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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies by the US War Dept. This massive 128 volume work is a collection of official military documents from the American Civil War, from both the Union and Confederate armies. Although the full title is “The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies”, it is known to anyone who’s ever done research in the ACW as simply the OR. The compilation was authorized by act of Congress in 1874, but is completion was the work of many years. Although this collection deals only with the armies, there was a second collection made for the navies, called the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (known as the ORN). Praise for the OR is superfluous: it is THE essential source for research on the war. HTML (English – very partial – Series I, Vol. 1-9,50, Series II, Vol 1-5, Series III, Vol. 1.).
Atlas to Accompany the Official Records Atlas to Accompany the Official Records by the US War Dept. The documents being published as the official records were frequently accompanied by maps and other images that could not be printed as in the OR volumes proper due to their physical size and the need for color printing. To accomodate these materials, an over-size full-color Atlas was also prepared. This Atlas, formally titled the "Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies", contained over 1000 maps and other images. Almost all of the maps were drawn up during the war itself by the participants, although some general images are pre-war and some others were drawn up for historical purposes after the war was over. Important Note: Map pages are numbered using Roman Numerals (I, II, III, etc.) Scanned (complete).
Italy 1:25,000 United States 1:25 000 by the USGS / U. S. Army Map Service. This is a series of 1:25,000 maps published by the U. S. Geological Survey and U. S. Army Map Service starting in the mid-twentieth century. The maps in the series were repeatedly revised and re-published in the decades that followed. The large scale of these maps makes them suitable for battlefield research, although of course care must be taken when used for battles which occured decades before they were made. Typically they are best used in combination with period maps, which lack the topographic information and accurate scales of these maps. At present, the online collection includes only the battlefield of Gettysburg. (Note: the 1:50,000 map series was started decades earlier than the 1:25,000 series, and so although it is less detailed than the 1:25,000 series, it remains valuable for ACW research.)
Italy 1:50,000 United States 1:50 000 by the USGS / U. S. Army Map Service. This is a series of 1:50,000 maps published by the U. S. Geological Survey and U. S. Army Map Service starting in the early twentieth century. The maps in the series were repeatedly revised and re-published in the decades that followed. The large scale of these maps makes them suitable for battlefield research, although of course care must be taken when used for battles which occured decades before they were made. Typically they are best used in combination with period maps, which lack the topographic information and accurate scales of these maps. At present, the online collection includes only the battlefield of Gettysburg. (Note: the 1:50,000 map series was started decades earlier than the 1:25,000 series, and so although it is less detailed than the 1:25,000 series, it remains valuable for ACW research.)
Gettysburg Miscellaneous Miscellaneous Gettysburg Maps This is a collection of important Gettysburg maps that are not part of any larger map series. The set includes sections of the 1858 Adams County Wall Map, the 1863 E. B. Cope horseback Survey Map, and the 1904 Gettysburg National Park Commissiion Map, which accompanied the two-volume book Pennsylvania at Gettsyburg. The first two are maps of the battlefield made within a few years of when it occured. The 1904 map, although made much later, was prepared by same E. B. Cope who did the 1863 horseback survey map and so has more authority than its late date might suggest.
Digital Base Map of Pennsylvania Digital Base Map of Pennsylvania Imagery by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania This is satellite orthoimagery taken from the Digitl Base Map of Pennsylvania project, which is undertaken under the control of the Pennsylvania Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources and is associated with a USGS controlled project called The National Map. The scale of this imagery is 1 pixel = 1 foot.. The entire (extremely large) imagery collection is available for free download from the PA DCNR website, but that portion of the imagery that displays the Gettysburg battlefield has been assembled from fifteen different plates and is available here as a single image.
Atlas to Accompany the Official Records Battle Field of Gettysburg by the US War Dept. The base maps are the product of the U. S. War Dept. from an 1868 survey of the battlefield of Gettysburg. John Bachelder, the foremost Gettysburg historian of the 19th century, added troop positions down to the regiment and battery level based on his own extensive research. (Note: the maps available here are the so-called "daily maps". Bachelder did still more maps at more frequent intervals called the "hourly maps". The hourly maps are not available online at present.) The carefully made 1:12,000 base map is by far the best quality nineteenth century maps for a battlefield I have seen. Surveyed almost immediately after the battle, it includes a remarkable level of detail and is the primary source for all subsequent battlefield maps.