantime, should circumstances bring your commands together, he will necessarily assume the command; otherwise to attend only to his half (about) of the island, and you to yours, but to mutually assist and support each other, in case of need, and in the defense of our country and sacred cause.

Major Whiting will remain acting inspector-general of the whole island. He will communicate (as well as yourself) all the information in his possession to General Bonham. I will endeavor to be with you as soon as practicable, or whenever required.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 13, 1861.

Brig. Gen. R. G. M. DUNOVANT, Commanding Sullivan’s Island, S. C.:

GENERAL: Major Anderson will evacuate Fort Sumter to-morrow morning, when he will be sent to one of the United States vessels, outside of the harbor. He will be allowed the privilege of saluting his flag on lowering it.

You will please direct that the ranking officers of Engineers and Artillery on the island accompany the detachment Of One company already ordered out, as part of a garrison to Fort Sumter, who will make a report of the exact present condition of the fort and of its defenses.

You will also direct Capt. George S. James to hold his company at Fort Johnson in readiness to move for the same purpose, as soon as orders to this effect are extended to him.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

{p.313}

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HDQRS. PROV. ARMY CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA, Charleston, S. C., April 13, 1861.

General JAMES SIMONS, Morris Island, S. C.:

GENERAL: Major Anderson will evacuate Fort Sumter to-morrow morning, when be will be sent to one of the United States vessels outside of the harbor. He will be allowed the privilege of saluting his flag on lowering it.

You will please direct that the ranking officers of Engineers and Artillery on the island accompany the detachment of one company, already ordered out as a part of a garrison to Fort Sumter, who will make a report of the exact present condition of the fort and its defenses.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD, Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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FORT MOULTRIE, S. C., April 13, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.

GENERAL: Fort Sumter has been set on fire, and as it is very important (with the vessels outside threatening to enter) to have all experience, I have determined to remain and avoid or prevent a re-enforcement. I do not think that there are more than three vessels off. Colonel Ripley and myself will endeavor to prevent an entry here to-night. I will, as you said, make myself useful; more so, probably, than I could at any other point. I shall go out in a row-boat during the night, with signals arranged, and reconnoiter the entrance and give timely notice of any boats approaching. I think the fire-hulk inside of Sumter had better not be lighted, as it will probably dim our vision.

I have just made out the vessels off. They are the Pawnee, Harriet Lane, Nashville, Atlantic, and a merchant schooner. They cannot enter in their vessels. With a good lookout (for a lookout stationed here, and a boat off in the channel, together with their fire-hulks, which are still floating in a line around Fort Sumter), I think you need have no fear of an entrance here. They are all here, and in fine spirits. Ripley is a most valuable officer-cool, collected, and energetic. He keeps all in spirits and up to their work. I have all the batteries on this island, and give the best directions, as I think may be useful, particularly in regard to looking out for and firing at boats or shipping. The guns are all intact, and in fine working order.

Respectfully,

H. J. HARTSTENE.

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HEADQUARTERS MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 13, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

My DEAR GENERAL: We require one thousand or twelve hundred men to re-enforce this position. Nothing should be left to chance. None have yet arrived, and this command will be worn out. The troops have been under arms all night. Six of the hostile ships are in the positions they occupied at dark last night. The two nearest are the Lane and the Pawnee. With these vessels so close to us, I cannot relax my vigilance {p.314} without such a force as would render a coup de main impossible. The men behaved very well and kept well on the alert. I visited the whole line last night (after midnight) and found everything quiet; but you are aware that this cannot last over such a long line of defenses, with an uncertainty as to the point of attack. Opinions differ as to whether anything got into Sumter last night. There may or may not. The night was dark, and occasionally stormy, and a heavy sea running. If anything did, it could not have been very extensive. Perhaps they desire to lay off, and send in one boat at a time or once a night. This is the most feasible plan, and that which I most fear. If it is in your power I beg you to come here for myself personally. I am nearly broken down for want of rest. The gentlemen you sent are very efficient. Quartermaster Hatch should send down tents for the general and his staff. We are without accommodations, and are temporarily in the hospital, which we may at any time be compelled to leave.

Very truly, yours,

W. H. C. WHITING.

[Indorsement.]

I hardly think the additional one thousand men could act on that island, and he ought to order the men to sleep in daylight and enforce it.

F. W. P.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 3.

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJ’T AND INSPECTOR GENERAL’S OFFICE, Montgomery, Ala., April 13, 1861.

In honor of the occasion, officially announced, that the United States colors have been hauled down at Fort Sumter and replaced by the white flag, a salute of fifteen guns will be fired in front of the Department this day at two o’clock.

By command of the Secretary of War:

S. COOPER, Adjutant and Inspector General.

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CHARLESTON, April 14, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

I have possession of Sumter. Anderson and garrison on Isabel going in morning. None killed; two wounded. Quarters in ruins. Interior of fort damaged. Armament still effective against entrance to channel.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 14, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I beg an immediate answer, by the bearer, to this. Captain Lee, Corps of Engineers, has preferred to me a claim to “the honor of being sent to Sumter this morning.” The very faithful, skillful, and laborious duties performed here for three months continuously by Captain Lee entitle him to this distinction, if he so considers it. As the Chief Engineer of the Confederate Army, and charged {p.315} with the supervision of the works on Morris Island, I have no hesitation in saying that, I consider Captain Lee entitled to the credit of the engineering work done here, with his assistants. To it he has devoted his time and personal interests. Captain Lee naturally feels aggrieved at having been superseded on the eve of action, on the occasion of my being relieved from engineering duty (although, undoubtedly, that was due to the supposed state of his health). Captain Lee does not desire to make the report called for in your order, but claims to be sent to Sumter. I indorse this claim, and most respectfully and earnestly request that you will return an order sending Captain Lee, for the present, to Sumter, on duty with the garrison. It is certainly due to his untiring devotion, he not being absent from his post for three months, and it is the reward which he has asked for.

W. H. C. WHITING, Adjutant and Inspector General.

P. S.–I understand perfectly that you want a specialist. The major has no feeling about the matter, and will make his report. Please to grant this.

W. H. C. W.

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CHARLESTON, April 14, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Fleet still outside. Can spare no guns yet, but hope to do so soon.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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SOUTH END BATTERY, Morris Island, S. C., April 15, 1861.

Brigadier-General BEAUREGARD, Commander-in-Chief, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: These vessels of the enemy, which are causing us some anxiety, and, at any rate, treating us with great disrespect, I would like to have the pleasure of driving off from our port; and, if we cannot succeed in that, at least make them keep at a respectable distance. I volunteer for the service. If you will allow me to put the rifled cannon on board the Lady Davis, under my command, I can go out, and, at long range, try the effect of the shot on them. I think in this way I may be able to annoy, if not drive them off. Should this plan meet your views, I would be glad to try and carry it into execution.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. B. HUGER, Lieut. C. S. Navy, Commandant of Batteries.

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MORRIS ISLAND, S. C., April 15, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Commanding Provisional Forces, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: Having posted the troops on the island, with such general directions in case of action as I am able to give, I must call your attention to the danger which they may suffer should the enemy cover the main line, and keeping out of the close fire of the Dahlgren battery, string along the beach to shell the troops. I propose to take two of the {p.316} mortars from Stevens’ battery and place them behind Gadbuy’s during the night, and one just below the Dahlgren. Sturgis will never venture under vertical fire. The enemy will know nothing of the move. No epaulement is necessary, nature having provided that. The weak point of the island is the low flat between Vinegar Hill and Gadbuy’s, affording, as it does, no cover to the troops, and a point of attack by which the enemy might endeavor to separate or cut in two our line. I have issued the orders for this move, but will hold their execution for your approval. I would like also to have the Dahlgren (used by Hamilton in the late action) immediately, for placing at Light-house Hill (Battery Huger). These movements should be commenced, if decided upon, at once. We require, also, more artillerymen. The Palmetto Guards should return to the island to man their mortars. Perhaps some could be spared from Pleasant and Johnson. I would respectfully indorse the remounting of a few 24s (now in the city) on Pinckney, and a mortar to be sent there. The channel defenses must be immediately increased by more columbiads; three from the iron battery, two 42s from the Point, and five 42s from Sumter (lying on the parade). The three 8-inch columbiads, half buried, to be used as mortars in Sumter, can be made available, if quickly done; the 10-inch on a mortar carriage also. The serviceable battery of Sumter should be put in order and supplied without delay. Had not Major Trapier better attend to these constructions? The pintles can be placed at once; the carriages have been ordered; perhaps there are some extra ones at Sumter; the epaulements to be constructed at leisure. A traverse breastwork, three hundred yards, running back from Vinegar Hill, is directed to be constructed. Please visit this post.

Very truly,

W. H. C. WHITING, Adjutant and, Inspector General.

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MONTGOMERY, April 15, 1861.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

If floating battery worked well I shall order one for Pensacola, so give me your opinion. If favorable, can Captain Hamilton, under whose supervision it was constructed, be induced to go to Pensacola for that purpose?

L. P. WALKER.

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CHARLESTON, April 15, 1861.

Hon. L. P. WALKER:

Floating battery worked well for enfilading. Believe it good. Want Hamilton for a few days. We have a remarkable rifled cannon, 12-pounder, superior to any other here. Others ought to be ordered.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 15, 1861.

Brig. Gen. G. T. BEAUREGARD, Commanding:

GENERAL: As the floating battery has to be removed from its present position, and as you are desirous of placing it at Wappoo, for defense against boats, I would suggest that the armament be changed to 8-inch {p.317} siege howitzers, to throw grape, canister, and spherical-case shot. The howitzers are at the Citadel; but the carriages will have to be made. The detachment that fought the battery (a portion of Company D, of the artillery battalion) could serve it again, but as the company is well drilled at the exercise of heavy guns, you will, no doubt, require its services in the harbor. If authority could be obtained from the honorable Secretary of the Confederate States Navy for me to enlist twenty-five seamen, four of which to be rated petty officers, and Mr. Grimball and Ingraham could be assigned to me, I could take charge of the battery and perhaps make her useful.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. R. HAMILTON, Lieutenant, C. S. Navy.

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GENERAL ORDERS, No. 22.

HDQRS. PROVISIONAL FORCES, Charleston, S. C., April 15, 1861.

The forces on Morris Island shall constitute one division, to be commanded by Maj. Gen. M. L. Bonham, S. C. V., which division shall be divided into two brigades, as follows: The first brigade, to be commanded by Brig. Gen. James Simons, S. C. M., shall be composed of Colonels Cunningham and Hagood’s regiments, and Lieutenant-Colonel De Saussure’s battalion of artillery; and the second brigade, to be commanded by Brig. Gen. P. H. Nelson, S. C. V., shall be composed of Colonels Gregg’s and Kershaw’s regiments, and the battalion of Colonel Rion’s regiment on the island; the first brigade to occupy the northern portion of the island and the second brigade the southern portion. The general officers will at once assume their commands, and will furnish to these headquarters a list of their respective staffs.

By order of Brigadier-General Beauregard:

D. R. JONES, Assistant Adjutant-General.

Library Reference Information

Type of Material: Book (Book, Microform, Electronic, etc.)
Corporate Name: United States. War Dept.
Main Title: The War of the Rebellion:
a compilation of the official records of the
Union and Confederate armies.
Prepared under the direction of the Secretary of War
by Robert N. Scott.
Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1880-1900.
Published/Created: Washington : Government Pub. Off., 1880-1901 (70 v. in 128).
Description: 70 v. in 128. 24 cm.
Subjects: United States. Army--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Sources.
Confederate States of America. Army--History--Sources.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Regimental histories.
LC Classification: E464 .U6